The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date:
July 27, 2006
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:00911


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text










,R FOR OVER 68 YEARS
68th Year, Number 40 Port St. Joe, FL 3 Sections 38 Pages
July 27, 2006


USPS 518-880


Sand Berms 1 B


A Pirate's Life for 'Little Captain'

By Despina Williams .' I
Star Staff Writer
Michael Long had just turned 10 when "
he began believing in pirates.
He'd outgrown Santa Claus and the
Easter Bunny, those scarcely seen visitors
to his Monteagle, Tenn. home, who brought.
him gifts and hit the road.
He met the Pirates of Saint Joseph Bay
last year on his family's July 4 vacation ,
and marveled at their triumphant entrance
in Frank Pate Park.
A weathered pirate ship carried
them ashore and smoky cannbn blasts
announced their arrival.
The descendants of settlers of the lost
city of Saint Joseph, they spoke in.a pirate
brogue and told Long fascinating stories
about their treasure, hunting expeditions
off the coast of Africa.
They shared their wealth with the
children who gathered in the park, and
they gave Long a special treasure.
Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny, the
paternal lords of presents and chocolate .
eggs, had never made ideal playmates, but
the pirates offered Long both' fantasy and
friendship.
They made him an horiorary member .
of their pirate band. "
They took his calls and answered his ""
e-mails.
And, as it turned out, they changed his .
life forever. -
First Contact
Long, his mother, Brenda Burrill, and :
sister, Heather, arrived in Port St. Joe for
the first tinie last year.
They heard of the Pirates of Saint 1t..
Joseph Bay from a clerk at CVS pharmacy,
who told them about the family-friendly
July 4 activities at Frank Pate Park.. '- :-
Lured by the promise of treasure and
beads, the family arrived at the park on
Saturday, and found it already humming
with actieity. .
The main attraction was Treasure
Island, a largd sandbox filled with buried ."
treasure. At this year's Independence on the Coast festival, Michael Long, 11, joined the Pirates of Saint
Joseph Bay as an "honorary pirate." He is shown holding the pirate flag, accompanied by pirate
(See LITTLE CAPTAIN on Page 2A) Katarina LeBlanc and his mom, Brenda Burrill.


School Board


Approves Budget

By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
During a special meeting last Thursday,
the 'Gulf County School Board approved
for advertisement a tentative budget with a
school district millage rate of 4.41, down 0.25
mills from last year.
A mill represents $1 for every $1,000
in appraised value. This year, each iill
generates $2.9 million, up from $2.54 million
last year.
Because property values increased by
some $400 million this. year, the school
board's 2006-2007 millage rate reflects a
total property tax increase of just under 6
percent.
The school board has limited discretion
in determining millage rates, with three out of
four school funding components determined
by the state.
But for the past two years, the board has
been conservative where it could, namely, in
setting the local capital improvement rate,
which finances building repairs, new portables
and equipment for the School district.
The board approved for advertisement
a .405 mill property tax for capital outlay
projects to include the construction/
remodeling of Gulf Academy, three school
buses, and renovations to the district's six
public schools.
The local capital improvement rate
represents a .25 mill reduction from last year,.
which translates into a savings of $353,681
for taxpayers.
A portion of the tax levy is required under
state law in order for the school board to
receive $3,499,002 in state grants.
County taxpayers currently pay 90
percent of state, and local funding for county
public schools, up from just over 4Q percent
less than a decade ago.
The state kicks in the other 10 percent.
A:90 percent required local effort village
is a cap. and according to the district finance
officer, Sissy Worley. is based on what the
state feels the county can absorb in light of

(See SCHOOL BOARD on Page 8A)


Bidwell Announces Candidacy for School Board District One


For most of his life, .Eric Bidwell's
-existence revolved around the public schools
in Wewalaitchka. Born in 1969; Eric enrolled
4in Wewahitchka Elementary School in
.1974 and graduated from
*Wewahitchka High in 1987.
After earning an Associate's
*degree from Gulf Coast
'Community College, and
.a Bachelor's degree in
)English from the University
of West Florida, Eric
returned to Wewahitchka's
public schools in 1992 .to
begin a teaching career
that spanned 13 years. For
the. past two years, .Eric
has worked diligently to
build a .successful home
construction business.
"I enjoy running my own l
business. but I would also
like to continue helping our
young people gain a quality a
education. As a school
board member, I can once Eric I
again play a positive role in the Gulf County
school system and consequently in the
education of the students in this area," stated
* Bidwell. "Our children are the future and
their education is of.the highest importance.
When I was a teacher, I was responsible
for our students' learning on a daily basis,
and when given the-opportunity to serve the'
,citizens of Gulf County as their representative
for the district one school board seat, I will
bring the same energy and dedication to
this position that I demonstrated during my


teaching career." .
Because he has seen the school system
from both the inside, as a teacher and student,
and now from the outside, as a business
owner, Bidwell believes he
has a unique perspective,
Which will enable him to
better perform his board
duties. Additionally, Eric
S was an educator at all
levels of the Wewalutcl-ka.
system, giving him ftirther
S insight into the needs of
S our schools. During the
First five' years of his career,
Eric taught middle school
language arts. Next, he
S transferred to high school
where he taught English,
drama and T.V, production
for seven years. He finished
his. last year of teaching
as the Physical Education
instructor at Wewahitchka
Elementary School.
dwell Eric is a lifelong
resident of Wewahitchka. He and his wife
Tammie, a 1985 graduate of Port St..Joe
High School, have been married'for 19 years
and they have three children, Kody and Kory
,who are both Wewahitchka High graduates,
and Kalyn, who .is entering the tenth grade
at Wewahitchka High. Currently, Eric is
enrolled in the graduate program at: the
University of West, Florida -and he plans on
earning his master's degree in educational
leadership in December of this year.
In announcing his candidacy for the


district one seat on the Gulf County School
Board. Eric would like.to encourage all voters
to be a positive force for our schools by electing
him to this position. He will do his best for


'll of the countN's schools and students.
"Although I believe we have good schools in
Gulf County, I feel they can be improved if we
all work hard toward that goal."


Guillory Qualifies as Candidate



for State Representative


Ray Guillory has qualified to run,
as a Democrat for the State House of
Representatives for Florida in District 6. Ray
is a long time resident of Northwest Florida;
his.family has live here for three generations.
He is himself the father of a. 2 year old
daughter, He is a professional chef at one of
the Gulf Coast most popular restaurants.
Why is Ray running for this office?
"I just did not see that any of the other
candidates really were representative of
the average citizen in our communities. I
believe that our area needs a better economic
system than that provided by the tourist
economy. We need to work on bringing jobs
that provide high wages and good benefits.
not more restaurants, retail, and low-end
service jqbs. Housing is a real concern for a
lot of people; real estate has' sky rocketed.
Homeowners insurance has almost .tripled,
and property tax bills have increased, all
of which is hard on our seniors with fixed
incomes. I just don't see why those who profit
so much, restaurant. owners, real estate
developers or their political cronies should be


rusted to help change a system they profit so
much from."
You can learn more about Ray and
his campaign by visiting his website wwa
elraiisahus-canw


Ray Guillory


BBs In County ............................. 3A Mexico Beach Audit ............ 7A


too Bed Tax Benefits................. 1C Mexico Beach Budget .......... 1C


O A Freedom
SNewvsFwaper

Business Hours:
8:00 am 5:00 pm
Real Estale Advertising Deadline
Thursday 11:00 am
Display Advertising Deadline
Friday 11:00 am
Classified Advertising Deadline
Monday 5:00 pm
872-1'278


INDEX
Opmions ._-4__ A Chuin News ___ 5B


Llitis lo lh Editorf ---. 5A


NASAR --- 12A Things To Do & S~ee 2B


Candidates Slate................. 1B Football Schedules............. 11A


EE MI E

-iS


Navlgate the coast
ww".emseraldcrni".com


Classified Line Ads
Deadline Monday
Spm ET 4pm CT

747-5020


'C,-.7.. .*1.t
--Lr- 4-f:. rP-~ 'j~ -5
r ~ .j, .,: 492g


Spons-.__ -.-12A

Wedaler -14A

AnnoiuDemenis ....-. B

So(el? News ._._. B

OhllUdrles ....- .. 4B


Law Enroemeol --. 8-

Srhooi News .. IOB

Legals 7C

Traes & Servies--.-8(

Classibeds.--- --.-. 9 IOC


A ll, U


Bic


Communill Caleodu-6B~







2ATeSa.Pr t o. L*TusaJl 7 20 salse 97*Srvn ufcut n uronigaesfr6 er


Little Captain
To enter the sandbox, 'Michael's not going to want
children completed tasks to do this,"' she recalled.
chosen by the pirates, such A shy, withdrawn
as reciting the alphabet child, Long suffered from a
backwards, jumping up and stuttering problem that made
down on one foot or singing a even the most mundane
pirate song. interactions painful.
When Burrill learned the Though hewould normally
nature of the pirates' game, shrink in the presence of
she wondered if she had strangers, Long was drawn
made a mistake in bringing to the pirates. To Burrill's
her son to the park. surprise, he approached
"I saw all these kids them, intent on answering
having fun, and I said, their demands.


At last year's Independence on the Coast celebration, Michael
posed for a commemorative photo with Capt. Morgan Garrison
Reid, the leader of the Pirates of Saint Joseph Bay.


;/""vw ~-~'ag 4A
In the crowd, Bud Arnold,
a.k.a. Greybeard, overheard
Long greeting a fellow pirate,
and eased his way into the
conversation.
Arnold was struck by
Long's difficulty speaking, and
evenmorebyhis determination
to communicate.
"It became obvious to
me that he, was trying very
hard to interact with us,"
remembered Arnold, who
asked Long if he, too, wanted
to be a pirate.
When Long's face
brightened, Arnold reached
into his leather pouch.
Arnold was a freshman
member of the pirate band and
had taken to heart the words
of Capt. Morgan Garrison
Reid, who encouraged his
crew to find ways to make their
interactions memorable.
In his pouch, Arnold
kept two special prizes: green
jewels for the girls and coin
necklaces for the boys.
The necklaces were
smaller versions of the one
he wore around his neck. In
presenting Long the necklace,
Arnold declared him an
"honorary pirate."
"He was so eager and
struggling so hard that I
made him an honorary pirate
in honor of those efforts,"
Arnold recalled.
The entire interaction
lasted less than 15 minutes,
and Long disappeared into
the crowd.
Pirates Follow Suit
As Capt. Reid, Scott
Lamberson is the pirates'
fearless leader, and during
the Independence Day
holiday, he is unfailingly in
character.
So when Long strolled by
wearing Greybeard's necklace,
Lamberson did what any self-
respecting pirate would do
- he made a beeline for the
treasure.


Michaef Long tries on Capt. Jack's.hat at last year's pirate feast as the pirate Morgan Adams looks


"Come here son, let
me see that," Lamberson
beckoned.
Recognizing the necklace
as one of Arnold's special
treasures, Lamberson saw a
way to boost the quiet child's
self-esteem.
"Greybeard doesn't give
that to everybody," he told
Long. "It must mean you're
pretty special for Greybeard
to give that to you."
Emboldened by
Lamberson's remarks, Long
approached one pirate after
another. Each knew instantly
that Long was a special kid,
and found a way to let him
know it.
Tommy Davis, a.k.a.
Capt. Jack, came to the park
wearing a $3,000 replica of
'the costume worn by Capt.
Jack Sparrow in The Pirates
of the Caribbean movie.
When Long admired his
tricorn hat, Davis placed it on
his head.
"It was 10 times too big
for him and iit covered up
near about to his nose, but
he had the biggest smile on
his face," remembered Davis.
The gestures were small,


and the encounters, brief, but
they had a profound effect on
Long's spirit.
'Davis' wife, Carol, a.k.a.
Morgan Adams, sat with
Long at the afternoon's pirate
feast. She noticed that his
confidence had grown since
her encounter with him
earlier that day, when he
scarcely said a word.
.At the feast, Long played
with the cannons and
chatted with the crew. When
he reluctantly left the park
that evening, he bid his new
friends farewell.
"When he left, he hugged
each and every one of us,"
remembered Carol Davis. "I
put it in the back of my head,
'Hey, we did a good thing for
this kid.'"
That day in the park,
the pirates did.not know the
impact they'd made on Long's
life.
He was just one child in
a crowd of 2,000 people vying
for their attention, one they
had treated with kindness
and sent on his way.
They learned later what
a remarkable day it had truly
been.


A Troubled Childhood
In the weeks following the
2005 Independence on the
Coast celebration, the pirates
received an e-mail from a
grateful Burrill.
After thanking the
pirates for their kindness,
Burrill unburdened her soul,
revealing the intimate details
of her son's past.
According to Burrill, Long
had endured physical abuse
by his biological father during
a court-ordered visitation at
age two.
Burrill said Long's father
locked him in a closet,
deprived him of fluids and
did not change his diaper for
eight days.
After sit weeks, Long
returned to Burrill bearing the
signs of persistent neglect. He
was severely dehydrated and
nearly five pounds lighter.
Long had also stopped'
speaking.
"It was like you give
someone an apple and'they
give you an orange back and
say it's the same thing," said
Burrill.

(See LITTLE CAPTAIN on Page 12A)


IT'S NOTHING BUT E

A TFCU USED


RATES AS
S LOW AS


'I


-LIMITED TI
APPLY NOW FOR EXT


BLUE SKIES WITH

AUTO LOAN.











ME OFFER-
RA SPECIAL RATES.


FIRST 100 5.8 r
APPROVED LOANS RECEIVE
50 APR
OR EXTEND YOUR TERM TO 72 MONTHS AT 6.39 APR-

NEXT 200 5Q
APPROVED LOANS RECEIVE
D YUR APR
OR EXTEND YOUR TERM TO 72 MONTHS AT 6.49'APeR-


S i.


REMAINING
APPROVED LOANS RECEIVE
RATESASLOWAS APR'
OR EXTEND YOUR TERM TO 72 MONTHS AT 6.59'APR
-OFFER SUBJECT rTO I:HANCE WITHOUT N NOTICE ," SUBJECT TTO APPLICATION AND APPROVAL -


Tyndall
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


If you are thinking of buying a used car, truck, or sport utility vehicle, a Tyndall Federal
Credit Union Used Auto Loan offers tremendous savings. For a fast application process and
affordable monthly payments, simply call our Lending Center at (850) 747-4321, or toll-free at 877-747-4321.
You may also visit any Tyndall Federal Branch location, or apply on-line at www.tyndallfcu.org.
"trsvn'-w cl-~ -www. tyn dallfcu.org
If you live, work, worship, or go to school in Bay, Gulf, Walton, Jackson, Okaloosa,
Franklin, Calhoun, Holmes, or Washington Counties, you may qualify for membership.
APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Subject to application and approval. Qualifying Interest rate is based on creditworthiness. Ask for your specific rate.
Special rates good from July 1, 2006 to September 15, 2006. Promotional rate available for loans repaid by automatic means only. Purchase a vehicle
NCUA dated model year 2001 to 2003 (with fewer than n loF 00r m i .;i P ,,d .j t .' ,;. j r.. T,,, 0n I. ',b 0 r.. ,,f I,, tl,t *, n I 72 1"n.nth,
when you buy a vehicle dated model year 2004 to 0ll.,ik ,, I..P, Me ;I.)1.. 11 i. ll :l r lI: P) .ill r.T. l P,. .I p 1101 Q ,l'l :, 1N.: .'l.'.; llr'! l
Federally Insured by NCUA. 5.89% APR(Annual Percentage Rate) financed for 60months would be $19.29. Member eligibility required. Offer subject to change without notice.


i. I


--.


I


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2A1 The Star, Part St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006


... .... .... f .......... j II I w


"


i
1.







gbU !,IVt:!U 1 70 S v-G-o"nVro."r so6 erTe t, o S.o F Th s ,Jy 726-


County Commission Again at Odds with Port St. Joe


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
The regular Gulf County
Commission meeting was a
quiet affair Tuesday night,
sandwiched as it was
between the first and sec-
ond public county budget
workshops on Monday and
Wednesday.
Nonetheless, even with
only 18 people at Tuesday
night's meeting, the plate
was full.
Commissioner Bill
Williams asked for a
motion to request the city
of Port St. Joe to volun-
tarily stop their annexation
of numerous land parcels
into the city as they have
been doing, until the city
presents the county with a
cohesive plan of their goals
and how they plan to pay
for them.
He asked that commis-
sioners agree to tell the
city that if they do not stop
voluntarily, then the county
will force the issue legally.
Williams said that
in the last eight or nine
months, the city had made
some strides installing the
Highland View water and
sewer system, as agreed to
in an interlocal agreement,
but that it was to go out for
bid in mid-August "at great
cost and it keeps rearrang-
ing the county comp plan"
in reference to state leg-
islation addressing growth
management.


In making his motion,
Williams said, "We have to
say, 'That's enough.' They
have to stop until they can
say how they are going to
fund it."
Arguing that the city
had an eight-to-12 year debt
service on the Highland
View water and sewer proj-
ect, Williams reiterated that
the city had no debt service
plan and no plan to deal
with the impact of the proj-
ect on residents.
He wanted county
administrator Don Butler
and Lee Vincent, Port St.
Joe city manager, to meet
with the engineers to devise
a joint plan.
"So far there has been
no discussion with the
county planning depart-
ment or administrators,"
said Williams, "although
I have asked the city to
come several times to pres-
ent to the county, but they
haven't."
County attorney Tim
McFarland added, "Just
one of my questions is,
'How does this [city annexa-
tions and projects] affect
the (WindMark Beach
Development of Regional
Impact) order for the coun-
ty?' ",
"It's out of control,"
agreed Williams. "They're
moving at quantum speed.
It can be done cordially,
but we must talk. If I were
a citizen of Port St. Joe, I'd


be asking, 'Who's paying for
all this?'"
Williams' motion passed
4-1, with Commissioner
Nathan Peters voting "no."
In other business:
Garbage was again
the topic as trash contin-
ued to be a major problem
along the "tourist corridor"
of U.S. 98 and C.R. 30-E.
The Gulf County code
enforcement officer pre-
sented the commissioners
with some startling figures
and a solution for the prob-
lem.
According to her infor-
mation, just in the area
along C.R. 30-E to the state
park at the north end of St.
Joseph Peninsula, only 57
percent of homeowners pay
for waste management, or
garbage pickup. These fig-
ures did not include Indian
Pass or St. Joe Beach.
The commissioners
were shocked, and intently
discussed her suggestion of
mandatory pickup for the
entire area, with a twice-
weekly pickup during peak
tourist season, which she
described as March 15-
Sept. 15.
The primary question
was how to enforce it after
requiring mandatory pick-
up. McFarland told them
the ruling "must be done
with an ordinance to give
it teeth."
A motion to immediate-
ly draft an ordinance and


put it into the process was
passed 5-0.
Commissioner Nathan
Peters, who missed Monday
night's budget workshop,
addressed the commis-
sioners saying, "This board
must find ways to cut taxes.
One way to increase rev-
enues is to charge everyone
to use the county landfill,"
reading the state statute
that encourages counties to
charge everyone for such
use.
Pointing out the $30
per ton tipping fee in Gulf
County versus the $47.50
fee in Franklin County,
Peters said some contrac-
tors were coming from
Franklin to Gulf to dump
their trash.
"We're losing money big
time," he pointed out.
Peters then made a
motion to change the Gulf
County tipping fee to $40
per ton for residential and
$50 per ton for contrac-
tors, and to also tighten lit-
tering laws in the county.
Commissioners Billy
Traylor, Carmen McLemore
and Williams all applaud-
ed Peters' suggestions,
but asked him to hold
his motion and, to -work
closely with Joe Danford,
Gulf County Solid Waste
Director, to determine the
appropriate fees; since this
idea had been discussed
at Monday's budget work-
shop, which Peters could


not attend.
Peters withdrew his
motion after agreeing to
work with Danford and
have something set up and
operational by October 1.
Commissioner Jerry
Barnes requested that the
county replace almost 40
missing street signs on
C.R. 30-E along the pen-
insula, stating the prob-
,lems encountered by Gulf
County Emergency Medical
Services in responding to
emergency calls and being
unable to locate the appro-
priate streets.
At a maximum cost
of approximately $800
to replace all 39 signs,, a
motion was passed 5-0 to
replace the signs immedi-
ately, since it was a safety
issue.
However, as Butler point-
ed out, the Commission
needed to decide on a firm
policy, since one year ago
the board passed an ordi-
,nance not to replace street
signs for private roads in
the county.
According to the code
enforcement officer, only
two of the missing 39 signs
were for county roads; the
other 37 were for private
roads on the Cape.
After passing the
motion to.replace the signs,
commissioners decided to
change the ordinance in
the future to address the
issue.


County Commissioners Face Full House at First Budget


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
The parking lot was full
and the seats inside filled
quickly minutes before the
first scheduled Gulf County
Commission preliminary
2006-07 .budget workshop
Monday.
When the meeting
Began, it quickly became
standing room only, as Gulf
County Commission chair-
man Carmen McLemore-'
' opened the workshop say-
ing, "Personally, I hope
we're not here all three
nights [of scheduled work-
.shops], but if it takes it, we
will be here."
He then asked every-
one to be "professional,"
acknowledging that "many


of the items we'll be dis-
cussing are hot topics."
The first person to
speak was Jim'Garth, rep-
resenting tle local group
Citizens for Reduced Taxes.
Garth made a short plea
for teamwork to reduce
taxes, thanking McLemore
in particular for the oppor-
tunity to address the com-
mission.
He said he hoped
S"these workshops save our
county from financial ruin,
because if taxes are not
reduced, they may impact
our county more than the
[paper] mill closing."
David Richardson,
Gulf County planner, then
addressed the meeting on
the impact and budgetary


importance of state Senate
Bill 360, which radically
overhauled county compre-
hensive plans.
"This is a growth man-
agement statute that gov-
erns everything we do,"
Richardson explained to'
the commissioners and
audience. "Our upgraded
county comp plan must be
adopted by December 1.
2007,, and this law is rig-
idly enforced now. If the
county does not file, it or is
not in compliance, we are
subject to sanctions."
According to the infor-
mation, Richardson dis-
played on-screen for the
audience, compliance \\ith
the bill means 'that suffi-
cient revenues. are, or will


be, available for the first
three years of the five-year
comprehensive, plan, and
committed for the fourth
and fifth years from veri-
fiable funding sources. In
other words,; funds must
be committed and avail-
able for all the projects for
each of the five years, or
the county's plans could be
shut down.ii .-.
McLemore' then spoke.
presenting his hopes for
the proposed budget aind
his plan to reduce. county
spending enough in 2006-
07 to. prevent increasing
the budget.
Framed by. a giant
bar graph splayed across
the screen behind hiim,


done."
McLemore's budget!
reduction plan included
eight immediate. and two
future steps:
1) Implement a hiring
freeze;
2) After November 1,
discontinue providing dirt
within the county:
3). Discontinue tear-,
ing down and removing
old houses and structures,
which, he acknowledged.
had "both good and bad
points;"
4) Reduce operational
hours of the county land-
fill (Five Points Landfill on
C.R. 71) by one day per
week;
5j Implement a freeze


Williams took the
lead-in of street signs to
discuss the issue of the
three giant billboards being
installed along U.S. 98. He,
as well as all the other com-
missioners and the code
enforcement office, report-
ed being flooded with tele-
phone calls objecting to the
new metal billboards.
Williams told the com-
missioners that the compa-
ny installing the billboards
was in compliance with cur-
rent laws, but he wanted
the Commission to imme-
diately, amend the existing
laws to keep any more on
the giant signs out of. the
county, especially the coast-
al area. He warned them
that the company already
had plans to install sev-
eral more in other locations
across the county.
Under current law,
according .to the code
enforcement officer, bill-
boards can be 160 square
feet and up to 35 feet high.
She suggested future signs
be limited to at least one-
half that size.
Commissioners vpted
unanimously to allow
MoFarland to write a -,new
ordinance and to advertise
it and hold public meetings
to pass it as quickly as pos-
sible.




Workshop
the next five years:
2006-07: community
storm shelter
2007-08: public works
building
2008-09: : ambulance
building
2009-20: maintenance
building
2010-11: county jill,
Fu ture steps were. 1 to
identify areas. like the cbun-
tybuilding deparunent.:that
can be self-supporting.-The
first area to review. accord-
ing to McLemore, woulf be
the County landfill.
2) To use the, county's
bed tax to fund and sup-
port services that support
tourism. ,;
S McLemore reiteireed


o._. : .,-.. . . . . . . . . ..... ,...... .....' ,' .,.:.
- .. ., ., ', -.e ,+ i '


,' --, ; $-.-; --


: .' ,'. :.;
-- ', ,' ." ;
"i!
, '- "-- I-- I
-- I *"

-: ...*.. ";, .: _..
'-rls


- _*..
.,' s ,

........... -' .-.. .
.i^?i!
-


DENTAL NEWS FROM THE OFFICE OF


FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA
,''l I i', i- J{ u C" '~.


BLEACHING
Not'all teeth are acceptable as candidates for bleaching. It is important to listen to your dentist's
advice. Experience tells your dentist which teeth will be successful or not. Teeth that are vital or those
that have or need root canal therapy can both be treated.
The steps ofa vital bleach include isolating the tooth, cleaning the tooth thoroughly, air drying the
tooth, and finally placing a special solution on the tooth, using moderate heat. Many dentists repeat
the process tow or more times. Results can very, but even an excellent result may not remain successful
for more than a few years.
An alternative to vital bleaching is nonvital bleaching. The steps involved are basically the same.
The exception is that the tooth is bleached from both the inside and the outside. Studies and experience
have shown that this is a more predictable and successful procedure because the bleaching process
penetrates more thoroughly and is not limited to the tooth's enamel.

Come visit our new state of the art facility.
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!











fo, ikfeecnutto


I-V-. .


4:
, r .. i. i


Gulf County Commission chair Carmen McLemore presented his plan to reduce county spenaihg at
the first county budget workshop.

McLemore stood and on the purchase of new several tines that "this bd-
said, "As chairman, this is equipment after October 1; get is nothingpersonal,"ell-
where I'd like to see us 6) Curtail the coun- in e -,e e -
go." Stretching to point to ty's annual spring clean- ng department heads that
the highest mark on the up campaign, which takes no one was being singed
graph he continued, "This eight weeks each year. "We out. "I feel this is wha:we
year's [budget] request at can do it on a daily basis," have to do as leaders. We're
seven million [dollars] is said McLemore. "We already going in the wrong d|rec-
unacceptable. I'd like to have the trucks and we can tion and have to change.it."
see us back down to last use inmate labor crews." The meeting ran uhtil
year's [budget]," pointing at 7) Implement a four- 10 p.m. E.T. The second
a chest high mark on the day, 14-hour work week for county budget workshop is
graph. some county departments, set to begin at 5:15 p.m.
"I'd really like to see us saving, he said, about E.T. Wednesday, July: 26,
go back down below that," $75,000 in fuel per year. with department heads
he said, pointing to a mark 8) Prioritize construc- department he
about hip high, "about a 10 tion of new buildings, decid- and. constitutional officers
percent decrease. It can be ing the importance of each. scheduled to speak exery
done and I'd like to show He said five new buildings five minutes until 9:50 p.m.
you some ways it can be were already scheduled for E.T.
-!* ^' I:'


^**K'


:,
r.
.I r""-
Ilr
L
~J1rZ


-


The Star, Poet St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 1 3A


Established IO7 937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


L:


. :
-i --


~illi~~ i


"" .


r


0-



















I AA-Tk. c.-.. o.4 C I ip FL Tkrcrlns, I iv 27 ,f200


rw:


Fiscal Follies, Part II


We'll take a moment to praise County
Commission chairman Carmen McLemore,
who opened Monday's first budget work-
shop with a presentation about budget
conditions.
McLemore, using a graph similar to
one circulated over the past few months by
,a grassroots citizens group, demonstrated
how property taxes had skyrocketed the
past five years and expounded on his
belief that commissioners needed to sound
retreat on tax bills this year.
McLemore continued by outlining a list
'of initiatives he believed could be scrapped
from the budget as an effort toward purse-
tightening, including delaying construction
*projects and putting off the purchase of
some equipment and the like.
We would humbly note that one project
on the chairman's scratch list was reha-
bilitation of the county jail, representing
yet another in a stream of flip-flops, this
one the reversal of a pledge to address
the crumbling condition of the jail in the
upcoming budget lest the sheriff leave
commissioners with the keys.
For all the posturing before a packed
meeting room on Monday, the words
remained wildly off the mark, including
"the laughable assertion by Commissioner
Bill Williams that commissioners were
actually still of a mind to embrace zero-
based budgeting, a claim laid waste by the
tentative budget before the Commission as
they began their series of workshops this
week.
We have said it before, should com-
missioners really be determined to curb
spending and provide some relief for tax-
payers, the axe will need to be wielded
not on projects, equipment and supplies
but rather on the factors which have most
bloated this budget workforce decisions.
For example, consider that the coun-
ty currently employs *mbre people under
the umbrella of "courthouse maintenance"
than it does county emergency. medical
personnel.
In fact, the county pays eight employees
roughly $195,000 a year to save the lives
of 15,000-plus county citizens in the event
of an auto accident, fire or other medical
emergency, while paying nine employees
more than $250,000 to ensure the court-


house is clean.
Three of those courthouse mainte-
nance folks make more each year than all
but one of the EMS staff.
As the saying goes, apparently, cleanli-
ness is next to godliness.
And if commissioners are indeed
intending to provide taxpayers with a
line-by-line explanation and rationale for
expenditures, as Williams said a linchpin
for zero-based budgeting they could start
by offering the reasoning for having a staff
of 23 in Public Works and 25 in the Road
Department.
As we argued last week,
the county is hardly in thee cr
infrastructure business, that county
with water and sewer han- is heading
died by the municipalities, site direct
a hospital being paid for private se
in part through a sales tax, the phrase
road rehabilitation by a with less"
bond issue. the mantra
Which begs the ques- ness deemi
tion, what could be the rea- cally sound
son that the county must
employ 48 people com-
bined in Public Works and
the Road Department? What do all those
folks do? .
Continuing on that same thread, we
find that where the county once upon a
time employed just one or two people in
the Mosquito Control, there are now five.
Tirn to the Building Department to
discover five more employees and a ques-
tionable use of manpower, as with GIS
mapping which has doubled in size and,
more importantly, payroll, in the past
couple of years.
If those numbers aren't enough con-
sider a microcosm of how many of these
folks are paid while pausing to note
that a surname connoting a degree of con-
nection in the county generally carries a
healthier salary.
Just an observation and anecdotal at
that, we'll acknowledge, but review the list
of salaried employees and the link seems
evident.
SIn this sample, one county officer
receives a fairly hefty salary which the
tentative budget bolsters with a 4 percent
increase while also receiving more than


Gary Was No Help!


Now,'folks, something tells me I'm in trouble
here already and we're just starting this story.
And this one definitely fits into that category of
one of the mysteries of life....like that leaning
tower that won't fall or that hanging garden in
SBabylon.
S My stove top quit. It had a bad element or
.a loose impediment or something. Cathy was-
.'cleaning it (that's not the mystery here, that's
the shocking.revelation) and as she attempted
Sto plug one of the big eyes on the back side in,
.the thing exploded! It sent sparks flying .off the
-'vented hood and up to the ceiling fan!
She called Gary Gaddis. He is supposed to
know something about drop in oven tops. He
said, "That thing is 20 years old. It is worn out!
You tell Coach (I taught this child in another
hifetuunel to buy you a new one."
We've got a son, a grandson, a daughter-
'in-law and Josh's mother-in-law coming in two
-cdays. Cathy runs down to the store and orders
a-new range topl
I stand in the kitchen and survey the car-
nage. The little burnt places on the hood give
:iit a woodsy look. If you run the fan on high,
y ou can't even see the dark blotches. I pick up
the,"bad" eye and think for a moment of trying
-to plug it in. That thought passes quickly. But
another one takes it place! You know, Cathy-
.hasn't really cooked a meal on this thing since
itheboys went off to college. That was ten years
ago!,This stove top has been in here for twenty
'years.....but it was only in use for the first half
of those years!
S I've got a ten year old stove!
There is no way you can wear that thing out
'in one single decade! I ain't gonna eat Quaker
.Oats rice cakes, tuna fish sandwiches and
cheese and crackers for ten years....and then
-rush out and buy a new stove top!
I sat down in the floor beside the 20 year old
refrigerator that worked perfectly to have what
Sigmimd Freud would call an "introspective dis-
cussion with myself". Something here ain't right!
Cathy, truthfully, would have probably cooked a


JTHE STAR


USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday at 135 West Highway 98
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
General Manager: Krichelle McGhee
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: Kevin Burke
Creative Design Manager: Kathleen Smith


Florida Pre
Association


ss National Newspaper
n Association


HUNKER DOUWR


WITH KES

Kesley Colbert
Contributing Writer


meal or two for me since the boys left if I had
insisted. But my cholesterol "problems" came
upon me at about the same time Jesse graduat-
ed. Cathy, in the interest of my good health-and
quite possibly seeing a little respite from some
cooking chores-went from serving up sausage,
bacon, hamburgers and fried chicken to seed-
less grapes, raw cabbage and celery sticks!
The mystery here is how could a stove that
hasn't been used in ten years go on the blink?
Could it have broken down from lack of use? Did
a grease overflow in 1989 lead to this dilemma?
Could the problem stem from the water balloon
fight when Josh was a sophomore? Did it have
little rust cholesterols that were at work deep
inside the inner parts? For the first time in my
life I wished I had just an inkling of knowledge
concerning what goes on in a kitchen.....
Maybe a little personal culinary background
would be in order here. My first attempt at cook-
ing came at the primary department Sunday
-School picnic out at Carroll Lake. I was the only'
five year old to set fire to my marshmallow and
then accidentally sling it into the ashes trying to
swish out the flames.
As a twelve year old with Buddy Wiggleton
and Bobby Brewer I'm the guy who suggested we
save money by buying those Red Bird Imitation
Vienna Sausages. We camped out on the far side
of Jarrell Switch Bottom. I'm not sure what goes
in a, can of REAL Vienna sausages but me and'
Buddy and Bobby learned the hard way that
imitation sausages are mostly decomposed cat


POSTMASTER:
Send Address Change to:
THE STAR
Post Office Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone (850) 227-1278

PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE
PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


$14,000 in lump sum sick leave buy-back,
nearly $3,000 more in vacation time buy-
back and $10,000 in what is noted as
"Salaries: Non-Payroll."
Let's have an auditor anybody, actual-
ly explain how any salary is not payroll.
Then toss in another five grand or so
to attend a litany of annual conferences -
an e-mail summary would almost seem to
suffice given the entourage the county has
sent to such conferences the past couple of
years and what remains is a hefty pot of
take-home dough.
That is just one exam-
ple,. and extrapolated
x of this is across all departments and
government all employees would add
in the oppo- .tens of thousands of dol-
ion of the lars when all employees.
actor, where are counted, we are likely
"doing more entering six-figure territory
has become to payroll costs.
for any busi- Add to that free medi-
ng itself fis- cal coverage the coun-
ty pays the whole freight,
including coverage for fam-
Sily members and there
is no disguising that these
are personnel decisions by Midas.
SWhile possibly such benefits could be
rationalized when the staff rolls were less
-fat, given the recent growth in staffs such
carrots are simply unsustainable.
The crux of this is that county govern-
ment is heading in the opposite direction
of the private sector, where the phrase
"doing more with less" has become the
mantra for any business deeming itself fis-
cally sound.
The difference is simple: no boss to
look over the shoulder because chances
are the bosses, the taxpayers, are unaware
of this runaway gravy train.
In fact, the dynamics, we would argue,
reveal the opposite, with the payroll and
staffing representing just another bit of re-
election ballast for commissioners across
the board.
The bottom line is this when com-
missioners get real with spending restraint
by reining in the real drag on the budget,.
the bloated workforce, they will begin to
earn their.$25,541 annual salary.


guts and ground up pig snouts. Frying'em over
ai open fire didn't help one iota! Buddy fainted
from the smell.....
David Paschall and I cooked most of our
meals in college on an old hot.plate he found
behind the Monteagle Diner. It sparked and
smoked the first few times we used it and finally
blew up. David got a coat hanger and wrapped
one end around the coils and plugged the other
end into the wall socket.....we used that hot
plate for two semesters like that.
We didn't have any pots or pans so we
'cooked our Van Camp Pork and Beans right in
the can. The first few bites were a little.on the
cold side. The middle section was pretty tasty.
The last few spoonfuls were always scorched.
I like. my pork and beans well done to this
day .....
When Cathy's sister had her first child
Cathy went off for a month "to help Jo Bair
through the rough spots". Me and the boys
almost succumbed to the elements while she
was gone We were down to "hungry and desper-
ate" when I attempted the home made biscuits.
Josh and Jess relieved ine of all cooking duties
even before the dough started swelling. "Dad, we
won't ever get the smoke out of the house!"
"Dad, we can use this as a hockey puck."
"Dad, the butter runs off the side."
"Dad, my biscuit has black feet."
That was the day of the famous water bal-
loon fight. After we quit laughing and skiing, we
had to get the shop vac to clean up the kitchen.
I figured we washed out the skillet and got their
minds off the biscuits at the same time....
And thus ended the cooking phase of my
life.
But the kitchen appliance problems rage
on. This is all Gary Gaddis's fault. Cathy called
the wrong stove top repairman! I've got a closet
full of coat hangers. And David Paschall's num-
ber is in our rolodex. I'm thinking I might just
have a solution here after all.....
Respectfully,
Kes


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23.00 YEAR $15.00 SIX MONTHS
OUT OF COUNTY
$33.00 YEAR $20.00 SIX MONTHS
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the
publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage
further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed
word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


/


k ` ''


Tim Croft
Star News Editor


I]


tI



il


% OF 4See BIG SHOES Page 5A) I
b';~rrE~ii. *-4;7hAh ';- i,?8~-'8 F',P4='~Q7Pi~ d ~~'J ~ ..~77


J


94#4 1 he ZJtr, rort bT. joe;, rL InU LJuyz I 4


Big Shoes

There are plenty of political races to parse
and predict in the coming months, but one is
of particular interest for voters considering the
broader picture.
The campaign for the District 6 seat in the
Florida House of Representatives is notable
not just for the candidates who have quali-
fied, but the man those eight individuals foul
Republicans, two Democrats and two write-in
candidates -hope to replace.
Allan Bense is term-limited from running
again, not that many that have once served as
Speaker of the House, as Bense did the past
two years, actually take a seat with the rank-
and-file after spending time up at the podium.
Already, the television is full.of commer-
cials touting the conservative credentials of one
candidate seeking to succeed Bense and others
have been busy making announcements, tour-
ing the district and placing signs.
This particular race, more than any other
in the area, will take place beneath a giant
shadow.
A couple of caveats are in order at this
point.
In no way did Rep. Bense and I share a
common political philosophy, but that was part
of what made our relationship unique, when
compared to all the other politicians I have
interviewed and written about.
We understood that we hailed from dif-
ferent points on the political spectrum and
whether intended or not, Rep. Bense always
seemed to welcome a differing slant, and an
opportunity to argue his positions to somebody
who wasn't part of the choir.
I wouldn't call it spirited debate that's not
the roles we embraced when we entered the
same orbit but there was/an independence of
thought there that-seemed to provide a comfort
zone for our interviews and discussions.
And they were not always emotionless
interviews, another aspect of this man which
conjured deep and lasting respect.
He was willing to open up, to lift the shade
on;,government, decision-making anid the per-
sonalities in play to observe'aid un'dderstand
the human side.
And Rep. Bense did it effortlessly and,
in conveying respect on this reporter, with an
unspoken understanding that some things were
off-limits to me as a reporter, but not.as some-
one who understood and had participated in
the inside baseball of politics.
Two episodes, in my mind, provide the
measure of the man.
The first involved, long ago, a bump in life
experienced by one of his children.
Bense, given his rising position in state
politics, understood and was empathetic to the
fact that I had a job to do, that the nature of
events might find their ivay into print, whether
he was comfortable with that or,not.
He never begrudged my role, never exerted
any pressure on how to handle the stoiy, and
later thanked me and my boss at the paper for
the sensitivity we had demonstrated at a time of
family upheaval.
From that point forward, we always talked
about our families and how everybody was
doing, starting each interview or talk by catch-
ing up, something as rare as high wages in
journalism.
Bense was also unfailingly polite in return-
ing phone calls, which, though I came to know
him pretty well over the years, never failed to
provide a refreshing surprise.
Several years ago, as he spent more and
more time around the state campaigning for
Republican candidates and to be Speaker of the
House, it became increasingly difficult to line
up face-to-face interviews.
Yet, leave a message with an aide in his
office and when he had a free moment to
breathe there would be Rep. Bense on the
phone.
I remember conducting one phone inter-
view at the Saturday breakfast table, a time in
his week when he certainly had better things to
do. Another pre-session interview occurred on
a-Friday evening, long after the dinner hour.
And rather than an abrupt and hurried
interview, he took the time to explain the nuanc-
es of pending legislation, initiatives he hoped to
see through and the human dynamics in play.
Further, he treated the weekly paper in Port
St. Joe just as he did the daily papers in his
district, with respect and understanding of the
roles to which we had to submit.
Mind-boggling comes to mind, but that was
Rep. Allan Bense.
Regardless of where your political views
fell, this is a genuine human being, polite, forth-
right, generous and professional.
A stalwart for his political philosophy, but
also a humble man who understood, person-
ally, what it meant to overcome tough odds and
succeed by force of will and sweat.
He was also a champion for his district,
which later in his term, after redistricting, came
to include Gulf County and Apalachicola in
Franklin County.
If something was needed in his district, be
it funding for a lighthouse or beach restoration
or infrastructure improvements, Bense was
willing to be the standard-bearer in Tallahassee.


r ~


I


SsTHE



i STAR

--' -,- t-. .~- ,lLR HO/IESTO.II f OIISR- I i R OR O 68 YF.RS

Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years







CSTUDIISfle 17 Y / 3erviry Lvu.ii covun i u.nu rr v T S t, Pr S. J F -- I--,-


Elvis Lives


By: Jamie Lester
My son, Trey, is 10 years
old. At this age, I would
have thought he would be
into Harry Potter, Amanda
Bynes, or some super-
cool dude of his era. I was
wrong. Of all the people in
the world my son would
admire, it's a rock and roll
singer from years ago: Elvis
Presley. Trey's interest in
Elvis seemed to start when
he was six years old. I was
driving back from Seattle,
Washington and happened
to go through Memphis,
Tennessee and I took Trey to
Graceland, the home of Elvis
Presley. Elvis memorabilia
was everywhere, along with
television screens playing
Elvis singing and acting.
Ever .since then, Trey has
been fascinated by Elvis.
The past several years
since that time, Elvis was
mentioned no and therl,
but once Trey started to
read and learn about Elvis,
his desire to discover even
more about him grew as
well, especially when he
realized his cousin's father,
Ken Hicks. was once Elvis'
bodyguard. Ken's uncle was
J.D. Sumner. leader of the
Stamps Quartet. The Stamps
Quartet played with El\is in
the late 70's. Although Ken's
employment was short-
lived. he still brought home
stories about Evis and J.D.
After listening to the stories
from his cousin and reading
even' piece of literature and
listening to all of his music
he could get a hold of. Trey
learned more about Elvis
than I will ever know! I can
ask him a question like:
What year did El\is produce
Hound Dog. and where did
he first perform it?" Trey
will tell you it was 1956 and
Elhis performed it on the
Ed Sullivan Show. singing it
to a hound dog.
I have created a room in
our house called the "Elhis
Room" which is Trey's
bedroom. It is lined with
El\is wallpaper and tons
of memorabilia. Because of
his love for El\is. I decided
to take Trey. his brother
Luke. and grandmother
Joyce. to Graceland for an
Elhis tour. Trey's excitement


.Big Shoes

He cared about folks succeed-
mg and if he could help. all
the better.
As already stated, there
were certainly areas of govern-
ment and politics on which we
were hardly on the same page.
but that never factored in our
sometimes long discussions
on politics m the state.
The state, this county, is
little lesser for his riding into
the political sunset at this time
in his life. though his stated
reasons, to devote more time
to family and home are char-
'acteristic..
Politics and government


began the day we left! The
journey began when we
left Wewahitchka, Florida
around 2:00 p.m. on a
Friday. As we traveled down
the road heading north to
Tupelo, Mississippi, we
listened to Elvis songs from
the 1950's through the
1970's, including gospel
songs-all the way there
and all the way back.
We arrived in Tupelo
around 11:00 p.m. that
evening. Trey was so excited.
When we started out the
next morning, we couldn't
even stop for breakfast,
we went straight to Elvis'
home place. It was a great
place to visit and very \\ell
maintained. The staff was
very pleasant and Trey w'as
in Heaven. I couldn't get
him out of the gift shop.
so Luke and I went to
explore because Trey and
his grandmother picked
out the souvenirs. Finally,
after walking through the
museum we made it to El\is'
small, shot-gun-type house.
It had only two rooms-the
front room where the family
slept and the kitchen. We
had our picture taken on
the front porch sitting in the
swing-Trey w\as amazed.
The house w\as wood-frmne
with whitewash paint. The
walls in the front roonl
were originally covered with
newspaper. It was in this
room that El\is 'as born
and where his twin brother.
Jesse. died.
Elis' dad, Mr. Vernon
Presley. worked for Mr.
Bean who owned a 15 acre
farm. Mr. Bean sold Mr. &
Mrs. Presley a small strip
of land. and this is where
Mr. Presley had the house
built. The total cost was



Fro wn m 4e 4A

needs more men and women
like Rep. Bense. who wade
against a tide which is erod-
ing principles. conunon sense.
accountability and profession-
al debate on the important
issues of the day.
For those who nish to suc-
ceed him m the Florida House.
Bense offers a template, not so
much in his conservative phi-
losophy. but more unportantly
in his conduct, humanity and
ethics.
In other words, the foot-
steps he leaves behind to be
filled can only be described as
enormous.


$180, and Mr. Bean held
the mortgage. Times were
really hard during the late
30's. When Mr. Presley got
arrested and spent a year
in jail, the payments could
not be made. Mr. Bean
foreclosed on the property.
Elvis and his mother, Mrs.
Gladys Presley, had to move
in with family.
I was curious to know
why Vernon Presley went to
jail for a year. I was told he
added a few zeros to a check
he received from none other
than Mr. Bean, the man who
employed him, sold him
the land, and gave him the
money to build their house.
Elvis' mother was a
true Christian woman who
ran the house with a tight
fist. She made sure church
played a part in their lives
and they attended regularly.
Elvis started singing at a
young age in their home
church, which was an
Assembly of God Church in
Tupelo. Elvis' mother bought
him his first guitar from the
local general store. At age
13, he started playing. A
statue of Elvis at the age
of 13, holding a guitar was
placed on the grounds of the
museum. After Elvis' dad
got out of jail. the family
moved to Memphis for better
employment opportunities.
Therefore. when finished in
Tupelo (after Trey purchased
a life-size cardboard statue
of Elvis and many other
things), we headed to
Nlemphis. like the Presleys.
There it was. Graceland.
as gracious as its name. The
splendor of seeing my son
Trey's eyes as we pulled
next to Graceland was worth
the whole trip. Graceland
represented a palace fit for
a King. At that time. a king
named El\is.
As you walk through
the mansion, the 70's time
frame speaks loudly. The
trophy room was amazing.
All the awards Elvis
received during his career
shined with gold. silver.
and platinum. What was
amazing to me is that Elvis
received only three Grammy
Awards and they were all
for gospel music, not rock
and roll as you might think.
As the tour of the mansion
ends. yot go through the
meditation garden where
Elis. his mother. father, and
grandmother are buried.
I noticed Trey looking
at the graves. When he got
to Elvis' grave he stopped
to read every word. A
continuous flame burns
at the head of El\is and
flowers are placed daily
by individuals all over the
country. Trey stood only
a few feet away from the
person he is most fascinated
with. I had no idea what to
expect next. but he took
something out of his pocket
and dug a very small hole
placing something at Ehis'
feet. We were surrounded in
silence and the sadness on


Question

The county's preliminary budget includes a property tax in-
Online crease of 44 percent. About right?
Opinion
Pole Results
S. 'Yes. it's the cost growth. 0%o


No. enough is enough. 105o0
Visit The Star's website to
weigh in on next week's
Don't know, don't care or don't own property loo
question: wwwv.starfl.com


To Voice An Opinion


Write To:
P.O. Box 308
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To:
(850) 227-7212
Email To:
tcroftl@starfl.com
I


Comments from our readers in the form ot letters
to the editor or a guet column are solicited and
encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page should
be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are
exchanged. All letters and guest columns must
be signed and should include the address and
phone number of the author. The street address
and phone number are for verification and will
not be published. Letters must be in good taste
and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for
correctness and style.


everyone's faces was very
apparent.
When we left Graceland,
we headed to Nashville. I
decided to end our tour with
a live performance by an
Elvis impersonator named
John Beardsley entitled,
"A Tribute to the King-
Through the Years 1953-
1977." The performance
was held at the Earnest
Tubb Texas Troubadour
Theatre, which is home to
the Earnest Tubb Record
Shop, Midnite Jamboree (it
is the second oldest radio
broadcast in the world). It
was great! John's sound,
actions and movements were
very close to Elvis'. I even
heard people comment on
Mr. Beardsley's performance
and all seemed to agree
his performance would
outshine Las Vegas any
day; I agreed. Mr. Beardsley
portrayed every musical
time era Elvis played a part
of. It started from Elvis'
first record in the 1950's
and went straight through
to the late 70's. Country
music star T. Graham
Brown describes the show
as follows, "If you want to
see a great show, you need
to go see John. I guarantee
you it's the best Elis show
you ever saw." The Queen of
country music. Kitty Wells.
says of it. "A great showman.
a great show. It is one of the
best I've ever seen."
The band that supported
Mr. Beardsley was mixed
with vast amounts of talent.
Some of his band members
have played for Reba
McEntire. George Strait.
\'ince Gill. Little Jimmyi
Dickens. and many others.
His band represented a long
history of strong musical
talent. When it comes to
the female backup vocalists.
Elvis would have been
proud. Those two ladies
were beautiful, talented, and
great singers; their charm
and their smiling faces
brightened the whole stage.
To those beautiful ladies.
John and his band. you
create joy in what you do and
I hope you will be blessed in
the future with your singing
and song careers.
The show wouldn't
have been the same without
the sound and lighting
operators. Thanks for all of
their hard work and great
personality you showed
to everyone that walked
through the door. Special
recognition goes to the
person that sold the tickets
and made the popcorn-
none other than John
Beardsley's wife. Because
of her. Elvis introduced
his friend. Trey. during his
performance and allowed
Trey to participate. Trey was
so shocked that his name
was mentioned: when the
spotlight hit him he froze!
Can you believe it-Trey
silent and still! John asked
Trey about a few songs Elvis
sang during his career and
Trey just stood there. Bless
his heart. After they took the
spotlight off of Trey. he told
me everything there was to
know about those songs!
Again, thank you. John, the
staff, and the band for a
great experience. I would
reconunend to anyone, if
you go through Nashville,
you must stop off to see
this show-you will not be
disappointed.
As you listen to the songs
Elvis sang and his impact on
people in general, it affects
people in so many ways. I
can understand why people
were crying at his grave site


even though he died over
twenty years ago. You never
know what song may have
impacted their lives. Those
tears reminded me of what
impact Elvis had on me. I
started thinking back as I
glanced at Graceland one
last time...
It was August 3, 2005


when I left the Bay County
Court House and made the
journey to my home where
my two sons awaited me.
My father, Bo John Lester,
was there waiting for my
return. When I walked
through the door, my father
said, "You have to go take
care of Trey." I walked back
to his bedroom and he had
Elvis playing on his CD
player. I gathered Luke, my
six year old, and sat on the
floor. As I held Luke, I told
them I was not successful in
convincing the judge to have
them live with me. I told
them their mother and I
loved them very much, but I
had done everything I knew
to convince the judge that
the best choice was for them
to live with their father. My
mother had already told
Trey the news. I tried to
hold back tears, but I could
see the loss in Trey's face.
He had started to organize
a celebration sleepover
with his friends because he
thought he would be living
with me. Trey and I clung
to each other and I could
not hold back the tears
for long. We both cried. He
said, "Daddy, I have picked


out a song for you. Would
you like to hear it?" I said,
"Yes." He reached over and
changed the song that was
playing and he stood very
still and just looked at me.
The song he played was "Are
you Lonesome Tonight" by
Elvis Presley. His face was
sad, but I realized at that
moment my little boy just
moved a little closer to being
a young man. I said, "Trey,
that song is so sad." He said
in his broken voice, "It's a
sad time, daddy." I broke
down even more as we both
looked at each other. Then,
Trey started singing another
Elvis Presley song, "Don't
cry daddy, daddy please
don't cry."
As our family 'left
Graceland, I looked back at
the mansion one last time
and said to myself, "Thank
you Elvis for your inspiration
to those in this world, brit
most of all thank you fotr
your songs of life, meaning,
joy, and happiness. You're
still alive in the hearts and
minds of people all around
the world, especially in th.e
heart of a little boy name
Trey Lester."


Vtecf yoLzir -fyerK

Board of County Commissi

Residents and taxpayers can contact
Commissioners in the following fa.
By county cell phone:

Commission (
Carmen McLere
be reached at 22


.- .. ,, -



; -
;;c .. -




Carmen McLemore
Commissioner

:, .r Corimmissione
V~.II Travlor can ber
",, ; i-i '-227-6036 -: '









Billy Traylor. : .:;
Commissioner -

A

at 227 6422.









Bill Williams n" '.
S Commissioner. ', :


te;1 T: a


.:.
". -.,




































-- -Nathan Peters, Jr. .'- -,
SCommissi:ner. ,
S.. I,:*: .....




































Jr .ninsirneir .s













mm, .m-issioner
...-. ..-. v ; .'3 -4 0 -2 t, -
.r. '.: .5'-.r- ..] -' : ,;



















_r
f : .. ,-..- :..'. :: -.. .-*,. ..:% ="' .; ,' '. __


(County
yIr




Lha'-man',i
Lore,'cat
-79
746 .' .

4kol,:


,________________-____-____ k '- '


-0 mmmmma-


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 SA


4 7Q17 'Prvinry Gijifr-..I rountv and sucrroundina areasn for 68 years


I






6A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 Estob/ished 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding oreos for 68 years


Bare-Bones Budget Proposals



Are Lean Fare for Mexico Beach


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Mexico Beach's first
budget workshop for
the 2006-07 fiscal year
began on a grim note last
Thursday.
The meeting dealt with
just the city's enterprise
funds water, sewer, and
sanitation. No capital funds
had been included in the
budgets, because a work-
shop to discuss just capital
funds for all departments
was being scheduled.
Water Funds
In introducing the water
department's proposed
budget, Mexico Beach city
clerk Deborah McLeod
stated to the city council,
"This preliminary budget


has been cut to the bone."
It contained no capital
funds for major purchases,
and no significant raises
for employees of the water
department.
Bottom line: the city's
current rate structure for
its water funds does not
generate enough money for
operations.
This has been the case
since the city installed a
new water and sewer sys-
tem in the late 1990s.
McLeod explained the
proposed budget, which
contained the following rec-
ommendations:
Decreasing the salary
line for 2006-07 byremoving
allotments for two adminis-
trative employees' salaries
from the water fund (25


percent for Troy Williams,
Public Works Director, and
10 percent for Henry Flack,
City Administrator).
According to Flack, the
historical trend has been
to allocate portions of cer-
tain salaries from a num-
ber of sources (i.e., vari-
ous department budgets)
instead of from a single
source.
"We have stopped this
practice this fiscal year,"
said Flack, explaining that
he had suggested that "this
should stop for three to five
years to get these enterprise
funds healthy and see what
the real costs are."
No longer paying for
overtime from the water
fund as in the past, which
decreases the proposed
budget overall by $130,000
from last year.
Limiting engineering
fees by producing in-house
plans to go out for bids
for jobs traditionally han-
dled by a single engineering
firm.
Increasing retirement
benefits for employees with
the addition of the Florida
Retirement.
At this point McLeod
interjected that the retire-
ment was one of the main
items that the city must
keep because so many city
employees had said that if
the city did not offer it, they
would be forced to leave.
McLeod offered the
council three options for
balancing the water fund
from user fees, which, by
Florida law, is the only way
a city's water fund can be
funded and balanced.


Registration

WHEN: Saturday, August 5 and 12,
from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM.
WHERE: Fire Station on Williams Avenue


WHAT TO BRING: Registration fee of
$50.00, evidence of health insurance, recent
photograph, and a copy of applicant's birth
Certificate.


TEAMS:


Dolphins (6-7-8 year olds)
Jaguars (9-10 year olds)
Buccaneers (11-12 year olds)


Equipment distribution will be done immedi-
ately following registration. Please call Dan
VanVleet at 227-2584 with any questions you
may have about league registration.







YUHF OO TALL


Preliminary Budget for water, sewer, sanitation

Customer Bill Using Opetion that balances FY07 Budget


Cost to customer 4,000 gallons:
Current
Water (option 2) $23.24
Sewer (option 3) $32.00
Taxes: $1.63
Sanitation $21.77


Total Bill:


The options would
affect all users of city
water, including about 600
accounts in Gulf County.
Only two of the options
would actually produce a
positive cash flow.
According to McLeod,
"The city has been running
at a deficit for so long, we
have no choice but to raise
rates."

Sewer Funds
The proposed budget
for the city's sewer fund
was, again, "bare bones,"
said McLeod, as she deliv-


$27.36
$39.52
$1.92
$21.77


$78.64 90.57


ered figures to the council.
Just like the water
fund, no capital funds were
included in the proposed
sewer budget, and overtime
was excluded.
According to the report,
$48,000 in sewer fund
expenses are an annual
expense for the city's Gulf
Breeze loan, with, another
$44,000 combined annu-
al expenses covering four
other loans and bonds.
McLeod said she had
challenged the Gulf Breeze
bond holder, but it was
"not open to negotiation.


Tuesday, July 25, 4 p.m. Central Time
pre-agenda meeting for the August 1
city council meeting
Wednesday, July 26, 4 p.m., Central
Time
second budget workshop on city enter-
prise funds
Thursday, July 27, 4 p.m. Central Time
first budget workshop on city general
fund


-1-
-- --- -
SANY THREE Rooms &
yl l ONE HALL CLEANED
I ONLY'
Today y !.

(Cleaned & Protected $15500)
F Ior PRESENT COUPON
All Your I Aroom is an-area up to 300 sq. ft.
I Great Rooms or Living/Dining Rooms
k Carpet I count as two rooms.
Cleaning Needs ResidentialOnly
I7 Expires 7/31/06


Whiter Brighter

Teeth with

NO sensitivity.

WE GUARANTEE IT!



=OMEN,


. TAKE THE
l AcquaChallenge
I at the dental office of


4t -.


: .AcquaBri'te is 'the.revolutionary' ew
-. /vhifewiing system, that ,ill giv.eyou a .
:-'whiter brighter'smile with NO senstvity.v
':.. : V'-l.WEGUARANTEE.lT! ;


C '.7 -ic; -.


FrankD. My, DI

31 WliasAvnflPrtS


$4.12
$7.52
$.29


Increase


$11.93 15 %


To change the bond would
mean refinancing it," said
McLeod. "We had an ana-
lyst look at it before, and
,we were told it was not fea-
sible to refinance the bond
at today's prices."
"This [sewer fund] ha,
been a traditional 'catch-
all' for a lot of expenses,"
McLeod told the council.
"For this year we're sepa-
rating out the items that do
not belong in this budget,
and putting them entirely
where they do belong."
Another change within
the new proposed sewer .
budget: all public works
personnel who need sup-
plies and other items for
the department will have to
go to McLeod to verify the'
need and order it.
In the past, McLeod ''
said, the city did not have a
formal purchasing plan in
place, and also did not buy
in bulk.
"Someone just made a
phone call and ordered it," ,,
she reported.
Council member Curtis
Dale strongly urged the .,
council and Williams to ,
look' at bhilko purchases
and 'consider working with 7
some other municipality to "
buy supplies at bulk rate.,"-
Dale then offered his ser-
vices to investigate this idea
for the city. ,
McLeod reported that
in the preliminary budget,,
sewer user fees increase 52 ,
percent with an addition-
al 17 percent allotted for
growth, with approximately ,;
300 units expected to come.
on line soon. .
"This represents the
necessary increase in rev- -
enues to balance FY 07's '
budget with no capital," she
said.
Of the three options
presented to the council for
the proposed sewer budget,
only the third option cov-
ered expenses.

,Sanitation Funds
All agreed that garbage -
was a major issue in the
city, but Mexico Beach has
no choice but to take its,,-
garbage to the Bay County
incinerator, explained
Mayor Al Cathey.
He then asked "do we
need to find another meth-
od instead of constantly
sending [our] trucks all the
way to U.S. 231 to dump?"
McLeod's report
showed that sanitation
user fees had increased by
3 percent, due to penalty
revenues and a growth fac- .
tor of 2 percent. Sanitation -.
expenditures had increased -
by 5 percent from the pre-
vious fiscal year because of,
again, the allocation of the
two salaries, health insur-
ance and retirement ben-
efits.


.l ., l Operating expenditures
12 Iin sanitation had increased
by 13 percent due to the
Aa -gi inclusion of almost $45,000
in reserve funds to pur-
chase a new garbage truck
SI. in the near future.
The sanitation depart-
It Je L 32456 ment has no debt.


I ..~. **" -


r ~For allyour

Advertising needs...

Be Sure to

Contactyour

West Port St Joe
Account Executive

Rachel Browning

227-7856
135 W. Hwy 98
THE STAR Port St Joe, Florida


- r


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


6A The Star, Port St. Joe, FIL-Tusa, uy2,20


I


;I


1...


I










Mexico Beach 2004-2005 Audit Finally Arrives


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
After a four month
delay, the preliminary audit
for the city of Mexico Beach
has finally arrived.
It covers fiscal year
2004-05, which ran October
1, 2004 through September
30, 2005, and includes the
last nine months of former
mayor Kathy Kingsland's
second term, plus the first
four months of deceased
mayor Chuck Risinger's
first term.
Kingsland was mayor
of Mexico Beach from
June 2001 to June 2005.
Risinger took office in
June, 2005, serving until
his death May 14, 2006. Al
Cathey, mayor pro tem at
the time of Risinger's death,
became mayor of Mexico
Beach for the remainder
of Risinger's term, which
ends June, 2007.
In a letter dated June
30, from auditors Carr,
Riggs & Ingram, LLC, of
Panama City, the auditors
stated that Mexico Beach
is not in a state of financial
emergency and no deterio-
rating financial conditions
were noted.
However, the auditors
gave a lengthy list of rec-
ommendations and chang-
es that the city needed to
make immediately in ref-
erence to money handling
procedures and records:
1) Timely filing of pay-
roll tax returns "Payroll
tax returns during the year
were filed incorrectly and
not timely filed, which
resulted in significant pen-
alties and interest" of more
than $9,000.
2) Record storage and
retrieval "During our audit
we noticed that account-
ing records could not be
located when needed. The
causes of the problem were
numerous:
Lack of clearly speci-
fied system for filing
records;
.- Failure off those who
removed records frominthe,
files to indicate who took
the record;
Failure to return the
record to the files ormisfil-
ing when it was returned;
Lack of specific poli-
cies for removing prior year
records -from the files to a
designated storage space;
The result was that
employees spent nonpro-
ductive time searching for
needed documents. This
condition could also pres-
ent problems when we or
government agencies need
documents in support
of tax returns and other
reports subject to audit."
31 Timely depositing of
funds "Deposits for col-
lections are not being made
daily and intact. Such pro-
pedure is a vital part of a
good internal control sys-
tem," noting one example ini
which a payment in March
2005 was not deposited
until February 2006.
4) Timely requesting of
funds "Grant funding is
required to be requested
pn a timely basis," noting
one example bf funds from
a 2005 contract only being
noticed as "not requested"
during the audit in March
2006.
5) Personnel files
should be maintained for
each employee "While
conducting our audit, we
noted that many person-
nel files contain data that
is either old or incomplete.
Maintaining current per-
sonnel files is an important
Internal control."
6) Software ""During
the previous year and in
(the current year, the city
continues to encounter
S extensive problems .with.
Sthe accounting software
program it uses. It appears
there are inherent limita-


tions in the software that
results in certain post-
ings and transactions to
be improperly recorded in
the general ledger. We rec-
ommend the city pursue
I .'** *


M E Ca.ptain .-- '


S.--..
*l "!\ ; ,

/ .N- :_

Wayne Rowlett, Realtor


HOW DOES THAT,
COMPUTE?
The growth of information tech-
nology in real estate has pro-
vided benefits to both agents
and consumers. Not only are
buyers and sellers better in-
formed and more demanding,
but real estate agents are also
able to offer a higher level of
sers-ce.

When computers and the In-
ternet first came to prominence
and use in real estate, the ex-
pectation was that access to all
that information would soon
replace the need for represen-
tation in the sales transaction.
Why then would there be so
many more agents practicing,
now? In the real estate indus-
try. the number of aaerits. the
use of technology, and econom-
ic growth have all increased to-
gether over the years


Barefoot Properties
Now ,':'n-iirners. can nvew list-
ings online. research neighbor-
hood d-em,",rapl-ia:s. and -ven
find a lender alter shoppnLma
around tlfor the bct rate -and
lowest fees. All of this creates
a more educated homeowner
or buyer, who understands the
benefits of representation.
It's almost like "information,
overload," and the real estate
agent is there to translate all
the input, as well as assist with
complicated matters like title
insurance, inspections, legal
documents, negotiations, and
more.
Real estate. like law or medi-.
cine, is not something ycu learn
on Internet search engines like
Google or Yahoo. There may
be such a thing now as irtual
reality, but there can never be
virtual realty, and there should
never be a virtual agent!

Thinking of selling? Call for
a free consultation. Wayne
Rowlett of Barefoot Properties.
1085 Cape San BIas Road.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. (850)
227-8492 wr@gtcom.net
www. CaprtwaTie.i-eit


DID YOU
KNOW THAT 88%
OF ADULTS
REMEMBER
SOMEONE WITH
AN ESPECIALLY
ATTRACTIVE
SMILE?


Why not start with one of the first things most
people notice about you... your teeth? Heck, we'll
even make it easier for you with a free complete
exam and x-rays. That's right free for the entire
month of January and February. Now you have
one less excuse for avoiding the Dentist. Let the
staff at Dr. Lister's office keep your smile healthy
in a friendly, stress free environment that will
make you feel truly at home. So take a short drive
to Downtown Wewahitchka and let us share our
home with you!

Free exam and xrays for new patients only!

Call today for an appointment.
Ask about our Specials.
Im am w m m m


options for new account-
ing software packages and
implement a change as
soon as practicable."
7) Accounts payable
- "The detailed listing of
year end accounts payable
maintained by the city was
incorrect. It appears some
accounts payable on the
listing were actually prior
year expenses, and there-
fore recorded twice and
other expenses listed on the
city's detailed listing were
never recorded in the gen-
eral ledger as an account
payable."
8) Need to improve cap-
ital assets records "There
continues to be deficiencies
in the city's maintenance
of its property records for
land owned by the city. The
city does not have a detailed
and complete listing of land
owned or the carrying val-
ues of the land."
9) Internal control
- "Separation of certain
accounting and administra-
tive duties among employ-
ees, which is recommended
as an effective internal con-
trol procedure, was inad-
equate at the city...The city
should separate duties so
that no one individual has
control over all phases of a


transaction..."
10) Deficit fund bal-
ance "The sewer fund con-
tinues to report a deficit
in operations. The deficit
amounts were $111,715 at
September 30, 2005 and
$193,924 at prior year end,
and $365,095 in fiscal year
2003."
Prior city audits con-
tained recommendations
for changes in methods and
procedures, but not to the
extent of this audit:
Year ended Sept. 30,
2002:
Two reportable condi-
tions were disclosed during
the audit but none of the
conditions was reported as
a material weakness and
both were corrected;
No instances of non-
compliance material were
disclosed during the audit;
No reportable condi-
tions in internal control
over major programs were
disclosed during the audit;
The city did not quali-
fy as a 19w-risk auditee.
Year ended Sept. 30,
2003:
Two reportable con-
ditions were disclosed
during the audit and both
were considered material
weaknesses; the city began


working on correcting the
conditions;
No instances of non-
compliance material were
disclosed during the audit;
No reportable condi-
tions in internal control
over major programs were
disclosed during the audit;
The city did not qual-
ify as a low-risk auditee,
and it was determined that
the City was "not in a state
of financial emergency";
Although the city
reported a deficit for the
sewer enterprise fund in
2002-2003, the unreserved
fund balance in the general
fund was sufficient to cover
the reported deficit. The
fund deficit was attributed
to repaving expenditures
related to sewer system
upgrades;
Current year audit
recommendations included
changing cash management
and grant activity, arid sev-
eral internal control defi-
ciencies. All problems were
addressed and corrected by
the city.
Year ended Sept. 30,
2004:
Recommendations
made in the preceding
annual financial audit
report had been satisfacto-
rily addressed by the city,
except for continuing prob-
lems with capital assets
records and several ques-
tions of internal control;
Current year recom-
mendations were for bet-
ter software to eliminate
recurring problems with
accounting, timely filing
of accounts, and listing
accounts payable correctly,
all of which were being cor-
rected by the city.
Again, the City was
determined not to be in
a state of financial emer-
gency.


CRY

227-
OR PRIST

229-


SEEN LEXI?.,

4 OVERSTREET .
2006 AT 7 A.M. $
EASE CONTACT
(STAL

-5446 .
INE POOLS

-7665 -
lp va wsj.


IIi.


4320 Cape San Bias Road

Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Local: 850.227.2160
Toll-free: 866.242.7291
Fax: 850.229.8783
Visit
www.CapeSanBlasRealty.com
and take a 360 virtual tour!


Cape San Bias Barrier Dunes 273 Parkside Circle
M L II ,r.4.:,:- 6 t,00 I l':: I.:[ :l, r 2> So0
MLS idl 1242.$365.000.' l iPi.2,,. .. r r -.it,

,. ::,&L-


Port St. Joe 1314 McClelland Ave.
3 bedroom, I, bath, lot size 62xl55 approx
MLS # 200973.1195.000 *,:i- [:,,., L..-.r-. t 650-227-2160


31








'3E
CA


Mexico Beach 103 16th. Street
BR/2BA, Plus a 2BRJ BA Mother-in-Law suite. 2,790sf, lot size 75x1o00.
MLS#110687. $450,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850.227.5949.


,PE SAN BLASI BARRIER DUNES 89 279 PARKSIDE
M bI Sr : 3, s t,. .r I ,9 t, .
MLS 7103858 S489,000. C i ,:,nai3 j~ cl, ar65C'.22 ;.0


LOTS an
Port St.Joe Residential Lot- 125 14th. Street Bay View,
I ix 120 c.r 30acres approy MLS# 200365. $239,000.
Port St. Joe Residential Lot 1310 Monument Ave. L.t i'..e
approx. 120 x 105. MLS# 200355. $259,000.
C-30 Shallow Reed Subdivision we have released 6 Village lots
for $279,000 each.
Port St. Joe Commercial -Village at Marina Cove 171
Village Dr. Lot size 40x 98. MLS #105310. $389,000.
Overstreet Pine Breeze SD 948 South Long St. Lot size 108
x 300. MLS # I11065. $75,000
St. Joe Beach Interior 303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD.
approx. 80x140. MLS #110234. $270,000
Treasure Bay C-30 BayView- 5312 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103
x 220. MLS # 105578. $389,000.
-..\Treasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5438 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103 x


'p -


SHORELINE SKINCARE I
Therapeutic Skin Treatments


PERILMANENT MAKEUP
Microdermabrasion Chemical Peels
Customized Facials Body Treatments
Waxing Skin Tag and Spider Vein Removal
Medical Grade Skincare Products
LED Light Therapy
FREE SKIN ANALYSIS
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE


For an appointment, please call
(850) 227-1953
Melinda A. Dement, Licensed Aesthetician
Aline's Salon 315 Williams Avenue *Port Si.Joe, Florida
www.shorelineIkancare.com


Cape San Blas
Realty, Inc


Port St. Joe 1009 Monument Ave.
t tr,:,:., t, 636i I SC I O lot :'
MLS p108274.5299.000. ,lPi.,,:,i PF., ,r 850 227.5949


St. Joe Beach -8113 Coquina Dr.
iMLS#1 td10 C6.*5,O00. C (4:1,6,:, I L,-Cori r lO
MLS#111806.f$365,000. Cs" F 0 r,,1,1 Pi(, i 650 327.5949


Cape San Bias Sealins SU 632 Seainss Dr.
4 t,;Sdrro. 4 'S 155h. I 49-i-. cie.-,tor
MLS M08476. S595,000. %:.,i ll '>-"i Lfllofl !E850-227-2160


id LAND
220 MLS #107974.$450,000
Cape San Bias Seagrass Sub. 120 Seagrass Circle 128 x
107 lor sze MLS # 108472. $649,000.
Port St. Joe Interior 144 Betty Dr.- irregular lot size. MLS *
# 109390 $119,000
Treasure Bay C-30 -5454 Sand Bar Drive -Approx .59 accre,
MLS# 106513 $307,000 -
Wewahitchka Seven Springs Subdivision 121 Little River *
Circle. Approx .5 acre. MLS #109706. $75,000. ,
Cape San Bias Jubilation 122 Rosemary Ct. Approx ,20
acre. MLS # 109793 $395,000
Overstreet-Wetappo Creek- 9959 Hwy.386- Creek Frontage
120ft, lot size approx 2.6 acres.--MLS #200843. $450,000.
1 2"


m

Dr. David B. Lister, DMD
COSMETIC AND FAMILY DENTISTRY

New Yea r''Res'olutio hl.-"',


i Lsrst-rr-~~llWIN I I a el i_, L--- lq-- a~~"I-" L"bsP~BO~~ .


TheStrPot S. oe F husdyJul 2, 00 7A-.


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


.. .
'.



HAVE YOU

*too. LAST SEEN I:
z ON JUNE 29,
. IF FOUND PL


*0
*0'
ur..

*6
*Be


I

E


P


I1










Mexico Beach Needs Poll Workers for Primary, General Election


Mexico Beach city clerk
Deborah McLeod is asking -
for volunteers to work as poll
workers during September
primary and November
general elections.
According to information
published by the Bay County
Supervisor of Elections Mark
Anderson, a poll worker
must:
Be a registered voter in
Bay County;
Be available for the entire
election day, approximately 6
a.m. to 8:30 p.m.;
Attend a one-hour
orientation class which
includes a test;
Attend poll worker
training classes before
elections.
Variable schedules are
provided for both orientation
and training classes.
Retirees under the Florida
Retirement system must
allow a full year's lapse prior


to working as a poll worker.
Poll workers are needed
every year for state, county,
federal and municipal
elections.
Prior to each election the
Supervisor of Elections will
train all poll workers, who
include clerks, touchscreen
specialists, inspectors, and
deputies.
Each worker will be
trained in the operation of the
election voting equipment,
plus the assigned duties and
responsibilities as a member
of the election board of the
specific precinct.
The training is mandatory
and varies from one to
four hours. There is also
a certification process that
clerks and touchscreen
specialists must complete.
Responsibilities of poll
workers include:
Reporting to his or her
assigned precinct at 6 a.m.


Ray Howell President
Keith "Duke" Jones VP/Business Development

Lj OGulif COUntg Land G

Abstract Compani
Title Insurance Abstracts Escrows Real Estate Closings
411 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9388 Fax: (850) 229-9398
email: gulfabstract@yahoo.com


KEITH L. JONES, CPA
AUDIT ACCOUNTING, TAX &, CONSULTING SERVICES



Ame,, ca Couiits on CPAs
411 Reid Avenue Port St Joe, FL 32456'
850-229-1040 PH 850-229-1050 FX
keith@keithjonescpa.com'- www.keithjonescpa.com
MEMBER: AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPA'S


on election day;
Preparing the precinct
for voting;
Setting up voting
equipment;
Greeting the voters,
verifying their registration,
and providing them with the
appropriate ballot;
At the end of the day,
closing the precinct and
preparing election materials.
fro delivery to the Elections
office.
Poll workers are paid
according to duties, ranging
from $100 to $130, plus $10
per hour during training.
People who meet the
requirements and are
interested in working as poll
workers can go to Mexico
Beach City Hall, 118 North
14th Street, to fill out an
application. All applicants
must supply birth date, social
security number, and voter
registration number, along
with other information.


How Important Is One Vote?



Throughout history, numerous elections have been decided by just a few,

even one vote. Consider:

In 1649, one vote caused Charles I of England to be executed.

In 1845, one vote brought Texas into the union.

In 1876, one vote gave Rutherford B. Hayes the Presidency of the U.S'-

In 1923, one vote gave Adolph Hitler leadership of the Nazi Party.

In 2000, the presidential election was decided by less than 600 votes.

In 2000, the position of mayor for Panama City was decided by seven

votes.

In 2004, a Springfield commissioner race was decided by one vote.


School Board


its high property values.
Last month, the state
overestimated the county's
property value increase by
nearly $800 million, using a
formula that analyzed trends
over the previous one or two
years, when the housing
market skyrocketed.
The state readjusted the
county's required local effort
in early July when it received
the county's preliminary tax
rolls, dropping the millage
rate by .068, instead of the
more than half a mill decrease
projected earlier.
During Thursday's
meeting, schoolboard member
Charlotte Pierce commended
Worley for identifying the
state's mistake early in the
budgeting process.


"Her ability to recognize
this has saved us some
heartache and problems
today," Pierce said.
Superintendent Tim
.Wilder added additional
accolades.
"With all that hard work,
you make it look easy, and I
know' it's not. We appreciate
it," he told Worley.
The public is encouraged
to attend a public hearing on
the tax increase and proposed
budget to be held at 5:15
p.m. on Aug. 1 at the Gulf
County School Board office,
150 Middle School Road, Port
St. Joe.
In other business:
.Sue Gannon, the
district's human resources
coordinator briefed the board
on the status of the summer
teacher search.
As of last Thursday,
the district, had filled 31
open positions, with 12
filled ,by county teachers
who requested' a change in
assignment.


Gannon reported that
out of the 31 positions filled
approximately half of the
teachers would be working
out-of-field. All had plans to
receive their certifications in
their new assignments.
A teacher can only teach
out of field for three years.
Assistant
superintendent Bill Carr
reported that he had managed
to .reduce the district's
garbage bill by $826.46.
He accomplished this by
coordinating with the city,
eliminating two dumpsters
and relocating -one.
School board member
George Cox negotiated with
Emerald Coast Credit Union
to provide new teachers
entering the school district
loans up to $2,000.
Carr told the board
that Gulf County Unity
Community Developnment. an
organization selected to run
the summer food program,
ceased providing meals as of
the first of July.


From Page 1A


AVoluntary Pre-K teacheil
had been forced to pay out
of pocket for her students'
meals, and was reimbursed
by the school distinct.
"Next year, we'll try this
a / little differently," Carr
pledged.
All district instructional
and non-instructional
employees will break in the
new school year with a kick,
off party at Wewahitchli
Elementary School on Aug.
1. !
The kick-off will feature
breakfast, lunch, remarks
from a motivational speaker
and, sessions fpr employees to
discuss their plans with their
grade-level and -department
colleagues.
The district held a similar
kick off last year.
"It's always a fun time and
a week after that, it's back to
the books and gettmg ready
for school." Wilder said.


JUBILEE
B, U I LDERS
Affordable homes built on your land.


:0 7 7 8N'AdessesandBeautiful, livable homes at very affordable prices 'I High quality materials
pesoalwb paeOver 20 home plans and designs I Cost-effective, energy-saving features
wc> e pBuilt on your land with solid board-by-board construction
A Fk~ing --niati-s Ca.e=n

Call for Current Promotions (334) 678-8401
P i, Ar pe s at9,jubileebuilders.com c hd6885 US Hwy Fe231Cn o South I Dothan, Alabama 36301 .,
Schedule a Free Consultation
Monday-Friday 8am-5pm, Saturday 9am-5pm

Aab


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


BA heStrPot S. oe F -ThusdyJuy 7,2006







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe,. FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 9A


City Awards Bids for Water Projects


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
"Fifteen million dollars in
15 minutes."
In this way, Port St. Joe
city commissioner John
Reeves summed up the result
of a Tuesday special meeting
in which two hefty bids were
awarded for city water proj-
ects.
Last week, the board


agreed to allow city engineers
time to examine five bids for
the Long Avenue water main
extension.
Taking Mayor Frank Pate's
instruction to accept "the low-
est and best bid," Preble Rish
representatives advised the
board to approve a $166,775
bid from Gulf Coast Utility
Contractors in Southport.
Reeves expressed his res-


ervations about the contract-
ing firm, saying that he'd never
heard of them, and could not
personally vouch for their
work.
"Just because they're
bonded doesn't mean they're
going to do the best job,"
Reeves said.
When city manager Lee
Vincent assured Reeves that
the city's engineers would con-


require the district to develop
water resources, including a
regional perspective and over-
sight. The plan will also assist
local governments and utilities
in arranging for water supply,
including infrastructure con-
struction and facility opera-
tions for distribution.
Thus far, the district has
conducted workshops with
water supply utilities and
other interested parties in
Franklin County and plans to
hold additional workshops
later. Stakeholders will receive
advance drafts of the Regional
Water Supply Plan, and at least
one public meeting will be
conducted with the Governing
Board before approval. Also,
the plan will be distributed via
the District's website, www.
nwfwmd.state.fl.us by staff
and at public meetings.


duct an inspection of the con-
tractors' work, Reeves said he
did not mean to hold up the
project any further.
The board voted '4-0 to
accept the bid. Commissioner
Rachel Crews was not pres-
ent.
The board also unani-
mously agreed to award
Marshall Brothers contractors
a $13,360,000 bid to complete
a 2.5 million gallon per-day
capacity surface water plant.
The new water plant will
tap into the city-owned fresh-
water canal as the Northwest


Florida Water Management
District pushes coastal com-
munities to move away from
the underground Floridan
Aquifer.
Reeves stated that the
board had originally conceived
of the plant as costing approxi-
mately $8 million and asked
Vincent if the price was con-
servative.
Vincent noted that a
Northwest Florida Water
Management District grant and
additional state funds would
lessen the city's financial bur-
den, and assured the board


Action taken last month
will help secure future water
needs for Franklin and Gulf
counties.
The Northwest Florida
Water Management District
Governing Board on June
i 22 initiated a Regional Water
Supply Plan that will help the
two counties access funds
and employ plans for, meet-
ing projected drinking water
demands.
The plan will permit the
district to initiate alterna-
tive water supply and water
resource development proj-
ects, funded through the state
legislature's Water Protection
and Sustainability Program.
"Our concern is increased
salinity in coastal public sup-
ply wells, due to continued
and increased withdrawals
from the Floridan Aquifer,"
said Ron Bartel, director of
the NWFWMD's Division of
Resource Management. "Plan
implementation will ensure
that potable water is available
for generations to come."
The district has already
assisted the city of Port St. Joe
with buying the Gulf County
Water Supply Canal as a pub-
lic surface water source. The
canal is an existing diversion
'that served a how defunct pulp
mill. The district also drilled
-.test wells in Franklin County
to assess whether inland wells
could be used to serve the
coastal area.
Within three years, we
hope to develop a sustainable


and cost effective water supply
that will meet regional needs
at least through 2025," said
Joyce Estes, vice-chair of the
district governing board. "The
issue is that, as you approach
the Gulf of Mexico' less fresh
water is available, reducing
the long-term viability of pub-
lic wells for water supply."
Population for Region V of
.the District's seven water sup-
ply planning regions, is pro-
jected to increase from under
20,000 to almost 30,000
between 2005 and 2025. This
would require developing an
additional 2.35 million gallons
a day for this area of special
concern.
The plan will identify pre-
ferred alternative water sourc-
es based on quality, cost, feasi-
bility and resource protection.
Statutory responsibilities


Robert E. King DDS

GENERAL DENTISTRY-

Hygienist

Credit Cards Accepted


325 Long Avenue



227-1812


that he had made every effort
to reduce the price tag.
In other business:
*The board agreed to
award the Dixie Youth Girls
Softball League 15 and under
division $500 towards their
trip to the World Series in
Alexandria, Va.
"You don't get to make that
trip but once in a lifetimee"
said commissioner Benny
Roberts.
*At their first budget
workshop following the spe-
cial meeting, commissioners
examined a proposed millage
rate less than the rollback
rate.
Last year, the board
approved a rate of 5.17 mills.
The proposal would reduce
that figure to 4.15.


Contract Negotiations Begin at

Arizona Chemical's Port St. Joe Plant


Officials at Arizona
Chemical's Port St. Joe plant
today announced they will
begin negotiations on a new
labor agreement with the
local union Local 836 of
the International Chemical
Workers Union.
The current labor agree-
ment expires on August 19,
2006.
Arizona Chemical, head-.
quartered in Jacksonville, Fla.,
has six manufacturing plants
in the U.S., and five in Europe.
The company is a global sup-
plier of pine chemicals to the
adhesives, inks and coatings


and oleochemicals markets.
Arizona Chemical also has
research and development
capabilities and a network of
sales offices throughout the
world. The company employs
more than 1500 people.
Celebrating more than
75th year, Arizona Chemical'
(www.arizonachemical.com),
a company of International
Paper, is a global leader in
pine chemistry. The com-
pany is headquartered in
Jacksonville, Fla., and sup-
plies high-quality pine chemi- .
cals to the adhesives, inks and
coatings, and oleochemicals


markets. Arizona Chemical
has 11 manufacturing facili-
ties worldwide located in
Panama City, Pensacola and
Port St. Joe, Fla.;. Savannah
and Valdosta, Ga.; Dover,
Ohio; Bedlington and Chester-
le-Street, England;Niort,
France; Oulu, Finland; and
Sandarne, Sweden. Arizona
Chemical also has research
and development capabilities
and a network of sales offic-
es throughout the world. The
company employs more than
1,200 team members.


-RAFFLE*


t Outdoor Fire Pit s a

Donated by Kilgore's Brick Pavers

Valued at $650 Raffle Ticket:$5.00

Tickets may be purchased at

Bluewater Outriggers

The drawing will be on July 29th

after the weigh-in


PUBLIC NOTICE


A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning
and Development Review Board Meeting
on Monday, August 7, 2006 at 6:00 RM.
central time and at the Wewahitchka Board
of City Commission Meeting August 14,
2006 at 6:45 RM. central time. Both Public
Hearings will be held in the Wewahitchka
City Hall, located at 109 South Second
Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. The Public
Hearings will be to discuss and act on the
following, to wit:


Small Scale Land Use Change:
Charles Mayhann, Parcel #02388-
00R, changing Lot No. 9 from
residential low densityto mixed
commercial/residential. Subject
to all development regulations re-
quired by the City of Wewahitchka,
FL.


The public is encouraged to attend and be
hear on these matters. Information prior to
the hearings can be viewed at the City Hall
in Wewahitchka.

PROPERTY ID: 02388-OOOR
:" HWY 71 S

PROPERTY ID:
370 HARDEN CIRCLE
.28 ACRES
EXISTING RESIDENTIAL LD


$4999
l 'ur'" C. ir ,: ,-a r 5 r l..-"


/

i~t-


A4


IM for your chance
to win $10.000
'.,', a.lllel.corn im2nl n I,:-r


"With Ihe new inslant message -read, Stro:be,
you can send le I 8 ins rarl me iags ir, a fl.ilhr
Ty Penn;ngton


come and get your love'



CliteL
wireless


I Alitel Retail Stores IOThese Retail Stores Now Open Sunday. | Authorized AgentsI Equipment & promotional offers at these locations may vary.


COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL


Dothan
, 2927 Ross Clark Cir.
(334) 671-4111
Florida
Marianna
%2811 Hwy. 71
(8501526-7701


Panama City
2503Hwy.77N.
(850) 785-7000
Port St Joe
200 Reid Ave.
(850) 227-1000


Alabama
Daleville
Wireless Plus
(334) 598-2355
Dothan
The Wireless Co.
(334) 671-4795
(334) 673-1501


Wireless Advaniage Florida
(334) 702-0033 Apalachicola
(304) 702-4200 Beach Computer Svcs.
Ozark (850) 653-1234
Wireless Co. Blountstown
(334) 774-9660 B&B Electronics
Wireless Pus (850) 674-3711
(334) 774-0779


For Business & Government Accounts call 1-877-BIZ-CNTR or visit alllelbusiness.com


Publish July'27 and August 3, 2006


Chipley
S&S Wireless
(850i 638-0133
Graceville
Obar's insurance
(850) 263~4483
Marianna
Capital Cellular
(8501 526- 4022


The Wireless Co, Tyndall AFB
(850) 482-6255 Cell.-Accessories
Panama City (850)286-5488
Wireless Advri',age
(8507863-8859 Proud Sponsor of -
(850) 873 601,0


Federal, state & local taxes apply. In addition, AlItel charges a monthly connectivity, regulatory & administrative surcharge up to S1.70; federal & stale Universal Service Fund fees (both vary by customer usage); & a 911 fee of up to$1.94
(where 911 service is available). These additional fees may not be taxes or government-required charges & are subject to change. My Circle: Available to new and existing customers on current select rate plans S59 99/mo & higher, My
Circle applies to ten numbers per account, which must be shared among all lines on account. Not available on prepaid plans. Customer may not designate own wireless or voice mail number, Directory Assistance or 900 numbers as any
of the ten available numbers. Calls must begin & end in your plan's calling area. Designated numbers must be within the U.S. Program may be discontinued at the discretion of Algtel. Phone Promotion: Phone available at sale price to new
customers & eligible existing customers. Qualifying Alltel rate plan required. Contact Alltel to determine if you are eligible. Phone Details: Phone & applicable rebate available for a limited time, while supplies last, with activation of a qualifying
rate plan. Limit 1 rebate per qualifying purchase. Phone cannot be returned once mail-in rebate certificate has been submitted, Customer pays applicable taxes. See rebate certificate for details. Axcess Instant Messaging: Text Messaging
service required. The charges for Text Messaging service-will vary depending on your olan. Every instant message sent and received will count against your Text Messaging plan. IM2win Sweepstakes: NO PURCHASE Aair sens.e.nw,.es.e.
NECESSARY TO ENTER OR PLAY. To enter (1) download the Axcess IM application to your wireless phone and login with your AIM or Yahoo! user name and passwordto be automatically entered or (2) print your name, .sIue"s'
full address, daytime and evening telephone numbers, age, daytime phone and wireless phone number on a 3" x 5" piece of paper and send it in a properly stamped envelope to: Alltel "IM2Win" Sweepstakes, P.O. ,
511366, New Berlin, WI 53151. Sweepstakes ends at 11:59 p.m. CT on August 31, 2006; weekly entries must be postmarked by the sunday at the end of the entry period \or by Thursday, August 31, 2006 for Week 8) rnd / Consumer
received by the drawing date specified. Non-winning weekly entries will not be carried over into the subsequent week's drawing. Open to legal U.S. residents 13 or older residing in Alltal wireless service/coverage information
area in states listed in Official Rules. Void where prohibited. Full rules and details at www.alltel.com/im2win. Sponsored 2006 by Alltl Communications, Inc., Little Rock, AR. Additional information: Limited-time offer Code
- at participating locations. While supplies lat. Qualifying Alitel rate plan, credit approval & approved handset required. S20 non-refundable activation fee applies per line. S200 early termination fee may apply per line. \
Offers are subject to the Alltel Terms &Conditions for Communications Services available at any Alltel store or alitel.com. All product & service marks referenced are the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their PruALt
respective owners. Screen images are simulated. @2006 Alftel Communications, Inc, All rights reserved.


p .'


Water Supply Plan Initiated for


Franklin and Gulf Counties


PURPOSED MIXED


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county an surrounding areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 9A


, r- -r 1 I|r,:.'.'










2006 Bayou Bash to Award Grand Prizes, Door Prizes, Cash Prizes, and Surprises!


The 4th Annual Bayou
Bash Benefit Fishing
Tournament is scheduled for
July 29th, 2006, but don't
wait for the last Saturday in
July to start getting involved.
"The festivities are finalized
and the fund-raisers have
already started," said pre-
senting sponsor and hostess
Donna Spears.
"It took over three hours
to give away all the prizes at
last year's Bash. This year,
we've added Grand Prizes to
the mix, but ticket sales for
the Grand Prizes are limited
so those wanting a chance to
win big should act fast!"
Those Grand Prizes are
on display right now at Half-
Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe,
Bluewater Outriggers in Port
St. Joe, and Howell Tackle
in St. Joe Beach. Prize tick-
ets are available at those
locations and from Donna
Spears Realty (850-227-
7879).
,

















I




0(Y


'Just a $5 donation gives
you a good chance to win
some great stuff," said Mark
Moore of St. Joe Shrimp.
"The Deluxe Boat Package
at Half-Hitch is worth over
$700 and has everything
any fisherman/boater could
want or need. The deluxe
pier cart at Howell Tackle is
loaded with every bell and
whistle they could think of
and is worth over $400.
The Outdoor Fire Pit that
Kilgore's Brick Pavers and
Tile donated and has on dis-
play at Bluewater Outriggers
goes for over $650.00 and
would look really good in
my backyard. I'm buying
as. many tickets as I can!"
Grand Prize drawings will
be held after the weigh-in on
Tournament Day. Lucky tick-
et holders need not be pres-
ent to win Grand Prizes.
"The Grand Prizes alone
are valued at over $1,750,
but that's just the tip of the


iceberg at the Bayou Bash,"
said Donna Spears. "We can't
put a value on the door priz-
es yet, because donations
are still coming in."
Tickets for door prizes
are just a $1.00 donation
each, and will be available
to fishermen and the non-
fishing public on July 29th
at tournament headquarters
(St. Joe Shrimp at Simmons
Bayou on C-30).
"I wasn't able to fish
last year," said April Hicks,
"but my husband Chris and
I came out for the weigh-
in, made a $20.00 dona-
tion toward door prize tick-
ets, and must have won 4
or 5 prizes worth at least
$250.00. It seemed like
everyone there won some-
thing.",
Door prize drawings will
be held after the weigh-in
on Tournament Day. Ticket
holders must be present to
win door prizes.


With all the prizes given
away annually at the Bayou
Bash, and all the freebies
tournament participants
receive just for signing up
(t-shirts, hats, koozies, din-
ner, goodie bag, and more),
it's easy to forget how great
the awards are for winning
fishermen. The 2006 pay-
out for winning fishermen
is the biggest yet, "and Half-
Hitch Tackle has generously
donated gift certificates to
nearly double the number
of prize-winning places. The
official 2006 Bayou Bash
total purse is $7,500 and
will be distributed as fol-
lows:
ADULTS
(14 and over)
SPECKLED TROUT: 1st -
$1,500.00; 2nd $700.00;
3rd $400.00; 4th -
$250.00; 5th $150.00; 6th
$100.00; 7th $75.00;
8th $50.00
-. .. -. '..-


PR[SflIfIU By



AND MADE PO881111 BY
THE GE!NEROSITY 91


Pi"


'~u' ~
enc. '9'.


When?- l


-? '- .


Registration & check-in: 6:00am- 9:00am / Weigh-in: 6:00pm / Mullet toss: 7:30pm /. Awards ceremony: 8:00pm
Victory celebration: 8:30 until we git-r-done / Raffle and door prize tickets available all day- non-fishing public welcome!


Where? l. p C> & $t Bay

Registration & check-in, weigh-in, mullet toss, awards ceremony and victory celebration will be held atthe,St. Joe Shrimp
Company at Simmons Bayou south of Port St, Joe on C-30 A / Eligible fishing waters include St, Joe Bay and surrounding
waters- see map on back of registration form for details / Raffle tickets are available at Half-Hitch Tackle (for Deluxe Boat
Package), Bluewater Outriggers (for Outdoor Fire Pit), and Howell Tackle of St. Joe Beach (for Deluxe Pier Cart).


REDFISH: 1st $1,000.00;
2nd $450.00; 3rd -
$150.00; 4th $100.00;
5th $75.00; 6th $50.00
SPANISH MACKEREL: 1st
$750.00; 2nd $350.00;
3rd $150.00; 4th -
$100.00; 5th $75.00; 6th
$50.00
CATFISH: 1st $200.00; 2nd
$100.00; 3rd $50.00
CHILDREN
(13 and under)
SPECKLED TROUT: 1st -
$100.00; 2nd-$75.00; 3rd
$50.00; 4th $25.00
REDFISH: 1st $75.00; 2nd
$50.00; 3rd $25.00
SPANISH MACKEREL: 1st -
$75.00; 2nd $50.00; 3rd
$25.00
CATFISH: 1st $50.00; 2nd
$25.00
The Bayou Bash is full
of surprises this year, as
well. Kids who participate
will receive goodie bags
stuffed with additional gear.
A bonus fish category (adults
and kids eligible) will be
announced at registration
and check-in on Tournament
Day, with the winner to be
awarded a special prize by
Kristy Dorman of Capital,
City Bank. Paradise Coast
Vacation Rentals is sponsor-
ing a Mullet Toss at 7:30pm
to be held right on Hwy. C-30
A (to benefit the Gulf County
Sheriff's Youth Camp).
Local favorite Buddy
Hamm will be performing
live. Commissioner Benny
Roberts and Crew will be
serving delicious BBQ.
"It's a lbt to squeeze'
in to one day," said Donna
Spears, "but everyone has a
great time and it benefits' a


wonderful cause!"
Proceeds from the 2006
Bayou Bash will benefit
the Gulf County Domestic
Violence Task Force. This
deserving organization pro-
vides legal services, reloca-
tion aid, counseling, and
shelter for victims and chil-
dren, and desperately needs
funding. Your support,
through sponsorship or
participation, will be greatly
appreciated.
Tournament check-in
and registration are from
6:00am through 9:00am at
St. Joe Shrimp on
Saturday, July 29th. Weigh-
in: 6:00pm. Mullet Toss:
7:30pm. Awards
Ceremony: 8:00pm. Victory
Celebration: 8:30pm until
late. St. Joe Cab Co. will
be on hand with free rides
home for over-enthusias-
tic celebrants. Registration
forms complete with offi-
cia1 tournament rules and a
map showing eligible fishing
waters are available at St.
Joe Shrimp, Donna Spears
Realty, and local tackle shops
including Half-Hitch Tackle,
Bluewater Outriggers,
Howell Tackle, and Scallop
Cove. Registration forms will
also be available at check-in.
Entry fees are $30.00 for
adults and $15.00 for chil-
dren 13 and under.
Individuals or business-
es interested in sponsoring
the 2006 Bayou Bash or
volunteering on tournameAt
day should contact Donna
Spears Realty at (850). 227-
7879.


Program and off Lease

Cars Trucks SUVs -Vans
0. ,


I


What?


Cashand prizes will be awarded to fishermen in two divisions(adults & children13andunder)for SpeckledTrout (onefish
weight), Redfish (mostspots), Spanish Mackerel (one fish weight), and Catfish'(aggregate weight of all caught by single .
fisherman) / Prizes will be awarded in three divisions (adult men, adult women, and children13 and under) for the mullet toss.


Why? l ax Pri es, Good Food, Live Musi& Charty

Enjoy a fantastic day of fishing, an exciting weigh-in, lots of prizes, BBQ dinner from Commissioner Benny Roberts & Crew,
a fund-raising mullet toss, and live music by Buddy Hamm at the weigh-in and victory celebration / Prizes will be awarded as
follows:Troutladults-8 places, 1st place $1,500.00; Trout/kids-4 places; Redfish/adults- 6 places, 1st place $1,000.00;
RelishIkids- 3 places; Spanish Mackerel/adults 6 places, 1st place $750,00; Spanish Mackerel/kids 3 places; Catfish/
adults'- 3 paces, 1st place $200 00; Catfish/kids -'2 places (prizes for adults will be cash or gift certificates prizes for,
kids willbe gift certificates-prizes for the mullet toss will be gift certificatesand merchandise) / Raffle and door prizes, too!


How? Show Up, Sign Up, Hook Up and Hang Out!

: .To receive Official Tournament Rules and Entry Forms by mail or to sponsor or volunteer for this event, call Donna Spears Realty
at 227-7879, Rules and Entiy Forms will also be available at Half-Hitch Tackle, Bluewater Outriggers, Howell Tackle of St. Joe
Beach, St, Joe Shrimp, and Donna Spears Realty Enry fees Adults $30.00 / Kids $15.00,



COUNT Y D OCM C


VIOLE0sE


200
-Chvy rai BU
LS ha pe SO


2 00


PogeRa

Xp a -4
LonWeelBs
Ib k 8-A T


Plus Sales Tax and Tag 04
WAC with 720 Beacon Score or higher
72 mo Financing
0~ ~ ~ ~~M IV 'I' M., IVAT'YT 5:3 *


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


IOA The Star. Port St o.F -TusaJuv2,20


1101 K11,11- m"






F-tnbished l 1927 *--I Gna6rFl


NRSUR Rn


Rae Smith
Contributing Writer


Ful Se8


St. Joe Track Team Competes Denny Hamlin Sweeps at Pocono


In CCCC Track Classic


- C.


On July 15th St. Joe Track
Team competed in the 10th
Annual CCCC Track Classic
at FSU Track in Tallahassee.
The competing athletes were
,.Celeste Chiles, Madison
Wilson, Megan Palmer,
-" Nicole Endres, Samantha
ITaylor, Megan Walker and
,Kayla Parker. The athletes
c-'ompeted in events by age
-divisions set by AAU Track
'-& Field. Awards were given
,- o top three places in each
event. This was the third
."*Track & Field Meet the team
-completed in this summer.


Team Results
Girls Primary Division
Celeste Chiles Shot Put
2nd, Long Jump 5th, 100
Meters 8th
Madison Wilson Shot
Put 1st, Long Jump 4th, 100
Meters 9th
Girls Bantam Division
Morgan Palmer Shot
Put 1st, Long Jump 3rd, 100
-Meters 6th
Girls Sub-Midget Division
Nicole Endres 'Shot Put


1st, Long Jump 1st, High
Jump 1st
Girls Midget Division
Samantha Taylor Shot
Put 1st, Long Jump 3rd, 100
Meters 3rd
Megan Walker Pole
Vault '1st, Long Jump 2nd,
High Jump 1st
Girls Youth Division
Kayla Parker 100 Meters
1st, 200 Meters 1st, Long
Jump 1st


SPort St. Joe Youth Soccer


Fall Registration
Port St Joe Youth Soccer 250 soccer players from Port
:2 registration for the fall St Joe, Apalachicola, and
soccer season will be held Wewahitchka. Practices will
on Saturday August 5th and be held once. or twice weekly,
August 12 from 9 am until depending upon age group.
noon, at the STAC House.' Practice times arid locations
*The STAC House is located will be :arranged between
-on 8th street in Port St Joe. coaches and parents. Teams
Boys and Girls ages 4 to 'based in Apalachicola and
14 (8th grade) are invited to Wewahitchka will practice
play soccer. Players must be in their "home" towns. Most
at least 4 years old before games will be held in Port St.
i August 1 in order to play. No Joe on Saturday mornings
experience is necessary. between 8 am and noon.
Last year we had over Some games will be held on


weekday evenings. Practices
will begin during the week
of August 21 and game will
begin in early September.
Coaches training and
referee certification will
be held in late August or
early September. If you are
interested in coaching or
refereeing, please sign up at
the time of registration. Team
sponsors are also. needed.
The registration fee is $45
per child. A parent or legal
guardian will be required


to, sign the paperwork at
registration.
We are looking forward to
another great season. Come
join us!
Coaches, referrers
and sponsors are needed.
Please sign up at the time of
registration!


I


"What am I
i supposed to do?"
NEXTEL he wondered.
"My motor blows
Sup [last week]
and now I got
wrecked. I don't
know what else
to do."
The Cup
drivers- will have
nest weekend off
and it would seem that it is a
much needed break for some of
them. The will be back August
8th at Indianapolis Motor
Speedway aka The Brickyard.


Rookie Denny Hamlin
has now won both races
this year at Pocono. Hamlin
led 151 of the 200 laps in
the race.
Black flag for Tony
Stewart early in the race
for losing his temper with
Clint Bowyer and knock
him into Carl Edwards.
After the race s
Stewart said that '
Dale Earnhardt Sr.
raced that way all of
his career and if he NEx
was alive it would
still be allowed.
"Four guys
ended up having
a bad day because
one guy couldn't be
a little patient and
use a little give-and-
take," Stewart said.
"There is only a handful of guys
that don't get it but the problem
that they are in good race cars
and they don't run up front
enough to learn from the rest of
us how to race up front.""I've got
to choose my words carefully --
if it weren't for the respect of the
sport and the people watching
and his team, he'd be out there
bleeding right now," Edwards
fumed. "That's so frustrating.
How can a person make it this
far in life being such a jerk?"
Dale Earnhardt Jr. was
wrecked by Dave Blaney and fin-
ished 43rd. Jr stayed away from
reporters for over 30 minutes*
then finally talked with them.


Make
Chevy
Dodge
Chevy
Chevy
Chevy
Chevy
Chevy
Dodge
Chevy
Chevy


I N -W


NASCAR CUP SERIES STANDINGS
Rank +/- Driver Points Behind Starts Poles, Wins Top 5 Top 10
1 -- Jimmie Johnson 2939 Leader 20, 1 3 7 16
2 -- Matt Kenseth 2842 -97 20 0 2 10 11
3 -- Jeff Burton. 2621 -318 20 2 0 4. 13
4 -- Kyle Busch 2582 -357 20 1 1 7 10
5 +3 Kevin Harvick 2563 -376 20 0 1 8 11
6 -1 Mark Martin 2557' -382 20 0 0 3 9
7 -1 Kasey Kahne 2515 -424 20 4 4 6 11
8 +4 Denny Hamlin* 2514 -425 20 2 2 4 8
9 -- Jeff Gordon 2512 -427 20 0 .2 7 9
10 +1 ToriyStewart 2477 -462 20' 0 2 8 10


TASTEFUL
"BITE OF
INNOVATION











Port St. Joe's Appliance Source Since 1960.


The Best Quality.
The Best Price.
Whirlpool.
KitchenAid.
Roper.
Estate.
St. Joe
Hardware.


FREE DEUVERYTOPSj, CAPE &BEAS. WE WilHAULTHE OLDAPPLIANCE OF
ACE s0 JOE HARDWARE CO.
201 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe 229-8028
Hardware Monday-Friday 8:00-5:30 EST Saturday 8:00-4:30 EST Closed Sundays


SPORTS SCHEDULE


WEWAHITCHKA GATORS


2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Date Team
9/01 South Walton
9/08 Cottondale
9/15 Jay


9/22
9/29
10/06
10/13
10/20
10/27
11/3


PORT ST. JO


Port St. Joe
Northview
West Gasden
Sneads
Freeport
Liberty County
Blountstown


Emerald Coast

h Federal Credit Union
)E .WEWAHITCHKA


101 East River Road
Wewahitchka, FL 32465


530 Cecil G. Costin, Sr Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
emeraldcoastfcucom
EMERALDCOAST@GTCOM.NET


SPORTS SCHEDULE S

'oI PORT ST. JOE SHARKS


2006 J.V. Football Schedule


Game
1.
2.
3.'
4.
5.
6.


Place
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(A)
(A)


Date
8/18
8/24'
9/7
9/14
9/21
10/5


Team ,
Vernon
Blountstown
Wewahitchka
N.F.C.
Florida High
Wewa


Place
(A)
(H)
(A)
(A)
(H)
(H)


Time
8:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00


2006 Varsity Football Schedule


Game
1.
2.


Date
8/18
8/25


Team
Vernon
Blountstown


Advertise Here
and
Support Your Team!


Reeves Furniture &
Refinishing
234 Reid Ave. 229-6374
All Wood Furniture, Gifts,
Wicker, Kitchen Cabinets


9/1'. Marianna
9/8 Chipley
9/15 *Freeport
9/22 *Wewahitchka
9/29 '*Sneads
(Homecoming)


8. 10/6
10/13
9. 10/20


Place Time


10/27
11/3


A-1 Oil &
Muffler Service
210 Hwy 71

639-4175

The Star
Come Visit Us At Our New Location
135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


*Liberty County (A)
OPEN
*Jay (H)


(Senior Night)
*West Gadsden (A) 8:00
Apalachicola (A) 7:30
* District 1 Games/Class A All times are Eastern.

Bayside Lumber
516 First Street
229-8232
Your Building
Materials Headquarters

Gulf Coast Real Estate Guide
Give Us A Call
To Place Your Ad Today
227-1278 or 653-8868


Game
1. .
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.,
10.'


7:30
8:00
8:00
8:00
8:00

7:30

8:00


.850-227- 156-


TheSta, Prt t. oeFL TursayJul 27 206 II


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Kevin Harvick
Wins Busch Race
Harvick led 149 laps of the
250 lap race. This was his 21st
Busch Series win.
"We've come pretty close
here a couple times in the trucks
and never were able to finish it
off," said Harvick, who picked
up his first career win at the
track. "It was just an awesome
day, not just for me but for all
of RCR. All these guys built
brand new short-track cars and
to have it come down to myself
and Clint, that was pretty awe-
some."
Pos. Driver Make
1. Kevin Harvick Chevy
2. Clint Bowyer Chevy
3. Denny Hamlin Chevy
4. Reed Sorenson Dodge
5. Johnny Sauter Chevy
6. Carl Edwards Foi-d
7. John Andretti Ford
8. Jason Leffler Chevy
9. J.J. Yeley Chevy
10. Jay Sauter Chevy
28 Darrell Waltrip Dodge
The Busch Series goes to
Gateway International Raceway
on July 29th.



.2


Pos. Driver
1. .Denny Hamlin
2. Kurt Busch
3. Jeff Gordon
4. Brian Vickers
5. Kevin Harvick
6. Jimnie Johnson
7. Tony Stewart
8. Bobby Labonte
9. Jeff Burton
10. Martin Truex Jr.







12A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Little Captain


Long did not speak again
for two years, except during
night terrors where he'd cry
for his mother. Burrill slept
near her son and tried in vain
to console him.
A doctor who evaluated
Long determined that he
suffered from post-traumatic
stress and separation
anxiety.
"His brain just shut
down," Burrill said.
Long began talking again
at age four, when he called
his mother over to the couch
and told her he loved her. He
.spoke normally for the next
two years.
According to Burrill,
Long began stuttering at age
six, the day before he was
to return for another court-
ordered visitation.
Embarrassed by his
speech, Long withdrew
inward. The thought of


speaking to a stranger filled
him with anxiety, and his
grades in school plummeted.
His shyness had become
debilitating.
In her e-mail to the
pirates, Burrill described that
day in the park as a turning
point.
Through their simple acts
of kindness, the pirates had
brought back the fun-loving
boy she had been unable to
reach.
The pirates discussed
Burrill's e-mail a few weeks
later during their annual
pirate debriefing.
Each pirate recalled
meeting Long in the park.
They remembered his
eagerness to participate in
the day's events and how
hard he'd struggled to meet
their demands.
"As we went around the
group, every one of us had


* custom web sites
* domain registration
* web site hosting
* technical support

THE STAR
'135 W.Hwy 98
Port St Joe, Florida


* e-commerce
* maintenance
* flash animation
* web site updates

THr T isn'L Apalachicola
Tff J Carrabelle
,129 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, Florida


From Page 2A

interacted with him and
it was just really special,"
remembered Tommy Davis.
Pirates Send a Present
from the Sea
In her e-
mail, Burrill
told the
pirates that
herfamilywas
staying in a
Mexico Beach
rental house.
Wanting to '.
do something
special for
Long, the 4
p i r a t e s
hatched a
plan.
Tommy
and Carol
Davis found
a jewelry
box shaped
like a pirate
chest and
filled it with
treasure a
sword, beads,
photos of
the crew and
other pirate '- ,
goodies.T A. "
Th ey
wrapped it in
a weathered Michael join
piece of
brown paper
and tied it with a string of
rustic twine.
Dressed in plain clothes,
the couple took the package
to the rental home.
At the park, the pirates
had told Long that they were
embarking that evening on
their ship, the Merry Wench.
Because Long had never
seen the Davises out of
costume, they would tell him
that they were travelers who
met the pirates in Mexico, and
were delivering the, treasure
chest on their behalf.
As it turned out, Long


was not home when Tommy
and Carol arrived, but he
believed their story.
For the next few weeks,
Long carried his treasure
chest wherever he went.
Pirates who E-mail
The pirates continued
to communicate with Long


re-mailed that he hoped the
pirates were okay.
Tommy Davis replied with
a fantastical tale of Capt.
Reid's heroism. Reid, said
Davis, had sailed through the
eye of the storm and brought
his crew to safety.
'"That's why Capt. Jack


date.
With time, Arnold's friends
and co-workers understood
the reason behind his strange
lapses into pirate-speak.
"The word's getting out,
so it's becoming a little less
conspicuous," said Arnold.
Occasionally, the pirates
slipped up.
Lamberson
sent e-mails
from his
personal
account
instead of his
Capt. Reid
account;


ied the pirates for a group photo at this year's Independence on the Coast festival.


throughout the year.
Long e-mailed them
frequently, inquiring about
their newest adventures and
general well-being.-
The pirates replied in
character and blind-copied
their e-mails to the rest of the
group to keep their stories
consistent.
Lamberson,, a self-
described "detail guy,"
consulted maps of Africa to
make his adventure tales
seem authentic.
"If you're going to
lie, you've got to lie with.
accuracy," he quipped.
During the tumultuous
2005 hurricane season, Long


walks the way he does,
he's still getting over his
seasickness," Davis wrote.
A project manager for
an engineering firm, Arnold
could not check his e-mail
as often as the others, so
he gave Long his cell phone
number.
When Long's name
popped up on his phone,
Arnold quickly transformed
into Greybeard.
"Arrgh, Michael, how' you
be?"
A bachelor, Arnold
often found himself in the
uncomfortable: position of
speaking in a pirate brogue
in front of an unsuspecting


Iron In Your Water?

*Rental,,

Lease K I T O

Purchase

N* on-electric "r i
equipment


We Can Help





Crystal Water Conditioning

800-210-6601 e iOKINETICdO




No one thinks that a catastrophic injury
or accidental death will strike them
until it happens.


We have been helping families facing
tragedy since 1973. We have offices
throughout NW Florida.


On the web at Kerrigan.com




Keigan,Estess,Rankin,


McLeod &Thompson,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW



202 Marina Drive
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


(850) 229-3333
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience.


Arnold was
caught off
guard when
Long asked
him about
a recent
tr easu r,e
hunting
expedition.
Most
of the time,
the pirates
managed
to make
things right
with quick
thinking and
ingenuity.
Long -was
willing to
overlook
o t h e r
inconsisten-
cies. ,


Need to Build a web site?


or Need Help with an Existing web site?


Contact

Katie Flament


596-7179


'(V


Burrill
monitored Long's e-mails,
and sent frequent updates on
her son's activities.
When she reported that
Long was having trouble in
school, the pirates shared the
life lessons they'd learned at
sea.
"If he's having difficulty
in school, we'll tell him how
difficult we thought school
was it's a lot like sailing the
ship, you've got to keep on
course," said Arnold.
The pirates encouraged
Long to study hard and
eat his vegetables. In their
letters, they called him "Little
Captain."
Long soaked in the
wisdom of his newfound
friends. He printed each of
their e-m'ails on letter-size
,paper and :posted- them, in
chronological order, on a 17-
fo.t wall in his, bedroom.
When he found an e-mail
out of sequence, he took them
all down and started over.
A Mother's Gratitude
In 'her e-mails, Burrill
reported on the markeOi
'changes in Long's behavior.'
His conduct grades
in school improved, he
now volunteered for public
speaking assignments and lie
was more outgoing than he'd.
been in years.
Long's teachers marveled
at his new-found confidence,
and Burrill gave the pirates
all the credit.
Burrillbelieved the pirates
restored Long to his former
self, and helped her come tb
terms with her feelings for.
Long's father.
"I gave up all 'of th4t
bitterness and hatred that
was consuming me," said
Burrill. "Not 'only did they
bring back this boy that I was
trying to love out, but they
gave the family their mom
back."
".The pirates were
overwhelmed by Burrill's
letters.
"You'd cry sometimes
reading them because you
realized how much better
things are at home, and how :a
simple gesture we did would
make such a big impact,"
said Lamberson. "It just blew
our minds."
Back for the 4th
The pirates worried
that their act was placing
undue pressure on Burrill.
They didn't want her to feel
obligated to make the long
trip to Port St. Joe every July
4.
But Burrill had made
her 2006 Independence Day,
plans months in advance. *
"This year, there was
no question where we were
going," said Burrill.
The pirates promised
to make Long an honorary
member of their crew, and he
was eager to slip into his red
and white striped Greybeard
pants, a Christmas present

(See LITTLE CAPTAIN on Page 13A)


,: ,


0e s -a M S he :e- fa 0 .


'%AMmeow


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


12A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyJuy2,06







Established 1937 Servin~i Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 13A


Little Captain From Pge 12A


from Arnold.
The pirates planned to
meet at the Marina on July
4 at 2 p.m. to board their
vessel. They asked Long to
ride with them and carry the
pirate flag ashore.
With no funds available
to rent a pirate ship, the
pirates were sailing on Bill
Kennedy's aptly named boat,
the Uncivil.
To prevent Long
from seeing them drive to
the Marina in their cars,
Lamberson told Burrill to
wait until 2:10 before arriving
at the Marina.
Unfortunately, Arnold
didn't get the memo, and he
greeted Long and his mother
while standing outside his
pick-up truck.
Long was too excited to
notice. He ran up to Arnold
wearing his look-a-like pants
and a huge grin.
The pirates told Long that
the Merry Wench had broken
down outside the Cape and
they caught a ride to shore.
On board the Uncivil,
Lamberson altered his
traditional pre-invasion
ritual. He instructed the
pirates to keep in character
and nixed his "It's Showtime"
pep talk.
Lamberson slipped only
once, calling Davis "Tommy"
instead of "Jack," but Long
did not seem to notice.
Once in the park, Long
fulfilled his pirate duties. He
handed out beads, helped
with the booth, and greeted
the crowds.
When children came to
him with their treasure maps,
he told them the spots where
treasure had been found.
"He was approaching
:other children and interacting
with them just as we had
,interacted with liim," said
,Carol Davis.
The crew noticed a
'change in Long's personality.
They described him as more
outgoing and more talkative.
'His stutter even seemed less
pronounced.
"I think you can see more
of the little boy now," said
Arnold.


To thank the pirates
for all they had done for
him, Long presented them
a special gift: a driftwood
plaque adorned with photos,
shells and seahorses.
"It was just very special,"
said Arnold. "He's just a very
special little boy."
Other Michaels
As he sailed into Frank
Pate Park this July 4,
Lamberson was preoccupied
by a single thought.
"On board, I realized that
it wasn't all about Michael
now," said Lamberson.
Long's story helped
Lamberson realize that his
work as a pirate could have a
greater impact.
"We feel like there's a lot
of kids that need what we
offer," he said.
Lamberson calls his new-
found mission a "ministry."
He hopes to nurture children
-who, like Long, are "a little
behind the scenes, a little
.shier," and make a lasting
impact in their lives.
"I told the pirates, There's
going to be other Michaels in
the park this year and we're
going to look for them,'" he
said.
Though not all of his
fellow pirates are comfortable
with the term, Arnold also
describes his work as a
"ministry."
"What we're finding is
there's a tremendous need
out there," said Arnold, who
recounted a memorable
experience at last year's St.
Andrews Pirate Festival.
Though all the pirates
know Long's remarkable
story, they do not all know
the story of another young
child whose life was touched
by a pirate.
S In St. Andrews, Arnold
found himself being shadowed
by 'a young girl and he wasn't
sure why.
The girl, named Chloe,
followed him throughout the
day and finally summoned
enough courage to approach
him.
Arnold spoke to Chloe
in his pirate brogue and
she seemed to relax in his


THINK OF IT AS'

AN OWNER'S MANUAL

FOR YOUR MONEY.












The free Consumer Action Handbook. It's in print and online
at ConsumerAction.gov. For your free copy, order online at
ConsumerAction.gov; write to Handbook, Pueblo, CO 81009; or
call toll-free 1 (888) 8 PUEBLO.


A public service message from the U.S. General Services Administration.


presence.
Later, Chloe's mother
pulled Arnold aside.
"Her mother told me that
her father had hung himself
six months before and I was
the first guy that she'd taken

up with," said Arnold.
"After you hear that, it's
hard to let loose that hand."



- .
2"2 : '- ?" : :" ? .


Arnold has been in
contact with Chloe's mother.
and hopes to see her again
at the St. Andrews Pirate
Festival this fall.
His experience with
Chloe underscored the lesson
he'd early learned from Long
- that pirates can make a
difference.

n-~ ~
/ ,






L


Michael (right) holds aloft the pirate flag
the crowd at the 2006 festival.


as Capt. Jack works


"I'm finding other children
that are extremely touched
by our presence. It's become
a very special role to play."
Something to Believe In
Burrill keeps two pirate
scrapbooks one for herself
and one for Long.
Hers contains names
Long has never heard, names
like Scott Lamberson, Bud
Arnold and Carol and Tommy
Davis.
She plans to show her
son the scrapbook when the
time is right.
Burrill knows that Long
cannot sustain his belief
in pirates much longer. He
is 11, an age when most
children have lost their faith
in fairy tales.
The pirates have offered
Burrill their support when the
day arrives, but are willing to
let the fantasy continue.
"Let him believe as long


as he wants to believe, and if
we. need to sit down and tell
him why we did this we will,"
said Lamberson.
When the truth is finally
told, Lamberson hopes Long
will join his pirate band, and
help further their ministry.
"If he understands it's
pretend, we'll say, There
might be a kid in this park
that you need to help this
year,'" Lamberson said.
Burrill believes her son
will accept the truth with
some sorrow, but knows that
he will always feel a special
bond with his pirate friends.
"I think there will be
a little sadness that goes
with that, but he's going to
love them that much more,
knowing what they did for
him.
"He's never going to
forget."


Hannon Insurance is
proud to be one of the
oldest, continuously
owned family businesses
in Gulf County. We pride
ourselves on providing the
best personal service pos-
sible to our clients.
Take advantage 'of
our FREE quotes for any
insurance service. Then
shop for ,insurance like
you would anything else.
Compare our rates. You'll
appreciate our low-pres-
sure service.


The Best Coverage. The Best Price.
The Best Company. The Best Agent.


FirstAFloridian H a indo
TraveersCompany Insurance

1850-227-1133
Roy SmithAndy SmithfKaren ClarkeLaura Ramsey Cindy Ward


STAR


Gulf County's Best Source For Local News


for over 68 Years


Now home delivered every


Thursday Morning





Call 227-1278


*Home Owner's

*Seasonal

Properties

*Windstorm

*Flood

*Auto

*Boats

*Small Business

*Renters


P~~9n ~~~~I$I~PCIP~BBBAUjiJ


The tar Pot S. Jo, F hurdayJul 27 206 -13A1


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I


y


01


-: 1.


HE







14A Ihe btar, ort St. Joe, I-L Inursaay, July z/, zuu

THE FORECAST


RECORD
High: 95' (1990)
Low: 71' (1953)


TODAY


(,vi


Partly sunny, hot and
humid
High: 920; Low: 740


TOMORROW

'^
*' 5 *


- Partly sunny with an
isolated storm possible
High: 910; Low: 74


SATURDAY


Partly sunny with an
isolated storm possible
High: 890; Low: 740


SUNDAY



I/ ,


Chance of scattered
thunderstorms
High: 890; Low: 750


MONDAY


c V1



Chance of scattered
thunderstorms
High: 90; Low: 760


TUESDAY






Chance of scattered
thunderstorms
High: 90; Low: 750


WEDNESDAY





Chance of scattered
thunderstorms
High: 890; Low: 750


Today's high and tonight's low temperatures


S -- -lerprse .-- Dothaf-.
98 4 terprise'. 92, 70

93,-74'


Bainbr~ihge
94i7fl B-


Defunmqk Springs .
.-- .-'v -- ar a. _-
-, ,, i 93.7 1 1 .. .
%-ONiceville .
.- 93.f3- "'_, Crystal Lake '. r -sto
932 93 -s Tallaha ee
Beach ,' -570 ,
'".. _' Wewa itchka i
Panama City, 9/75 -
9376 -...


Pensacola
89'74


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 7/24 na/na/0.18
Sunday 7/23 89/75/0.25
Saturday 7/22 92/74/0.38
Friday 7/21 92/72/0.00
Tnursdjv 7/20 92/73/0.00
Wednesday 7/19 ................... 92/74/0.00
Tuesday 7/18 91/73/0.00

SUN & MOON
Sunrise Sunset
Thursday 7/27... .6:58 a.m.. .8:38 p.m.
Friday 7/28 ... .6:58 a.m.. .8:37 p.m.
Saturday 7/29 ,,.. .6:59 a.m.. .8:36 p.m.
Sunday 7/30 .... .6:59 a.m.. .8:36 p.m.
Monday, 731.....7:00 a.m.. .8:35 p.m.
Tuesday 8/1......7:01 a.m.. .8:34 p.m.
Wednesday 8/2.. .7:01 a.m.. ..:33 p.m.

Moonrise Moonset
Thursday 2 ... 9 05 ., r,.. 10.21 p.m.
Friday, T-2 .9 59 a rni .10:47 p.m.
Saturday 7 29 ...1i052 a i. 11 12p rn.
Sunday 7/30 .... .11:44 a.m. 11:38 p.m.
Monday 7 31... .12 37 pm -
Tuesday 8/1 ..... 1-32 p m. .12-04 a.m
Wednesday 8.2 .2:30 p.m. 12 34 a m.


Port St. Joe* "

92 76


APALACHICOLA RIVER
Site Flood Stg. Stage Chg.
Woodruff Tailwater 66.0 39.38 -0.01
Chattahoochee 39.39 -0.01
Blountstown 15.0 0.95 0.07
Wewahitchka na na
I OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
Thomasville, 15.0 1.67 0.17
Concord 23.97 0.29
Havana 25.0 -11.63 0.34
Bloxham 22.0 3.01 -0.17


11E

Extreme


The UV index forecasts the
ultraviolet radiation coming
from the sun. The higher the
number the more risk of sun
damage to your skin.


1 23 4 5 6.-7 8 9 101 12
Low MIIril' Hijh V/r Hr E.lll i,



First Full Last New


Aug 2 ,,iAug. 9 Aug.15 Aug 23


Frid;
Hi


Albany 92
Apalachicola 95
Bainbridge 92
Bristol 99
Columbus 89
Crystal Lake 91
Defuniak Sp. 94
Dothan 90
Enterprise 98
Ft. Walton Bch.96
Gainesville 91
Jacksonville 92
Marianna 92
Mobile 89
Montgomery 93
Newport 98
Niceville 91:
Panama City 93
Pascagoula 96
Pensacola 90
Port St. Joe 91
Tallahassee 94
1/aldui,5 93
Wewahitchka 92
Wilma 92


ay
Lo Otlk
72 pc
76 t
71 pc
78 c
72 pc.
77 c
74 pc
72 pc
73 pc .
73 t


72 pc
74 pc
73 pc
73 t
71 pc
78 c
76; c
75 pc
71 t
74 t
74 c
71 pc
71. pc
78 c
78 c


Saturday
Hi Lo Otlk
93 72 pc
89 76 t
93 73 pc
10078 c
91 73 pc
92 76 c
95 75 c
92 72 pc
95 75 t
90 74 t
91 71,,pc
92 73 pc
91 74 'c
90 73 t
90 72 pc
98 76 c
92 76 c
91 76 pc
92 71 t
90, 74 t
89 74 c
93 73 pc
92 72 pc
92, 78 c
93 78 c


ST. JOSEPH BAY
Thursday A.M. ft. P.M. It.
High 11:38 2.0-
Low 9:55 0.0 -
Friday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 12:03 2.0-- -
Low 9:53 0.0
Saturday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 12:26 1.0- ---
Low 9:38 0.0 -
Sunday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 12:48 1.0 .
Low 9:08 0.0
Monday A.M. ft.. P.M. ft.
High 5:31 1.0
Low 8:08 1.0
Tuesday A.M. ft. P.M.? ft.
High 4:30 1.0- --
Low 1:51 1.0- -
Wed. A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 4:19 1.0-
Low 2:22 0.0 ---


All forecasts, maps and graphics
@2006 Weather Central, Inc.
For a personalized forecast,
goto:
Wv rap ?ll n lTl ,l ,l.)rll ill-lr l


I


I
I I UM
n


Hot and humid weather will be experienced over the eastern half of the nation on Thursday. Widely scattered showers and
thunderstorms will be experienced from the northeastern U.S. to the Gulf Coast. More thunderstorms will be experienced in the
Southwest while the 'Junrr.e.vt Jillll remain sunny and hot.


City
AlbuquerqUe
Anchorage
Atlanril
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buhalo
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dayton
Denriver
Des Moines
Detroit .



City
A':apulco
Amsterdam
Airens
Baghdad
Bangkol,
Beijing
Berlin
Brussels
B' Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Dublin


Today
Hi Lo
91 68
69 51
86 69
91 71
97 64
90 70
99 70
88 74
84 69
91 59
89 72
85 71
89 69
85 70,
90 61'
91 70
85 70


Today
Hi Lo.
;7 75'
85 65
91 73
11486
92 80
'89 73
87 68
87 65
70 52
97 73
80 58
71 53


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
90" 68 pc.
70 54 pc
85 70 pc
89 72 pc
94 64 s
90 70 pc
101 69 s
89 74 t
;83 67 pc
93 60 s
88 71 pc
86 70 t
86 68 t
86 68 t
.95 64 s
90 69 pc,
91 72 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
88 77 pc
79 58 sh
92 74 s
11585 s
91 78 t
93 74 pc
85 64 t
78 61 sh
65 46 s',
99 74 s
82 57 t
72 54 sh


City
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Omaha
Orlando



City
Geneva
Helsinki
Hong, Kong,
Jerusalem
Kabul
Lima
London
Madrid
Me'rI.o CiTy
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi


Today
Hi Lo
95 73
74 51
88 75
87 70
92 72
10786
91 74
77 66
90 73
90 79
89 69
92 68
88 72
91 76
89 76
94 73
93 75


Today
Hi Lo
90 64
70 52
87 751
95 74
100 71
69 55
'76 55
98 70
83 57
87 65
73 51
94 76


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
94 74 pc
78 52 pc
86 15 s
89 70 pc
93 74 pc
102 83 pc
91 74 t
76 66 pc
9( 75 pc
89 79 pc .
87 67 pc
92 69 s
87 72 pc
89 76 t
90 75 t
95 72 pc
92 75 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
87 64 t,
73 54 pc
89 76 t
96 73 s
103 73 s
68 56 pc.
75 56 sn
93 65 pc
78 56 t
88 64 1
75 58 sh
95 73 I


City
Pniladelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis,
Salt Lk City
San Diego
. San Fran.
Seattle
Spokane
Tucson
Wash., D.C.
Wichita



City
Oslo
Paris
Rio
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronio
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw


Orl3ndo
93/75
Miami
90/79

Today
Hi Lo
90 74
101 85
84 68.
81 67
85 59
10472
94 73
99 64
95 75
10072
79 71
67 57
80 59
93 62
93.75
92 73
*99 74


Today
Hi Lo Otik
77 .57. t
84 63 t
85 71 s
92 73 pc
80 63
89 77
67 52 pc
87 69 pc
86 65 t
.75 61 s
92 66 pi:
86 64 .pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
89 74 pc
101 85 *pc
86 68 t
81 63 t
82 58 s
98 64 s
91 73 pc
98 63 pc
97 77 t
10174 s
78 72 pc
68 57 pc
79 57 s
91 60 s
93 75 pc
89 74 pc
98 74 pc


iGO-Q --
Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
79 58 sn
79 56 sh
84 72 s
93 72 pc
82 64 pc
89 78 t
68 51 pc
85 68 t
85 65 t
73 57 pc.,
90 65 pc
90 65 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS .I.. 'i Cr.. P-''l L1' -L''',c.i,,..',. n.r .'sI =,v.- P:tI1, rdi, r.i,r*l:.m:W=Windy


FWC Exposure
"Fishing for Freedom." symbolize tU
a statewide group of 1,600 constitution
citizens concerned about tion of pow
Florida's environment, econo- another fli
my, citizens and constitution the "Due P
are planning a Key West to by both th
Tallahassee march in October Constitutior
to coincide with the Florida flag will s:
governor election campaigns. lions of juv
The march will be designed FWC are ii
to expose the Florida Fish Florida con
and Wildlife Conservation to unnecess
Commission's (FWC) refusal in seine nel
to provide due process, obey lation of thi
any checks and balances in The M.
government, and their inten- include:
tional forcing of commercial 1. Edu,
fishermen to unnecessarily kill an agency
and waste of the state's marine of Powers,
resource. acting alone
The march will originate sight, threa
from the southern most tip of constitution
Key West and will end; at the tinue to e:
Capital's steps, where upon form.
arrival, three flags that will 2.Shar
be carried throughout Florida are guara
will be delivered. One flag will cess" and


March Planned for October


he U.S. and Florida
Ls requiring separa-
ers in government,
ag will symbolize
process" guaranteed
e U.S and Florida
ns, and the third
ymbolize the mil-
renile fish that the
itentionally forcing
nmercial fishermeuT
sarily kill and waste
ts each year in vio-
e constitution.
arch's major goals,

cate the public than
without Separation
such as the FWC,
e without ANY over-
tens to destroy our
i if allowed to con-
xist in its present,

e that all Americans
nteed ,"due pro-,
'"equal protection


of the law," yet the FWC have,
REFUSED to allow ANY con-
stitutional due process for citi-
zens it governs since 1999.
3. Expose the FWC's gross
and intentional mismanage-
ment of our state's resources
using the court proven exam-
ple of 98 million juvenile fish
unnecessarily being killed and
wasted for every seven million
pounds of legal fish brought to


No More Towing
Park It Here
Under The Bridge


market.
Some of the other issues/
stories the march will expose
include:
Documented horror sto-
ries of how the FWC, an unac-
countable agency with its own
law enforcement branch have
destroyed innocent lives.
How the FWC .have
"thumbed. their nose" at ,the
legislature and refused to obey


J 624 Grouper Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
eugeneiraffieldfisherie$.com


Secured Fence Indoor A Outdoor Storage FJ~icilm
Outdoor 13toraage HaWe, (BV's (her- 28,000 nqalw % Sprtnkl~eri Trailer. ionIu'l
: aDOa14 Indoor storage (Bongo on $50 per Jmonb 0u1Ide 5
$3.00 per EL. a month I raiser Onl
Q7.00 per ft. *amondrth flotue
Ieagth Onll
C a e (U qJIe (8150) 227-33157 UoL 5ibout One 1111lonil Fir~ee Stonstr
LOcatrd .,ncler 150 briag m hirghbrid View6 next to Port St Joe & only mi'u~tei "on' St. loscpn RiV untooramp


our elected lawmakers in an
attempt to create their own
communists" environment of
tyranny.
'Expose that the head
of FWC Law Enforcement'


Lee'

6On


admits to arresting citizens
under PROPOSED LAWS, anld
show that the commander hai
promised the Legislature--NOT
to do so just before the arrests
were made..


Trust Your Car to the Experts in
Diagnostic Service and Reppir.
Our complete diagnostc and repair center Is
the smart choice in automotive repair. We
use the latest factory-approved techniques
and state-of-the-art equipment to perform
diagnosticc tests
and rerpairs quickly and correctly. '
>


850-227-9727


WEATHER
Temps for July 27


NORMAL
High: 90'
Low: 74'


License#MV52258
Tune-Ups, Front End
Alignment, Tires & Brakes
'1 ;. u l r, :.5. urc ar- :in ir. ie- .t



Lee's One Stop Auto Care, Inc
274 Commerce Drive Port St. Joe
227-9696


-





L'


~""~


CIII~B~Wl~a~?B~i~~''; ''


I


Establish 797 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


IAR -- n- C, I-- C? TL ....4-. 1.1,, 7 I~f)





Pet of the Week 4B


Obituaries


Law Enforcement 8B


Fctnhlischer 793.7 .Servin Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 SECTION B


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
It's sort of like Sisyphus, chained forever to
the mountain, trying to roll the great boul-
der uphill for eternity, or so it seems.
In this case the city of Mexico Beach plays
Sisyphus, the need to rebuild the beach after
major storm damage is the boulder, and the
sand, well, the sand really is a mountain.
Last year, the city of Mexico Beach built
an emergency sand berm from the east side of
the city canal to just east of Toucan's to try to
protect the beach, the houses, and two motels
lining the coast after Hurricane Dennis hit in
July.
This year, the city is building a second
berm, a storm protection berm, trying to shore
up the beach before another major hurricane
hits.
But with the work 90 percent complete,
the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP) gave Chris Forehand, vice
president of city engineering firm Preble-Rish,
verbal notification that the almost completed
berm was not acceptable, even though the
berm's original design and location had been
approved and permitted by both FDEP and
Florida Fish and Wildlife (FWL).
According to a letter from FDEP to Forehand
on July 13, the city, FDEP and FWL represen-
tative Dr. Robbin Trindell, discussed the berm
project because of the "discovery that the berm
was being constructed in such a manner that it
interfered with sea turtle nesting by obstructing
the free passage of hatchlings back to the water
and altering the beach topography."
The letter acknowledged that the work in
progress had been permitted, but that "staff
had determined that the location of berm
immediately adjacent to the shoreline, while
consistent with the permit plans filed with the
permit application, does not meet the landward
location requirement ... interfered with sea tur-
tle nesting, and does not provide the longevity
and stability of a storm protection berm located
in a more landward location...
"Staff also finds that the berm's proximity
to the waterline creates ideal conditions for the
erosion of its seaward slope and the creation


. ....










/-.- -_ ,' .' -,












Marie Logan/The Star
Berm construction is almost complete at the El Governor Motel.


.- I ,.





S .-
.- ,"^.- A..^ ..











of scarps cut into this slope," the letter con-
tinued.
To correct the problem, Mexico Beach
must now relocate the berms (already con-
structed) to landward locations immediately
adjacent to the emergency berms constructed
last year, while avoiding areas within a 10-foot
radius of marked sea turtle nests, or working
in any manner that would disturb the several
nests scattered through the project area.
The city also must submit a completed sea
turtle ":.htmg plan and work with FWL to cor-
rect non-compliant isea turtlel lights within the

(See SANDY BLUES on Page 3B)
(See SANDY BLUES on Page 3B)


The following candidates have qualified for


upcoming primary and general elections in


Gulf County:


County Commission,
District 2
Jerry Pridgeon (Dem)
Tom Semmes (NPA)
Billy Traylor (Rep)

County Commission,
District 4
Nathan Peters, Jr. (Dem)

School Board, District 1
Martin Eric Bidwell (NPA)
Danny Little (NPA)

School Board, District 2
George Cox (NPA)

School Board, District 5
Charlotte Pierce (NPA)
John Wright (NPA)

U.S. Senator
Leroy Collins, Jr. (Rep)
Floyd Ray Frazier (NPA)
Katherine Harris (Rep)
William "Will" McBride
(Rep)
Peter Monroe (Rep)
Brian Moore (NPA)
Bill Nelson (Dem)
Belinda Noah (NPA)


Lawrence Scott (WRI)
Bernard Senter (WRI)
Roy Tanner (NPA)

U.S. Representative
Allen Boyd (Dem)

Governor
Karl C.C. Behm (NPA)
Piotr Blass (WRI)
Bob (WRI)
Glenn Burkett (Dem)
Carol Castagnero (Dem)
Charlie Crist (Rep)
John M. Crotty (Dem)
Jim Davis (Dem)
Richard Paul Dembinsky
(NPA)
Tom Gallagher (Rep)
Max Linn (REF)
W. Papa-Roqui Maneiro II
(WRI)
Omari Musa (WRI)
Vernon Palmer (Rep)
C.C. Reed (WRI)
John Wayne Smith/
James J. Kearney (NPA)
Rod Smith (Dem)
Michael W. St. Jean (Rep)
Atlee Yarrow (WRI)


Attorney General
Walter "Skip" Campbell
(Dem)
Merrilee Ehrlich (Dem)
Bill McCollum (Rep)

Chief Financial Officer
Milt Bauguess (Rep)
Randy Jdhnson (Rep)
Tom Lee (Rep)
Alex Sink (Dem)

Commissioner of
Agriculture
Charles H. Bronson (Rep)
Eric Copeland (Dem)

State Senator, District 6
Alfred "Al" Lawson, Jr.
(Dem)

State Representative,
District 6
George Mac Brogdon
(WRI)
William Earl Fisher, Jr.
(Rep)
Ray Guillory (Dem)
Janice L. Lucas (Dem)
Jimmy Patronis (Rep)
Steve Runion (WRI)


Cameron Skinner (Rep)
Lee Sullivan (Rep)

Supreme Court Justice
Fred R. Lewis (NOP)
Barbara Joan Pariente
(NOP)
Peggy A. Quince (NOP)

District Court of Appeal,
District 001
Edwin B. Browning, Jr.
(NOP)
Brad Thomas (NOP)
Peter D. Webster (NOP)

Circuit Judge
Circuit: 014 Group: 003
Richard H. Albritton
(NOP)

Circuit: 014 Group: 008
Glenn L. Hess (NOP)

Circuit: 014 Group: 011
Christopher N. Patterson
(NOP)
Elijah Smiley (NOP)


Cb[UL)IISIIUUo iilu i uYly ul


4B


F







' mI e DTar, ron OT. JOe, rL II*uriLuy, Juiy /t,. u, -y-


Celebrating Innovation In



Palliative And End-of-life Care:


Covenant Hospice Recognized


Pensacola, FL -
Covenant Hospice today
was named a Circle of Life
Award Honoree. Covenant
Hospice was recognized
for its innovative program
that improves the care of
patients near the end of
life or with life-threatening
conditions.
The Circle of Life Award
celebrates programs across
the nation that have made
great strides in palliative
and end-of-life care. The
awards are supported by
the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation in Princeton,
N.J and are sponsored
by the American Hospital
Association, the American
Association of Homes and
Services for the Aging,
the American Medical


Association and the National
Hospice and Palliative Care
Organization. Covenant
Hospice is one of seven
organizations honored this
year by the Circle of Life
Award Program.
Covenant Hospice, a
not-for-profit organization,
currently serves 35 counties
throughout South Alabama,
Northwest Florida and the
Big Bend area of Florida.
In 2005, Covenant served
over 5,000 terminally ill
patients and their families.
Covenant Hospice was
chosen by a selection com-
mittee made up of lead-
ers from medicine, nurs-
ing, social work, and health
administration. The com-
mittee focused on innova-
tive programs that respect


patient goals and prefer-
ences, provide comprehen-
sive care, acknowledge and
address the family or care-
givers' concerns and needs,
and build systems and
mechanisms of support to
continue the program for
future patients and caregiv-
ers.
"It's a privilege to be
recognized for the work
and ideas we feel are so
important to our com-
munity. This is an award
for everyone involved with
Covenant Hospice, and we
hope the success of our
program helps inspire oth-
ers in this area," said Dale
0. Knee, President & CEO
of Covenant Hospice.
This is the seventh
year for the Circle of Life


Award. For more informa-
tion on the Circle of Life
Award, visit www.aha.org/
circleoflife.
Covenant Hospice is a
not-for-profit organization
dedicated to providing com-
prehensive, compassion-
ate services to patients and
loved ones during times of
life-limiting illnesses. The
focus of Covenant Hospice
is to enable its patients to
live as fully and comfort-
ably as possible, to provide
dignified palliative care, to
assist patients' loved ones
in coping with end-of-life
issues and the eventual
death of the patient, and to
improve care for all patients
at the end of their lives by
example and education:


*~oa'4e hae 4ie, f9 10 "a dam uc/

q4a1wd~aPat4~a ae -2adc4 &"wera b&.


From The Port St. Joe Lions Den


Greetings to the readers
of the Star from the Port St.
Joe Lions Club. Our club
is one of many thousands
of Lions Clubs in the
world. The official title
of what you know as the
Lions is the International
Association of Lions Clubs.
Lions Clubs are community
service organizations and
their motto is "We Serve".
Many associates Lions
with services that provide
.assistance to those who


such as local scholarship
funds for worthy students,
funds for community youth
athletic teams, and hearing
aids, to name but a few.
Our club strives to use our
assets in a way that serves
the broadest part of our
community. It is my hope
that this monthly column
about our activities will
educate our community
as a whole about Lionism
and our Port St. Joe Lions
Club.


July 5th meeting featured
a presentation by Steve
Brinkmeyer, coach of the
Dixie Ponytails girls' youth
softball teams. Three
teams from Port St. Joe
were tournament eligible.
The Lions Club voted to
donate $300 for each team,
a total of $900. Our July
12th meeting guests were
Sandy Quinn and William
Thursday, coaches for
boys youth baseball. Two
Port St. Joe teams were


President of Gulf Coast
Community College. Port
St. Joe Lions Club has
had a close relationship
with the college and their
scholarship program.
Our Lions Club was most
pleased to provide a
scholarship endowment gift
of $25,000 to the college
for worthy students. At
our third and final meeting
of the month the Lions
voted to cook scallops for


are visually challenged in So what did we do in tournament eligible and the the annual Ciamer 01 T
some way. That has been July? Jimi Anderson was club voted to $300 for each Commerce Scallop Festival, 4
the major feature of Lions, elected the club president team. Our distinguished as a community service for 'Nj a. T urns.
but these clubs assist the along with new officers and guest of that meeting the chamber.
community in many ways a board of directors. The was Dr. Bob McSpadden, TwitNbe hang a Diney Prncess party t the park in Hneyvly 31, 2006. Shle
on July 29, 2006 at 4pm. T'Nizjah is the daughter of Nikki

Boyd Votes To Protect Our Pledge Myers and Tremayne Pace of

Pledge Protection Act passes in the House of Representatives t t


WASHINGTON, D.C.-
Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-FL) today voted in favor
of the Pledge Protection Act
(HR 2389), 'which would
prohibit the Supreme Court
and other federal district:
and appeals courts from
ruling on cases challenging


the constitutionality of the
Pledge of Allegiance. This
legislation passed by a vote
of 260 to 167., ,
The Pledge Protection
Act was introduced in
response to a 2002 decision
by the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Ninth Circuit that


NEW! See The Star On Line at

www.StarFL.com

.. ..-.- .*.* -. ..: "-. -. '* '.

WEWA MEDICAL CENTER
Dr. Peter H. Obesso, MD .
Echo Saindon, PA-C
S Hours: MNonday though Fridav-8:00 a.m. Lo 5 00 p m .p-
.-z
SNewu Patiewm Welcome Please Call 639-5828 for an Appoinment
Medicare. Medicaid. BCBS &: Sliding Fee



-For allyour

Advertising needs...

Be Sure to

..Contactyour

Port St. Joe*Wewahitchka
Cape San Blas*Downtown Apalachicola
Account Executive

Kim Tharpe


227-1278

THE STAR THETAN
135 W. wy 98 129 Commerce Street
Port St Joe, Florida Apalachicola, Florida


the phrase "under God"
was unconstitutional. The
Supreme Court reversed
that ruling in June 2004 on
.technical, notconstitutional,
grounds.
"For the past five
decades, children and
adults alike have recited
the Pledge ofAllegiance,"


said Congressman
Boyd. "It represents
our patriotism and
commitment to this great
country. I was proud to
vote today to protect our
Pledge of Allegiance-our
nation's statement of
shared national values."


To have your Wedding or
Birthday photo print in color
there will be a $10.00 Fee.
Deadline is Monday at 5:00 p.m.
for Thursday's paper














Power Wherever You Go
Additional models of Honda Generators in Stock!




EU2000ii EM7O000IsAB
2000 Watts (16.7A) of Honda 7000 Wans (45 8122 9 A) 120/240V
inverter 120V AC Power of inverter Power
Super Quiet 53 to 59 dB(A) Powerful Honda Commercial
Lightweight (less lhan 47 lbs.) OHV Engine
Eco-ThrotleTM Runs Up to Standard Electric Start with Remote
15 Hours on 1 gal. of Fuel Start Capability
670-8100
131 Highway 98, Eastpoint
..4r,,.ir,( -i. f..u r.. ,-,.,s,.iiiai wefings.com
Connection of a generator to house power requires a iraosfer device to avoid possible injury to power company personnel. Consult a
qualified electrician. For optiu performance and safety, we recommend you read the owners manual before operating your Honda
Power Equipment- (c) 2006 American Honda Motuo Co., Inc.


Satellite Pharmacy Re-opening
The Satellite Refill Pharmacy at the Base Exchange has been
renovated and will be open for business July 24. All refill opera-
tions at the Main Clinic will be terminated at that time.
The Refill Pharmacy operating hours .are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday Friday. The automated refill call-in number is 283-
7177 or (800) 356-5273.
New Thrift Shop Hours
New hours are: Tuesday and Thursday only from 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. No consignments will be accepted unless you are
permanently changing station in or out. For details or appoint-
ments, call 286-5888.
Limited Space at the Marina
There is limited parking at the Beacon Beach Marina due
to the pavement of the parking area. The public boat launch
is closed; however, the private boat launch will be available for
usage for all Tyndall patronage. The Marina Grill is open. The
estimated completion date of construction is July 28. For any
further questions or concerns, please feel free to call the marina
at 283-3059:


THle BAyOa RESTAtURANT

Sc&Ilfc iNe 91iING IN t UNIQue OTl40TM pteRe
Specializing in authentic Cajun and Creole cuisine
Come try our vgry own Shrimp Gumbo, Crawfish Etouffe and more
'fl well as a full fll mflerican line up of Stgaks, Seafood, Specialty Salads,
Gourmet Sandwiches and a Child's menu.
Conveniently located on mainstreet in Wewahitehka. One block liorth of tiwy
22. Call ahead for business hours and daily lunch and dinner specials.
850-639-9444








50 ton Travel Lift
A Yachts: 30 65 feet
Larger Vessels: 1,000 ton
Marine Rail .


Iwww.PSJBoatworks.com
l q ~ www.GCShip.com
Tohatsu outboard dealer
At the junction of Gulf County Canal and
ICW near White City
Call first and ask for Red orTroy


Wmam


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years.


I 'D l- C4 -4(Z 1. I T~icenv hiv 7 00






sItLawt31nICa *./ ,J e''i'n' %: ii c -,uluviuil iv 0 1w


Sandy Blues -, Fr:p .age


project area.
-At a special meeting held
last week to discuss the berm
situation, Mexico Beach mayor
AL Cathey told the city coun-
cil -that he had received half
a dozen telephone calls from
people complaining that the
berns blocked public beach
access at the street ends. He
said the way the sand was
being piled at the access points
-was "not leaving an opening for
beach access with these great
humps of sand in the way."
Council members bat-
ted around several ideas, one
being to cut tunnels from
the access points through
the mountains of sand, but
that idea was nixed because,


according to Forehand, coun-
cil member Curtis Dale, and
Mexico Beach city administra-
tor Henry Flack, those tunnels
would create channels for the
tide to wash in and out and
carry the sand right back out
to the water.
Flack was also concerned
that FEMA would balk at pay-
ing their share of the berm con-
struction if the city built such
tunnels, and Troy Williams,
Mexico Beach Public Works
Director, said the workers had
already had to dig tunnels in
front of several houses to allow
beach access.
The mayor said since the
berm was 90 percent com-
plete when FDEP changed the


rules, the city would rework
the berms under emergency
procedures, "looking at using
local construction people to
move the sand hopefully at
$10,000 to $15,000 instead of
the original $55,000 bid."
Given the current situa-
tion, the bid is no longer valid,
according to Flack.
Cathey closed the meeting
by setting a one week deadline
of Friday, July 28 to see if the
berm work was nearly fin-
ished, or if the city needed the
additional 30-day, penalty-free
extension that FDEP agreed to
give because of the extra work
required.


Marie Logan/The Star
Berm construction maneuvers around vacationers.


~L -


Lightning Kills!


AlA.






I~j~.VP


;;,vow


Marie Logan/The Star
Large mounds of sand still sit along the beach waiting to be moved and shaped in the berm.


l, oA/in.iriveprloodplains, "
Watch out for alligators
*Ornamental Iron & Aluminum Work ainoild laes; marshes. ins
*Gates & Automatic Gate Openers swamps. ponds,
*Spiral Staircases Railing, drainage canals and
*Stair Railing Fencing ditches. Never approach I
Since 1982 an alligator, never offer
Call (850) 769-5192 Today for a Free Estimate oodalligator ne fe
KURT SCHMIDT ENTERPRISES, INC. pets and small children i
UNDER GOD'S CONTROL away from them.


FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT PUBLIC NOTICE

USDA .Rural Development has received an application for financial assistance from
Gulf County Association for Retarded Citizens, Inc. for the construction of a new office
and training facility in Port St. Joe, Florida. An Environmental Assessment has been
conipleted by USDA Rural Development concerning the construction of this new office
and training facility.

USDA Rural Development has determined that the proposal will not significantly affect
the quality of the environment for the proposed new office and training facility to. be
located on Water Plant Road in Port St. Joe, Florida. Therefore, USDA Rural Development
will not prepare an environmental impact statement for the proposed action.

Copies of the Environmental Assessment can- be reviewed or obtained at the USDA
Marianna Area Office, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 5, Marianna, Florida 32448.

Any person who feels this determination is in error should submit a written statement
outlining the specific environmental concerns to USDA Rural Development, 2741
Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 5, Marianna, Florida 32448 within 15 days of the date of
this 'notice.

A general location map of the proposed project is shown below.


PROPOSED PROJECT SITE


A A- .A



VENUE R

C '*AVENUE 'F
\ AVENUE E


\ AVENUE
A VENUE A
S HOWARD RD *14oD
., MARINA DR FIRST ST










PORT ST. JOE GULF COUNTy
Publish July 13 & 20. 2006


When a storm ap-
proaches, and lightning
is present: '
-Stay away from
open high ground and
isolated trees.
-Stay away from.wa-
ter, including lakes and
rivers. Stay off the beach
and out of boats.
-Do not seek shelter
in a convertible car or
golf cart. .4
-Stay away from
doors, windows and all
metal objects, including '
pipes and faucets.
-Stay off corded tele-
phones and away from
all electrical devices,
like televisions and corn-
puters, iPods, DVD and s-1
CD players. ,' '


U -


Sun & Hot Weather Safety
-Wear sunglasses at all times during the day.
especially on the beach.
-Always wear a hat in the sun.
-Stay out of the sun in the hottest part of
the day: 10:00 am 2:00 pm.
- Be careful of heat stroke and drink lots of
water (not alcohol)!
-Never leave a child or pet in an unattended
vehicle, especially with the windows partially
or fully closed.
-Do your most strenuous activities at a cooler
time of day, never in the middle of the day.
-Dress in loose, lightweight, light-colored
clothing.
-Always use sunscreen to avoid a sunburn.
Remember to re-apply sunscreen regularly.


Building Supply


Visit Our New, Larger Location

at 272 Commerce Dr

St. Joe Commerce Park
Hwy 382 (Industrial Road)

Serving Gulf Franklin ur Bay County
For your Building Supply Needs


7:30 5:00


M- F


Doors

Molding

Rebar &

Mesh

Cement


Lumber

Plywood

Trusses

Pilings

Hardware

Windows


I


272 Commerce Drive

(850) 229-8232


.- F


" '


I--I I I


-M


I---r


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, Jly27 206 3


Fcrhi-hr 9.7-Srvn uf onyan urunigaea o 8 er


t


r-


~"







AR Th, Star. Pt J F


Pet of the Week


Available now for adop-
tion from the St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society -
Pepsi, a nice jack russell
male pup (pictured), Rosco,
a chocolate lab male pup
about 7 months old, Prince
a yellow lab male, Hound
pups 5 1/2 months old (1st
shots), Molly a nice white
pit bulldog female.Jeter a
grown black lab male, Betsy
a 5 1/2 months old hound
mix, Jasper a 6 1/2 months
old bulldog pup, always kit-
tens! Come See.
Please remember to visit
Faith's Thrift Hut, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday.


St. Joseph Bay Humane Society is an Equal Opportunity
Employee. We are looking for part time help six days a
week.
3 hours in the morning and 2 hours in the afternoon.
Pay $7.00 an hour. For more information please contact
Carolyn Lee at 227-1103.
References must be provided



Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

"P4/"uoz aouk-ie& i o laoWes ia ce 1957"


Support the "Pet of the
Week" by advertising here.

Only $15 per week
Call advertising
2f27-1278 o
for more information


Garden of the Month


The home of David and
Faye Thompson, 200 '7th
Street, Mexico Beach, has
been chosen as the Garden
of the Month by the Sea
Oats and Dunes Garden
Club. The Thompsons are a
military family, having lived
in many states before settling
in Callaway, then moving to


Mexico Beach in 1992. Faye
is Membership Chairman of
AARP.
A beautiful pink crape
myrtle is the focal point of
the front lawn. A magnificent
weeping willow, along with
two maples (one red, one
silver) and two Sago palms
complete the picture. A
quaint 'old-fashioned well,
built by David,
adds further
interest to
the spacious
lawn. The
inviting porch
contains
rocking chairs
and, a lounge
ibeckoning one
to sit relaxing
and enjoying
Nf the beauty of
nature.
Beautiful
hydrangeas
and roses form
Sa hedge on the
Sright--. of the-
beautiful pink
brick home,
with a think,
well-kept
hedge of holly
,bordering the
left. A coral
vine clinging
to the building


peeks out from
the rear o: the
building.
H u g e .

carrying .
a variety
ofplants i
add a '
touch of .y- .
whimsy "I 0 .
to the .~
overall 'i-
picture.
T h e ..
lot line S
abounds
with roses.
periwinkles. '"-l
hibiscus, zinnias
and other volunteer
plants. Faye inherited her
love of gardening 'from her
grandmother and mother
and many of her plants have
been transferred from their
gardens.
In. strolling through the
arbor in the side yard, one
is delightfully led into an
unexpected treat. This area
contains peach, fig, .citrus,
pecan, guava, banana trees,
and others too numerous to
mention. A huge pear tree
hangs with ripe fruit. A large,
cultured scuppernong, vine
provides a delicious and ample
'supply of scuppernongs for


the Thompsons and
their friends. In
the middle of
1 the garden
is a large
vegetable
garden.
Faye said
that many
of the,
vegetables
w e, r e
volunteer
from the '
previous
year. A
huge, sweet
potato patch,
wat ermelons,.
pepper, peas,
strawberries, snap beans
that have been staked, and
tomatoes in neat rows have
used every available inch of
space.
David has built a potting
shed along with an adjoining
'mulch bed that is very
-convenient and helpful 'in
caring for all their gardening
endeavors.
The large back yard is a
true haven that is constantly
being improved and changed
to satisfy the owners' wishes.
A tour of the Thompson's
yard is a real pleasure that
Sone finds interesting as well
as pleasant. The Thompsons


Donald Allen

'6, Hodges
Donald Allen Hodges,
i 68, passed into heaven on
Saturday, July 22, 2006 after a
brief battle with cancer, under
the care of Hospice Savannah.
Mr. Hodges was born on
'November 6, 1937 in Long
County, 'GA to Julian Vivian
Hodges and .Eula McCall
Hodges. He was a resident
Sof Hinesville, GA and more
recently of Mexico Beach, FL.
He was a former member of
Gum Branch. Baptist Church
Sfor over 25 years where he was
ordained a Deacon in 1994.
',More recently Mr. Hodges was
a member of First Baptist
Church, 'Port St. Joe, FL.
Mr. Hodges served his
country in the U.S. Navy for 20
years. Upon his retirement in
1975, Mr. Hodges andhis family
settled in Hinesville where he
has owned and operated Don
Hodges Electrical Corp. for
the past 30 years.
Mr. Hodges was preceded
in death by his father, Julian
Vivian Hodges, and two. of his
children, Maggie Deana Hodges
and Robert Allen Hodges.
He is survived by his wife of
38 years, Lois Curling Hodges'
of Hinesville; his mother, Eula
McCall Hodges of Hinesville;
his three daughters and their
families, Kellyand GregPerusse
and children Deana, Rachel
and Michael of Houston, TX,


Kimberly and Allen Garcia and
children Andrew, Christina,
Krystle, Maggie and Joseph
of Bossier City, LA, and Leigh
Anne and Bill Jordan and
children Ethan and Patrick 'of
Memphis. TN; three brother
and sisters-in-law, Jerry
Hodges of Savannah, Milton.
(Mickey) and Helen Hodges of
Hinesville, Julian and Merry
Hodges of Hinesville; and
several nieces and nephews.
Mr. Hodges was close to his
wife's family which includes
her mother Audrey Curling,
her sisters, Rose White Sheila
Curling and husband Tom
Bronson, and Betty Mills of
Virginia Beach, VA and their
children.
Donald was a good son, a
good husband, a good father,
and a good friend but most
importantly he was a "Born
Again Christian." He will be
greatly missed by all who
knew him.
Visitation was held 6:00-
-8:00p.m., Monday, July 24,
2006 at Carter Funeral Home
Ogelthorpe Chapel.
Funeral. services were
2:00 p.mi., Tuesday, July 25,
2006 at Carter Funeral Hbme
Ogelthorpe Chapel with Rev.
Brent Vickery officiating.
Burial will be in Elim Baptist
Church Cemetery with full
military honors.
The family has asked
that any memorials made
in .his honor be made to
Hospice Savannah, PO Box


13190, Savannah, .GA 31416
or Hospice of the Emerald
Coast, 2925 Martin Luther
King BLVD., Panama City, FL
32405.
Carter Funeral Home
Ogelthorpe Chapel in charge
of arrangements.


Elizabeth Barron
,Mrs. Elizabeth Barron,
affectionately known as "Lil
Mama", was born
December 14, 1919 in
Conecuh County, Evergreen,
Alabama to Joe, Likely' and
Emma Williams Likely., She
accepted Christ at an early
age and was raised in the
Baptist faith. As a young adult
during the early forties, Mrs.
Barron moved to Cincinnati,
Ohio where she joined .the
First Baptist Church of College
Hill and served faithfully in


the choir and the women's
auxiliary. Mrs. Barron later
met and married the late
Reverend Julius Barron, Sr.
She was a licensed
beautician and practiced her
craft until 1998. She was
known among her family and
friends for her crocheted gifts.
In 1999
Mrs Barron was moved to
Port St. Joe, Fla due to failing
health, and remained until her
demise.
Preceding her in death
was her parents, her husband,
one brother, and three sisters.
Mrs Barron leaves to mourn:
her sons Ellis Likely (Lil) of
North Vernon, Indiana; James
Nearon of Las Vegas, Nevada;
:Ray Likely, ( wife Minnie) of
Port St. Joe, FL; Walter Likely
(Alice) of Long Beach, Calif; her
step-son. Julius Barron Jr. of
Ohio; one sister -Mrs. Rozener


;8radley 's

SRuto i IcLIC: GateS
\GATED COMMUNITY SPECIALIST

Since 1982 Serving the Panhandle
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL
SWING & SLIDE GATE OPERATORS CCTV
PARKING SYSTEMS TELEPHONE ENTRY
SYSTEMS
KEY PAD & CARD ACCESS
(850) 227-9866
www.securitygates.com


Jones of Evergreen, Ala.; eight
grand children; twelve great-
grand children, two .special.
friends- Mrs. Shelton and Mrs.
Pleart of Cincinnati, Ohio and a
host of nieces, nephews, and
friends.
She will be taken to
Cincinnati, Ohio for funeral
services and interment.
Local services were
provided by Comforter Funeral
Home.

Phyllis Messina
Phyllis Messina, 67, of
Chamblee, GA, died July 16,
2006. She was a loving wife to
Charles Messina for 46 years,


also surviving are her daugh-
ters, Cynthia Weaver, and
Sabrina Lee; 6 grandchildren
3 brothers, Ronald Keel, Gary
Keel, and Terry Keel ; sister,
Sandra Wright. Funeral ser-
vices were held Tuesday, Ju,ly
18th at 3 pm at the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints, Glenridge Ward, 6449
Glenridge Dr. NE, Sandy
Springs, with Bishop Stephan
Van Sant officiating. In lieu
of flowers, contributions may
be made to the charity of your
choice. The graveside service
was held at 2:00 p.m. EDT
Thursday, July 20, 2006 in
Magnolia Cemetery


Heritage Funeral -'



M ---'.
'
It 1 4,J I K B~ k h ^


247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway


785-1316

Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners

"Serving Bay and Gulf Counties"


2006
Hurricane
Names

Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William


' '


~E~t~Maa~a'----;lwau+9e8~18~'39~~3~~''~- ~Y~~:-:~TI~Kl~i~i~i1


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 yeats


4B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyJuy2,06


. ..-1. ..1i . .i


MW






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 5B


H H N EWeeTI invite ou to cisit thte cfuvic of pmou choice thi, week ............

Superior Bank SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER COSTING & COSTING Rish, Gibson, Scholz
Port St. Joe. Mexico Beach FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
Apalachicola Carraelle FUNERALHOME. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. CostinJishThomasS.Gibson
For All Your 50710th Street Port St. Joe L.F.D. Personal Injury Real Estate Russell Sch Paul W. Groom11
Financial Needs w workers' Compensation Russel Scho Paul Groom I
Financial Needs (850)229-8111 (850) 227-1818 (850)1227-1159 (850)229-8211
MEMBER FDIC EQUAL HOUSINGLEtDER (50) 22-811 850) (85021


HOLY


AFTER


Whether done in infancy or later in life, baptism

is a treasured rite in many churches.


By PAUL ASAY
Freedom News Service
In the biblical book of Mark, Jesus wades
into the Jordan River to be baptized by his
cousin, John. It's considered the beginning of
Jesus' adult ministry.
Jesus was an adult when he was baptized.
Today, baptisms are dominated by children.
Some are infants, baptized days after birth.
Others are older, with baptisms accompanied
by Sunday school parties or celebratory din-
ners.
Regardless, baptism remains what it was
from the days of Jesus: a new beginning a
symbolic start for a lifelong journey of faith.
Amy Mae Kelly, 6, is in her Sunday best
a plaid dress with ribbons and a smile that
won't go away.
She'll change clothes soon, into a bath-
ing suit and white robe. Her father, Ben, will
lead her into the baptistery behind the stage
at Pulpit Rock Church in Colorado Springs,
Colo., where she'll wade into the warm water
and confess her faith to hundreds of friends
and strangers. Then her father will hold her
nose and tilt her back, and the water will fold
over her. She'll come up dripping, raised by her
father's hand. She'll hear the applause dimly
through water-filled ears.
She knows what to expect. But as she's
talking and smiling, just 20 minutes away from
her baptism, she confesses that she's a, little
nervous.
Still, she wants to be baptized. Why?
"Because Jesus commanded it," Amy Mae
says. "Because he did it."
In many Protestant churches, particularly.
evangelical ones like Pulpit Rock, baptism is
the ceremonial pivot point of Christian faith.
Many are baptized as children. Their lives as
"sinners" may not extend much beyond pilfer-
ing a roll of Life Savers or fibbing to their par-
ents. Still, anyone who is baptized symbolically
and publicly sheds his or her sinful ways for a
new life focused on Jesus, his teachings and his
redemptive power.
"They have to be old enough to have a
personal relationship with Jesus," says Bonnie
Aldrich, Pulpit Rock's children's pastor.
Churches like Pulpit Rock don't perform
,infant baptisms. People baptized there have
to "understand and believe," according to the
church's Web site ~ lwww.pulpitrock.com).
But the age at which children are allowed
to make such decisions varies from church to
church.
A few, like the Mennonites, rarely baptize
someone who isn't in his or her midteens or

By PAUL ASAY
Freedom News Service
McKenna Donohue won't remember her
baptism,
She was 2 months old when she was bap-
tized a wriggling, naked baby in her father's
hands. McKenna was immersed in a water-filled
plastic tub at Holy Apostles Catholic Church in
Colorado Springs, Colo.; the Rev. Paul Wicker
brushed water across her head, saying "I bap-
tize you in the name of the Father, and of the
Son, and of the Holy Spirit."
S She was then anointed with a sweet-smell-
SIng mixture of olive oil and balsam called
chrism, signifying that McKenna has entered
-Christendom's holy community.
If children are innately spiritual, as some
experts say, baptism is often the first step in
Christianity to giving that spirituality direc-
Lion.
Infantbaptismis one ofRoman Catholicism's
Seven sacraments and a treasured rite in many
Protestant denominations as well. Although its
inain participants are sometimes just days old,
` baptism draws on some of Christianity's most
Ancient, most resonant themes.
S. McKenna's immersion represented the
; death and resurrection of Jesus. The water
poured on her head washed away her sin. The
white garment McKenna wore symbolized puri-
ty. And the chrism placed on McKenna's head
'nointed her as part of God's "royal priest-
Shod" the same kind of anointing performed
on Israel's kings hundreds of years before
Jesus was born.
"The smell (of the chrism) just stays with
her," said her mother, Lisa Donohue. "I didn't
want to bathe her."
Infant baptism has been part of Christianity
t since at least the third century. It's not intended
to give infants a nonstop, one-way ticket to
heaven, according to the Donohues, who teach
classes on baptism at Holy Apostles. Rather,
baptism is a boarding pass: Whether those bap-
Y tized stay on the train is up to them.
"Baptism is where it all starts," said Sean
D onohue, McKenna's father. "It's the initiation
Stihat begins this journey."
SBy having their child baptized, parents
t vow to raise that child in the Catholic faith.
d Godparents present at most Catholic bap-
t tisms commit to being good spiritual exam-
Sples for the child.
At Holy Apostles, other Catholics in the
Parish make an unspoken commitment, too,
Sby ceremonially welcoming that child into a
Broader faith-based community. Just as babies
, are invisibly marked with a cross at their bap-
' tism ceremony, so parishioners turn to one
Another and mark each other's foreheads with
invisible crosses.
S Parents who balk at going to Mass regularly


FIRST UNITED >
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. Rev. Malcolm "Mac" Fulcher
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. PASTOR

Morning Worship: 11:00a.m. Wi
Methodist Youth Fellowship: 6:00 p.m Minister of MmsidYouth
Evening Worship: 7:00 p.m. Deborah Loyless
All Times are EST Director of ChildrenMinistries


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
igb)lan b view aptift f urt
s 382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


AGE OF UNDERSTANDING: Matthew Egeler,
12, prepares to be baptized by his father, Dan.
People baptized at Pulpit Rock Church have to be
old enough to "understand and believe."

beyond. Other denominations or churches say
a child should be in grade school.
Pulpit Rock doesn't have an age limit.
That church, like most others, gives class-
es to those who want to be baptized. Children
learn that baptism doesn't guarantee a spot in
heaven or wash away sin. They needed to make
a commitment to Jesus beforehand, and the
commitment is the important thing.
But they're told baptism is an important
public display of faith a graduation cer-
emony, of sorts, into the Christian community.
They learn that baptism is one of Christianity's
holiest traditions, and that it's a symbolic way
to say that they've been "born again."
"It's like when Jesus died and rose again,"
says Bethany Egeler, 9, of the baptism's symbol-
ism. Going under the water is death. Coming
up again is new life.
Bethany and her brother, 12-year-old
Matthew, are getting baptized together by their
father, Dan.
"You're showing everyone that you're com-
mitted to following Christ for the rest of your
life," Matthew says.
Rachel Shaffer, 10, will be the first into the
baptistery on this Sunday. She says she's not
nervous. "But I think my dad is," she adds.
Pulpit Rock believes parents as a child's
primary spiritual teachers should baptize
their own children.
This is not common practice; many church-
es require that a, pastor perform the ceremony.
But at Pulpit Rock, the extra involvement
makes a child's baptism a particularly powerful
moment for the parents.
"I'm very excited," said Ben Kelly, father of
Amy Mae. "Everything else can be taken away,
but this can't."


YOUNGEST OF THE FAITHFUL: Blaze Caudill,
6 months, is held in front of the congregation by
his father, Dan, as he is baptized at Holy Apostles
Catholic Church by the Rev. Paul Wicker Infant
baptism is one of Roman Catholicism's seven sac-
raments.

might want to wait on baptism, the Donohues
say, until they're ready to commit to faid] them-
selves. Baptism, they say, should not be an item
to be checked off a spiritual "to-do" list.
And, they add, it's OK to wait a bit.
Before the Second Vatican Council in the
1960s, most Catholics were, taught that unbap-
tized children were destined for hell. For many
new parents, the first stop out of the delivery
room was their local parish, where they hur-
riedly performed a baptism ceremony.
Today, the Catholic Church doesn't doesn't
tell parents where unbaptized babies might
wind up in the afterlife, according to the'
Donohues.
"We don't pretend to know God's heart and
grace," Sean said.
For Catholics, baptism isn't about choos-
ing whether to follow the faith. The "choice"
is made years later with another sacrament,
confirmation.
Lisa Donohue believes that McKenna's bap-
tism illustrated how she will someday meet her
maker there: naked and needy. "Children are
so dependent on their parents," she said later.
"That's how we -should come to God."


you're Among friends at
Oak Grove Assembly of God
David A. fernandez. Pastor
Office: 850-227-1837 'Parsonage: 850-229.6271
613 Madison SteePort Port t. Joe, fC
Schedule of Services
Sunday Wednesday
Sunday School 945am Mld Week Meal. 5:00pm
Morning Worship 10:45am VMid Week 1ible Study 6:15pm
X.ds on the Move lO:45am .Mnistry In actionn 6:15pm
Cross Training Vouth 6:15pm
Men's .Ministry. Monday 6:30pm
Cadlesi .inisstr- Tuesday- 7:00pm
Dynamic Praise & Worship Preaching the Pure Word ...


Mike Wesibroc
Pastor


Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
k, Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.


church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem



We meet at 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study O 10:00a EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm EST
"We are about our Fathers business"





CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Singing:
Worship:


24292


t Catioic Church of Gulf Coun

St. Joseph Parish
20th & Monument, Port St Joe, FL, 227-1417
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (CDT)



i C"Our Church can be your home"

First Church of the Nazarene
2420 Long. Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9596


Sunday School .......... l j
Sunday Morning Worship ..1 ,
Sunday Evening Worship ........ ... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service . 7 p.m.






111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410

Sudy Worship Service: 9:00 a.m. CST
SundqStool: 10:15 a.m. CST
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist (hrch
NuRSERY Provmi
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


Fmily life (hurh
"Touching Lives with the Love of Jesus"
Join us in worship ... i n,
0M Apalachicola Panama City
10:30 Sunday Morning Hwy. 98
7:00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew
& '
Cathy Rutherford Reid Ave.
Rhema Bible Training Center graduates Famly ife Church
Visit our website at:
familylifechurch.net yWewahitchka
323 Reid Avenue *Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)


"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
Romans 16:16

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meets At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, Wewahitchka
(1/4 Mile North of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bible Study 9:00 a.m. CT
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m. CT
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. CT


9 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday


Worship withus at


Long Avenue Baptist Church


Where Faith, Family &


Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm


1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691
& *1857


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


llI ~ i~ s~~ 19%~i~ a ; ? re~iipp gSpl~ .~ IIILRIBIIIIIII.


Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue >



BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Him.'
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship. God bless you!
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725



First Baptist Church>
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE

Brent Vickery, Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Michael Rogers, Minister to Students
Sunday School ... ........ 9:45 am
Worship Service ......... 8:30 & 11:00 am
Disciple Training . .. ..... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship .... ......... . 7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting .......... 6:30 pm
Mon-Fri: Devolion on 105 5 FM. ... 7 49 am ET



-j% The friendly ,.'.....-.. :.


First Baptist Church
MExico BEACH
Located at 823 N. 15th St., Mexico Beach
Corner of 15th '- California 648-5776
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages)
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Please note, all times central
Reverend Eddie LaFountain


MFTLL4& "A Reformed Voice
-W1 _in the Community"

SC C Dr. Bill Taylor, Pastor

Sunday School .......................... 9:30 a,m.
Sunday Fellowship................... 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service ........ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service ............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Night (Bay St. Joseph) 6:30 p.m.
Thursday Firehouse Fellowship .... 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Chrimnan School

TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845






IlullrrtS J Fn


9V


Meeting Schedule for Local Government
Gulf County School Board
The School Board meets once a month,
typically the second Tuesday of the month,
though during the summer that schedule is
subject to change. Meetings are typically con-
ducted at district offices located on Middle
School Drive in Port St. Joe, though during the
school year the board conducts one monthly
meeting at high schools at each end of the
county.
The School Board's next regularly sched-
uled meeting is at 2 p.m. ET on June 30 in the
board meeting room. This meeting will mark
the end of the fiscal year. The board's initial
budget meeting will be held 2 p.m. ET on July
20.
Postings of all School Board regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found
at the district offices.


City of Port St. Joe
The Port St. Joe City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the
first and third Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m.
ET in the Commission meeting room on the
second floor of City Hall on Cecil G. Costin
Blvd. near Reid Avenue.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall.
City of Wewahitchka
The Wewahitchka City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the
second and fourth Mondays of each month at
6 p.m. CT in the first floor meeting room at
City Hall.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall on Second Street.
Board of County Commissioners
The Board of County Commissioners


ILin


IL


Movie Nights Coming to Mexico Beach and Gulf County


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
It might not be the old
drive-in movie, but it will be
drive up, park, and walk to an
outside movie screen.
The Mexico Beach
Community Development
Council (MBCDC) and the Gulf
County Tourism Development
Council (TDC) have teamed to
present outdoor movies to res-


idents and visitors of Mexico
Beach and Gulf County, tenta-
tively beginning in August.
"We'll shortly be showing
"movies in the park" at several
locations," said Lynn Marshall,
president of MBCDC. "It will
be a fun family night where
you can bring snacks or a pic-
nic basket and the family for a
good movie."
"We'll be testing the equip-


'-OVA.:d
tCd


ment next week," added Paula
Pickett, director of the Gulf
County TDC. "If it all works,
then we will go forward."
The setup consists of a 10
by 16 foot projection screen
and projection equipment,
which will be moved to dif-
ferent locations in the area to
give everyone an opportunity
to enjoy a movie out of doors.
The movies will all be


free and open to the public,
and the two groups plan to
offer the viewings year round,
weather permitting.
Pickett said public inter-
est will drive the movie selec-
tion, which will be a mix of
recent movies and classics, all
family oriented.


ST. JOSEPH BAY
Dnate Time HIt. Time HIt.


Builders; In'. July 27 12 04P 165 H 09-52P 007 L
CRC #132706 July 28 12:28P 1.41 H 09:39P 0.28 L
85 473335 July29 12:51P 1.14 H 09:09P 0.48 L
July 30 05:31A 1.00 H 11:19A 0.86 L
98 01:11P 0.86 H 08:12P 0.62 L
I ''.' July 31 04:33A 1.16 H 01:41P 0.61 L
Aug 1 04:21A 1.34 H 02 19P 0.39 L
bluewavebuilders@yahoo.r.om .
S. Aug 2 04:36A 1.52 H 03:16P 0.20 '





LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!


TABLES
CHAIRS
LINENS
BEACH WHEELCHAIR
Wte eliuerrr


WEDDING ARCHES
CANDLELABRAS
PUNCH BOWLS.
CHAMPAGNE FOUNTwAIN
MamoulHmtKsS


Hailing from Hickory South Carolina, Chris Clifton has

done it all in the music business.
A run as James Taylor's guitar guru in the 70's and studio work on countless projects have given Clifton a chance to hone his chops
and establish himself as one of the premier guitarists on the circuit. Currently playing Key West and "Great places along the way" Chris
is focused on the accoustic sound and harmony phrasing with vocalist and guitarist "Diamond" Dave Edmisten. They will be appearing
at Dockside Cafe Wednesday through Saturday July 26th through the 29th from 7:30PM to 11:00PM.


SIXIE
THEATRE
APAcmUCOU.aA., A Not-For-Profit Theatre

MOVIES All Summer Long!

Pirates of the Caribbean:

Dead Man's Chest =:' .
Nationwide Opening!
July 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22


Superman Returns


July 27,


28, 29


An Inconvenient Truth


August 3,


4, 5


P,4 .q. j..uir -


Thursday, Friday, Saturday

8:00 PM~ All tickets $6.00

# 653-FILM (3456)
www.dixietheatre.com- Schedule subject to change

Next Movie Schedule August 3 issue


Our deferred annuity

plan will interest you.

Rf you're interested in earning high interest on your
savings, tax deferred and wirh rnk-lo ,
then we have the plan for you with
Auto-Owners Life Insurance Compan,.
Contributions to the plan can .
be made when it's convenient
for you. Stop in our agency
and see us today!

t4uto-Owters Insurance
Life Home Car Business



Coastal Insurance Agency
312 REID AVE PORT ST JOE, FL
850-227-1900

I--------------.-------


Send Your Community Events
Write To:. ..Besuretoput Comrin
The StarlCommunity Events' ; iewsas thsujecftw
P.O. Box 308 -mailing. .. ,
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To:." Annoulncemehtrate i
(850) 227-7212'' to 50 wordsancw
E-mail To: maXimurntiof4 weeks.
starnews@ starfl.com .,.... .:.;-..,


d Rhonda Harri'cn r .i B


*. . . .


4 '~j~


Bluewave


CRIBS
HIGH CHAIRS
TENTS
DINNERWARE
K wommo7* 7
VV If"f ** l


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


6B Te Sar ortSt oe L -Thursday July 27. 2006


conducts regular meetings twice a month, at 6
p.m. ET on the second and fourth Tuesdays of
each month in the Commission meeting room
located in the Robert Moore Administrative
Building next to the County Courthouse on
Cecil G. Costin Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at the Robert
Moore Administrative Building.
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council conducts
its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. CT on
the second Tuesday of each month in the Civic
Center located behind the business district on
30t" and 31st Streets.
Postings of all regular and special meet-
ings and workshops can be found at City Hall,
located on 144m Street, or the Civic Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting, typ-
ically during the lunch hour of the first Tuesday


vil &A~ rmwartlsrmawmrrwi


:Txj~:


of the month at Sunset Coastal Grill. For more
information contact the EDC at 229-1901.
Budget Hearings
Local residents and taxpayers should be
aware that summertime brings the budget pro-
cess to government entities around the area. All
the listed governmental bodies will be conduct-
ing budget workshops and hearings throughout
the coming months.
We will post the times and places of all
budget meetings, but the information will also
be available at the locations listed for finding
meeting and workshop agendas.
A note to civic organizations and
other groups in the area: submit meet-
ing times and locations to the newspa-
per and we will publish them each week
on this page.






gr1bIUaith,,4 1 70/ e- aGufontan su-u1' rafr68yasTeSaPrStJoF Thrdy ly2,06'7


'I


JULY
Timber Island Yacht Club Youth Fishing Class
and Tournament, July 8, Timber Island Yacht Club,
Carrabelle
Fourth Annual Bayou Bash Fishing Tournament,
Port St. Joe, July 29


AUGUST
Third Annual Port St. Joe High School Athletic
Department Golf Tournament, St. Joseph Bay Golf and
Country Club, Aug. 5
MBARA Annual Kingfish Tournament, August 25-
26, Mexico Beach


,Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Fax To: Be sure to put Community News as the
The Star/Community Events (850) 227-7212 subject when mailing.
P.O. Box 308 Email To:
Port St Joe, FL 32457 starnews@starfl.com Announcements are limited to 50 words,
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks.


SEPTEMBER
Music in the Park, Each Thursday night at 6 pm (CT)
in Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Annual Scallop Festival, Labor Day Weekend, Port
St. Joe
Beach Blast Olympic Triathlon & Duathlon,
September 23, Beacon Hill Park, Great sports event
involving swimming, biking and running. More infor-
mation: www.TheBeachBlast.com.
The event will bring hundreds of visitors to the area.
Volunteers needed. Come support local athletes!
Annual Kingfish Shootout, Sept. 25-26, C-Quarters
Marina, Carrabelle


Everything You Need To Know About The Area, But Didn't Know


To Ask: Summer Tourist Tips No. 6


- Area Rules and Beach


Etiquette: The Beaches, Part I, Mexico Beach to St. Joe Beach


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Some general information
about this lovely area you are
enjoying will help you navigate
the "ins and outs" of beach life
a little more easily.
The Beaches
The area known as The
Beaches runs for nine uninter-
rupted miles along the Gulf
Coast, between Tyndall Air
Force Base and Port St. Joe.
While both geographically and
in spirit Mexico Beach, Beacon
Hill and St. Joe Beach are
the same, technically there are
several important differences.
Mexico Beach is actually
i* n the most southeastern cor-
ner of Bay County, the county
that encompasses Panama
/ City and Panama City Beach.
Mexico Beach was incorpo-
rated as city in 1963, and the
city limits run east-west for
three miles, from just east
of the forests of the St .Joe
Company and. Tyndall Air
Force Base on U.S. 98, to the
county line at the junction of
U.S. 98 and County Road 386,
at the Lookout Lounge.
Both Beacon Hill and St.
'Joe Beach are in Gulf County,
Which runs from the Lookout
Lounge along U.S. 98 for
about 30 minutes east toward
Apalachicola.
Time Zones
Mexico Beach is in the
Central Time Zone, while
Beacon Hill and St. Joe Beach,
as well as Port St. Joe, Cape
San Blas, and Indian Pass are
all in the Eastern Time Zone.
The time zone line is at
the junction of CR386 and U.S.
9'8, at the Lookout Lounge.
All of Bay County is in the
Central Time Zone, while Gulf
County wanders in and out of
both time zones. For instance,
Overstreet is in Eastern while
Wewahitchka is in Central.
Law Enforcement, Fire
and Medical Care
Mexico Beach has its
own police, fire and emer-
gency medical services, while
Beacon Hill and St. Joe Beach
are served by the Gulf County
Sheriff's Department and
Florida Highway Patrol. St.
Joe Beach has a volunteer fire
department and Gulf County
EMS provides medical help,
plus ambulance service for all
three communities.
However, in the way of all


small rural areas, all the com-
munities, from Mexico Beach,
Overstreet, St. Joe Beach,
Port St. Joe, White City, even
Wewahitchka, Dalkeith, and
Cape San Blas help each other
during emergencies.
Speed Limits,
Crosswalks, Highway Safety
In Mexico Beach the speed
limit changes with the major
seasons. From Memorial Day
weekend (the last weekend
in May) through Labor Day
weekend (the first weekend in
September), the speed limit is
35 miles per hour. From just
after Labor Day through fall,
winter and spring, the speed
limit is 45 miles per hour.
Through Beacon Hill and
St. Joe Beach, the speed limit
remains 45 miles per hour
year round.
The entire length of The
Beaches is a no-passing zone.
That includes the state-wide
restriction of passing on the
right, along the shoulder of the
road, as well.
For those not familiar with
the law, it is illegal to pass any-
one on the right if there is not
a regulation second lane to the
right. It is illegal to pass on
the right by crossing the solid
white line, which marks the
shoulder of the road.
Five crosswalks were
recently installed in Mexico
Beach at various points along
U.S.' 98. Both pedestrians
and drivers need to pay close
attention along U.S. 98. By
Florida law, vehicles must stop
if people are already inside the
crosswalks, but pedestrians
cannot, by law, simply step
out into the crosswalk in front
of oncoming traffic. It's liter-
ally a "two-way street" type of
situation.
Visitors, especially pedes-
trians trying to cross U.S. 98
or parking along U.S. 98, need
to remember that U.S. 98 is a
federal/state highway and the
primary route in this area.
During tourist season and
with the added construction,
about 20,000 vehicles travel
on U.S. 98 each day, including
18-wheelers, dump trucks and
log trucks, not to mention the
usual array of delivery trucks,
RVs, campers, large pickup
trucks towing big boats, and
vacationers driving slowly try-
ing to find their accommoda-
tions or just looking at the
water.
People parking beachside
along U.S. 98 must be particu-


larly vigilant about physically
holding onto their children,
because there is absolutely no
room for error when getting
out of or into cars parked
along the highway.
Pedestrians must hold
onto children while crossing
U.S. 98 at any point, and no
one should try to run across
the highway while wearing flip-
flops. If you do lose your
shoes while crossing U.S. 98,
do not stop in the road to
try to retrieve your shoes, or
anything else you might have
dropped. Finish crossing the
highway and then wait until
traffic clears to go back into
the road to retrieve items.
Beach Public Access
There is ample public
beach access to The Beaches
all along U.S. 98. In Mexico
Beach, public walkovers are
at the junctions of every street
and U.S. 98. The wooden
beach walkovers are all handi-
capped accessible, but the
access points that are simply
sand are not easily traversed
by crutches or wheelchairs. .
In Beacon Hill and St. Joe
Beach, public beach access is
available, from west to east:
Across from the Lookout
Lounge, just over the Gulf
County line at CR 386;
At the public beach walk-
over across from Beacon Hill
Park;
Across from Express
Lane in Beacon Hill, along the
east side of the gray condos.
Beginning, at Ward Street
in St. Joe Beach, all the beach
access points are well-worn
trails across the dunes. Please
stay on these paths to avoid
damaging the unmarked
dunes.
Handicapped Facilities
In Mexico Beach, all city
facilities, including the city
pier (37th Street), city park
(22nd-20th Streets), and all
public restrooms, are wheel-
chair accessible.
Wheelchair access to the
beach is available at the mari-
nas and at the wooden beach
walkovers.
In Beacon Hill, the munic-
ipal park and beach walkover
are wheelchair accessible. St.
Joe Beach has no specific
wheelchair accessible loca-
tions.
Dogs on The Beaches
Mexico Beach does not
allow dogs anywhere on its


beaches.
If you want to walk your
dog, you need to cross the
county line at CR286 (Lookout
Lounge). Beacon Hill and St.
Joe Beach allow dogs on the
beaches with their owners.
However, Gulf County does
have a leash law and dogs are
required to be leashed at all
times.
Dog owners also need to
remember that the beaches
are public places, and need
to carry some type of "pooper
scooper" with them to pick up
after their pets. There are gar-
bage cans at the end of each
municipal boardwalk, so dis-
posal of waste is no problem.
The easiest thing to do is
to carry several plastic bags
(from grocery or variety stores)
with you when you walk your
dog.
Place one corner of the bag
over your hand (the remainder
of the bag is covering your
arm), pick up the waste with
your covered hand and, while
holding the waste in your
hand, pull the rest of the bag
over your hand, enveloping
the waste inside the bag. Then
simply tie off the bag, trapping
the waste in that corner of the
bag, and you can use the bag
for one more cleanup. When
you get back from your walk,
toss the bag in the trash.
Beach Public Restrooms
Mexico Beach has public
restrooms in four locations
along U.S.98:
At Toucan's Restaurant's
east parking lot, directly across
from Express Lane;
At Sunset Park on the
west side of the El Governor
tower;
At the west entrance to
town at the bend in Canal
Parkway as you turn the corner
along the marina. The white
building is set back about 50
feet and is right next to the
fenced power station. ,
At the City Pier at the


6i F il i r- mw1 1F w1


CHINESE RESTAURANT

^^MB f^Si


OPEN
SUNDAY FRIDAY:
10:30 AM 10:00 PM
SATURDAY:
4:00 PM 10:00 PM

WE SELL BEER


south end of 37th Street.
There is also a public
restroom at Mexico Beach
Municipal Park, between 22nd
and 20th Streets, and at the
west end of Under the Palms
Park, between Georgia Avenue
and Maryland Boulevard, with
access and parking off 7th
Street.
Beacon Hill has a public
restroom at Beacon Hill Park,
directly across U.S. 98 from


the public beach boardwalk.
St. Joe Beach does not have
any public restrooms.
Parks/Playgrounds
Mexico Beach has a lovely
little public park, on the north
side of U.S.98, between 22nd
and 20th Streets (across from
the Driftwood Inn). If you are
not good with directions, just
look for the city's water tower
(See TOURIST TIPS on Page 8B)


-~_______ '- .-''. -~ '""iTr'


Golf Cart

Sales/Services


St. Joe Rent-All
706 1st. Street
Port St. Joe
227-2112


DINE-IN & TAKE-OUT

WE DELIVER
($15.00 MINIMUM PLUS DELIVERY CHARGE)



LUNCH BUFFET


$505

10:30 AM 3:00 PM

412 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL

227-9999 or 229-1888


',, Gaskin-Graddy Insurance Agency, Inc.
Homeowners Insurance
Mobile Home Insurance
Automotive Insurance
Health Insurance

GASKIN-GRADDY INSURANCE YOUR FULL SERVICE INSURANCE AGENCY
156 2nd Ave, P.O. Box 157 Wewahitchka F1 32465-0157
(850) 639-5077 (850) 639-2553 1-800-782-6802
Fax (850) 639-5078

ggraddyins @gtcom.net

Serving the Panhandle Since 1931


TheStr, or St Je, L Tursay Juy 7, 00 -7B


Established 193R7 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


L:






Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


GULF COUNTY
Officer Hal Webb
working with Investigations
apprehended two subjects
at St. Joe Bay. Investigators
observed the two making
more than one trip to their
vehicle dropping off scallops.
Officer Webb waited on the
subjects to come back in on
their last trip and discovered
they had between 10 and 12
gallons of whole scallops in
the shell. The scallops were
seized and the appropriate
citations issued.
FRANKLIN COUNTY
On July 7, Officer Travis
Huckeba was on routine water
patrol in the Apalachicola
River system. Officer Huckeba
saw a small fishing vessel
tied up near the bank and
decided to perform a safety


Tourist Tips

and find your way to its and
base. The park surrounds the Beach
water tower.
The park holds a nice chil- B
'dren's playground with swings S
and a sand pile, a tiny pavil-
ion, picnic tables and little S
charcoal grills, plus a tennis about
court and a basketball court, enjoy
You have to supply the equip- the "i
ment. a little
Now at Mexico Beach's
.City Pier (37th Street), there B
is a tiny park-like area leading T
-onto the pier. In addition to etique
the public restrooms, it has a people
picnic table and an outdoor, walk-(
open shower. S
Beacon Hill has a 40- beach
acre park on the north side first
of U.S.98. You can't miss it beach
since it is the highest point are v
in Beacon Hill. The old light- tected
house beacon sits on top of the It
hill at the park, and shines out sea o
across the water at night. any t
This is a relatively new sea oe
park featuring a paved walk- walkii
ing track and nature trail, It
"bird sanctuary, tennis, basket- place,
ball and shitffleboard courts: dunes
;.baseball and soccer fields: "0
children's play-area, public have
restrooms, a pavilion, and a beach
!boardwalk down the hill to are n
U.S. 98 for easy beach access. points
,The public beach access is P
directly across the highway mate
from the park. mark
St.. Joe Beach does not points
'have a public park or play- trails
ground'i or a designated public areas.
'beach access. P
anyone
to use
Everything You Need To neetec
Know About The Area. But This
Didn't Know To Ask: Summer public
Tourist Tips No. 6 Area Rules Pi


equipment inspection. He
secured his vessel alongside
the fishing vessel and asked
the operator onboard for
a sound producing device.
The operator only muttered
to himself. Officer Huckeba
repeated his question two
more times and got the same
muttering response. Officer
Huckeba noticed empty beer
bottles in the vessel and
could smell the distinct odor
of an alcoholic beverage. The
subject had slurred speech
and seemed confused when
asked to do anything. Officer
Huckeba performed field
sobriety tasks on the subject
and found him to be impaired.
The subject was transported
to the Franklin County Jail
where he was administered a
breath test to determine the


level of alcohol in his system.
The subject was found to
be over the .08 limit set by
statute and was charged with
boating under the influence
of alcohol.
On July 8, Chief of Staff
Officer Sabra' Thornton and
Lt. Steve Thomas were on
routine land patrol in the
Apalachicola River Wildlife
Environmental Area when
they saw a subject that they
knew had an outstanding
warrant for possession of a
firearm by a convicted felon.
After confirming the warrant,
the subject was arrested and
booked into the Franklin
County Jail.
Officers Hank Forehand
and Don Walker were on water
patrol in the Apalachicola
area when they conducted a


JEA boarding on a long-line
vessel. While running checks
on the crew, it was discovered
one of them was giving a false
name due to warrants out
of Georgia. When his real
identity was figured out, the
subject ran off the vessel and
was captured after a short
foot chase through the streets
of downtown Apalachicola.
Georgia refused to extradite
and the subject was booked
on giving false identification
and resisting arrest without
violence.
Officer Hank Forehand
conducted a vessel check on
a vessel in the East River
and found two subjects in
possession of alligator meat
without permits. Both were
charged.


- From Page 7B


Beach Etiquette: The
ies, Part II

ly Marie Logan
tar Staff Writer

3ome general information
I this lovely area you are
ing will help you navigate
ns and outs" of beach life
e more easily.

leach Etiquette
here is a certain "beach
ette" pertaining to where
e should and should not
on any beach.
ea oats, sea grasses and
h morning glories are the'
line of defense against
* erosion, and as such
ery important and pro-
.
t is illegal to remove any
ats from any section of
beach, or to harm the
ats in any way, including
ng on them.
is also illegal in many
s to walk across the
themselves.
)ver time, multiple trails
been established on the'
es, and in the area there
numerous public access
s to the beach.
lease use only the legiti-
dune walkovers and
ed public beach access
s, and the well-defmed
in the more remote

lease do not cut through
one's private yard or garage
e a beach walkover con-
d to a private dwelling.
is trespassing. Find a
c access to the beach.
lease remember to clean


up after yourself and your fam-
ily. This includes taking with
you any soiled baby diapers,
beer cans, especially any glass
containers, all food wrappings.
This applies particularly to the
plastic rings holding six-pack
cans, of beer and soft drinks.
If you absolutely must take
these six-pack rings onto the
beach, cut the individual rings
in half. Otherwise. seabirds,
turtles and some fish get these-
plastic rings trapped around
their beaks, heads, bodies,
etc., and ultimately die a very
horrible, slow death.
One of the great delights
of strolling along any beach is
looking for shells and other
"stuff.",
The Beaches have an inter-
esting, assortment of shells
that wash up, but you need to
know which shells to take, and
which ones to leave behind.
It is illegal to take any
"live" shells from any Florida
beach. "Live" shells are those
in which a creature lives,
whether the occupant is the.
original "owner" or 'not; So if
any critter is visible, gently
place the shell back on the
sand.
This applies to sand dol-
lars and starfish, as well. If
you pick up either a sand dol-
lar or a starfish, turn it over
and very. very gently run your
finger across its alv'eolae. or
tiny "tentacles." If these "tenta-
cles"- move at all-on their own,
the starfish or sand dollar is
still alive, and you should gen-
tly place it back in the surf.
Avoid jellyfish and
Portuguese men of war when
they have washed up on the


Please visit The Star &


The Times at:


www.starfl.com


www.apalachtimes.com

Also visit our affiliated panhandle

resource guide at:


www.emeraldcoast.com

-4 I


*-'
-o a a n:af, our websites.


t Er:o more if rmation ca Katie at 596-7179

e Here are a few business now advertising

with us online. --


Cape San BIas-
R ,I I-'


-oa tiav


Gulf Coast Realty, Inc.


beach. Many types of jelly-
fish, with or without tentacles,
retain their ability to sting long
after they have washed ashore.
Do not let children handle
them or dogs sniff and paw
on them. If you are stung, get
medical help.
Also be careful not to han-
dle, any dead fish that wash
ashore, especially puffer fish
and baby sharks. Both types
of fish have either sharp quills
or sharp scales that can cause
nasty wounds, even if the fish
are dead.
It is actually illegal to
remove any part of migratory
water fowl from the beach,
including pelican feathers lying
in the sand. This is not strictly
-enforced along The Beaches.
but be aware of removing sea
gull and pelican quills from
the beach when you are in any
state park. The rangers may
confiscate them and, while


Words From the Coast

The Fourth of July has come and gone. A good time was had
by all and the first annual lighted parade of boats was held at
Port St. Joe marina. If you missed it, next year promises to be
even bigger and better.
One potential problem was noticed. If we had not had two
watchful crew members aboard our boat, we might not have
seen several small boats that were anchored with no navigation
lights on.
Since we live here, we knew these were not partially sub-
merged rock piles. But the only way we could make out what we
were seeing was by the light of the exploding fireworks. Many of
these little boats were pontoon boats with lights so puny (if they
were on), that you couldn't see them anyway.
One problem is that people don't realize navigation lights
must go on at sunset. It is not an option. When was the last time
you checked your nav lights to make sure they were working?
Night vision can be tricky. It is hard to judge distances, and it is
easy to be fooled by optical illusions, especially where there are
lots of lights, such as near a city. Picking out the lights of a mov-
ing background of dozens of lights is very difficult, if not impos-
sible. Poor or defective lights will probably not be seen.
We have to take lighting seriously because operating at night
is dangerous. Many people have poor night vision, or lack the
visual perception that is needed to operate safely at night. This
visual perception is a skill, not just good vision, to be able to
quickly pick out lights and identify what they are.
Many people who operate boats at night don't know what
they are doing. Ask them about taking a bearing of an oncoming
boat based on display of lights, and a lot won't know what you
are talking about.
Be safe on the water. There are lots of Coast Guard Auxiliary
courses available to teach you to be safe on the water.
As the skipper of the ship, you are responsible for the
safety of your passengers. If you haven't briefed your passengers
regarding safety and life preservers, you will be held a fault in
case of injury or death.
If you would like to find out how to learn more information
or have a complimentary vessel safety check of your boat, just
call Curtis or Marcia Low at 647-3858 and we will be glad to
check safety items with you. Should you need safety equipment,
the inspection form will permit you to buy needed equipment at
a discount.
Marcia S. Low
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 1-9, Panama City Beach, Florida

Watch out for alligators in river
floodplains. around lakes, marshes,
swamps, ponds, drainage canals and
ditches. Never approach an alligator, never
offer food to one, and keep all pets and
small children away frpm them.


(See TOURIST TIPS on Page 9B)


PUBLIC HEARINGS.TO AMEND THE GULF

COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

The Gulf County Planning and Development Review Board will hold Public Hearings Monday, Au--
gust 10, 2006 at 8:45 A.M. E.T., and The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold
Public Hearings Thursday, August 17, 2006 at 6:00 RM. E.T., in the Gulf County Commissioners
Room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building to review for transmittal the corrective test
and map amendments to Ordinance 2006-04, Ordinance 2006-06 and the proposed new text
and map amendments to the Gulf County Comprehensive Future Land Use Map for the follow-
ing:
4. Public Hearing Transmittal of a Large Scale Land Use Change St Johns Village of Gulf
County, Inc. St. Johns Village Parcel ID #01368-800R & 01369-OOR'
107.52 acres in Section 35 & 36 Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf
County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to Residential Low Den-
sity.
5. Public Hearing Transmittal of a Large Scale Land Use Change Jerald D. Gaskin Parcel
ID #01570-0OOR & 01553-0OOR 143.54 in Section 11, Township 4 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to
Residential Low Density.
6. Public Hearing Transmittal of a Large Scale Land Use Change Buckhorn Development, LLC
Buckhorn subdivisions Parcel ID #01186-100R & 01186-300R 136.17
acres in Section 24 & 25, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County,
Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to Residential Low Density.
14. Public Hearing Transmittal of a Large Scale Land Use Change Ralph Rish Parcel
ID#02977-050R and Parcel, ID# 02977-100R 26.05 acres in Section
17, 18, 19, 20, Township 7 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida
Changing Agricultural to Mixed Commercial/Residential.
Public Hearing New Text Amendments
Public Hearing Corrective Text and Map Amendments to Ordinance 2006-04 and Ordi-
nance 2006-06

This hearing and transmittal pursuant to Section 163, F.S.
All interested parties may.appear at the meeting to be heard regarding the consideration of the
comprehensive plan test and map amendment corrections and revisions. Text copies will be
available at the Gulf County Planning Department

4. St. Johns Village 5. Jerald Gaskin 6. Buckhorn Development

S h CatlhounCo.









14. Ralph l&sh












Ad# 2006-089 Publish July 27, 2006 & August 3, 2006


("


~41~18Ps slarrl~lrasr


8B he tar Pot S. Je, L -Thursday, July 27, 2006


---- --- ---- ---- - -----


lr--


MIN


:I""""llr~Pi--l--~uur*rrfi







FcrIkhd7.7 Sria ufcunyadsrrudn aesfr68yasTe tr or t o, L Tusdy uy27 06 9


Tourist Til

unusual, could also fine you.

Beach Fires, Other Lights
On The Beach at Night
As far as enjoying bonfires
on the beach at night, again,
you need to cross the county
line into Gulf County.
Mexico Beach does not
permit fires on its beaches,
but Beacon Hill and St. Joe
Beach do.
Just use standard camp-
fire safety. Make sure you are
well down on the sand, near
the waterline and not near the
sea oats. Keep the fire size
manageable, be very aware of
the wind, and be absolutely
sure that the fire is completely
extinguished when you leave.
Please remove all cans,
bottles, garbage, etc. when you
leave. Again, trash contain-
ers are conveniently placed at
.every beach walkover for your
convenience.
While talking about remov-
ing trash from the beach,
remember that it is turtle sea-
son through October 31, and
each piece of trash, plastic
rings, fishing tackle is a huge
-problem for sea turtles coming
ashore to nest.
As for beach fires and
other, lighting on the beach
at night, again, remember the
turtle rules: do not build
fies or use any lights of any
kind, including flashlights on
the beach anywhere near a
marked turtle nest. In fact,
lights anywhere on the beach-
es are a danger to turtles and
hatchlings. They will focus
on your artificial light and not
move toward the water, which
they must do to survive.

Turtle Nests
Please remember that
you must not engage in any
activity close to marked turtle
nests. This includes setting
up camp, placing and using
chairs or picnic tables, allow-
ing children to play or dogs to


romp. Turtle nests are strictly
off-limits.
Marked turtle nests will
be surrounded by four stakes
and yellow 'crime scene" tape,
and covered with a piece of
heavy wire screening that can-
not be removed. Turtle nests
are protected by federal law
and anyone interfering with
the nest, the adults or the
hatchlings will be prosecuted.

Beach Driving
Driving on the beach any-
where within The Beaches area
is definitely a no-no.
To drive on the beach in
Gulf County, you must pur-
chase a beach driving per-
mit from the Gulf County Tax
Collector's Office in the county
court house on Cecil Costin
Boulevard.
Currently, costs are $15
per year for Gulf County resi-
dents or Gulf County prop-
erty owners; $150 per year for
non-residents or non-property
owners.
AT the time pf permit pur-
chase, you are given a detailed
map of access points and driv-
ing areas. For long-time beach
drivers, the access point at
the Stump Hole is now closed
and access and driving to the
peninsula is severely limited
after the 2004-05 hurricane
seasons.
Anyone driving on the
beach needs tb be very 'aware
of turtle nests and stay far
away from them. Driving at
night, especially during turtle
season, is strictly prohibited.

Beach Flag. Warning
System, Lifeguards, Rip
Tides
The Beaches do not pro-
vide lifeguards anywhere along
their beaches. Signs stating
this are posted at most munic-
ipal beach walkovers, and
swimmers enter the water at
their own risk.
Everyone should watch


He's Working For You!




JUDGE ELIJAH SMILEY, MBA, CPA,
Bay County Judge






















I have served as Bay County Judge and
as an acting Circuit Judge of the 14th
Judicial Circuit for the past eleven years.
I have handled more than 20,000 cases
during my eleven years as a judge. I have
*upheld high standards of conduct and
honored the office as a public trust.

I offer experience and fairness you can
count on. I ask for your vote on
September 5th for Circuit Judge. Thank
you for the opportunity to serve.

JUDGE SMILEY IS A 1977 GRADUATE
OF PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
CAMPAIGN VOLUNTEERS AND HELPERS CALL 624-2378
judgesmiley@ATT.NET
Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Judge Elijah Smiley
for Circuit Judge #11. Non-Partisan


the weather reports or the
"boat and Beach" forecasts on
television each morning to see
what the water conditions are
for the day. There is a sys-
tem of colored flags placed on
the Panama City beaches early
each morning to alert people
of wind and water conditions.
These flags and conditions are
discussed on both Channel 7
(WJHG-TV/NBC) and Channel
13 (WMBB/ABC) morning
news programs, as well as
on local access channels 4
(Mexico Beach) and, 12 (Port
St. Joe/Cape San Blas/Indian
Pass).
It is in your best interest
and safety to watch for this
information. Even though the
forecasts are for the Panama
City area beaches, the same or
similar wind and water condi-
tions are probably going to be
present at The Beaches and
Cape San Blas.
Mexico Beach does get
dangerous rip currents on
occasion, especially around the
marina canal/old pier area.
The new-statewide beach
flag warning system is:
Green flag: Low hazard,
conditions are favorable for
swimming, swim at your own
risk;
Yellow flag: Medium haz-
ard, swim with caution;
Red, flag: High hazard,
swimming not recommended;
Double red flag: Danger.
water closed to the public;
Purple flag: Caution,
marine pests present. Marine
"pests" can be anything from
jellyfish to sharks.

Boat Launch Ramps
Things have changes in
Mexico Beach with the iftro-


From Page 8B


duction of all the condos front-
ing the city marina, on both
sides of the highway.
You can launch your yacht
from the city boat ramp in
Mexico Beach, across from
37th Street and the city pier.
It is currently very tricky
to launch a boat here, because
the ramp is hemmed in by
construction. There is very
limited boat trailer parking
just across U.S.98, but the
city now has a new boat trailer
parking lot at the west side of
town.
Head west over the bridge
at the very west end of town,
and just past the bridge, turn
right, or north, onto the gravel
road and immediately turn
right, following the canal on
your right. This is the new city
boat trailer park and it has
ample space for boaters.
There are no public boat
launch ramps in Beacon Hill
or St. Joe Beach. The next
public ramps are in Highland
View, under the big bridge
(Tapper Bridge), and in Port
St. Joe at Frank Pate Park at
the south end of 5th Street.
The Mexico Beach Canal
has a 5 mile per hour speed
limit and a "No Wake" rule.
One additional note: wave
runners must stay in restrict-
ed area, 1,000 feet offshore.

City Pier/Fishing Regs
Mexico Beach has a city
pier that is open to everyone.
It is wheelchair accessible,
located at the south end of
37th Street.
Many people need a license
to fish off the pier.and jetties.
Licenses 'can be purchased at
local bait and tackle shops.
S The money collected from
saltwater fishing licenses is
used to improve, and restore
fish habitat, and for marine
fisheries research, law enforce-


ment, and public education on
marine resources.

Surf Fishing
Anyone who is not a
Florida resident needs a non-
resident license to surf fish.
Florida residents don to need
a license to fish from land.
Caution: Be careful around
surf fisherpeople. They rarely
tag or mark their fishing lines
so passersby can see the actu-
al line running from the rod
toe the water.
If you are walking along
the beach, it is in your best
interest to walk behind any
surf fisherpepson to avoid gar-
roting yourself on the invisible
.fishing line.
Also be very aware of surf
fisherpeople who are cast-
ing while you walk behind
them. Very few fisherpeople
pay attention to passersby
and people strolling by are
frequently hooked when the
surf fisherpeople cast back-
ward in preparation for the
forward arc. Next week: Part
II Indian Pass to the Cape.


Watch out

for snakes in

grassy, wooded

or overgrown

areas. When

in uncleared

areas, stay on

well marked

paths and
trails.


PUBLIC NOTICE

A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Thursday, August 10, 2006 at 8:45 a.m.
EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Thursday, August 17, 2006 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will
be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The
public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following:

1. Continuance of the July 17, 2006
2. Final Plat Approval B.J. Heard & Chris King Baywoods Parcel ID #06230-OOOR 4.5 acres in Section 25, Township 8 South, Range 11
West, Gulf County, Florida- a maximum 11 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations, state and
unstated.
3. Preliminary Plat Approval Edward Bish Gulf Coast Ranches Parcel ID #0332 -175R 40.84 acres in Section 32, Township 7 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 16 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations,
stated and unstated.
4. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change St. Johns Village of Gulf County, Inc. St Johns Village Parcel ID #01368-80OR &
01369-OOOR 107.52 acres in Section 35 & 36, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use
to Residential Low Density.
5. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change Jerald D. Gaskin Parcel ID# 143.54 in Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 10 West,
Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to Residential Low Density.
6. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change Buckhorn Development, LLC Buckhorn subdivisions Parcel ID# 01186-1OOR & 01186-,
300R 136.17 acres in Section.24 & 25, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to
Residential Low Density.
7. Adjourn the July 17, 2006 meeting and Call to Order the August 10, 2006
8. Final Plat Approval Hargraves Engineering Bay Colors Parcel ID #06245-OOOR 3.78 acres in Section 36, Township 8 South, Range
11 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 15 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations, stated
and unstated.
9. Final Plat Approval Libby Owens Our Tara Estates Parcel ID# 01 359-370R & 01359-365R 10 acres in Section 36, Township 3 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 28 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations,
stated and unstated.
10. Final Plat Approval Coastal Pines, LLC Cottages at Coastal Pines Parcel ID #03323-170R 40.07 acres in Section 32, Township 7
South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 43 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regula-
tions, stated and unstated.'
11. Preliminary Plat Approval William J. Rish a subdivision Parcel ID# 06268-750R 5.06 acres in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range
11 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 8 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations state and
unstated.
12. Variance Steve Newman Parcel ID #06287-185R .10 acre in Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida
Permission to encroach into side setback 8 inches.
13. Variance Steve Newman Parcel ID #06287-295R .10 acre Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Per-
mission to encroach into side setback 2 inches.
14. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change Ralph Rish Parcel ID#02977-050R & Parcel ID#02977-100R 26.05 acres in Com-
mercial/Residential. .
15. Public Hearing Comprehensive Plan/EAR Text and Map Amendments
16. St. Joe/Arvida for WindMark Beach DO/PDP
17. Staff ,

The Public is encourage to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building
Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., 301.


Please do not feed the wild
dolphins in the bay. Remem-
ber to stay at least 50 yards
away from wild dolphins. Use
binoculars to watch them olav.


Pay attention
to the beach
flag system
and know surf
conditions
before you go ..
into the water!

.aC. WA, mNo ", S. ,'E L1,



._ "- ,. P

,,,M I, .,L, ,1 ,r 5'1 'u, r.L .t L"L ,1'l,,l ,L "


-n.SI a -t b ~---CIC--I~ ;1 -~111 --- J- --- rb131


TheStrPot t.Jo, L Turda, ul 2, 00 9B


Esalsed791- evn Gl ont n uronig ra or6 er






Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


p.m.
For a list of supplies, con-
tact the school office at 229-
6707.
There are still positions
available in many of our class-
es. Feel- free to stop by for
registration and enrollment
papers. Faith Christian School
is a ministry of Faith Bible
Church. Both the church and
school are located at 801 20"'
Street in Port St. Joe.


Public Hearing for Presidential

Search Held at GCCC
The Gulf Coast Community College Presidential Search
Committee will hold a Public'Hearing on August 3, 2006 in the
Jules Sarzin Lecture Hall of the Russell C. Holley and Herbert P
Holley Lanugage and Literature Building on campus.
The purpose of the hearing is for the Presidential Search
Committee to receive public input regarding the qualities, the
college should seek in its next president. Following the hearing,
the committee will begin developing a presidential profile..
The Public Hearing is scheduled for Thursday, August 3,
from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., and is open to the public.
For additional information, contact Wanda Luckie at (850)
872-3816,- or e-mail wluckie@gulfcoast.edu.



School Supply List


Parents and Students,
We do not have a supply
list for Port St. Joe Middle
School students. You will need
notebook paper, pencils, three
prong notebooks, and lock for
-your locker. You may carry a
backpack to school, but must
leave it in your locker during
the school day. Those stu-

Wewa Middle

School
Wewahitchka Middle
.School would like to invite
all parents and students to
an Open House at WHS/WHS
lunchroom, August 3, 2006 at
6:00pm. Students will receive.
their schedules, lunch num-
bers, and have an opportunity
to meet teachers. Hope to see
everyone there!!
Karen Turner
WMS Guidance Counselor


Grades Online
Parents,
You are able to monitor
your child's grades online.
Go to www.vulfkl2.fl.is and
click on:
a. for the parents
b. view grades online
c. click here to begin
You will need to enter the
student ID arid PIN' Code and
then select Port St. Joe Middle
School. r
If you do not have a PIN.
Code, please call 227-3211
after August 7th to 'make an
appointment. You will need to
sign a release and show proof
of identity.


9&0-, 44d.


BO KNOWS

PEST

CONTROL

227-9555
Honest, Dependable Service
20+ years experience
State Certified Since 1985


dents who have PE will need to
purchase a PE uniform from
Coach Lacour when school
begins.
On the first day of school
your teachers will let you
know of other supplies you
may need.
Have a great summer


* Extended school day program
* Reasonable tuition rates, fees, with
family discounts
* Close communication with parents


Give your child a head start with a
Christian education and Biblical worldview ,


.ENROLL NOW! j
CALL 229-6707

Faith Christian School
is a ministry of Faith Bible Church
801 Twentieth Street
H Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
A member ofI the association of Chrislian Schools Int I
Accrediled by the Sonshine ASsocation of Christian School
www faithchristianscrlool net


Documatica Legal
Forms Inc. has announced
the release of a novel legal
kit designed specifically for
victims of schoolyard bul-
lying. The kit, which fea-
tures logs to record bullying
events, and an online form
to convert the records into a
legal Notice of Harassment,
is customizable for any
common law jurisdiction
in the United States and
Canada. The forms will
be freely available to the
public at www.documatica-
forms. com/bullying.
"Every week, we hear
about tragedies occurring
as a result of bullying,"
says Christie Foreman,
Legal Writer. "It's time for
us to stop these events
before they start, by mak-
ing sure that parerits and
schools know the bullying
is happening." The notice,
designed to be served to the
bully's principal, teachers,
and parents, summarizes
the bully's actions and cor-
.relates them with violations
of 'criminal or civil law.
Upon delivery, the recipient
is obligated to address the
situation, or face increased
liability.for the bully's behav-
ior. Currently, 47 states and
several Canadian provinces
have some form of parental
liability legislation in place.
"This kit is revolution-
ary, in that it provides a
much-needed legal and
political recourse for vic-
timrs of severe harass-
ment and their families."
says Jeff Dare, Manager of
Product Promotion. "If we


4


can help just one family, it
will be worth the effort," he
adds.
Current statistics indi-
cate that bullying in North
American schools is occur-
ring at an alarming frequen-
cy. It is estimated that 30%
of U.S. students in grades
six to ten are involved in
bullying, either as victims
or aggressors, and 60% wit-
ness bullying at least once a
day. Furthermore, a study
by the U.S. Department of
Education found that 75%
of school shootings occur
as violent reactions to bul-
lying. In the long term, sev-
eral sources report that
bullying can lead to mental
health problems, anxiety,
depression, and even sui-
cide.
The N6tice of
Harassment form is the
most, recent addition to
Documatica's rapidly
expanding legal, document
selection; which already
includes a residential lease
agreement, bill of sale,
promissory note, and sev-
eral others. The company
hopes that the notice will
provide a valuable public
resource, and also serve
to showcase its website's
unique ability to generate
customized legal forms in
PDF format.
For more information on
the Notice of Harassment,
or other legal forms, visit
Documatica at www.docu-,
matica-forms.com or con-
tact documatica.pr@gmail.
com.


Tyndall Federal Credit

Union to Host Ty's Back-


2-School Celebration

Tyndall Federal Credit Union's Tyndall Savers Program' .
will be hosting "Ty's Back-2-School Celebration" on Saturday
July 29, 2006 from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Panama City
Mall-Center Court.
Tyndall Savers is an award-winning financial program for
children and teens. This youth program is represented by its
mascot, Ty, the Tyndall Turtle.
Upon opening an account with as little as $5, children will,
receive a backpack with school supplies inside. Children can' -
also have a free photo taken with Ty, the Tyndall Turtle, wheri
he appears throughout the day.
For further details, please contact Susie Price at (850)
769-9999 or toll-free at 888-8963255, extension 8476, or by
e-mail at sprice((tyndall.org.


Volleyball Practice Starts

Port St Joe High School, Lady Sharks Volleyball will start
Monday, July 31, at 4:00 p.m.
Practice will be in the gym. Important team information will
also be given out that day. It is very important that you attend.
Our first game is August 15. If you need more information
please contact Coach Taylor at 229-6177. See you Monday.


Port St. Joe High School
Lady Sharks Volleyball 2006-07


Date
August-
15
24
29
31

September
5
7
14
19"
21
26
28

October
-3
10
12 ,


Day Opponent


Tues
Thurs
Tues
Thurs,

Tues
Thurs
Thurs
Tues-,
Thurs
Tues
Thurs

Tues
Tues
Thurs


Rutherford
Liberty County*
'Wewahitchka*
Sneads

Carrabelle-
Sneads
'West Gadsden*
Liberty County*
Rutherford
Apalachicola
Wewahitchka*

West Gadsden*
Carrabelle
Apalachicola


Location Time (EST)
JV/VAR
Away 5:00/6:00.
Away 5:00/6:00
Away 4:30/5:30
Away 5:00/6:00


Away
Home
Away
Home
Home
Away
Home

Home
Home
Home


5:00/6:00
5:30/6:30
5:00/6:00
5:00/6:00
5:00/6:00
5:00/6:00
5:00/6:00

5:30/6:30
5:00/6:00
5:00/6:00


* District Game

District Tournament
The district semifinals wil be held Tuesday, October
17, at Port St. Jde. The first game (1,s4) will start at 5:00
PM (EST) and the second game (2vs3) will start at 7:00 PM
(EST). The'district finals will be held Thursday, October 19,
also at Port St. Joe, starting at 6:00 PM (EST).


Open Your Eyes to Visual Freedom


Reduce/Eliminate Glasses & Contact Lenses
Safe, Proven Procedure Revolutionary Technology

ReSTOR Lens is an intraocular cataract replacement lens that
provides cataract patients with a quality range of vision. ,The
ReSTOR Lens allows patients to experience the highest level of
freedom from glasses ever achieved in IOL clinical trials with 80. percent
of patients reporting "never" wearing reading glasses or bifocals
following bilateral cataract surgery.'

Call today and find out if ReSTOR Lens
is the right lens for you.


SCCENT'ER
of North Florida
PANAMA CITY PC BEACH CHIPLEY PORT ST. JOE
784-3937 234-1829 638-7333 227-7266
TOLL FREE 1-800-778-3937 www.eyecarenow.com

93 I f l111i'i 1 I iF'~jTlar~j ff1 ; A Tj


Faith Christian Plans Company Launches First

For Orientation and Ever Legal Notice of Bullying

Free Online Form Could Increase

For Student's Return Parent, Teacher Liability


The 2006-2007. school
year is about to begin! The
summer staff has been busy
preparing for the new year.
As a reminder, teachers
return on Tuesday, August 1st.
Orientation is Thursday,
August 3rd. Pre-school stu-
dents will meet through the
morning and afternoon (call
the office for times and details).
Parents of elementary, middle,
and high school grades will
meet in the evening at 7:00


rFaith Christian 'i


School


Excellence in a Christian Education
since 1974
K-3 through 8th grade
Special High School and college
offerings
Christ-centered, Bible-based
education
A Beka, Bob Jones, ACSI Curricula
Intensive phonics
Capable, qualified, and committed
faculty and staff


Cal 27-27 ToaytoPlce ou A i

TheStrTh TmesorThNwsHeald


* A


IOB The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyJuy2,06


~L~







Estblihe 197*SriQGl onyadsronigaesfr6 ersTeSaPr t oF hrdy uy2,20


Despite skyrocketing growth in tutoring programs, educators say the most


valuable lessons for young learners involve socialization skills, not academics.


Story by THERESA WALKER
and JENNIFER PINNER
Freedom News Service
Parents expect their kids to
be doing homework. They'll even
ask their children's educators to
give homework. They want their
children to learn, to keep up.
But what if the child is only
3 or 4?
Believe it or not, Norayma
Cabot, education coordinator for
Head Start in Orange County,
Calif., gets homework questions
from a lot of preschoolers' par-
ents.
"One of the things we tell
them is once they get into kinder-
garten they're going to have home-
work, and 'it's going to be things
they don't want to do dittos,
and trace-this-trace-that," Cabot
says. "We tell parents the best
homework you can do with them
now is play with them."
As she speaks, four little boys
who attend Jeanne Hardy Head
Start in Huntington Beach, Calif.,
run around in fireman outfits,
dipping pieces of plastic tubing
in water before running over to
a playhouse covered with yellow
and red paper that looks like
flames. One boy shouts "Fire!"
They all point their pretend hoses
at the house and scrunch up their
mouths to make noises like water
shooting at the flames.
Cabot asks them a question:
"What are you dressed as?"
"Firefighters," they answer.
"Firefighters, yes," she says.
"Muy bien."
This is how children learn
at this age, Cabot says, but often
parents will come and say, "All
they're doing is playing teach
them their letters."
With everybody from the
president to the parent pushing
schools and students to improve
academic performance, the tykes
are feeling the pressure, too.
Yet educators who work with
young children want parents and
the wider community to know that
drilling kids on their ABC's and
1-2-3's to ensure success in pre-
school is the wrong lesson.
The emphasis needs to be
more on socialization than memo-
rization, they say. At that age,
knowing how to share Is more
important than knowing how to
spell. I
It's sad to think of a 4-year-,
old getting kicked out of school,
-but preschoolers are three times
as likely to be expelled as kids
in any other grade, according to
a report last year from the Yale
Child Study Center.
From state to state, preschool
to preschool, bad behavior led to
failure.
The report,
"Prekindergartners Left Behind,"
was the first nationwide look at
the expulsion rate in state-funded
prekindergarten programs pub-
lic schools, Head Start, for-profit
child care, and community pro-
grams. Researchers found that 7
of every 1,000 preschoolers ages


3 and 4 get expelled.
"I've worked with a lot of par-
ents that come into my group, and
one of the reasons they are there is
their child has been kicked out of
preschool or is about to be kicked
out," says Brett Patterson, a psy-
chologist who works with an early
childhood education program.
"It's not basic skills that get
a kid kicked out of preschool,
it's more the lack of redirection,"
says Patterson, who coordinates
teacher training. "Its what's hap-
pening afterward when the teacher
comes to deal with it, (such as)
running out of the classroom, foul
language."
The Yale Child Center study
found that preschools that provid-
ed intervention or other therapeu-
tic services, such as Head Start,
had the lowest rate of expulsions.
School readiness is a goal
common to policy-makers, educa-
tors, parents and the community.
But how to define it?
"Parents are very much aware
and very caught up in readiness.
They're doing a lot of pre-emp-
tive academic drilling," says
Joyce Jones, director of St. Paul's
Preschool in Tustin, Calif., who
also teaches courses for school
administrators at Orange Coast
College. "We call it 'drill and kill.'
Parents are getting more and
more stressed out about readi-
ness. Readiness for preschool and
kindergarten what does that
look like?"
At St. Paul's, where 240 pre-
schoolers are enrolled in morning
and afternoon sessions, school
readiness looks like this to Jones:
A child who is able to sit and be
engaged in "circle time" when the
teachers read or play music to the
group. A child who can follow a
schedule and routine. A child with
some sense of self-help skills, who
can put toys away, help clean up.
At the other end of the spec-
trum, 4-year-old Sam Albertson
furrowed his brow and rubbed
his left eye with a small fist as he
counted red dots on a page as part
of his second math lesson at a
Kumon Math and Reading Center
in Gilbert, Ariz.
It was just one part of his
40-minute session, which also
included a chunk of time devoted
to teaching the boy how to read.
His mother Kelli wants him
to be able to read by the time he
starts kindergarten.
"I want him to have an easier
time in school and be ahead of
the game," Albertson said. "I don't
expect him to be a genius. I just
want to give him that extra help."
She is part of a national trend:
Parents who enroll their children
in pre-kindergarten classes and
tutoring prior to sending them to
kindergarten.
"For parents that come here
and start early, they're already
looking way into the future," said.
Barbara Penaloza, owner and
instructor at the Gilbert Kumon
center.
Many parents, such as


Albertson, have their sights set on
college preparatory high schools
or prestigious colleges and schol-
arships. This is a way for their
child to have an edge over the
competition, Penaloza said.
But some early childhood edu-
cation specialists are concerned
about parents pushing their chil-
dren further along in school cur-
riculum at younger ages.
Pam Powell, assistant pro-
fessor of teaching and learning
at Northern Arizona University,
said the topic is a controversial
one and parents should consider
whether the child is ready for cer-
tain goals such as learning to read
before kindergarten.
"There may be children who
are ready and eager to read before
they go to kindergarten and others
it may be tough for," said Powell,
formerly a teacher in the Gilbert
Unified School District. "How do
you decide which child is which?
It's not like there's a recipe right
for everyone."
Powell favors balancing play-
time with learning time when
teaching prekindergartners. She
encourages parents to take their
time and let their child learn
through methods designed for
their development level.
"We need to be cautious of
being competitive with our chil-
dren," Powell said. "Each child
is an individual, and each child's
development is individual."
At the Kumon center, Penaloza
said students run through various
drills until they master basic math
and reading skills.
"There's no fun and play.
They do number boards, drills
for words and math cards pretty
much right after the other," she
said.
Growth in tutoring programs
offered by Kumon and Sylvan
Learning Centers has skyrocketed
over the past three years.
The international Kumon
Math and Reading Centers reports
a 115 percent rise in enrollment
for students ages 4 to 6 since
2003.
Sylvan Learning Centers
report about a 40 percent enroll-
ment increase in the same age
group in the same period. Sylvan
created a beginning reading pro-
gram for 4-year-olds three years
ago after many parents across the
country requested it.
Reasons for the growth vary,
but officials with the centers agree
that more rigorous academic stan-
dards in public schools play a part
in the demand.
"With the schools being held
to higher state standards, (the kin-
dergarten curriculum) is moving
more quickly and it becomes sink
or swim," said Amy Shumway,
executive director of three Sylvan
Learning Centers in Arizona.
"Parents are very proactive (and
often say), 'No matter what my
child is going to have to do, I
want to make sure they're going
to be able to be successful and get
through'"


The question remains: Do
kids today misbehave more? The
lack of comprehensive studies
such as the Yale report makes it
hard to answer.
It may be that behavior con-
sidered acceptable in less struc-
tured preschool settings of the
past is now termed misbehav-
ior. A fidgety 4-year-old who can't
sit still and complete a work-
sheet becomes a disruption, says
Sharon Seidman, president of the
Orange County Association for the
Education of Young Children and
a professor of child and adoles-
cent development at California
State University, Fullerton.
"I would suggest that children
today may well be misbehaving
more because we are placing them
in more situations that encourage
misbehavior."
Seidman helped conduct
research on primary teachers' pri-
orities for early childhood educa-
tion.
"This research clearly
showed that local kindergarten
to third-grade teachers are more
concerned about children's social
skills than their academic abili-
ties as they enter public school,"
she says.
In a recent national survey
sponsored by Gymboree, a retailer
that conducts childhood develop-
ment sessions, preschool teachers
said their chief concern is that
parents don't know how to pre-
pare their children for school and
lack knowledge of child develop-
ment.
The three most important
skills the teachers cited for a
child's success in preschool:
1. Verbal communication
skills
2. Ability to follow directions
3. Ability to participate in
group activities.
Number and letter recogni-
tion, along with color and shape
recognition, fell to the bottom of
their list.


August 4-6

I Tickets: Civic Center Box Office *
marinaciviccenter.com *
S, ./ ticketmaster locations *
| '* r Ticketmaster.com 850-434-7444


RESENTED BY .CR


BACIK WITH A V


A4







- Neal Smith Willow-St. George Is.
,IMusic: Don Juan Jazz-Ensemble
Sponsor: Robeyson & Friedman, PA.
-" h k 'I "t,


............. ........ .


ss I

4".


UM.




Sam Kates-St. Joe Beach
Music: Joe Hutchinson,'roup
Sponsor: Coastal Community Bankl.



F, jRWFL


First Fridays, a summer celebration of
the arts, is back for its second season.
We hope you will join us each first
Friday from 6:00-7:00 PM, EST for a
wine and cheese artist reception. Music
and cash bar from 7:00-9:00 PM, EST
at the Port Inn and on the lawn of
Coastal Community Bank.. Enjoy great
art, music, libations and fun.


John Fbwler-Cape San BlI
Music: Tocomas '
Sponsor: The Port Fint Wine & Spirits,


This series is proudly sponsored in part by:


p. THEOSTAR
PO R' N INy ....-- -




A L.

2 1k


,, I _~aI Fm fsr


o


Toe


The tar Pot S. Je, L -Thusda, Jly 7, 006 I


Established 1 937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I


L.' *





1'R I-,e SUrfr PrIra.St In, IL Thljr~dnv July2s9Gu nf


I


I SCRUFFY
SPANN
Democrat/Republican Mix
"The perfect
pound puppy!"
Rebecca & Bill Spann


Maltese/Poodle
"Knows lots of commari
very smart."
A.. th Jean Robson


ONROE DUREN
^ Persian
"Movie Star"
Ike & Alisa Duren


Pug
"My Grandma says I'm a little bos

Hazel & Tim R


HARLEY GIRL
Chihuahua
"It didn't take her
long to train us."
Charles & Vicki
Grantland


e may be small in
ture, but he's
ig on attitude."
Roger & Shirley Hagen
17glip.


Sicilian Donkey
"Rosebud is the sweetest
donkey in the world! Rosebud
likes sunsets, leisurely walks
and hanging out with friends."
Mike & Patty Helms


IVIR1M .U.UUfo ish. n"PLMF Iuuruu, _e lff wrN '
Seal Point Siamese Pomeranian-Shih-Tzu English Bu g Chi h Fawn Chinese Pug
"She is as affectio.. "4 very loving little boy "Looks are deceivin e is t ve o y life.' "Sparky loves to play
as she is beauti that keeps watch over I'm a Nole" nd aK outside and play tag
Catherine Otto his food dish." Chris Speck with the mailman."
Jerry Mitchell Paul & Kristy Jones

NA U oardia, roo N Spacious: p os, Clean,,.B6 n. fu aci ,-
oo0i -..0. Doggy Daycare
The rU/i PLACE that your pets will LOVE.! ObediceTri
eObed.ie..ce rammingg
Call Today! Profes-onalIFull-ServicerGo i.
,* 871"-1785 .^"Do gy even" QfEash DogParkl

..-NajuPets.com Fof Pet u d .
.~-~, t -~ ', ^'. -'^ 'J'^ ,- *,J ..-1' ...,'.,;- .t .. t-- .o


COASTAL
CARPET CLEANERS

Call us for all your stain removal and
pet odor control needs!
I I I :II11 I I


The winner will feature The News
Herald, The S ime h sday July
27, and rece a ul, gi pa e
as well as e to o run -
dition, th op 1 gett illa
receive a oto t to be featu i
n an individual month page of a 2007
t Calendar. The Top 25 finalist's entry
tos will be featured on a "Best of the
Best" page in the calendar.


"A SHOP DEVOTED TO DOGS, CATS, & PEOPLE WHO LOVE THE'
COLLARS & LEASHES GROOMING SUPPLIES
GREETING CARDS PET PHOTOGRAPHY PET APPAREL
TOYS & TREATS BREED SPECIFIC T'S & GIFTS
AflO


210 S. ArnoldRd (Hwy 79)
Panama City Beach
Midway between Front &
Back Beach Rd on Hwy 79
850-235-0881


And .
Barks & Bubbles
Professional Grooming
By Loving Hands
850-233-WOOF
(963)


Of Nort-t Arrrtea

AT YOUR VETERINARIAN SOON!
Keeping track of your beloved pet's health history is easier than ever with the
Companion Animal Passport
f EWsyTrc4D
This 36 page document serves as a detailed record of your pet's vaccinations, exams,
surgeries and treatments but also as their official health certificate for travel. It explains
about vaccinations needed for dogs and cats. This Passport saves time, energy and
frustration for the responsible pet owner, and quite possibly your pet's life.
Usually sold for $10.00, as a special offer during the "Pet of the Year" Contest, the
Companion Animal Passport is available to you for only $7.50 a savings of $2.50
- when you take this advertisement to:
Ainmal Care Center
8'01 Fro t Beach Road .
Panama City Beach, FL. 32407
SALES WILL START MID-AUGUST!


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


12B The tr Pr t Je L hrdaJl 2 ,20


I


ur






Watermelons


12C


Legals


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


7C


Classifieds


9-10C


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 SECTION C


Sleeping Arrangements in Gulf County,





Mexico Beach Pay for Multiple Uses


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writter
Who sleeps where, and for how long, in GULF COUNTY TRA
Mexico Bach and Gulf County is of paramount COLLECTI
importance, in a most benign way, of course. COLLECTI
Sleeping arrangements are important in
the county simply because of the bed tax. MONTH 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2
The bed tax, unlike its name may imply,
is not a tax on actual beds, but a tax on each October $6.669-62 $11,258.16 *$5,1i
dollar spent for lodgings in Mexico Beach and
Gulf County. The tax is then applied to tourism November $1,720.85 $11,591.22 $3,21
development, such as promotions of all kinds,
beach maintenance, parks upkeep and facili- December $4,311.74 $4,886.60 $5,29
ties, special events, professional'services, and
operating expenses for the two tourism devel- January $4,408.14 $4,493.06 S5 02
opment councils.
The Gulf County bed tax was implemented February $5,502.62 $9,157.46 $8,74
in 2000, at two cents per dollar spent on any *
rental under six months in duration. March $5,502.62 $11,763-18 $22,45
In February, 2002, the Gulf County bed
tax was increased from two cents to three April $12,564.09 $13,827.' 9 19 3(
cents. With budget workshops currently in
progress for the 2006-07 fiscal year, changes May $9,746.25 $11,033.37. $18,39
are planned for the Gulf County Tourism |
Development Council (TDC) budget, including June $21,339.78 $29,133A16 $50,49
a one cent increase in the bed tax.
The proposed one cent increase will be July $29,463.43 $33,190.44 $51,5W
applied directly to the St. Joseph .Peninsula
beach re-nourishment project that some penin- August $11,299.67 $14,764.33 $23,1(
sula voters approved in a July 6 mail-in vote. I
If approved, the one cent bed tax increase Septemrber 58.573 43 57.113 T $iS2.44
will help pay for the $10 million re-nourish-
ment of a nine-mile stretch of the Gulf side TOTAL S5121,102.24 $162,211.28 $225,33
beach along the St. Joseph Peninsula, from the
Stump Hole area to the state park at the north
end of the peninsula. YEAR TO 1999-2000 j 2000-2001 j 2001-2
Paula Pickett, Director of the Gulf County DATE $50,425.931 $78,010.241 $87,72
TDC, said the Gulf County bed tax has been
highly successful, allowing the county to send
representatives to trade shows and other pro-
motional events nationwide, and bringing in
visitors from" across the country. This figure does not relfect 2 large managemer
In 2004, the county, through the TDC, pub-
lished a dnewly-revised visitor's guide, paid for





.. .. ..' a' .. .......... .....


'~;

IA
./
.9


ANSIENT BED TAX
N REPORT
200Z 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006
31.02 $8,765.21 $10,707.16 $15,963.50 $13,063.80
75.67 $7,090.11 $9,426.22 $9,368.19 $8,198.26
99.78 $5,242.46 $6,381.20 $8,639.98 $9,151.40
C1 54 $8,529.06 !$11,383.19 $11,545.15 $13,755.60
6.97 S9 920 70 514 385 48 $13,456.54 $11,959.09
55.88 $21,165.64 $22,042.98 $34,141.49 $19,440.69*
96 89 $24 899 55 $26,720.99 $25,233.90 $45,946.03
16.89 S27 603 39 $31,606.49 $37,324.74 $32,634.68
95.59 $54,683.75 $60,020.62 $66,579.96
61.77 555 877 71 $75,431.92 $75,516.82
09.25 $37,284-41 $31,776.84 $21,049.68
S9 63 $14.843 13 S19 891 52 515.56431
10.98 $275,905.12 $319,774.61 $334,384.26 $154,149.55

002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2206
'4.74| $113.216:12 $132,653.71 $155,673.49 $154,149.551



it companiesthat were late with payments as of 5-1-06.


in part by bed tax dollars and part by the Gulf
County Chamber of Commerce.
"This brochure has been a big factor in
bringing in more visitors," said Pickett. "We
were able to produce a top-quality piece, which
won a silver ADDY award and was the basis for
the 2005 state visitor's guide."
The St. Joe Company, the TDC, and Richard
Henderson, a well-known Atlanta graphic artist
and long-time resident of Indian Pass, com-
bined forces to produce the guide, said Pickett,
"Dick Henderson, through his exceptional tal-
ents, put us on the map in grand style."
For the upcoming fiscal year, the guide will
be totally revamped, said Pickett, using the
artistic talents of another well-known resident,
Chuck Creasy.
The Tourism Development Council has,
since its formation, operated out of a tiny
office in the Gulf County administration annex.
Pickett, one part-time assistant, and one full-
time public relations person are employed by
the TDC, and their salaries are paid from bed
taxes.'
While some months' revenues fluctuate
widely from year to year, total yearly bed tax
revenues have steadily increased each year in
Gulf County, even with severe hurricane sea-
sons in 2004 and 2005.
_- Taxes are calculated on the fiscal year
schedule, from October through the following
September.
According.to Pickett, the breakdown of the
proposed 2606-07 Gulf County TDC spending
plan, paid for wholly with bed tax revenues, is
as follows:
25 percent = beach nourishment
50 percent = promotion. marketing, adver-
tising. etc.
(See BED TAX on Page 2C)


COLDWeLL eaNer ForootteN coast eaHYtv Presents


i ___ttNn C arto


Busnes AdvanageMoneMaketAcon


We Want Your
Business Checking!
Free Starter.Kit includes:
Checks
Deposit tickets
Binder
Endorsement stamp

No Kidding!
Overdraft Protection
Business Debit Card
,Consolidated Statements
Online Banking. ,
;':-, .'

S re serious' .,,.. ,
i' lperity apt Work checking i
Up to $100,000 liner- credit*
*, Courier service



4 80'5c APY (nn,ual peTrcerilage iicldl ia a',aljblae n balances
c,, $50.000 or mw.e and s. good through 12,'31,06 Thereafiter
the iale ai lhed to 60,.: o i W all Street Journal Prine. 'Ths prori-.cl
1 lional nimerel rair e for ne. rnc' r.er y .nl';, requirEsa a bi:-ne.s
Chioc g 1 aCourl IDto be opened and h3E .T3I..iTI ITu aci,:ur.
balance of $500 000 Olhper r,rri.ion.n ard ic e aTy apple,
Not a.dalable forf public fund,:
Subeci 1to crod.l approval Qualric: ai.n tr 80-' LTV li,..r, Ti.,
valuel is basE3d or c:redi hlo.oy and .:thecr ,eneria A. a .r p ,.p
may be requiredd Th-? nl.reM I al.6 n ffCh,u: a, ? 5 1 I4.'1- l.'.1
91ial be I-e1 d ., 1 75,7S I.r 180 m lh Ther.en r -, ..
rate ,a ary arid ,;rd ,, e .r ded o te PihT.C Ral, a; l.J R,,rj 3
Ihe Wall Sire.et Journal Loan tI.rnri re u ljb iCl :I .'.:. a'
lITe mwIhOiul rnoriC..


-~T Subl'ed' to 11 ced apriau-3


1 Member FDIC


Tonya Nixon
Business Development Oftcer


Port St. Joe 850-227-3370
528 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd.


PROSPERITY BANK
&u~idifg oaer COMwumaty


EVERYONE IS INVITED!
EvePY FPiDaM PPOM 5PM EDT tiLL...
JUNe 16tH. THOUGH LaBO Day weeKeND


Fhe Food oud (oft f0 ,i,, Mulet To0 Colde tA:
(Oat iAW11#j F m kite Flui0g Coiieft!"
Music ICat Not eoitiA#Iafo

['Io//.ll Ski, 9oo0dnig dig Potoutaou0A

90 0 0koeA Kids Pegirj Pig
Face Amifteia C'J and Katooke


aud (a'cle Pulldliq CofKtea Efwte'i to u'it a Deep c'Po F/a i hi fip ip

June 16 th St. Joe leach Hwy 98 & $86 July 28th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 9 9$86
June 29rd Cape San Plas Salinas Park August +th Cape San Blas Salinas Park
June 90th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 6, 986 August 11th St. Joe peach Hwy 98 9- 86
July 7th Cape San Pias Salinas Park August 1 8th Cape San ilas Salinas Park
July 14th St. Joe each Hwy 98 9$86 August 25th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 86
July 21st Cape San Plas Salinas Park September 1st Cape San Plas Salinas Park
' -,_.A': 2-,- ^.: .. --,. ,-" .," J: -`-2`- (r ``; 2-- i^ ^ 3 i ^ J ^ *" : .-^ S -L ;```- *-:S*-* ^ ~ ;t?... = .. -


.,,MI







A% Th oul lll0 .rr r S J FuaI L- hu-s1-Y u 2 6s 9 sn


A-7


Bed Tax


Just across the county
line, Mexico Beach bed tax
revenue is used similarly to
Gulf County.
The Mexico Beach
Community Development
Council (MBCDC) was formed
in 1998, at the same time as
the bed tax was implemented.
The CDC has had two
presidents, J. Patrick Howard
and the current president,
Lynn Costin Marshall.
From its inception, the
Mexico Beach bed tax was
set at three percent, and is
used to fund Marshall's posi-
tion and that of one part-time
employee.
Like Gulf County, Mexico


Beach uses its bed tax funds
for advertising, promotions,
special events, facilities and
maintenance, and operating
expenses.
About $12,000$ 14,000 of
the funds are spent each year
for postage to mail Mexico
Beach's visitor's guide to inter-
ested people nationwide.
A large portion of the
funds goes to maintain the
Mexico Beach canal, said
Marshall, which connects the
city's marina to the Gulf on the
west end of town.
None of the bed tax dol-
lars have been used to pay for
the emergency beach berms
that the city constructed dur-


2001-2002 Bed Tax 2002-2003 Bed Tax 2003-2004 BedTax
October $5,952.46 October $7,492.05 25.86% October $8,431.06 12.53%
November $4,724.29 November $5,467.92 15.74% November $5,561.88 1.72%
December $4,473.77 December $4,903.36 9.60% December $5,096.24 3.93%
January $5,460.29 January $6,074.24 11.24% January $7,316.68 20.45%
February $6,742.48 February $7,142.22 5.93% February $9,523.76 33.34%
March $12,837.68 March $12,919.17 0.63% March $13,034.15 0.89%,
April $13,282.28 April $14,196.00 6.88% April $15,377.47 8.32%
May $14,697.34 May $18,853.42 28.28% May $17,952.48 -4.78%
June $28,481.76 June $33,307.09 16.94% June $28,916.33 -13.18%-
July $30,848.21 July $33,914.62 9.94% July $38,254.72 12.80%;
August $15,508.90 August $17,090.26 10.20% August $13,772.49 -19.41%
September $9.520.35 September $9.008.20 -_538% September $9,753.09 8.27%
$152,529.81 $170,368.55 11.70% $172,990.35 1.54%

2004-2005 Bed Tax 20052006 Bed-ax
October $8,820.77 4.62% October $7,770.67 -11.90%
November $6,572.34 18.17% November $6,759.02 2.84%
December $5,781.87 13.45% December $5,071.74 -12.28%
January $7,701.52 5 26, January $7,390.33 -4.04%
February $8,864.46 -6.92% February $8,815.11 -0.56%
'March $15,97287 22.55% March $14,702.17 -7.96%
April $16.36724 6.44% April $16,5564 1.15%
May $18,639.17 3.83% May $19,040.12 2.15%
June $31,208.86 7.93% June $0.00 -100.00%
July $35579.62 -6.99% July $0.00 -100.00%
August $12,675.28 -7.97%. August $0.00 -100.00%
-September $8.812.71 -9.64% September $0.00 -100.00%
$176,996.71 2.32% $86,105.20


Life Management Center Names Ailes ExecutiveDirector


- .' MLS #200398 This luxurious Gulf Front
home near Indian Pass has everything you would
want in a beach front home Panoramic views
from the 4 decks and top balcony hardwood floor
living area, cultured marble used throughout
bathrooms with top of the line custom upgrades.
IElevator FEMA flood insurance and much more
$1,495,000


PANAMA CITY, FL The
Board of Directors of Life
Management, Center of NW
Florida, Inc. has named Edwin
R. (Ned) Ailes, M.S., LMFT as
its Executive Director effective
July 1, 2006 four months
after appointing him as Interim
Executive Director. Ailes
replaces Peter T. Hampton,
Ph.D. who has retired after 31
years with the, agency, 29 of
which were spent in the top
leadership role.
Ailes joined Life
Management Center in 1998
when the agency acquired the
Gulf County Guidance Clinic
where he served as Executive
Director. Prior to accepting
the Interim Executive Director
position, Ailes directed Bay
County Adult Outpatient,
Psychiatric, Services, and Case


Management as well as Project
H.O.RE., the Friendship Center,
and the Florida Assertive,
Community Treatment (FACT)
programs of Life Management
Center. Additionally, he super-
vised the agency's Gulf County
and Calhoun County clinics.
In this new role, he will over-
see the entire agency adminis-
tration, as well as Psychiatric
Services, Crisis Stabilization,
and the FACT program.'
Ailes began his:, career
as a Counselor with the Bay
County Guidance Clinic, Inc.
(now Life Management Center)
in 1975. He joined the Gulf
County Guidance Clinic, Inc.
as Executive Director in 1976.
Ailes also served as an Adjunct
Professor for many years during
his career, teaching Psychology
courses and family and par-


enting skills programs at Gulf
Coast Community College.
"Over the past year, the
Board of Directors has reviewed
many qualified candidates
for the position of Executive
Director. An extensive national
search for the most appropriate
individual was conducted.
The Board 'of Directors rec-
ognizes Ned as the most quali-
fied applicant and is pleased to
have him continue as Executive
Director," states Connie Rigby
Leete, Board President.
Life Management Center
of Northwest Florida, Inc.,
established in 1954, provides
comprehensive, highly skilled,
affordable behavioral health
and family support services for
children, adults, and families in
the communities of Northwest'
Florida.


You too can have an investment ,
in paradise with

MORE BEST LOANS

ON THE PLANET

from Bank of America

For details about all Home and Lot Loans, NO FEE
Home Equity Lines of Credit and Construction,
Perms, please contact-

Chollet Ramsey, Vice President
850.927.4812
chollet.ramsev@bankofamerica.com

Bankof America 4 .


"Call me and I will work hard for you"

KGary Dugger
(850) 229-4600 Office (850) 258-3453 cell
iI GDugger@gtcom.net PSJRealty.org
REALTY 143 Acklins Island Dr. Port St Joe, Fl. 32456


3 l ,lpp.r j,1, 2 tear : 2 tEr. i Fr,-.r
on Cape San Blis. New Carpet. A downstairs room
with half bath could be third bedroom MLS# 111293.
$849,000


179 Cayman Lane Gulf Front on Cape San Bias. 85 Location. Currently houses three businesses.
Front Feet. Located in X-Zone. Solid pine floors and $750K 3240 Sq. Ft. MLS# 109243
new artic ice carpet.Very spacious with open' floor
plan. $1,350,000. MLS# 109581


3, I ~c,-util '.i.-i:f. 1 1-. ..' iE, 1 --,i .. I Ii9 147 Cayman Gulffront Duplex in X Zone.Unit on Pre-construction opportunity to own an elegant
landscaped acres. 2.3 miles past Raw Oyster Bar on the left sits next to house above. Both sides may be townhome for $290.000.00 on Bonnet Street in
left. Zoned Commercial/Residential. May be subdivided purchased. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 4 decks. $588K. MLS# St Joe Beach.These won't last so move fast! Take
MLS# 111240. $250,000 10493 1Cape San Blas. MLS# 104931 Cowries to Bonnet.
Existing Office W Home on Bay I a View


BAY FRONT. Great investestment opportunity in Simmons Bayou. Asking $1.2 million. All serious offers will be answered.Two acres plus
or minus. Zoned Commercial/Residential. Development Feasibility Assessment available. Property can accomadate three units.Adjoining
1.96 acre property FSBO may be acquired if a larger parcel is desired. From left to right. 896 sq. ft. office fronts C30 with 125 feet of Hwy.
frontage. Easily converted to apartment Middle picture is 1728 Sq. Ft. two bed one bath with Florida Sunroom running full width of house
facing the Bay. Right is a snapshot of the bay. 95 feet of Bay Frontage. FEMA available.


________ vr WIN i I Wwwwwom


'/


From Page 1C


ing and after the 2004 and
2005 hurricane season.
Neither are bed tax dollars
paying for the current berm
construction, which is being
financed in part by Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) and Florida
Department of Transportation
(FDEP) grants and loans.
Because the number of
units from which bed taxes are
collected is so much smaller
in Mexico Beach, its bed tax
revenues do not rise as much
or as rapidly each year as Gulf
County, as seen in the accom-
panying chart.


-- 7' ~C1 I~I1II ~Clr


Mexico Beach Cape San Bias Carrabelle Apalachicola
710 HWY 98 4288 Cape San Bias Rd. 603 Avenue A NW 145 Avemie E
(850)648-10'10 (850)227-1010 (850)697-1010 (850)653-1010
vvwvv--, bf C) rg 0 t to 11 CO las, t xO In I


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2C Te Sar, ortSt. oeFL.ThrdyJuy2,06


A







- a I Qn'1- c..- -x... n.IS -,-. ,j... J ,nrin r nreasc r 68 venrs


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 3(


Shoppers cashing in on



tax-free holiday


By Andy Meinen
Florida Freedom
Newspapers
Melinda Womble
pushed her shopping cart
down an aisle Sunday at
Target. Womble held a
list of supplies includ-
ing Kleenex, scissors
and pencils her third-
grade daughter, Kayla,
needed for the upcom-
ing school year.
On Saturday, a tax
holiday' on school sup-
plies started and will
end July 31. Customers
won't pay taxes on cloth-
ing and books less than
$50 and school supplies
less than $10 dollars.
Womble of Blountstown
waited until the tax-free
period to do her back-to-
school shopping.
"Every little bit helps. It
all costs too much anyway,"
she said, pointing to a pack
of five brightly color pencils
which cost $4.99.
Children, parents and



Cape


Target employees, wearing the hol
red polo shirts, hustled Shi
through the school-supply Journe
section at the store off State City M
77. Special displays hold- in on
cloth

Merchandise or l
have
qualifying Time
for tax-free holiday: ofoA
*Clothing: $50 or less the s
Shoes: $50 or less ed c
free.
*Accessories: $50 or less sever
*Books: $50 or less wore
* School supplies: $10 or less "Tax
left c

in sa
ing crayons, notebooks and said.
folders filled the area. Cas
Julie Jenson, the browse
human resources manager depart
at Target, said the store has Sears.
seen an increase in sales "I
since Saturday. tax-free
Other stores also are shoppi
experiencing a rise in cus- add up
tomers taking advantage of



Sites to


iday.
oppers *packed
;ys at the Panama
all looking to cash
tax-free shoes and
ing.
If a shoe costs $49.99
ess then they don't
to pay taxes," said
Dthy Vedros, manager
urneys.
sign hanging above
tore's doorway alert-
ustomers to the. tax-
holiday. Vedros and
ral other employees
white T-shirts with
Free" on the upper
hest.
We've got a big surge
ales so far," Vedros

ssandra Olivas
ed through the shoe
ment on Sunday at

always wait till the
e holiday to do any
ing, because taxes
,"' he said.




Be


Auctioned


Business News


The Leading
Producers Round
Table (LPRT)
of the National
Association of
Health Underwriters
(NAHU) is proud to
announce that Ross
E. Tucker, CLU,
RHU of Tucker Life-
Health Insurance
& Annuity, Inc. has
qualified to receive
the Association's


a -^
2' ip



, ,-

Ross E. Tucker


Leading Producers Presidents
Council Award as a Lifetime &
Qualifying Member for 2006.
Demonstrated professional
excellence in the sale of health


and related insur-
ance products is the
criterion for mem-
bership in this elite
group of "LPRT"
sales and sales
management lead-
ers. Only a small
percentage of health
insurance agents
achieve this presti-
gious award.
The National
Association of


Health Underwriters (NAHU),
founded in 1930 represents
health and disability insur-
ance professionals through-
out the United States and the


world. NAHU members serve
the health insurance needs of
over 100 million people.
The agency has served the
area since 1984. Mr. Tucker
graduated from FSU in 1973
and has been an insur-
ance agent for 25 years. He
is a RHU (Registered Health
Underwriter) which denotes
both educational and field
experience in health insur-
ance competency, and CLU
(Chartered Life Underwriter),
which likewise denotes both
educational competency and
field experience in life under-
writing, considered to be tan-
tamount to CPA in accounting.


Lightning Kills!

When a storm approaches, and lightning is present:

-Stay away from open high ground and isolated trees.
-Stay away from water, including lakes and rivers. Stay off the
beach and out of boats.
-Do not seek shelter in a convertible car or golf cart.
-Stay away from doors, windows and all metal objects, including, -
pipes and faucets.
-Stay off corded telephones and away from all electrical devils,
like televisions and computers, iPods, DVD and CD players.



Presented By PRESTON RUSS, REALTOR Coastal
Gulf County's Top Volume Sales Leader 2005* [ t


By Daniel Carson
Florida Freedom
Newspapers
For the second time in
less than a year, a Gadsden,
Ala.-based company is auc-
;tioning prime real estate in
Gulf County.
J.P King Auction Co. has
announced it is holding an
Aug. 5 auction of 14 Cape San
*Blas home sites in the Cape
Isle Preserve subdivision on
County 30E.
Company spokesman Carl
Carter said 10 of tih sites are
waterroint parcels, with a lot
of th-ose measuring at least .5
acres. The other four sites will
Shave beach access and water
'views.
Total acreage for the sites
-is 6.64 acres, Carter said.
"Each home site will be
sold as an individual par-
cel," Carter said, although he
added that buyers can group
parcels.
The sites' building areas
are located behind the Coastal
'Construction Control Line,
'according to the company,
allowing owners to build with-


out seeking approval from
the -Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
Real estate developer Tim
Dodson owns the property.
Carter said Dodson lives
in Atlanta, and owns other
Florida properties.
He said the company's
. previous Gulf County land auc-
tion, held in November 2005,
attracted a sizable crowd.
At that auction, 812
acres of property along Little
Wetappo Creek and Overstreet
Road sold for more than $5.5
million, a(cordiln to the com-
pany's Web site
Most of that acreage was
zoned agricultural and located
about 10 miles from the coast-
line and northeast of Mexico
Beach.
The Cape San Blas auc-
tion starts at 10 a.m. EDT at
the property, with individuals
required to present a cashier's
check of $20,000 to partici-
pate.
Carter said that there
would be another auction later
in the day, as Dodson also will
sell his luxury home in Santa


While walking in the shallow waters of St. Joe Bay,
remember to do the "Stingray Shuffle" shuffle your
feet through the sandy bottom of the bay instead
of walking regularly. This shuffling gives the 'rays
ample warning of approaching humans and they
will swim out of your way.


SResidents of Gulf County,
Did you know for minor illness or injury...


Rosa Beach.
"We'll go to Cape San Blas,
auction the home sites, and
then jump in the car and drive
over," Carter said.
'He said the Santa Rosa
Beach sale will take place at
6 p.m. at Dodson's Four Mile
Village home. The Santa Rosa
Beach residence sits on 1.39
acres and includes a pool with
two waterfalls.
For more information on
either auction, go to www.jpk-
ing.com.


j

'I) ~











- I.
I.,
--p.-,.


I,-


V.
/ .
- *, .-.

-~

:~i:.. ~'


make vou wonder why vou'd ever want to go outside. In a setting that begs you never to go in. lt'.yourplace along the unspoded
shores of one.of the last great beaches in Northvest Florida. Come back to WindMr'k Beach -,even if you've never, been.

Y.z


-.. = ; : .. :.


r---------------------_._._.
, .,-. .. -.
''" "' I "
.,1
I I 0


www.Coast al RP e al ty I n fo .com
Contact Preston Russ at:
Office: (850) 227-7770
Mobile: (850), 227-8890
E-mail: home'bi ruis@aol.com
S Website: Homesbyruss.com


'Excellent location Gulf views with a short walt: ti: their bach. b:aird,' aill.'. r ,.m- .
munity pool'and spa. Priced to sell quickly. Aci:rdirg ti: FEMNA fi.: :d majp the
pi..p-In, .ri,,Iuld ejail, be in the X flood zone: Ne'. mctiii r,:l' l LS 110836. Onl ,
$535,000. ... ... ,,. -..


:; i! i


It>


------- (---- -



OPEN HOUSE .
Wednesday, May 24th Sunday, September 10th, 2006 .
-HOURS


I .' Wednesday -Saturday,'10am -5pm Eastern Daylisght Tne
I I 1
., tICC Sunday, l-pm- 5pmnEasteiIDaylightTimne
I 7'L.' .C 4, U GClosed M6nday 6 Tuesday, "
,, '- Open MemorialDay, July 1st- 4th,
", ,,'- ." ..*-. 6 Labor Day, 10am 5p Eastern Daylght Time.
., ........ TIC'KETS .
"C 'hl.d n: n' Adulls.-(Ages' 18 older) $12
S" Children: (Ages 5-17) $6 I {free for children under 5)
- ----- --- - - - - --- --- ------------- ------ ---
WirdMak Bech lolored on ihe hore of St Joseph Bay, 22 miles west of Apalachicola and 39 iniles east of Panama City in the Eastern time zone.

1 !, [o.r Forinformation onthe 2006 Southern Accents Showhouseat WmndMark Beach, call 888-212-7050
S,: or visit wwwwsouthernaccents.com.-For information about WindMark Beach, visit our sales center.
JOE.com or call 850-227-2400 or toll-free 866-227-9.007.

- -- --- ----- --- ----PRC0JECTTEA~M----- ----. --------------------
SDeeloper Budder. Thhr St ,; C,;,r.p-r I Intenors. PhiLhp id.,:: i LcheCtCL. C..,pr R,:,bertor & Partner.I- Landscape Archurect, EDAW\. Inc.
11111oi iit-iitii i lld ll lll s l nIth Ih I I I II l llIi I1Iial, llhIIiIIiit lUlilI lr lhld lIh l l nIIiillhillbI I


SoUtlhem Accents Portion oftthe proceeds to benefit a sH Habitat for Humanity'
-" "COMING, SOON TO oULF COUNTY "' ." '
S. IFYOU DON'T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA, STO .

Obtain the Property Report required hb federal law and read it before signing anyhing No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property.
- : ., : -'.; -- .. ; .j -- -. .. .. .. ( .:t m S 3 K S.- S ^ -' ^ ^ ^^.^ ^^A. ;: J ; k :? 2


2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WindMark Beach
The 2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WmdMark Beach was created to live up to its surroundings. It's packed with ideas to


You can see a doctor

without an appointment!


Walk-in patients

are welcome!

Evening and weekend hours are now available at
St. Joseph Care of Florida located at the
Gulf County Health Department
2475 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe
New hours are:
Monday-Friday, 7:30 .am. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Pediatrician also available for appointments.

Discount rates available based on income.
We look forward to serving you and your family.
For more information, call (850) 227-1276, ext. 100

This adL erisement brought to you as a public service of
St. Joseph Care of FL, Inc/Gulf County Health Department 23725
" --" I-t---:--- T .-


Established 7937 S3erving Uuit county ancl surrounaing areas Tat 00 Y UriS


---- ----- -


l-U







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Citizens Board Approves Continuing Builder's Risk


Citizens Property
Insurance Corporation's,
board of governors decided
Friday to continue covering
builder's risk insurance poli-
cies after state and mdustry
officials said the coverage was
critical to Florida's economy.
"Our action today is a-
serious, response to the mar-
ket," said Bruce Douglas,
board chairman at an emer-
gency teleconference meet--
ing. "The economy of Florida
needs :an interim plan to get
it through." .


"We will not cancel any
existing policies." Douglas
said. :
The boardof governors
' voted unanimously to con-
tinue writing new policies
policies until Dec. 31 and to
renew existing policies. The,
policies will be at actilarily
sound rates.
- The new rates will be
,higher. said Bob Ricker. pres-
ident of Citizens. The total
rate increase has not been
calculated, he said.,
The board's ,dedi-


sion came .after Florida
Chief Financial Officer Tom,
Gallagher, Office of Insurance
Regulation Commissioner
Kevin: McCarty and a num-
ber of builders said Citizens
needed to continue its cover-
age. .
Citizens board members
voted -at a' June meeting to
began scaling back coverage'
after an OIR request in May
to "'Justify" 'writing the poli-
cies, which cover construc-
tion-projects until they receive
a certificate of occupancy.,


Citizens notified OIR
there appeared to be no
specific requirement that
Citizens write the builder's
risk policies.
Citizens stopped writing
new policies July 15 and had
planned to stop renewing pol-
icies on Nov. 1.
Citizens writes these poli-
cies for., wind drainage in high-
risk- areas along the Florida.
coast.,
Members also voted 'to
discuss .the issue 'again at,
their November board meet-,


ing to see if private-sector
companies had entered the
- market and increased the
availability of builder's risk
policies. ,
Board ",members, also
approved a motion to provide
coverage for about 70 con-
tinuing care residential cen-
ters in the state..
The board said the cen-
ters, which often have largely
residential structures that
also house medical or reha-
bilitation cepRters, would be
eligible for. coverage as com-


Coverage

mercial-residential struc-,
tures.
But the coverage would
.be limited' to buildings where
at least 75 percent of total
building space is defined as
residential.
Citizens- must file rate
changes and plans with'OIRto
put the coverage into effect.
For more informa-
tion, contact: Rocky Scott.
Public Information Manager
Citizens Property Insurance
Corporation 850-513-3774
(office) 850-513-6595 (cell).


Northwest Florida State



PartksReceive $12,5 Million


--Senator Charlie Clary
backs additional funding for
park facilities--
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida -Department of
Environmental, Protection's
(DEP) Florida .Park Service
received an additional S12.5
million in the 2006,2007 bud-
get. to--expand and develop
five state parks in Northwest
Florida. Spearheaded .by
Senator Charlie Clary, the
funds will improve Blackwater
River State Park. Camp Helen
State .Park, Eden Gardens
State' Park, Heiderson Beach
State Park and Topsail Hill
Preserve State Park.
"Florida State Parks offer
something for everyone, from
nature-based recreation to.
historic and cultural sites,"
said DEP Secretary Colleen M.
'Castille. "With Senator Clary's
support; Northwest Florida
state parks can expand and
Improve their facilities to
become more accessiblle to
visitors while presenting the
area's pristine natural resourc-.
es."
The additional funding-
will be used for park projects
such as: --


Blackwater River
State Park, almost $1.8 nil-
lion The park will renovate
the campground and construct
a -new tool storage building
and two picnic pavilions.
Camp Helen' State
Park, $1.6 million Funds
will be used to stabilize the
historic structures, including
the recreation hall and four
cottages.
Eden Gardens State
Park, $1.5 million The fund-'
ing will'allow the park to relo-
cate the entrance road and
construct'new picnic areas.,
i Henderson Beach
State Park, $1.5 million The
park will construct an addi-
tional day-use area for visitors.
to enjoy. .
Topsail Hill Preserve
State Park, almost $7, million
- Funds will be used to repair
roads, expand the camp-
grounds and improve camp-
ground sewer access..
"It has been a ,privi-
lege for the last six years to
work with the.,,Department
of Environmental Protection
to support our nationally
awarded state parks system,"
said Senator. Charlie Clary "I
'* '- ,ft


thought that it was important
in my last year to make sure
that the parks in my area that
were devastated by the recent
storms were able to recover
and welcome our many con-
stiruents from this state and
visitors to experience ...the
real Florida."
The first two-time Gold
Medal winner honoring the.
nation's best state park ser-
Vice, Florida's state park sys-
tem is one of the largest in
the country with 159 parks
spanning more than 725,000
acres and 100 miles of sandy
white beach. From swimming
and diving in Florida's rivers
and springs to birding and
fishing.or hiking and riding on
natural scenic trails, Florida's
state parks offer year-around
outdoor activities for all ages.
Battle reenactments and Native
American festivals celebrate
Florida's unique history, while
art shows, museums and light-
houses offer a window into
Florida's cultural heritage.
For more information
about Florida State Parks, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.org


Market Research Report On CAFTA-DR Countries

Is Now Available, Bronson Announces


A market research
report on the sLx nations of
the Central American Free
Trade Agreement (CAFTA-,
DR), which includes the
Dominican Republic, is now
available to Florida's agri-
cultural industry, Florida
Agriculture Commissioner
Charles HI. Bronson
announced today.
The study -- one of the
largest consumer research
projects ever undertaken by
the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services -- includes an exam-
ination of retailers and eco-
nomic growth, along with
other pertinent information
that will provide insight
into the region and assist
with sales opportunities for
Florida's agricultural indus-
try. .
"When early discus-,
sions regarding the Central
American Free .Trade
Agreement began in mid-
2004, I directed our market-
ing staff to begin developing
a series of missions to help
Florida's agricultural pro-
ducers better understand the
region, consumers, trends
and potential sales to these
markets," Bronson said.
"With a combined pop a-


tion'ofmore than 48 million,
we should not underestimate
the potential buying power of
the area."
The CAFTA-DR study
provides, a broad spectrum.
of information for seg-
ments of Florida's agricul-
tural industry to utilize as
they expand sales into this
region. .CAFTA-DR signatory
nations include Costa Rica,.
the Dominican Republic,
Honduras, El Salvador,
Guatemala and Nicaragua
"Through this on-the-
ground intelligence, we have
gained considerable insight
into shoppers' receptiveness
to imported agricultural
products," Bronson said.
"This information, should
assist our state's agricultural
producers as they develop
strategies for marketing to
this region."
Much of the data was
gathered during a pilot mar-
keting campaign involving
the PriceSmart warehouse
shopping club, which has
24 outlets .in 11 countries
in the Caribbean, Central
America and the American
Virgin Islands. .The pilot
program, which -began in
November 2005 and finished
in May 2006, featured sev-


eral Florida commodities
including tomatoes, bell pep-
pers, strawberries and citrus
juices.'
The Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer /
Services' Division of
Marketing and Development
Sexamines regions throughout
the globe to ascertain market
potential, product penetra-
tion, obstacles and how best
to introduce Florida agricul-
tural products to consumers,.
About 100 nations routinely
import agricultural products
from Florida, with net sales
exceeding $1.3 billion annu-
ally. The division routinely
partners with retailers, gov-
ernment agencies, grower
associations and agricultural
companies to help penetrate
new markets, develop 'exist-
ing markets, and expand
overall sales in markets
throughput the United States
and the world. The .com-
bined impact of these mis-
sions and campaigns have
generated more than $1.1
billion in sales during the
last four years and produced
over 34 billion 'consumer
impressions for -the "Fresh
from Florida" logo that rep-
resents Florida agricultural
products globally.
i .


NOTICE OF PROPOSED


TAX INCREASE





The Gulf County School Board will soon consider a

measure to increase its property tax levy.



Last year's property tax levy

A. Initially proposed tax levy............$12,446,408

B. Less tax reductions due to Value

Adjustment Board and other assessment

charges....................... .......... ............. $82,788

C. Actual property tax levy............... $12,363,620

This year's proposed tax levy .......... $12,814,353



A portion of the tax levy is required under state law in

order for the school board to receive $ 3,499,002 in

state education grants. The required portion has in-

creased by 5,90 percent,.and represents approximately

eight tenths of the total proposed taxes.



The remainder of the taxes is proposed solely at the

discretion of the school board.



All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing on

the tax increase to be held on August 1, 2006 at 5:15

p.m., at the Gulf County School Board, 150 Middle

School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida.



A DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the

budget will, be made at this hearing.


NOTICE OF TAX FOR SCHOOL

CAPITAL OUTLAY
The Gulf County School Board will soon consider a measure to impose a
.405 mill property tax for capital outlay projects listed herein.

This tax is in addition to the school board's proposed tax of 4.005 mills
for operating expenses and is proposed solely at the discretion of the school
board.

THE PROPOSED COMBINED SCHOOL BOARD TAX INCREASE FOR BOTH
OPERATING EXPENSES AND CAPITAL OUTLAY IS SHOWN IN THE
ADJACENT NOTICE.

The capital outlay tax will generate approximately $1,117,987.00 to be used
for the following projects:

CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING
Gulf Academy

MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION, AND REPAIR
HVAC Systems
.Lighting
Paving
Port St. Joe Elementary
Port St. Joe Middle School
Port St. Joe High School
Wewahitchka Elementary
Wewahitchka High School
Wewahitchka Middle School

MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES
Purchase of Three (3) School Buses
Purchase of Two (2) Vehicles

NEW AND REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT
School Furniture and Equipment
Data Processing Equipment and Software
Communications Equipment
Maintenance Equipment,

PAYMENT FOR RENTING AND LEASING EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AND
SITES
One (1) Year Rent of Portable Classroom

PAYMENT OF COSTS OF COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL STATUTES
AND REGULATIONS
Restore- Borrow Pit

All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to be held on August
1, 2005 at 5:15 p.m. at the Gulf County School Board meeting room, 150
Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida.

A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL OUTLAY TAXES will be made at
this hearing.


4C The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyJuy2,06


~llllllrllllllllCI9IIIIIClllllllls er I ge31b~- ~s~ -. ,L- Iplrr~l~ergllllllllc~e=; ~r~





PROPOSED
Local Effort-
Discretionary


MILLAGE LEVY:
3.419
0.510


Supplemental Discretionary
Capital Outlay


0.076
0.405


TOTAL MILLAGE:


CAPITAL TOTAL ALL
ESTIMATED REVENUES: GENERAL FUND SPECIAL REVENUE DEBT SERVICE PROJECTS FUNDS
Federal Sources 80,000.00 1,542,200.90 1,622,200.90
State Sources 4,079,302.00 11,620.00 71,500.00 955,723.00 5,118,145.00
Local Sources 11,405,649.00 442,500.00 .40,000.00 1,750,762.00 13,638,911.00
TOTAL SOURCES 15,564,951.00 1,996,320.90 111,500.00 2,706,485.00 20,379,256.90
Transfers In 558,674.00 600,000.00 1,158,674.00
Fund Balance (July 1, 2006) 850,228.15 26,343.60 1,350,979.94 .919,268.91 3,146,820.60
TOTAL REVENUES & BALANCES 16,973,853.15 2,022,664.50 2,062,479.94 3,625,753.91 24,684,751.50

EXPENDITURES
Instruction 8,938,500.99 751,789.90, 9,690,290.89
Pupil Personnel Service 597,092.00 125,684.00 722,776.00
Instruction Media Service 333,409.59 3,392.00 336,801.59
Instructional & Curriculum 233,328.57 144,603.00 377,931.57
Instructional Staff Training 218,150.00 90,849.00 308,999.00
Instruction Related Technology 148,192.00 148,192.00
Board of Education ,170,217.00 170,217.00
General Administration 524,519.00 23,112.00 547,631.00
School Administration 1,183,780.00 1,183,780.00
Facilities Acquisition & Construction 2,306,563.91 2,306,563.91
Fiscal Service 224,692.00 224,692.00
Food Service 820,355.00 820,355.00
Central Service 163,351.00 163,3.51.00
Pupil Transportation Service 983,716.00 ,36,771.00 1,020,487.00
Operation of Plant 1,558,874.00 1,000.00 1,559,874.00
Maintenance of Plant 688,769.00 688,769.00
Community Service '. .0.00
Debt Services 328,272.50 328,272.50
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 15,966,591.15 1,997,555.90 328,272.50 2,306,563 91 20,598,983.46
Transfers Out 1,158.674.00 1,158,674 00
Fund Balance (June 30, 2007) 1,007,262.00 25,108.60 1,734,207.44 160,51600 2,927,094.04
Total Expenditures, Transfers & Balances 16,973,853.15 2,022,664.50 2,062,479.94 3,625,753.91 24,684,751.50


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDG
AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE A NG


SCHOOL BOARD OF GULF COUNTY

HISTORICAL SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

(TEN-YEAR SUMMARY 1995-96, 2001-01, 2005-06


Total Revenue
Federal, State, and Local
20,000,000 16,788,988 18,595,692
1,5.o00 o "o- 13,241,576
10,000,000
5,000,000 -

,1995-96 : 2000-01.' 2005-06

Fixed Capital Projects
Total Revenue for Fixed Capital Outlay
2,750,000 2,609,496
2,250,000 -
1,750,000 1,513,185
1i250,000 880,883
750,000
250,000 i
1995-96 2000-01 2005-06

Number of Students
S 'otal Unweighted FTE Students
3,000 -
2,323 2,175 2,263'
2,000 -




0
1995-96 2000-01 2005-06
Number of Employees
Total Number of Employees

S291 301




100 -


1995-96 2000-01 2005-06


Operating Revenue
Total Current Operating Revenue
15,186,622 15,274,060
15,000,000 -

10,000,000

5,000,000
0
S1995-96 2000-01 ,2005-06
Debt Service
Total Revenue for Debt Service '

850,000 712,136
650,000 -
450,000 311,668
250,000 -89,181
50,000 I "M i
-1995-96 2000-01 2005-06

Revenue Per Student
operating Revenue divided by Unwreighted FTE Students.

8,000 6,983 6,749


4,000 -
3,000 -
2,000 -
1,000 -
1995-96 2000-01 2005-06

Teaching Personnel
Total Number of Instructional Personnel
300 -


100 -


0


1995-96


2000-01


2005-06


Total current operating revenues have been reduced by Workforce Development funds in
the amount of $211.,972 in order to provide comparability in the calculation of current
operating revenue per UFTE. This adjustment is'necessary due to the exclusion of-adult
programs from UFTE beginning in 1998-99.


4.41


TheSta, ortSt.Jo, h Turday Juy 7, 006 -


Established 7 93 7 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 6 years


BUDGET SUMMARY

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF GULF COUNTY DISTRICT SCHOOL

BOARD ARE 5.00 PERCENT MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES

FISCAL 2006-2007


\I ''







6C Thes___ Stnr Port __ St. Joe FL Tu ,Jl 7 06Etbihd13 evigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


~-~e


By: Kay Kelly
The sixth principle of xeri-
scaping is the appropriate use
of lawn areas. I believe the key
to this is the word 'use'. There
are places where lawns are
incredibly useful, as well as
places where the lawn makes
no sense whatsoever.
The problems with sim-
ply blanketing a property with
grass and calling it a day are
worth repeating. The environ-
mental impact of having grass
is directly proportionate to the
fastidiousness of the property
owner. In plainer language,
you type A personalities who
must have the perfect, lush
lawn with no weeds are much
harder on the environment.
A lawn like that requires the
use of herbicides, pesticides,
and chemical fertilizers, all of
which are contributing to the
pollution of groundwater, not
to mention needing copious
amounts of irrigation water.
It is possible to have a nice
lawn without these pollutants,
and without wasting water, but
the people skilled in accom-
plishing this are too few to
count. (If you ever find one,
you'd better give him the keys
to your kingdom... he's that
valuable.) On the other hand,
if you are more relaxed about
having a yard. that is simply
green, and not too picky about
what's mixed in with the grass,
then your contribution to pol-
lution is more likely limited to
the carbon emissions from the
mower and weedwhacker. I'm
not anti-lawn.
I admire thick, beauti-
ful grass. It is a wonder-
ful erosion controller, for one
thing, and filters oil and other
pollutants out of stormwater.
Grass provides oxygen, has a


wonderful cooling effect on the
atmosphere, and has a posi-
tive effect on mental health.


It feels good under bar
Unlike many other grouse
ers, grass can be walk


without hurting it. It provides
a soft, cushy environment for
kids to play on. And if your
child happens to be a dog,
dogs prefer to 'use' grass too,
if you know what I mean.
Coming back around to
the appropriate use of lawn
areas, environmental edu-
cators are trying to impress
upon us the lesson that less
is better. Children (and dogs)
may increase the need for lawn
area, so a play area for them is
*1 very appropriate. If you enjoy
being outdoors, an entertain-
ment area with nice grass is
appropriate (and oh so trendy,
decked out with today's out-
door furniture and cooking
facilities). Other than that,
grass seems to be chosen as
a groundcover largely for aes-
thetic reasons. And, though
I hate to say this, because we
sometimes lack the imagina-
tion to think of alternatives,
grass is easy, and relatively
x. inexpensive in the (very) short
.- '. term.
e.e, r Let's look at some of
the places where the use of
grass is not appropriate. That
includes, first and foremost,
.' any area where it is difficult to
maintain. Tight corners, nar-
row strips, and steep inclines...
any such place where a lawn-
S;.'. mower can' t easily go should
not be planted with grass. I
t.- tend to go a bit ballistic when
., I see new landscapes installed
in commercial settings, like
parking lots, where someone
S\ saw fit to plant twelve square
feet of grass, and a tree. When
I the tree is established t he
irrigation to it could be turned
off, but oh no, that grass will
e toes. have to be watered forever.'
ndcov- Almost as bad is that little
:ed on skinny strip of sod off byitself


that is used to 'finish' an area.
Landscapers like to usegrass
around mulched beds to set
off a planting, but when it
involves constant mowing
and watering of a small, tight
space, more attention should
have been paid to the overall
design.
To reduce the problem of
off-site pollution, it might be a
good idea to rethink the use of
grass against streets and drive-
ways. Buffering these impervi-
ous surfaces with landscaped,
mulched beds would help
filter pesticides and, nitrates
from fertilizers that would oth-
erwise wash away with hard
rains.
Your lawn will be healthier
if grass clippings are left to
return to the earth. Make your
turf area large enough to allow
that, without blowing the clip-
pings into the shrubbery or.
into the street.
Having a nice lawn -is a
luxury that most of us can


afford, but we can also have
too much of a good thing. For
a very long time, landscape
designers have incorporated
some nice beds around a prop-
erty, and used grass as a filler
for the rest. Today, designers
are learning to think about
hardscapes and appropriate
lawn areas first, and using the
trees, shrubs, and groundcov-
ers as fillers for the rest of the
property.
As gardeners and hom-
eowners, we may be living with
a grass yard that has been
there, since way back when,
complete with thin patches
where the trees have grown
and created too much shade,
pocked with the exposedhroots
from those trees, and costing
more time, .money, and water
to maintain than we care to
admit. It is not too late to
change, if only we are willing
Questions? Comments?
Opinions? Email me at
kc.kelley(5)mchsi.com


Pay attention to

the beach flag

system and know

surf conditions

before you go into

the water!


Charming cottage Ilocated on a beautiful
wooded lot in a well established neighborhood.
Completely renovated in 2004! MLS#: 111660
ONLY $209,000




I -^',.., .. "

f-^"'^ '*','


_

.. .-"--. .'-- :



3 BR 2 BA House on quiet street with lots of
upgrades: granite countertops, fireplace, Pergo
wood floors, pool & hot tub, wonderful family
room. MLS# 110465 $329,000.


Large building lot in Palm Breeze subdivision, Gulf Front Gated Community with two swim-
close to town, bay and beaches. This is a beauti- ming pools, tennis courts and easy access to
ful subdivision with underground utilities which America's Number One Beach (Selected by Dr.
allows modular homes with covenants and re- Beach, 2002). 34 Townhouses Available from
strictions..103 X 190. Starting at $75,000. $325,000 to $650,000.


4 Commercial lots located in a rapid develop-
ing coastal community. Highly visible and high
traffic volume in Port St Joe. Gieat Bay views!
Possibility to pick up two additional adjacent
lots for bigger space. MLS 110987 $950,000.













'' ,




www.CoastalRei


Nice yard, fireplace, large master
room. MLS# 110119 $339,000.


alfyInfo.com


St. Joe Bay.
and living

Preston
Br
Victor R
Br
Scott Bu
RE
DebbeV
R
Betty Ca
R
Paul Pen
R
Gretche
R
Brian Bu
R
Rex And
R
Ann An
R
Chris Pi


R


8048 Cape San Bias Rd 110 Barrier Dunes
Cape San Bias, FL Cape San Bias. FL

850-227-7770 850-227-3200

800-584-1566 800-713-9695
' i .


L- '11.1*11


Gulf Fron tolo nhouie. II f ,r, J,
third bedroom. This unit has been well main-
tained and would be an excellent 'rental unit.
Priced to sell MLS# 200304 $439,000.









Charming 3 BR 2 BA House in Port St. Joe built
in 2004. Large kitchen and family room with tile
flooring and counter-tops. Whirlpool & separate
shower in master bath. In-ground sprinkler system..
MLS# 109637 $284,500








Month) Bj.)u, t' :' &, ,.:.,,,l,, l'.-.:
just two short blocks to public beach access.
Zoned commercial and would be a great loca-
tion for an office. MLS# 110825 $299,900
Russ 227-8890
roker
lamos GRI 340-1216
roker Associate
urkett 899-5242
EALTOR
Wibberg 227-6178
EALTOR
aughey 625-6197
EALTOR
nn 866-2853
EALTOR
n Upchurch 227-5543
EALTOR
urkett 227-8892
EALTOR
person 227-5416
EALTOR
person 227-5432
EALTOR
ierce 340-0628
EALTOR
106 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe, FL

850-227-7775

800-581-2910


Help your kids beat summer


boredom -

By Jason Alderman
My parents never talked,
about money at home and like
so many of us, I had to learn
about it on my own, often mak-
ing youthful mistakes along
the way. Take this opportu-
nity with the kids home from
school this summer to instill
in them your knowledge and
values about money. It's a les-
son that, will last them a life-
time.
You don't need to make
learning about-money a boring
form of home-based summer
school. If you make it fun, do
it together and integrate it in
your daily life, your kids are
bound to be more receptive.
Help them help you.
Just because the kids are on
summer break doesn't mean
your regular errands disap-
pear. Look for age-appropriate
tasks they can do for a price
- in addition to any allowance-
related(, responsibilities they
may already have. If you've got
yard work or grocery shopping
to do, get your kids to help -
it's a great way to spend more,
time together and provides
an opportunity to teach them
important money management
skills.
Plant the savings bug
early. Americans have a per-
sonal savings rate of minus
0.5 percent, the lowest since
the Great Depression. If your
kids don't learn the value of


and learn a few things


saving from you, possibly they
never will. Teach them about
"a rainy day" as early as pos-'
sible by have them save a por-
tion of their earnings. You can
sweeten the deal by matching
a portion of their savings your-
self, much as your employer
matches your 401(k) savings.
Teach kids what things
really cost. When your parents
said, "Money doesn't grow on
trees,", they weren't trying to
interest you in horticulture.
Try these ideas:
Take the kids shopping
and let them help compare
prices and value. Explain
how discounts and cou-
pons work, and ask for their
ideas on how to reduce the
total bill.
Teach younger, children
the ,basics of money, such 'as
different denominations and
how to count change after a
purchase.
Involve older kids in plan-
ning vacations by researching
travel costs online, calculating
gas mileage, estimating hotel
bills, etc.
When planning a major
purchase like a house or car,
have them help research and
comparison shop, and explain
how sales tax, loans and real
estate broker commissions
work.
,Get rid -of the junk. Most
of us -have closets bursting
with things we no longer use


or want. Hold a garage sale,
sell it on eBay or donate your
goods to charity and give the
kids cash for their portion of
the tax write-off. The Salvation
Army has a helpful online
tool for calculating the write-
off value of donated items at
www.salvationarmy.org under
"Donate receipts valuation
guide."
Don't forget the fun. Many)
family friendly websites have
interactive financial education
games you can play with your
kids. Visa USAs free personal
finance site, Practical Money
Skills. for Life, www.practi-
calmoneyskills.com, includes
interactive games like Financial
Football and Ed's Bank that
teach math and financial skills
in a challenging, fun way. The
site also features a parent's
resource section that can arm
you with facts and suggestions
on how best to talk to your
kids about money.
So help your kids and
yourself have a more enjoy-
able summer by ,getting
involved in their financial edu-
cation.
Jason Alderman directs
the Practical Money Skills for
Life program for Visa USA.
More information about par-
ent/children -activities and
other personal finance tips
can be, found at http://www.
practicalmoneyskills.com.


BIG DISCOUNTS I






I" I* '


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


6C The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyJuy2,06


.. .... .... / .......... i /t i ,


. r,


., L -- :illl:llll~ l;rl- lr -I~f;:-i.i~ ;;~;l:'~-l~~i;~








Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe,, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 7


PUBLIC NOTICES


THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

IN RE: The Estate of
FLORENCE WYNELL
PRITCHARD,
CASE NO.:06-53PR
Decedent.
/

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
I The administration of the
Estate of FLORENCE WYNELL
PRITCHARD, File No. 06-53PR ,
is pending in the Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456. The name and
address of the Co-Personal
Representatives and the Co-
Personal Representatives' attor-
ney are as set forth below.
ALLINTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on' whom this
Notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court, are
required to file their objections
with this Court within the lat-
ter of three (3) months after the
date of the first publication of
this Notice or thirty (30) days
after the date of service of a copy
of the Notice on them.
All creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against Decedent's
Estate on whom a copy of this
Notice is served, within three
(3) months after the date of the
first publication of this Notice
must file their claims with this
Court within the latter of three
(3) months after the date of the
first publication of this Notice or
thirty (30) days after the date of
service of a copy of this Notice
on them.
All creditors of the Decedent
and persons having 'claims or
demands against Decedent's
Estate must file their claims
with this Court within three (3)
months after the date of the first
publication of this Notice.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
lication of this Notice is July
20, 2006.
Co-Personal Representative:
Karen Rollins
230 South Duck Avenue
Wewahitchka, FL 32465

Co-Personal Representative:
Sandra Oltz
6302 Boatrace Road
Panama City, FL 32404

Timothy J. McFarland; Esquire
P.O. Box 202
326 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
FL Bar No.: 0984868
(850) 227-3113
Attorney for Co-Personal
Representatives
Publish July 13, 20, August 3,
& 10 2006.

PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that
Bayou Storage, pursuant to
FS83.806, will dispose, of or
offer for sell after 07/31/06,
the miscellaneous items belong-
ing to the following, tentants:
Art Jonas; Jeffery Stuart; John
'Dellolmo. Unit-contents may be
re- deemed by owner prior to
07/31/06 for cash only.
Publish July 20 & 27, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: The Estate of -
ROBERT JOSEPH SR.
Division Probate
deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Robert Joseph Sr.,
deceased, whose date of death
was November 23, 2003, and
whose Social Security Number is
261-20-8845, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division; the
address of which is 100 Cecil
G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Rm 148,


Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY. CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF,
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is July 20, 2006
Attorney for Personal
Representative
/s/J Mark Fisher
Florida Bar No. 494992
148 Miracle Strip Parkway SE
Suite 2
Fort Walton Beach, Florida
32548
Telephone: (850) 244-8989

Personal Representative:
/s/Jacquelyn E. Joseph
1001 N H Street
Pensacola, Florida 32501
Publish July 20 & 27, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: The Estate of
ORIN SCHOELLES,
CASE NO. 06-42 PR
Division Probate
deceased.
/

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of ORIN SCHOELLES,
deceased, whose date of death
was April 16, 2006, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida; Probate
Division, the address of which is
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,
Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative'sattor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE, OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. I
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TOW
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
.THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice July 20, 2006.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
/s/SEAN W. SCOTT, ESQ.
3233 East Bay Dr, Suite 104 ,
Largo, Florida 33771-1900
Telephone: (727) 539-0181
Florida Bar No. 870900


SPN: 01212383

Personal Representative:
/s/DIANNE WALLACE
334 Bay Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Publish July 20 & 27, 2006

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will hold
a public hearing to consider
adoption of an Ordinance with
the following title:
AN ORDINANCE RELATING
TO THE LEVY OF A SIX CENT
PER GALLON GASOLINE AND
FUELS TAX, (THE "LOCAL
OPTION GAS TAX"); AMENDING
ORDINANCE 89-4 BY
EXTENDING THE TERM OF THE
LEVY OF .THE LOCAL OPTION
GAS TAX; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The public hearing will be
held during the Gulf County
Board of County Commissioner's
meeting on Tuesday, August 8,
2006 at 6:00 p.m. est. in the
County Commissioner's meeting
room in the Robert M. Moore
Administration Building, Gulf
County Courthouse Complex,
Port St. Joe, Florida.
All interested persons
may appear and be heard
with respect to the proposed
Ordinance. If a person decides
to appeal any decisions made
by the Gulf County Commission
with respect to any matter
considered at this hearing, he/
she will need a record of the
proceedings and that for such
purpose he/she may need to
ensure a verbatim record of the
proceedings made and which
would include any, evidence
upon which the appeal is to
be based.
A copy of the proposed
Ordinance is available for
inspection on weekdays between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and
5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of
the Clerk of Court, Gulf County
,Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin,
Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida,
32456.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: CARMEN L. McLEMORE,
CHAIRMAN
Publish: July. 27, 2006 and
August 3, 2006
Ad #2006-086

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0506-25

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive bids from any person,
company or corporation inter-,
ested in providing the following
service:
Financing of a 2006 Ford
F350 4x4 Rescue Truck
with Utility Body, in the
amount of $43,376.00.
Financing will be for a
term of five (5) years, with
first payment due one (1)
year after establishment of
loan.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Bids will be received until
Friday, August 4, 2006 at 5:00
p.m. E.T., at the Office of the
.Clerk of Circuit Court, 1000
Cecil G. Costin, St. Blvd.,
Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL
32456, and the bids will be
opened, at this location on
Monday, August 7, 2006 at
10:00 a.m.; E.T.
The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
By: /s/ Carmen L.
-McLemore, Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk -
Ad #2006-087
Publish: July 27 & August
3, 2006

BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS

GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
for


AUDITING SERVICES

RFP NO: 0506-26

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners (the
"County") is requesting qualifi-
cations from
firms or individuals for the
provision of professional Audit
Services.

RFP DEADLINE: August 11,
2006
RFP OPENING: August
14, 2006

Late submittals received
after the fore mentioned dead-
line date, either by Mail, or oth-
erwise, will not be considered
and returned unopened. The
time of receipt will be deter-
mined by the time received
in the Clerk To The Board of
County Commissioner's office.
It is the sole responsibility of the
firm for assuring that the RFP is
received in the clerk's office by
the designated date and time.
No faxed, electronic or oral RFP
will be accepted.
To be considered, Firm/
Team must submit an original
and ten (10) copies of RFP in
a sealed envelope or package,
clearly marked with the Firm/
Team's name and address, and
the words "Audit Services: RFP
NO: "0506-26" addressed to:
Gulf County Board of County
Commissioners, Gulf County
Clerk of Court, Room 148, 1000
Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. RFP's will be
received until 5:00 p.m., E.T.,
on Friday, August 11, 2006.
RFP's will be opened on Monday,
August 14, 2006 at 10:00 a.m.,
E.T. in the same office.,
Copies of required infor-
mation for the RFP, Financial
Statements and Budgets are
available in the Gulf County
Clerk of Court's office, Room
148, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456,
Monday-Friday,,9:00 a.m., E.T.
to 5:00 p.m., E.T.
The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners reserves
the right to reject any or all bids
deemed in the best interest of
the County.
GULF COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS -
By: /s/ Carmen L. McLemore,
Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk
Publish: July 27 & August 3,
2006
Ad #2006-088

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND .
tH GULF COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS ADOPTED BY
ORDINANCE NO. 2006-04,
SECTIONS 4-11, EAR BASE
AMENDMENTS
IN COMPLIANCE
AND THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENTS
ADOPTED BY
ORDINANCE NOS. 2006-
04, SECTION 3, EAR BASE
AMENDMENTS, ORDINANCE
2006-05, WETAPPO CREEK
AND ORDINANCE 2006-06,
CUMBIE
NOT INCOMPLIANCE.
DOCKET NO. 06-1ER-NOI-
2301-(A)-(N)

The Department gives
notice of its intent to find
the Amendment(s) to the
Comprehensive Plan for Gulf
County, adopted by Ordinance
No(s). ORDINANCE NOS. 2006-
04, SECTION 3, EAR BASE
AMENDMENTS, ORDINANCE
2006-05, WETAPPO CREEK
AND ORDINANCE 2006-
06, CUMBIE, on April 11,.
2006, ,NOT IN COMPLIANCE,
and Ordinance No(s). 2006-
04, Sections 4-11. Ear Base
Amendments on' April 11, 2006
IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to
Sections 163.3184, 163.3187
and 163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Gulf
County Comprehensive.
Plan Amendment(s), the
Department's Objections,
Recommendations, and,
Comments Report (if anyl, and


the Department's Statement of
Intent to find the Comprehensive
Plan Amendment(s) Not In
Compliance will be available
for public inspection Monday
through Friday, except for legal
holidays, during normal bust-.
ness hours, Gulf County BOCC
Administration Building 1000
Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room
3, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
Any affected person, as
defined in Section 163.3184,
F.S., has a right to petition
for an administrative hear-
ing to challenge the proposed
agency determination that
the Amendment(s) to the Gulf
County Comprehensive Plan
are In Compliance, as defined
in Subsection 163.3184(1), F.S.
The petition must be filed within
twenty-one (21) days after pub-
lication of this notice, a copy
must be mailed or delivered
to the local government and
must include all of the infor-
mation and contents described
in Uniform Rule 28-106.201,
F.A.C. The petition must be
filed with the Agency Clerk,
Department of Community
Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2100. Failure to timely
file a petition shall constitute
a waiver of any right to request
an administrative proceeding
as a petitioner under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If
a petition is filed, the purpose
of the administrative hear-
ing will be to present evidence
and testimony and forward
a recommended order to the
Department. If no petition is
filed,thisNotice of Intent shall
become final agency action.
This Notice of Intent and
the Statement of Intent for
those amendments) found Not
In Compliance will be forward-
ed by petition to the Division
of Administrative Hearings
(DOAH) of the Department of
Management Services for the
scheduling of an Administrative
Hearing pursuant to' Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The.
purpose of the administra-
tive hearing will be to pres-
ent evidence and testimony
on the noncompliance issues
alleged by the Department in its
Objections, Recommendations,'
and Comments Report and
Statement of Intent in order to
secure a recommended order for
forwarding to the Administration
Commission.
? Affected persons may peti-
tion to intervene in either pro-
ceeding referenced .above. A
petition for intervention must.
be filed at least r .-rt. (20)
days before the i.r I hear-
ing and must include all of
the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-
106.205, F.A.C. Pursuant to
.Section 163.3184(10), F.S., no
new issues may be alleged' as
'a reason to-find a plan amend-
ment not in compliance in a
petition to intervene filed more
than twenty one (21), days after
publication of this notice unless
the petitioner establishes good
cause for not alleging such new
issues within the twenty one
(21) day time period. The peti-"
tion for intervention shall be
filed at DOAH, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3060, and a copy mailed
or delivered to the local gov-
ernment and the Department.
Failure to petition to intervene
within the allowed time frame
constitutes a waiver of any right
such a person has to request
a hearing pursuant to Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to
participate in the administrative
hearing.
After an administrative
hearing petition is timely filed,
mediation is available pursuant'
to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a),
F.S., to any affected person who
is made a party to the pro-
ceeding. by filing that request
with the administrative law
judge assigned by the Division
of Administrative Hearings.
The choice of mediation shall
not affect a party's right to "an
administrative hearing. -
-s- Valerie J. Hubbard, AICP
Director
DI.i:-.:.r. of Community
Fluiear.eng
Department of Community


Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2100
Publish: July 27, 2006

NOTICE OF INTENDED
ACTION THE GULF COUNTY
SCHOOL BQARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf
County School Board propos-
es to amend and adopt pol-
icies, as provided for in the
Administrative Procedures Act,
for the purpose of bring said
policies into compliance with
Florida Statures and State
Board of Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a
brief description of each pro-
posal change.
Code of Conduct
Student Progression Plan
Economic Impact: The pro-
posals will result in no direct
costs associated with implemen-
tation.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING
WILL BE HELD AT:
Time: 10:00 a.m., ET
Date: August 15, 2006
Place: Port St. Joe High
School
100 Shark Drive
Port St. Joe, FL. 32456
The entire text of the proposed
rules can be inspected during
regular office hours at the Office
of Instructional Services, 150
Middle School Road, Port St.
Joe, FL.
Special legal authority under
which the adoption is autho-
rized and the law being imple-
mented and interpreted are
made specific.
The addition and changes are
proposed by Sara Joe Wooten,
Assistant Superintendent of
Instruction' and approved for
consideration by Tim Wilder,
Superintendent.
Amendments: See Above
Publish July 27, & August
3,2006

NOTICE OF INTENDED
ACTION THE GULF COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf
County School Board propos-
es to amend and adopt pol-
icies, as provided for in the
Administrative Procedures Act,
for the purpose of bringing
said policies into compliance
with Florida Statutes and State
Board of Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a
brief description of each pro-
posal change.
Table of Contents
2.11 Orientation of Board
Members
2.70 Prohibiting
Discrimination, Sexual and
Other Forms
2.80 Reporting Child Abuse
2.95 Wellness Policy
3.201 Performance Grade
Schools ,
3.40 Safe and Secure
Schools '
3.51 Copying of Public
Records
3.60 Flag Display and
Pledge.
3.68 Background Screening
for Contractors
3.80 Schpol Volunteers
4.70 Home Education
Program
5.11 Admission to
Kindergarten
5.12. Admission to First
Grade
5.13 Homeless Students
5.16 Foreign Exchange
Student Admission
5.20 Student Assignment
5.30 Student Control
5.31 Zero Tolerance For
School Related Crimes
5.62 Administration, of.
Medication .
5.63 Students With AIDS or
HIV Disease
5.70 Student Records
5.80 Athletics
5.81 Drug. and Alcohol,
Testing of Student Athletes :
i 4 i Errployment of
'-_.r...: *.: .:. -. Not Full Time
L rr-pi *:,:: 7
6..144 Educational
Paraprofessionals and Aides'
6.145 Substitute Teachers
6.15 Assisting Teachers to
Become Highly Qualified
6.16 Appointment or
Employment Requirements
6.21 District Certificates
'6.30 Violation of Local,


State, and/or Federal Laws
6.33 Alcohol and Drug-Free
Workplace
6.36 Complaints Against
Employees
6.502 Approval of Leaves
6.543 Illness or Injury-in-
Line-of-Duty Leave
6.61 Employees with HIV,
AIDS or Other Communicable
Diseases
6.75 Whistleblower
Protection
6.80 Name and Address of
Employee
6.914 Use of Sick Leave by
Family Members
7.36 Indebtedness Created
Against a School or the School
Board
7.60 Audits
7.65 Antifraud
7.70 Purchasing and
Bidding
7.701 Bid Protest
Resolution
7.71 Selecting Professional
Services
8.10 Safety
8.44 Summer Nutrition
Program
8.501 Protests of
Construction Contract Bids .
8.51 Renovations or
Remodeling of Facilities
8.61 Telecommunications
Plan, FIRN2 and Internet Use
8.70 Management
Information System
8.80 Record Retention and
Disposal
9.21 School Reports
Economic Impact: These pro-
posals may result in direct costs
associated with implementa-
tion.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING
WILL BE HELD AT:
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Date: August 15, 2006
Place: Port St. Joe High
School
100 Shark Drive
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
The entire text of the proposed
rules can be inspected during
regular office hours at the Gulf
County School Board Office,.
150 Middle School Road, Port
St. Joe, FL.
Special Legal authority under
which the adoption, is autho-
rized and the law being imple-
mented and interpreted is made .
specific., .,
The addition and changes are
proposed by Bill Canrr, Assistant
Superintendent for Business
Services and approved for
consideration by Tim Wilder,
Superintendent.
Amendments: See above
Publish July 27, & August 3,
2006

GULF COUNTY SCHOOLS
NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS
UNDER FERPA
FOR ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE
AND SECONDARY SCHOOL
The Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
affords parents and students
over 18 years of age. ("eligible
students") certain rights with
respect to the student's edtica-
tional records. These rights are:
(1) The right to inspect and
review ,the student's educa-
tion records-within 45 days of
the day the School receives a
request for access.
Parents or eligible students'
should submit to the School
principal or designee a writ-
ten request that identifies the
records) they wish to inspect.
The School official will make
arrangements for access and
notify the parent or eligible stu-
dent of the time and place where
the records may be inspected.
(2) The right to request the
amendment of the student's
education records that the par-
ent or eligible, student believes
are inaccurate. .
Parents or eligible students
may ask the School to amend a
record that they believe isinac-
curate. They should write the
School principal or designee,
clearly identify the part of the
record they want changed, and
specify why it is inaccurate. If
the School decides not to amend
the record as requested by the
parent or eligible student, the
School will notify the parent or
eligible student of the decision
and advise them of their right to
a hearing regarding the request
for amendment. Additional


information regarding the hear-
ing procedures will be provided
to the parent or eligible student
when notified of the right to a
hearing.
(3) The right to consent to
disclosures of personally iden-
tifiable information contained in
the student's education records,
except to the extent that FERPA
authorizes disclosure without
consent.
One -exception, which per-
mits disclosure without 'con-
sent, is disclosure to school offi-
cials with legitimate educational
interest. A school official is a
person employed by the School
as an administrator, supervi-
sor, instructor, or support staff
member (including health or
medical staff and law enforce-
ment unit personnel); a person
serving on the School Board; a
person or company with whom
the School has contracted to
perform a special task (such
as an attorney, auditor, medi-
cal consultant, or therapist);
or a parent or student serving
on an official committee, such
as a disciplinary or grievance *
committee, or assisting another
school official in performing his
or her tasks:
A school official has a legiti-
mate educational interest if the
official needs to review an edu-
cation record in order to fulfill
his or her professional respon-
sibility.
Upon request, the School
discloses education records
without consent to officials of
another school district in which
a student seeks or intends to
enroll.
(4) Parents or eligible stu-
dents have the right to' file
a complaint with the U.S.
Department of Education con-
cerning alleged failures by the
School District to comply with
the requirements of FERPA The
name and address of the office
that administers FERPA are:
Family Policy Compliance
Office
U.S. Department of
Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-
4605
Publish, July 27, & August 3,
2006

FLORIDA EDUCATIONAL
EQUITY ACT

The School Board of Gulf
County adheres to the provi-
sions of the Florida Educational
Equity Act prohibiting discrimi-
nation in admission, employ-
ment, and treatment of stu-
dents. The provisions" of this
act are in compliance with all
Federal regulations. Specifically,
the Florida Educational Equity
Act states: "No person 'in this
state shall, on the basis of race,
ethnicity, national origin, gen-
der, disability, or marital status,
be excluded from participation
in, be denied the benefits of,'or
be 'subjected to discrimination
under any public K-20 educa-
tion program or activity, or in
any employment condition or
practices, conducted by a pub-
lic educational institution that
receives or benefits from federal
or state financial assistance."
(Section 1000.05, F.S.)
Any violations of the pro-
vision of the Act should be
reported to:
Bill Carr
Assistant Superintendent
for Business Services'
Gulf County School Board
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 .
Telephone (850) 229-8256
or (850) 639-2871/
The School Board has
adopted a grievance proce-
dure to resolve complaints of
discrimination. A copy of this
procedure is available in each
school office, and in the Office of
the Superintendent of Schools
which is located at 150 Middle
School Road. Port St. Joe, FL.
Members of the employee bar-
gaining unit may use the con-
tract grievance procedure refer-
ring to Article VIII, Section 2.
Publish July 27, 2006


Gulf County Board of County Commission Minutes


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 9, 2006
REGULAR MEETING
The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners' met
this date in regular session
with the. following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,-
Jr., and Jerry W. Barnes.
Others present were: Coun-r
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
ClerkBeckyNC.:.rr.: C'ep.r ',-ert.
Kari Summers, Clerk Finance.
Officer Carla Hand, .Chief Ad-
ministrator Don Butler, E.D.C.
Director Alan McNair, Hum an
Resources Director Denise Man-
uel, Planner David. Richardson,
Sheriff's Office Deputy Larry
Hightower, Solid Waste Director
Joe Danford, arid T.D.C. Direc-
tor Paula Pickett.
Chairman McLemore called.
the meeting to order at 6:01
p.m., E.T.
Commissioner Barnes
opened the meeting with prayer,
and Chairman McLemore led
the Pledge of Allegiance to the
Flag.
C.D.B.G. OVERSTREET
WATER SYSTEM
Judy Peacock, Planning
Manager for Florida Depart-
ment of Community Affairs,
and Debbie Boyett appeared
before the Board to present a
C.D.B.G. check to the County,
in the amount of $638,500.00,
for water lines and hook-ups in
the Overstreet area for low and
moderate income people.
CONSENT AGENDA
I Commissioner Peters mo-
tioned to' approve- the follow-
ing Consent Agenda items, and
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion, based .on re-
moval of pages '35-44 (Item.#3)
and page 62 (Item #10). Com-
missioner Williams discussed
the invoices received, from the
Sheriffs Office for prisoner
medical bills, in the amount of
$3,642.75 for medical bills and
$819.16 for. prescriptions. After
further discussion, the motion
passed unanimously.
1. Minutes April 25,
2006 Regular Meeting

2. Appointment Gulf
Coast Workforce Development
Board Members


3. Invoice Ausley
& McMullen, P.A. Gulf Pines
Hospital Bankruptcy (#46580
*$141.03 to be paid from Ac-
count #21111-33000)
'Bay Medical Center
H,.C.R.A. (#06001-00834' *
$526.07 / #06008-00120 *
$2,631.12 to be paid from Ac-
count #51462-31500) '
County Attorney Timo-
thy McFarland (April, 2006 *,
$6,808.44 to be paid.from Ac-
count #21314-31100)
Dolomite, Inc. Canoe Lane
at Indian Pass (#90685/#90686
/#90712/#90734/#90735/#90
736 $869.04 to be paid from
Account #41141-63000 Sec-
ondary Road & Bridge Funds)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Court-
house Roof Replacement
(#64510 $35,276.09 to be
paid from Account #71012-
62100) .
Preble-Rish, Inc. Mos-
quito Control Building Mod.
(#64522 $2,850.00 to be paid
from Account #42834-62100)
Prisoner/Inmate Medi-
cal Bills (Bay Medical Center
$702.00 /. Bay Medical E.R.
Physicians $960.00 / Bay Ra-
diology Associates $59.00 /
Buy-Rite Drugs $840.75|/ Ste-
-ven Goodwiller, M.D. $834.00
/ Gregory Grantham, D.M.D.
$185.00 / Dr. Robert King
$60.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #21111-31400)
Runiberger, Kirk &.
Caldwell General Employment
Matters (File #G214-107990 *
Invoice #698505 $260.00 to
be aid from Account #21111-
31200)

4. Policy Personal
Cell Phones (County Employees)

5. Purchase Request
Beaches Fire Department (5
MSA SCBA Units from Ferrara
Fire Apparatus $9,000.00 to
be paid from Account #32122-
64001) Purchase Request Pub-
lic Works (One Extended Cab 4
x 4 Pickup Truck through State
Contract from Garber Ford Mer-
cury, .Inc. / funds budgeted in
2005-06) /

6. Refunds Building
Permit Fees (James Townsend *
$1,969.14)


7. Resolution Au-
thorizing execution of the lease.
purchase documentation for
the backhoe loader for the Sol-
id Waste Dept. (approved' on
4/25/06 Bid #0506-20)}

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-15

WHEREAS, County of Gulf,
FL (the "Governmental Entity"),
a body politic and corporate
duly organized and existing as
a political subdivision, munici-
pal corporation or similar public
entity of the State of Florida (the
"State"), is authorized by the
laws of the State to purchase,
acquire and lease personal
property for. the benefit of the
Governmental Entity and its in-
habitants and to enter into con-
tracts with respect thereto; and
WHEREAS-, in order to
acquire such equipment, the'
Governmental Entity proposes
to enter into a lease-purchase
transaction pursuant to 'that
certain Governmental Equip-
ment Lease-Purchase Agree-
'ment (the "Agreement") with
Caterpillar Financial Services
Corporation, the form of which,
has been presented to the gov-
erning body of the Governmen-
tal Entity at this meeting; /
NOW, THEREFORE, BE
IT AND' IT IS HEREBY RE-
SOLVED:
Section 1. Approval of Docu-
ments. The form, terms and
provisions of the Agreement and
all other schedules and exhibits
attached thereto are hereby ap-
proved in substantially the form
presented at this meeting, with
such insertions, omissions and
changes as shall be approved -
by counsel of the Governmen-
tal Entity or other members
of the governing body of the,
Government Entity executing
the same, the execution of such
documents being conclusive evi-
dence of such approval; and the
persons holding the titles listed
below or any other officer of the
Governmental Entity who shall
have the power to execute con-
tracts on its behalf are hereby
authorized and directed to exe-
cute, acknowledge, countersign I
and deliver the Agreement and
all exhibits attached thereto,
and the Secretary/Clerk of the
Governmental Entity is hereby
authorized to attest to the fore-
r


going and affix the seal of, the
Governmental Entity to such
documents.
Section 2. Other Actioris
Authorized. The officers and
employees of the Governmental
Entity shall take all action nec-
essary or reasonably required by
the, parties to the Agreement to
carry put, give effect to and con-
summate the transactions con-
templated thereby and to take
all action necessary in confor-
mity therewith, including, with-
out limitation, the execution
and; delivery of any closing and
other documents required to be
delivered in connection with the
Agreement.
Section 3. No General Li-
ability. Nothing contained in
this Resolution, -the Agreement,
or any other instrument shall
be construed with respect to
the Governmental Entity as in-
curring a pecuniary liability or
charge upon the general credit
of the Governmental Entity or
against its taxing power, nor
shall the breach of any agree-
ment contained in this Reso-
lution, the Agreement, or any
other instrument or document
executed in connection there-
with impose any pecuniary li-
ability upon the Governmental
Entity or any charge upon its
general credit or against its tax-
ing power, except to the extent
that the payments payable un-
der the Agreement are special
limited obligations of the Gov-
ernmental Entity as provided in
the Agreement.
Section 4. Authorized Sig-
natories. Following are the true
names, correct titles and speci-
men signatures of the incum-
bent officers referred to in the
foregoing resolution:
Carmen L. McLemore,
Chairman
Section 5. Effective Date.
This Resolution shall be effective
immediately upon its approval
and adoption. This Resolution
was adopted and approved on
May 9, 2006.

(End)

8. S.H.I.P. Construc-
tion Assistance (Linda S: Farmer
- $25,000.00)

9. Special Projects
Payments as follows:


Dist. 1 Howard Creek Fire
Department -' Health Fair Dona-
tion $100.00
Dist. 2 Howard Creek Fire
Department Health Fair Dona-
tion $100.00

Dist. 3 Howard Creek Fire
Department Health Fair Dona-
tion $100.00

Dist. 4 -Howard Creek 'Fire
Department Health Fair Dona-
tion $100.00

Dist. 5 Howard Creek Fire
Department Health Fair Dona-
tion $100.00

(End)

10. Utility Permit/Ease-
ment Water Line (Long Avenue
to Garrison Avenue)

(End)

PUBLIC- HEARING AIRBOAT
ORDINANCE ST. JOSEPH
BAY

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider adoption of a proposed
ordinance regulating the opera-
tion of airboats and aircraft on
St. Joseph Bay in Gulf County,
County Attorney McFarland read
the proposed ordinance by title
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Barnes motioned
to adopt the following-titled or-
dinance. Commissioner Traylor
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-13

AN ORDINANCE OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, REGULAT-
ING .THE OPERATION OF AIR-
BOATS AND AIRCRAFT ON ST.
JOSEPH BAY; PROVIDING FOR
A PENALTY FOR VIOLATION;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE.

*Complete Ordinance on file
with Clerk*

COURTHOUSE ROOF/JAIL
ROOF

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that the Architect


who designed the Courthouse
roof has the plans ready to ad-
vertise for bids. He also stated
that the jail roof is leaking, and
he had the Architect give a cost
estimate for budget purposes to
put the same style roof on the
jail facility and to include the
new addition. Chief Adminis-
trator Butler reported that- the
estimated cost is $275,000.00
to $300,000.00. He recom-
mended hiring an Engineer to
do the work for the jail roof (in'
the amount of $20,000.00 to
$25,000.00), and the County
could advertise both jobs at the
same time. Commissioner Wil-
liams motioned to approve this
recommendation. Commission-
er Traylor seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to amend the General Fund
budget by reducing Reserves
and increasing the appropriate
line item to pay these engineer-
ing .costs. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.

M.S.T.U. REFERENDUM DATE

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that the Board ap-
proved the M.S.T.U. election
date as June 27, 2006, and stat-
ed that he and T.D.C. Director
Pickett met with the Supervisor
of Elections, and recommended
that the date be changed to July
6, 2006. Chief Administrator
Butler requested permission to
send a letter to the Supervisor
of Elections Griffin, notifying
her of the date change. County
Attorney McFarland then read a
proposed resolution calling for a
bond referendum for the Cape
San Bias Bayside area. Com-
missioner Barnes motioned to
adopt the following resolution,
and Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion. The mo-
tion then passed 4 to 1, with
Commissioner Peters voting no.

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-16

A RESOLUTION OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
- SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA,- CALLING A BOND
REFERENDUM WITH RESPECT
TO THE CAPE SAN BLAS BAY-
SIDE MUNICIPAL SERVICES
TAXING UNIT FOR THE ISSU-


ANCE OF LIMITED GENERAL
OBLIGATION BONDS TO FI-
NANCE BEACH RENOURISH-
MENT; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE..
WHEREAS, Gulf County's
beachfront is a County treasure
*with tremendous economic, es-
thetic and environmental impor-
tance; and
WHEREAS, it is in the best
interest of the citizens of Gulf
County residing within the Cape
San Bias Bayside Municipal
Services Taxing Unit (the "Bay-
side MSTU") created by Ordi-
nance No. 2005-25 of the Board
of County Commissioners of
Gulf County, Florida, enacted
December 13, 2005 (the "Ordi-
nance") that all appropriate ac-
tions to maintain, and renourish
such beachfront be. undertaken;
and
WHEREAS, the enhance-
ment and renourishment of
such beachfront constitutes a
municipal service, to residents
residing within the Bayside
MSTU; and
WHEREAS, the Board of
County Commissioners of Gulf
County desires to submit to
the qualified electors of Gulf
County residing within the Bay-
side MSTU the question as to
whether or not Limited General
Obligation Bonds should be is-
sued to fund the renourishment
of beachfront as described in the
Ordinance; -
BE IT RESOLVED BY THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA:
Section 1. A u-
thority for this Resolution. This
Resolution is adopted pursuant
to Chapter 100, Florida Stat-
utes, as amended; Chapter 125,
Florida Statutes, as amended;
Art. VII, Section 12, Florida
Constitution, the Ordinance,
and other applicable provisions
of law.
Section 2. Bond
Referendum Election on Beach
Renourishment.
a. Bond Referendum
Election. A bond referendum
election of the qualified electors
residing in the Bayside MSTU
in Gulf County is hereby called
to be held on July 6, 2006 to
determine whether or not the
issuance of Limited General Ob-
ligation Bonds in an aggregate


principal 'amount not exceed-.
ing $ 12,000,000.00, payable
from ad valorem taxes levied at
a rate not to exceed six mills (6
mills) on all taxable 'property in
the Bayside MSTU, shall be ap-
proved by such qualified elec-
tors to finance the cost of beach
renourishment.
b. Such purposes de-
scribed above shall also include
other purposes appurtenant,
and incidental thereto.
c., All qualified elec-
tors residing in the MSTU shall
be entitled and permitted to vote
in such bond referendum elec-
tion.
d. The polls will open
in accordance with' law relat-
ing to general elections at the
various voting places from seven
(7) o'clock a.m. until seven (7)
o'clock p.m. on the same day.
Section 3. Autho-
rization of Bonds. Subject and
pursuant to the provisions here-
of, Limited General Obligation
Bonds of Gulf County, Florida
are authorized to be issued in
the aggregate principal amount
of not exceeding $ 12,000,000.00
to finance the cost of the pur-
poses generally described in
Section 2 of this Resolution,
including allocations for admin-
istrative costs, legal fees, fees of
. fiscal agents and all other costs
associated with the issuance of
the Bonds. Such Limited Obli-
gation Bonds maybe issued in
one or more series and shall be '
payable from ad valorem taxes
levied at a rate not exceeding
six mills (6 mills) on all taxable
property in the MSTU, maturing
not later than twenty (20) years.
Such Bonds shall bear interest
at such rate or rates not exceed-
ing the maximum rate permitted
by law at the tine of the sale of
the Bonds.
Section 4. Places
of Voting. The places of voting
and the Inspectors and Clerks
for the polling places for the
bond election shall be the same
places and persons as for gener-
al elections within the County.
Section 5. Official
Ballot. The form of ballot to be
used shall be in substaially
the following:


R; Allij.lj:;jij- j 0 f






UO I lI f.. I he 01. J3 I I 'Je lkl.us ul '7 Esa e 3 n l o t an


Trades


&


Services


(Giuiiff Breec7e
011(Chanmige '
Isn't it time for an oil change?
We Come To You!
Call 850-227-1684
Ask for Julian


Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100


CD Pressure Washing &
Handyman Services
For Free Estimates Call
229-1750 Owner Daniel Griffin
Cell 899-1684 Manager Cindy Griffin


a Coastal & Native"
Landscapes


IRRIGATION
INSTALLATION & REPAIR
OUR SPECIALTY
850-927-4090



4 CARPENTRY
PAINTING ',
Home Repair Minor Renovations
Vinyl Siding & Gutters
Doors 7 Windows
Deck Maintenance
All But 6, LLC, Licensed/Insured
Charlie Poliski
850-545-1126 or 697-2668...


S Kilgore's
BRICK PAVERS
& TILE

Driveways, Patios, Pooldecks,
Retaining Walls, Stonework &
Granite Countertops
Office: (850) 229-1980
Cell: (850) 258-4312
Free Estimates
Where top quality and customer
satisfaction meet!
2890 W. Highway 98 Port St.Joe


O THE J. LESTER
COMPANY REAL
ESTATE APPRAISAL &
CONSULTING SERVICE
A Financial Service Institution
Residential Vacant Land Commercial Appraisals

JAMES E. "JAMIE" LESTER

Real Estate Appraiser & Broker
Master Degree Business Administration
State C c i rfid General Appraiser
License#RZ-2783
Broker License#BK532115.
"PROVIDING A QUALITY SERVICE TO A
QUALITY COMMUNITY"
Including Consulting Assignments Market Analysis
Feasibility Studies Finances Investments
Eminent Domain Estates Tax Purposes

850-639-4200
Fax 850-639-9756
Serving Gulf, Franklin,. Bay, Calhoun,
Liberty, & Jackson .Counties Specialty
: Assignments State Wide


Straight Cut Lawn Service & Pressure Washing
"7 Charles Thursbay
Owner
1620 Pleasant Rest Rd
(850) 648-2040 Wewahitchka, FL 32465



Paradise Pressure Washing


,hl ,, r "







Highway 98 *'Highland View *Port St Joe 850-227-7241 Fax 229-9405
l l ;, ,', ,
Do-It-Yourself Professional Carpet Cleaning with

RINSE-N-VAC
Great for Cleaning All Carpet, Upholstery, and
Auto and Recreational Vehicle Interiors
TRY IT TODAY!

TLC Lawn Service
P~'"Every yard needs a little TLC"

S229-6435
We now accept all major credit cards


Free estimates
Weed Round Up
Trimming, Fertilizing


Established 1991
Sprinkler Systems
Installed & Repaired


Licensed and Insured


S Shaklee #1 Natural
Cr.a: alor LV.- Nutrition Supplement
independent lstdbutor Company in the US

Patty & Glenn Waldo ti Ain Sln Care
GEnvironmetally Safe
850-827-2510 Cleaning Products
www.shaldee.net/PaltyWaldo Air and Water
gpWaldo@gtCm.net Purification




SUN CiOAST
Lawn Er Landscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
Full Lawn Maintenance
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Commercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522 8053

Landscape Design &
Consultation Services

Kay Kelley
Florida Certified
Landscape Designer

850-927-4090
Plan It before you Plant It! 26409


ST. JOE
NURSERY & SUPPLY '
7016 First Street Port St. Joe

227-2112

St Joe Rent-- il'


I


= TX


COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL
INSULATION DONE RIGHT EVERYTIME
FIBERGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OFFICE CELL
QanBQ<,G0^3Q SPiaga8


Locally
Owned *


lovl Residential
Commercial
Termite & Pest
Control
Termite Treatments Restaurant
* Motel Flea Control Condiominiums
* Household Pest Control New Treatment
* iReal Estate (WO) Repotis Constriucllo Sites
Specializing in Vacation Rentalo Properties
[ ] FAMILY OWNED
PLEASANT & PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the. Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do-0t-Yoursell Pest Control Products.
3.Jo


*~


Coastal & Native
Landscapes
Specializing in low, maintenance landscapes and irrigation,
with a focus on native and naturalized plants. We offer
complete landscape services and our area's only Florida
Certified Landscape Designer.
QOwnedi-byKay-.elley and Brooks.Wade
850-927-4090 'We Plant Palms, too!
.. .. .. *. ... .


DRIESBACH CLEANERS
180 Avenue C
Pick-up and Delivery
850-227-1671
* Residential Custom Wood
* Commercial *Industrial
A &'R Fence
,etze'ff o ,tfC REE 1Et ia
,-,, rr -,. FREE Etsmats
: .:.,- (850) 647-4047


ONEAL SANDERS
APPLIANCE REPAIR
SERVICE
Repair all major brands
Home # 647-5113
Work # 227-5112 o1n1


DJ Fence & ETC
HandyMan
You Name It
I'll Fix It
850-648-9531
850-624-4182 cell
"Let the Beauty of our God be
upon us & establish the work
of our hands"


I DRm BRI


CARPET AND UPHOLSTRY
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction IlCRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation Free Estimates
* Stain Protection Available

W X;"- .,- ;*r ;,j.-


mA'


Hardwood Flooring
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional'
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions
.Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Value for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com






23702


*BaaaAccrinSwr
Call/850227-920






PolEncosre
227-3628-


2 -966


OPERATED BY MIKE MOCK .'
- ICRC Certified -
Cleaning Specialist
CARPET CLEANING
CERAMIC TILE & GROUT
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS- VANS
LICENSED ANDkINSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL



F OI


.THE


STAR


135 Hwy 98


227-1278


-~ .~.
4 -


r


I I ~I


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


RfT .q- P +r ep F Ttr-lv uv2 .2 0


c


'I I









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2006 9C


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


ANNOUNCEMENTS






MERCHANDISE '


~um~


a gg a


EMP LOYMENT



im%


N


BUSINESS & FINANCIAL


REAL ESTATE






AUTO,MARINE,RV


I,


~j~- V I


-tt.'3^,
y.^.V^.
!'"<"'
'^*,.;.-f-
*v--^


VISA..


9.. -. ..

,, .



ANNOUNCEMENTS PETS & ANIMALS
1100 Legal Advertising 2100 Pets
1110 Classified Notices 2110 Pets: Free to
1120- Public Notices/ Good Home
Announcements 2120 Pet Supplies
1130- Adoptions 2130 Farm Animals/
1140 Happy Ads Supplies
1150 Personals 2140 -, Pets/Livestock
1160 Lost Wanted
1170 Found


1160 -

Wide gold 2 kt diamond
wedding band lost Wed.
07-12-06 in the Oak Grove
area. Reward offered, sen-
timental value, can not be
replaced. 850-942-1179


Need a

helping

hand?

Advertise in

the Help

Wanted

Section

in the

Classifieds!

747-5020


There are specific Flori-
da Statutes applicable
to the sale of dogs and
cats within the state or
transportated into the
state for the purpose of
selling.

Please research Flori-
da Statute 828.29 (Dogs
and cats transported or
offered for sale; health
requirements; consumer
guarantee) before
you offer for sale a cat
or dog.


2100

Lost Dog Found near
Boat Ramp & Overstreet.
Call 850-648-2039 to claim
& identify.


I MERCHANDISE
3100 -Antiques
,3110 -Appliances
3120- Arts & Crafts
3130 -Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170 Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210 Free Pass It On
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/ :
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical instruments
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)

$We Pay Cash$

We Buy Antiques, Old Jewelry,
Old Toys, Old Anything
Call Monique
850-227-1684


3190 |
Jet 7 Power Chair
needs batteries $2000 Call
850-229-6880.


3220
Cherry entertainment cen-
ter, 81in tall, 46in wide
$500. Oak 9 drawer dress-
er with 2 mirrors $200,
Must sell 850-229-7712



Furniture Sale
& upscale accessories
antique 'dining table &
chairs, coffee table, dress-
er, Karistan rug, nice
framed prints, mirrors, &
etc. 104 Cabell & Hwy 98,
near Constitution Park.
Look for sign, Fri 9a-?, Sat
8a-?," For apt call 850-
229-8414



Sofa & loveseat $50, 2
rocker recliners $25ea,
wooden desk $25,' 53
piece set of Pfaltzgraff
"Tea Rose" dishes $100,
229-9030 evenings







2 Day Huge yard Sale, Fri
& Sat July 28th & 29th,
9a-3p. No Early Birds, fur-
niture, antiques, paintings,
household, items, clothing,,
much much more 401
Ponderosa Pine Rd, Port
St Joe(near St Joe airport).
Watch for signs on C30A &
Hwy 98. Canceled if rain.


R Call 747-5020 o have your business listed here.


$500 Police Impounds!
Cars from $500! Tax Re-
pos, US Marshall and IRS
sales! Cars/Trucks/SUV's/
Toyota's/Honda's/Chevy's/
& More! For Listings, Call
1-800-298-5414 Ext C171. .






OLD MAIDS BY THE BAY
INC cleaning service. Resi-
dential, vacation rental.
Pressure washing. Call
229-1654. Leave message.






Clayton Concrete, Inc.
Concrete Construction
*House Foundations
*Driveways
*Patios
Serving Franklin & Guff'
Counties for 15 years.
Glen Clayton
229-6525/ 653-7352


Carport Sale
The Best Carport, RV Ports
& Metal Bldgs at afforda-
ble prices. Classic carport
12x20 $695. We have all
sizes Call 850-8,19-5093




Do you have
a love one in need of extra
care. Private Duty LPN
will take care of them, in
your home, Nursing home
or Hospital. Have good ref-
erences. Call
850-639-5030 for Brenda



Home Care CNA
with References. Call
850-827-2623. .







**All-Star**
*Beauties*
850-785-0016


Handyman
Port St. Joe Area
*Plumbing
-Electrical
*Painting
*Light Framing
-Yard Work

JOEY BARBEE
850-229-6147
Leave Message


Storm Preparedness
Handyman Services, interi-
or/exterior maintenance &
repairs 850-229-3474 or
8 5 0 -8 6 7 -3 9 9 8
www.fishingportstjoe.com







Airline Mechanic Rapid
training for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA pre-
dicts severe shortage. Fi-
nancial aid if qualify job
placement assistance. Call
AIM 888-349-5387.


Attend College Online
from Home *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,.
*Computers, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer pro-
vided. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call 866-858-2121.
www.OnlineTidewaterTech
cornn




Bushhogging
Call Pat & Larry
@648-6652
Responsible Teenager
will provide Lawn service &
odd jobs -at Reasonable
rates, Mexico beach & St.
Joe beach area. 647-5998




BANK
FORECLOSES!
Homes from $10,000 1-3
bedrooms available. HUD,
Repos, REO, etc. These
homes must sell. For List-
ings. Call 1-800-298-5507
Ext. H171.


3230
720 Fortner Rd. in Mexico
beach Sat. July 29, from
7am til noon Ct. Excercise
equipment, yard fountain,
circular saw, batter charg-
er, 6' ladder, area rug,
bedding and lots of good
stuff.
1610 Palm Blvd. PSJ Fri.'
July 28th from 5-7pm and
Sat. July 29th from 8 til
?.Lots of miscellaneous
items



HUGE YARD SALE. 914
16th street. PSJ. Sat. 29th
9am til noon. women's,
men's & children's clothes
and shoes, small table;
home exterior & interior,
doors, small, desk, All
kinds of misc. items.
Moving Sale Fri 28 & Sat
29 7a-2p central, 419 La
Siesta Dr, Mexico Beach,
furniture, tools, jewelry,
new clothes, dishes much
more, cash or local check
Sale, Sat July 29th, 130
2nd St Wewa FL, 9a-1p, In-
side of dental office, lots of
clothes shoes and other
items. Rain or shine



3280
Heavy & Small Equipment
for Boat yard 20 ton travel
lift. Pettibone crane, hyster
forklift jack spends, san-
iders, compressors, drill
press, table siw, 'much
more Call 653-8801 for
more information.



3300



End tables, (2) solid Oak,
Mission Style, dark oak in
color, New, $100 each; (2)
Pedestal sinks, New with
faucet, $60 each; (1) Large
L-shaped desk, solid
wood, New, $700 obo. Call
229-8142.

Steel Buildings
5 ONLY- 25X30, 30x40,
40x50, 45x80, 50x100.
Must Move Now!! Selling
For Balance Owed.
S 1-800-741-9262 Ext 83


Visit the Old Stuff Shop at
479 Hwy. 98 in East Point,
Florida. Old pictures,
wood furniture, couch,
chairs, desks, dressers,
tools, televisions, old bot-
tles, cast nets, We buy sell
or trade. Sell for less!
Open Mon-Sat 11am til
6pm. Call 850-653-5425

WANTED TO BUY
Old Guns, coins, guitars,
and watches. Call
850-227-4122


EMPLOYMENT
4100 Help Wanted
4110 Restaurants/Clubs
4120 Sales/Telemarketing
4130 Employment
Information,


--
F--7--4100



Administrative


Sales Associate
St. Joe Towns & Resorts is
currently recruiting for
Sales Associates for .their
Windmark Beach develop-
ment in Port St. Joe, FL.
This position requires a FL
real estate 'license, proven
history in selling and or
marketing coastal/resort
properties and 'computer
literacy in data base con-
tact management soft-
ware. This is an outstand-
ing opportunity to become
a part of the JOE team that
will develop 3.5 miles of
beach front property on St.
Joseph Bayl This position
maintains weekend and
holiday office hours.

Please fax your resume to
850-229-7952 or email re-
becca.standige()joe.com.
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required


Incorrect InsertionPolicy
For Classified
In-column Advertisers

All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver-
tiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will as-
sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce-
dure unless otherwise informed.

Please



your ad


Advertisers are requested to check the advertise-
ment on .the first Insertion for correctness. Errors
should be reported immediately.

The News Herald will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for
any error in advertisements to a greater extent than
the cost of the space occupied by the error.

Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti-
tutes a new ad and new charges.

The News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of
ANY ad under any classification.


4100 '

Automotive


Mad Hatter
Muffler & Auto
Center
Auto Technician
needed with experience.
ASE Master Tech. pre-
ferred. Must have strong
background in. solving
drivability & diagnostic
problems. Unlimited in-
come potential with sal-
ary and Performance
bonus. Full benefit
package with Insurance,
holidays, vacations, and
retirement. No week-
ends. Thomas Drive Lo-
cation. Call Fritz Garrett
at 850-234-5253 ,


Banking

Bayside Savings Bank has
full time teller position
available for our future
Mexico Beach Branch.
Qualifications include cash
handling and customer
service experience, PC
skills and a professional
image. Applications may
be picked up at 202 Marina
Dr. Pt. St. St. Joe FL Drug
Free Work Place


Driver

Bus Driver's Training: The
, Gulf County School Board
has 'immediate openings
for substitute bus drivers.
Training- will consist of 40
total hours including 20.
hours in the classroom
and 20 hours on a bus.
The next driver training
class begins soon. Train-
ing is free if an applicant
drives a bus for Gulf Coun-
ty School Board. All other
applicants for bus driver
training must pay a $52.00
fee. All applicants must be
finger' printed, take a bus
driver physical, and be
drug tested before being
approved by the School
Board as a driver. All li-
censed drivers for the Gulf
County School Board are
eligible for any full time po-
sitions that come available.
If interested or want more
information, call Carolyn at
the Gulf County Adult
School at 227-1744.


Driver

Driver Trainees NEEDED
NOW! No experience re-
quired. Werner Enterprises
has immediate openings
for entry-level semi drivers.
Our avg. drivers earn more
than $36k first year. 60% of
our drivers get home
nightly/ weekly. 15-day
CDL training available in
your area. Call today
1-866-280-5309


Drivers


AN
EARN AS YOU
LEARN
Career!
England Transport
now offers
On-the-job CDL Training
No credit check
No co-signers
No down payment!
Toll-Free
1-866-619-6081


4100


Drivers

USA
READY MIX
Now hiring Class A&B
CDL Ready Mix drivers.
Excellent benefits and
wages. Apply in person
1001 Cecil Costin Blvd.
Port St. Joe, FL
850-229-8858
USA EOE



Drivers

Wanted for .ocal Compa-
ny Home every night. 1
year ex. Clean MVR. Class
A & B license. $300 Sign-
On -Bonus after 90 Days.
769-9136.






General

ARE YOU
RETIRED?
PLAYED OFF?
OR.., OVER AGE
55 AND LOW
INCOME?

Volunteer and paid op-
portunities are available
now, working with Sen-
ior Citizens.
Nutrition Aid
Homemaker
Meals on Wheels
Delivery

We seek committed, so-
cially-conscious, law-a-
biding citizens. If you
are ready to make a dif-
ference in your commu-
nity, call us today.
Gulf County
Senior Citizens
229-8466







General

Gulf County's
Growing Older
Population
Needs YOU!

The fastest growing
segment of our popula-
tion is the age 60 and
older group.
THIS SPELLS JOB
'SECURITY
Come by Gulf County
Senior Citizens Associa-
tion to discuss what is
available and where you
mayfit:

Client homes
Senior Center
Administrative
120 Library Dr,
Port St Joe, 229-8466


4100
General

Ft. Myers, FL medical
manufacturer is seeking an
Experienced Quality Con-
trol Inspector. Inspection
hand tools and CMM ex-
perience required, Vi-
sionScope preferred.
Medical device experience
will be a plus. Fax resume
to 239-225-2233 or mail to
10061 Amberwood Rd. Ft.
Myers, FL 33913.

General

IMMEDIATE
OPENING:
Part Time Maintenance/
Handyman, Full and
Part time Housekeep-
ers,_ and cooks needed
for Geri-Care Assisted
Living and Beacon Villa
Retirement Center. Flex-
ible hours, great work
environment, rewarding
,and meaningful job. We
are looking for a hard
working, committed per-
son who Is comfortable
working with elders.
This employee will re-
port to our Assisted Liv-
ing Administrator. The
right candidate must
pass a background
check and drug screen-
ing. We are an equal
opportunity employer. If
.interested, please call
Deborah. at
850-647-4000 or Kim at
647-9170




Healthcare


Bay St.
Joseph Care
120-Bed, long term care
facility is seeking indi-
viduals who have com-
passion for the elderly
and enjoy working to fill
the following positions:

*Transportation Aide
(part time)
Rehab Technician
(full time)
*Certified Nursing Asst.
(11-7 and 3-11)
Activity Director
(full time)
*Director of Nursing
(full time)

Full-time Benefits
Included:

Medical/Dental/Vision
Insurance
Short Term/Long Term
Disability
*Company Paid Life
Insurance
*Paid Time Off
*401K Retirements Plan
Uniform Allowance
*Attendance Bonus
*Referral Bonus
*Tuition Reimbursement
*Shift Differential

Please Contact:
Carrie Harrison
HR Director
220 9th St.
Port St. Joe, FL
(850) 229-8244 Ext 105
Fax (850) 229-7129


Avon
Earn 50%
-: Now Only $10 for KIT + Free Gift
Call CheriMaxwell
850-653-2137


- ----- '~-dL.~B


A


6100 7f6o'


Illlt-~--B"~""PBB"srse;ei~llii~S ---rs4-BL~abS1~JB~Ce


'" ^'.








Inf l TU PrOTADn nDo T iT r i i c Tl-I IIIDCflV IL V97 90nn


4100
General

Cashier
Walker's .Dixie Dandy,
2176 US 98 Hiland
View.Apply in person.

General

Pest Control
Technician
Experience helpful but will
train the right person. Must
have a clean Florida Driv-
ers License. Must be avail-
able to work 40 hours a
week or more if needed.
Apply in person at 321 B
Reid Ave from 9:00-11:30
or 1:00-3:00

Healthcare

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Port St. Joe &
Mexico Beach Area
We needcaring & compas-
sionate caregivers to work
in Mexico Beach & Port St.
Joe area. Work times are
based on your availability
and we need to fill 24/7
shifts. Benefits Offered.
Home Instead Senior Care
850-522-1920
or 1-866-575-1920


Healthcare.
The Gulf County Health
Department has one open-
ing for a full-time,
Career Service
(benefits assigned)..
Health Support
Technician
Twelve-Month per Year
Position based in the Port
'St. Joe medical clinic. Fin-
gerprinting and O/T Due
To Emergency Duties Re-
quired. Knowledge of ICD9
and CPT Codes, and med-.
ical clinic experience re-
quired. For information
pertainirng to this position,
.:.:.nii Lesia Hathaway at
8c.0) 227-1276, ext.. 149.
This Agency is accepting
electronic applications
only for this position. Refer
!to Requisition Number
64084154. Closing date is
August-1, 2006.
Apply at:
peoplefirst.myflorida.conri
For assistance, contact:
People First at
1 877.562-7287


General
Laborers needed for
Landscaping Company.
323-1700

Oil-Related
Youngquist Brothers, Inc.
Excellent Job Opportunity
in South Florida! Positions
Available: *Drillers
*Derricks *Floor Hands
Excellent benefits package
available after 90 days.
Fax resume 239-489-4545
or contact Cliff at
239-489-4444. MUST
PASS PHYSICAL & DRUG
TEST. Drug Free
Workplace


ea

Professional

00 Gulf Coast
S ommun. y College


Coordinator, Gulf/ Frank-
lin Center (Port St. Joe)
to supervise the daily func-
tions/ activities of the Gulf/
Franklin Center. Requires
BS degree, MS degree
with exp. in college admin-
istration preferred. Salary
based on degree & experi-
ence. Open Until Filled.
Additional info: http://
dept.gulfcoast.edu/jobs.
GCCC is an EA/EO/M/F/
Vet employer.

Professional

CLOSING
COORDINATOR
Do not miss out on this ex-
citing opportunity to work
for one of Florida's best
employers! WindMark
Beach Sales Center in Port
St Joe has an immediate
opening for a Closing Co-
ordinator. .' Individual
should have previous real
estate closing and title
work experience or mort-
gage experience. Attention
to detail and the ability to
handle multiple tasks in a
fast-paced environment re-
quired. We offer great pay
and ,an excellent benefits
.package! '
Please submit Resume via
fax to 229-7952, email to
rebecca.standige(@joe.
com or visit careers.joe.
com to submit an online
application & resume
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required.


The News Herald is seeking an
individual interested in providing
great service to our customers in the
following areas .

Callaway and Panama City

Individual must have reliable transportation and be
able to work early a.m. hours. This is an independent
-contractor position with part-time hours and full time
earrinng3s Mini-. LcOin. rg necessary.

Come join
The, News Herald Carrier team
and earn above- average $'s while being your own
'boss. Carrier applications accepted:
THE
NEWS HERALD
501 W. 11th Street

Apply using the Mulberry Street Employee entrance
S or call 747-5050. .


in


the -4E .
APALACHIC
& CARRABEL m


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:

Toll Free:

Fax:

Email:

Email:


850-747-5020

800-345-8688

850-747-5044

thestar@pcnh.com

thetimes@pcnh.com


-
- -~'~ -~. -.


I HELP IS ONLY A.


4ft


V


PHONE CALL


AWAY


4100
General
Reel Repair person P/T.
Experienced, See George
Duren @ Blue Water Out-
riggers. 229-6031. Pt. St.
Joe

Professional
Ft. Myers, FL medical
manufacturer is seeking an
experienced Program En-
gineer. Experience re-
quired using 5 axis milling
centers. Gibbs CAM expe-
rienced preferred. Fax re-
sume.to 239-225-2233 or
mail to 10061 Amberwood
Rd. Ft. Myers, FL 33913
Technical
Ft. Myers, FL medical
manufacturer seeks an Ex-
perienced CNC Machinist.
Experience in 5 axis milling
centers or Swiss machines
required. Fax resume to
239-225-2233 or mail to
10061 Amberwood Rd. Ft.
Myers, FL 33913.

Technical
Immediate Openings for
1st class skilled trades:
Electronic Technicians
Sheet Metal Mechanics
Pipe Fitters Ship Fitters
Welders (FLUXCORE) In-
side/Outside Machinists
Ability to earn up to
$1,600.00 a week, 60+
Hours Available *TOP PAY
and LONG TERM WORK in
INDIANA for Qualified Ap-
plicants* i Other locations
available throughout the
US: AL, FL, VA, MS & LA
**Must be eligible to work
in the U.S. plus have 3
YEARS SHIPYARD OR 5
YEARS INDUSTRIAL EX-
PERIENCE** DO NOT
WAIT! CALL NOW! Con-
tact: 888-269-3381
(Operators available -24
hours) recruiter@ameri
force.com EOE/DFWP,
Se Habla Espanol

Trades






ARCTIC POLAR
Heating & Air, LLC
Lic#RA-0067062
WANTED: Equipment/Duct
Work Installers, Service
Technicians Clean driving
record req.
Must pass background
check
Top Producers=Top Pay
Incentive Bonus Program.
Prior experience a PLUSI
Apply at:1516 E. 11th St
,PC, FL*
Call 850-785-5447 or
850-541-3308
Drug &'Alcohol Free
Work Place. EOE

Trades

TRIM
CARPENTERS
NEEDED.....

FOR PORT ST. JOE AND
MEXICO BEACH AREA.
APPLICANTS MUST PRO-
VIDE OWN TRANSPORTA-
TION, MUST HAVE EXPE-
RIENCE, MUST BE DE-
PENDABLE AND PROVIDE
QUALITY WORK.
GREAT PAY FOR THE
RIGHT APPLICANT.
CALL TRIMMASTERS LLC
LENNY COLLINS
5 85014.-0166 OR
&50.5618.5937


Trades

HVAC Mechanics
& Helpers
(Experienced)
PANAMAA CITY &
MEXICO BEACH AREAS)
Top Pay, Excellent Bene-
fits, Vacation/Holiday Pay,
401K.
Keith Lawson Company
Kendall Clark
(850) 527-5439
KLC is an EOE/AAE/DFWP
Minority Applicants
encourage to apply







Professional
Real Estate Auction Firm
seeking RE Broker to work
Panama City/Port St Joe
area. Huge potential Call
850-622-3791


| 4130
*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.
Advertising Sales Pro
wanted. Top Commis-
sions, experience re-
quired. For phone inter-
view, Mr. Haggerty, 877-
665-6618.
Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland. Secu-
rity, Law- Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139
Earn Up To $550 Weekly
Working through the gov-
ernment. Part-time, no ex-
perience needed. Call to-
day! 1-800-488-2921 ask
for Dept. L
General

100 WORKERS
NEEDED
Assemble crafts, wood
items, clay, sewing, and
more. Year round work.
Free information packet.
Call for details.
1-801-428-4657, 24 hours.
www.atlanticfamily'
publishing.net
Now Hiring for 2006 Post-
al Jobs $18/hour. starting,
Avg. Pay $57K/ year Fed-
eral benefits, Paid Training
and Vacations. No Experi-
ence Neededl 1-800-
584-1775 Ref #P5101

-- fl ----- ---






I BUSINESS & FINANCIAL
5100 Business
Opportunities
5110- Money Io Lend


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
710l Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160- Mobile Homes/Lots
7170.- Waterfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare




2 br, 1 ba
Cottage
Located on .25 acre lot
at 605 Marvin Ave, PSJ.
Almost completely re-
modeled and rewired
with beautiful original
hardwood floors, new
carpet, ndw tile, and
new A/C.
!2nd Reduction
$171,000!
Call 850-814-1040.
100 Sunset Cir. PSJ, This
luxurious home offers Bay
view, formal living/dining
rooms, breakfast room,
custom built kitchen
w/appliances, family room,
3 b r, 2 ba, .5 ba w/ mud
room, laundry room, secu-
rity, & sprinkler systems,
hurricane shutters, home
warranty, 2544 sf, $490K,
MLS# 108138 Call Gary
Poole Coldwell Banker
899-1134 or 769-8971
2002 Modular home, 2500
+ sqft. 4 br, 3 ba, acre lot
with 5 sheds. Above
ground, pool, $229,900
Call 639-5460.


1U E6A U 5.JL U ZU TJL ,ZU


5100
All Cash Business! Local
candy vending route.
$50,000/year potential. 30
machines plus candy.
$5,995. Call now! 1-800-
704-5414

Do you have
the Drive, Desire and Pas-
sion to make some Real
Money Working from
Home?
Act Now! Call
1-800-645-7815
Get Healthy! Get Fit! Get
Paid! Earn $100K in six
months. Call Kev/Jen,
1-800-641-7006 (24 hour
message)
*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend kiv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.



k




REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals,
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 -Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals


6100 --



New Metal
Building $1650/month.
2800sf has new office and
bathroom. CalP
850-258-6139
Two Private 2nd Floor Of-
fices with shared reception
and kitchen. Beautiful view
overlooking St. Joe Bay at
Simmons Bayou. Perfect
for real estate office or
small business. $350.00,
monthly per office. Utilities
included. First, last month
rent plus $150.00 deposit
per unit required. Call 850-
229-7799 M-F, 9-4pm.,

America's

Mini Storage


850) 229-8014


BEACH

STORAGE
Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
St l'e Peach


MINI STORAGE


In Port St. Joe


814-7400


PLUS SMALL ENGINE
REPAIRS
NOW AVAILABLE
Climate Control

St. Joe
Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Phone 227-2112
/ MINI-STORAGE \

mmFIF
a5x10 10x10 10x20

On Site Rentals 6 Days
A Week

ASK ABOUT FREE
MONTH'S RENT!





Upstairs 2 br, 1 ba apart-
ment $550/mo. + deposit.
Call 850-648-5052 or
478-983-2206



6120 |
Beach House for rent.
Across the street from des-
ignated beach, awesome'
view! 3 br, 1.5 ba front &
back 'screened porches.
C/HA, great place! $1500
mo. Call 850-227-5301 or
850-227-6297



St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba,
enclosed garage, gulfview,
beach access, furnished,
$1200 mo., Will consider
lease purchase. Call Bob-
bie@ 258-5261-.







2 br, 2 ba Condo, Availa-
ble Sept 1st. Waterfront w/
Oceanview, with boatslips,
$1500 mo. (352) 636-8000.







2 ba 2 ba New 1st Tear
House for long term rental,
Near Indian Pass, no
smoking or pets, $1500
mo, 214-352-3147




2BR, 1 BA
Home, Just Off Port St
Joe Bay, CH/A, carport,
$700/mo + 1 mo. dep.
Call 678-517-6001




3 br 2 ba, Very Nice MH
on large.corner lot at Over-
street. $900mo. Call 850-
227-4608


.dldd

6100


To Place Your Classified ad


THE STAR
f 7sunrIuts


_m~_l~jF~C


.~saTSP~a~~


i 6140
Cape San Bias : Board-
walk Sub. 3 br. 2 ba, pool,
hot tub, fully furn. $1800
mo. Call 850-229-8593
Cape San Bias Beach
Side Home, 2 br, 2 ba Gulf
View home close to St Jo-
seph's State Park. Broad-
walk to beach, Screened
Porch and two sun decks.
Unfurnished, available for
6 to 12 month lease.
$1200 per month. Call
owner at 843-342-5983, or
a local friend at 850-340-
0628
Gorgeous Bay Sunset
view on CR-30, 2 bdrms,
21/2 baths, wood floors,
custom cabinets, fully fur-
nished, screened porch &
open deck, 6-9 month
lease, $1295 mo, first, last
month rent & $650 security
deposit. on signing. No
pets. 850-229-7799.
Gulf Front, CR30-A, 3br, 3
ba C/HA, multiple decks,
beautiful beach, fully fur-
nished, no pets. $1650
mo/$750 dep call
850-648-5045
Gulfview on C-30
Treasure\ Shores west if
Indian Pass Raw Bar: 2 br
2 ba old FL. Classic
Cottage, newly remodeled,
.scrnd porch, non-smoking
& no pets. $900 per
month, minimum 6 months
lease. Owner is licensed
Realtor. Call Margaret
850-527-6517
Large 3 br, 2 ba, large
yard, close to schools,
$850' mo., Refs required.
(404) 797-7870.
Large airy home in High-
land View area. 3 br, 2 ba,
large living/dining room &.
huge Florida Room. Great
kitchen, carport, rear deck,
fenced yard. $1100 mo.:
Call -850-227-5301 or
850-227-6297

-7it~f^


7100
House only for Sale! Must
be moved. 5746 Hwy 71 (6
miles N. of PSJ). Approx
1400 sf, 3 br,1 ba,hrdwd
floors, C/A, FR stove,
refig, W/D. Ducky Johnson
has moving cost info.
$18,000. Call Mary Lou @
850-227-4625
MEXICO BEACH
Best Deal on the Beach!
Beautiful 2 Br, 3 ba fully
furnished Gulf view
Townhome $389K
770-426-6896
Mexico Beach 3 br 2 ba
MH, nice lot, possible gulf
view, $175K Pelican Walk
Real Estate 850-647-2473
Mexico Beach 3 br 2 ba,
garage, pool, fireplace,
new roof, carpet, fresh
paint, sprinkler system,
$285K, Pelican Walk Real
Estate 850-647-2473
Mexico Beach New
Townhouses, pool starting
$214.900. Pelican Walk
Real Estate 850-647-2473


Overstreet, Florida 3 br, 2
ba located 650 N. Canal
Dr. $1200/month + $1100
deposit. Call 648-5865
Several Long Term Rent-
als Available, starting at
$750 mo. Call Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700.
' St. Joe Beach cottage, 1.5
biks to Gulf. 3 br, 2 ba,
newly redecorated, new
appliances, Lg. screened
porch, shed for RV/Boat.
Pets maybe, No smoking.
227-3453
WeWa: "Magnolia Lodge"'
2br, 1ba waterfront apt.
elec; water, sewer, yard
maint incl. boat ramps &
dock on site. $750.
mo/+$200 dep. Call
850-639-6760.
Wewahilchkoa ? .2r .
with fenced in yard. in
Dalkeith area, close to sev-
eral boat ramps, less than
1/2 mile, off Hwy 71. No
smoking,, no Pets, refer-
ences req'd.. $800
mo/+$500 (1st & last)-
dep, 1 year lease. Call
850-647-2552 /



3 br, 1. ba Mobile Home,
125 Woodley Dr. Wewa, FL
blocks from Chipola ,River,
$595 mo:, (917).650-6452.
Furnished 2 br; 1 ba sin-
.gle wide trailer for rent.
$500/mo + $500 deposit.
Call 850-648-5306
Nice clean 2 br, 2 ba, large
shady, yard with storage
building. 1 block from St.
Joe Bay. Highland View
area. $700 Call
850-227-5301. or
'850-227-6297
1*~~~ '. "*


Reduced to
$139,950
Eastpoint, recently re-
modeled 3 br, 2 ba on
large lot, close to boat
ramp, blacktop road,
City water & sewage,
FL. Must sell!'
850-694-4457.
St Joe Beach 2 br TH, re-
modeled, beach access,
239K, Pelican Walk Real
Estate 850-647-2473
St Joe Beach 3 br 2 ba,
CH&A, dedicated beach,
workshop, Carport great
buy, $275K, Pelican Walk
Real Estate 850-647-2473
WeWahitchka 2003 MH
on 180'x190' lot. 3 br, 2 ba
-w/new carpet & metal roof.
Close to schools and boat
ramps. $90K. Call Heather
Harris 850-227-6805 Blue
Water Realty

7-1- 7110

PSJ Beach 115 Coranado
St. 50x125 Ft Lot with old-
er Mobile Home, view
steps to beach, will con-.
sider owner finance Or
property swap. Motivated,
$359K Call 850-647-9214.
Wewahitchka 3 br, 2 ba.
Just 2 blks from Lake Al-
,ice. Approx 1/3 acre w/,
fenced yard .and a variety.
of trees. Call Billy Joe
.Smiley at Port Realty Inc.
850-340-1213


7120



New Metal Building
2800sf includes new office
and bathroom. Priced at
$395,000 Call
850-258-6139



S'7150 1
75x150 lot with util: 2nd
blk from gulf. MH,
front/back porches, w/2 util
bldgs. 24x36 carport New
AC, Roof, flooring. & appl.
$250K Best $ on Beachi
.850-647-9193'

Residential
Development
Potential


Gulf & Calhoun
Counties, Florida
A St. Joe
LandMark Property
SBeautifully set on a 4/-
150-acre tract with
five-acre lake
*30 miles from Port St.
Joe .ar, di miles from
Wewar,,i.:r, a

*Boating enthusiasts
'.*,ii enjoy nearby lakes,
rivers and the Gulf of:
Mexico
Call Gail Ward with GVA
Advantis Real Estate
Services Company at
850.674.5333.
JOE.com
Keyword:
Rhames Pond

STJOE0


IF YOU DON'T KNOW
JOE,
YOU DON'T KNOW
FLORIDA.

Lots For Sale
Southgate Lot Reduced
to $99,000 for quick
sale.

Barbara Drive Lot Only
$105,000.
Palm Breeze Lot 103' X
190' Only 75,000
Call Now!
Office 227-7770
Office 227-7775
Office 227-3200
Preston Russ
Mobile 227-8890

4 ,,Coastal
at F


8100 Antique & Collectibles
8110 Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
8140 Vans .
8150 Commercial
816 0- Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes







Acura Integra '91
79k miles, new tires, very
clean $2600 850-340-1827
Mazda RX8 '04, 8,500 mi-
les, 6 speed, Loadedl;
Lightning Yellow, CD,
leather $22,500 call
653-6375
To Place An Ad
in The Times
Classifieds
Call
(850),747-5020
or
1 (800) 345-8688


8120
Milsubishi Oullander 03,
4 door, excellent condition,;
new tires, 50K miles,
$15,000 obo 850-387-4357'
after 6 pm.,


P- TRCSo


Establishled 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years,


Dodge Pickup '79
green, drives good,
$600, 229-6769







2003 BMW
K1200RS. Excellent, gar-
age kept, rare Piedmont
red. ABS brakes, cruise'
control, heated grips,'
keyed system cases, new.
tires, new 20k' service with.
synthetic lubricant. NADA
Retail $10,470. Asking'
$9,750. Call 850-819-8726

Suzuki
600XK '03 very fast, very
nice bike. First $5000
takes it. Call 850-258-6139 -




Key West 20' 2020WA
Blue Water. Excellent con-
dition 150 Suzuki Out-'
board. Not 'many hours orn
motor. Electronics includ-
.ed. $16,800. For more info:
227-9325



S8220
2003 Yamaha XL800
Waverunner, 3 seater,.
120hp, trailer, cover, rear.
step, one owner, less than
35 hours, selling due to
health, $5800. Call 850-
227-1321.


I 7150



Bayview Lot
in Highland View, on Pom-
pano Street. $129,500.
Call (706) 333-0159.




Eastpoint
1 acre building lot, city
water, sewer, power,
paved road, close to
Bay & boat ramp, ready
to build $80,000 Call
Some Owner Fin. avail.
850-694-4457
Mexico Beach Lot,
175x100, walk to beach,
$189K. Motivated Seller
850-596-2057 or
850-271-1453

St Joe beach 2V1 lots, 1
block from water, $10K
buyer rebate, $535K, Peli-
can Walk Real Estate
850-647-2473



7160
Overstreet Area Mobile
home for sale. Asking
$109K. Some owner fi-
nancing avail. Call
478-960-0800




Residential Waterfront
and water view home sites
'from $150,000. Coldwell
Banker, Residential Real
Estate, Inc. Don Yarbrough
850-527-5887






Established 19~37 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, July 27, 2006 liC


ade


Are your eyes protect-
ed against the sun's dam-
aging rays? If not, maybe
it's time you looked into
getting new sunglasses

By ROBBYN BROOKS
Freedom News Service
e lather on sunscreen
when we hit the beach
or wear cover-ups to
protect our skin. We spend
time and money on picking
the right products to keep the
sun's cancer-causing rays from
damaging our bodies.
Why not do the same for
our eyes?
Ultraviolet light is the pri-
mary cause of cataracts and
macular degeneration. You can
even experience sunburn on
your corneas. And just like
skin, your eyes never recover
fully from overexposure to the
sun's rays.
"I didn't know that," said
David Shaw, who spends most
of his, workday as a car sales-
man outdoors. "That's kind of
scary to think about."
Even though the threat of
damage from the sun is very
real, it is preventable if you
shield your eyes.
All sunglasses, however,
aren't created equal.
"There's definitely a big
difference between fashion
eyewear and performance
eyewear,", said Rob Burns, an
optician at Family Eye Care in
Fort Walton Beach, Fla.
Just because you are wear-
ing tinted sunglasses doesn't
mean you are keeping your
eyes safe.
"Most of the inexpensive
glasses you get at kiosks in the
mall at least have a little UV
protection now," Burns said.
"But you have to be careful.
Most of the big frames you
see teenage girls wearing do
almost nothing for your eyes."
In fact, Burns said, wear-
ing dark tinted lenses without
UV protection can actually do
more harm to your eyes.
With dark lenses, pupils
expand to let more light in.
With the light, comes more UV
rays. That means more expo-
sure to UV rays because the
glass isn't UV protective.
So, here's what to con-
sider when you purchase your
shades.
Burns said the first thing
to look for is 98 percent UV
protection or higher. Then try,
to find polarized lenses. That
will cut down and sometimes
eliminate surface glare from
windows, water and other
reflective surfaces. As far as


it goes, its important to mi
sunglasses that fit close to
the face to avoid peripheral
light entering. Mirrored lenses
are also a plus because your
shades will "squint" for you.
All those qualities can usu-
ally be found in glasses from
reputable, .big-name manufac-
turers. But that can mean a
hefty price tag.
Expect to pay anywhere
from $100 to $200 for an
effective pair of glasses.
"It's hard for me to choke
down paying that much for
something I might lose," said
Max Putz, manager of the
Sunglass Hut in Santa Rosa
(Fla.) Mall. "But I look at it
as an investment. You get out
what you put in. And you only
have one set of eyes."
And sometimes that price
tag is beneficial. Putz said
nationwide companies like


In


The


= ,, .
Sunglass Hut offer warranties,
If something breaks, the com-
pany can fix it.
"People really need to
shop around," Putz said.
"They need to ask questions.
Some sunglasses don't have
any UV protection and are just
for fashion. And some aren't
optically correct and you will
have a wave or distortion in
the lens."
Just like Burns, Putz said
she sells a lot of polarized
lenses. Golfers, tennis players,
anglers and outdoor enthu-
siasts are the main buyers.
The color contrast is crisper,
makes it easier to track balls
and fish, and makes driving
much safer.
Shaw, who works at Lee
Kia in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.,
can vouch for the polarized
lenses. He said he spends
most of his day out on the lot


Presented By Rex and Anne Anderson, REALTORS
Gulf Front, X-Flood, Single Family Home for $875,000


iI~l


Gulf front home in beautiful area on Cape San Blas. 3 bedrooms,
and 2 1/2 baths. Enjoy spectacular sunsets and dolphin shows. Home
is nicely set back behind the dune line and has two master bedrooms
facing the gulf. X-Flood zone with no flood insurance required. Seller
is offering to pay 2% towards buyer closing costs or for decorating al-
lowance. MLS# 110808 *


and the reflection of the sun
off the cars can be "blinding."
"Before I bought the polar-
ized sunglasses I was still
squinting," Shaw said. "These
are much more comfortable
than my old pair and help
me focus on my customers
instead of the environment."
Shaw also said his new
shades definitely help him out
on the golf course.
And you don't have to give
up fashion altogether to pro-
tect your baby blues.
Several. designer brands
offer 100 percent UV protec-
tion coupled with polarized
lenses. The trick is knowving
where to look and trusting
your eye-care professional.
"Go to a store and ask
for help," Burns said. "It's our
job to help you. protect your
eyes."


-SCoastal


",roup


www.RexAnderson.com





Phone: 850-227-1800
Rex Cellular: 850-227-5416
Anne Cellular: 850-227-5432
Email: Andersons @gtcom.net


Sales Information provided by MLS Association


Shade


Lens Material
Polycarbonate. lenses are made of remarkably strong plastic and are 20 times more
impact resistant and three times lighter than glass. Lenses have a scratch resistant coating.
Glass lenses are the sharpest and clearest lenses. Optical-quality glass lenses are
* impact-resistant and more scratch resistant than plastic lenses. They also keep their shape
when heat is applied.
Lightweight glass lenses have the same properties as regular glass but are 20 percent
thinner.
Lens Color
Green lenses provide contrast in low light conditions and reduces eyestrain in bright
conditions. They filter some blue light and protect against glare.
Gray lenses allow colors to pass through the lens evenly, allowing true perception and
the least amount of color distortion. They are easy on the eyes.and best for bright sun. They're
also great for sports and outdoor work.
Brown lenses improve contrast by filtering out blue light and reducing glare. They're
ideal for sports with high glare, such as skiing, boating, driving and fast action sports. They
can be used well in overcast or hazy conditions.
Rose lenses allow high contrast for increased depth perception in low light conditions.
They improve contrast against blue and green objects and are great for golfing.
Lens Treatnients
Internal anti-reflective multi-layerpd coatings on the inside of the lenses absorb the
reflections that hit the lens from behind and from the side,.
Flash treatments make a lens more effective for intense sunlight and glare. A thin
metallic treatment is placed over a regular sunglass lens to create the mirrored look.
SClearseal is a waterproof treatment that allows water drops to retain a spherical shape
once they touch the lens. That action makes it easier to clean the lenses. This treatment is
greal frr waler poris fishing and snow sports.
Polarized lenses have a filter encased w ihin them that traps and eliminates glare from
water or other smooth surfaces. They absorb a argue percentage ol overall light and work well
for boaters and anglers. ,
Source: Revo, www.revo.com

,et uo't pnefewwticnat 6a6team (ie l tput
find uO't UseM JtomeW!!!!

P Pelican Real Estate
171 Highway 98, Suite D
Eastpoint, FL 32328
rIPelican (850)670-8886
| .| WEopm ~~C a || www.pelicanproperty.com


CLEARED. 1.11 acre lot located
in Fairway Park Subdivision in
Carrabelle. New development
three blocks from bay and a short
distance to boat launch and golf
course.
MLS # 108377............. $139,500


CHARMING 3BR/2BA home
with spacious kitchen/dining
area, quaint family room w/fire-
place. Ideal neighborhood lo-
cated in Apalachicola. Close to
downtown and schools.
MLS # 201380......... $335,000


LU ~1trmn


BEAUTIFUL Gulffront home-
site with FEMA located in Money
Bayou. Nice wide beach to enjoy
walking, shelling and horseback
riding.
MLS # 201081........... $1,300,000


* orAOUStUa owvzoA nome to-
cated in Apalachicola. Wonderful
landscaped :property boasts the
natural look.
MLS # 200076............. $329,000


PRETTY 1.32 acres with lots of
vegetation. Property has an unob-
structed view of the Apalachicola
Bay.
MLS # 107581............. $440,000


EXQUISITE 4BR/4BA home in
the exclusive St. George Plantation
located on St. George Island. This
home features many amenities and
has been extensively redecorated.
MLS # 110802 .......... $1,299,000
iimmmvtifrylbailllt~- APiF^HiHi


WONDERFUL lot located on St.
George Island. Short distance to
beach.
MLS #108570 ........... $380,000


GiKA.r lot one blocK ott tirgnway
98 located in Lanark. Popular
area due to land elevation and its
close to boat launch and bay.
MLS # 108411............. $125,000


J.'.l.I. A.UO LU9ac nUL Wiu pinelll s, iNJIX.UI Lk/.VA hme. llIlcal e IVLatCU
high elevation and dry. Located on 3.47 acres that adjoins Tate's
in new development in Carrabelle Hell National Forest. Only.02
only three blocks from bay and a miles from the Apalachicola Bay.
short distance to boat launch and This property has many amenities
golf course, including a workshop.
MLS # 107486.............. $144,900 MLS # 200021.............. $399,000
f LEADING REAL ESTATE
y COMPANIES JTHE WORLD"'


4 -- ---wnsmog


'1~"".


The tar Por St Jo, FL- Tursdy, uly27, 006- I


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


*..


i.7






lt l Thl Stnr PcIrt St Joe. F


Striping


it rich


Watermelon is now more convenient. Here are 10 quick,



delicious things to make with the refreshing fruit


Story by CATHY THOMAS
Photos by NICK KOON
Freedom News Service
Odd as it seems, I like to
stand in line at the supermar-
ket checkout. I'm endlessly
curious about what shoppers
buy.
And over the past few
weeks, I've noticed that more
and more carts contain water-
melon.
Buying a watermelon used
to mandate culinary commit-
ment. Weighing as much as
30 pounds, one of these behe-
moths meant that either you
fed a crowd, or your family
ate it everyday until the crisp
magenta flesh became watery
sludge.
But now consumers pur-
chase it willy-nilly, without
worry about how to use it
up. They buy small pre-cut
watermelon wedges covered
with plastic wrap, or bite-size
chunks in see-through contain-
iers, or in increasing numbers,
mini-watermelons that aren't
much bigger than softballs.
Keith Kato, general man-
ager of produce company
Dulcinea, says sales of its
mini-size seedless Pureheart
watermelons have increased
more than 500 percent over
the past three years.
"We have seen this cate-
gory (mini-watermelons) grow
consistently, and we expect it
to not only grow the overall'
category, but also to become
30 (percent) to 40 percent of
watermelon sales."
Mini-melons (sometimes
labeled "baby" by other pro-
duce companies), average
about 5 pounds, and a hun-
gry watermelon devotee might
cut one in half and devour
the entire half section. The
season peaks April through
September, .but mini-melons
are available year-round.
But convenient size
(whether mini-melons or larg-
er melons that have been cut
into wedges or pieces) is only
part of watermelon's increased
appeal. Over the past few years,
seedless varieties of all sizes
have become commonplace..
Hard, shiny "spit-out" seeds
have disappeared in these
varieties, replaced with, seeds
that aren't developed small,
soft, empty white "pips." A pip
is the portion that surrounds
the seeds in seeded varieties.
The lack of seeds in a
watermelon makes the flesh
firmer and helps it to .stay
fresh longer whether left whole
or cut and refriierated.
Large or 'small, more than
1,200 varieties of watermelons
are grown ',in 96 countries,
according to Stefanie Simek,
marketing and communica-
tions manager at the National
Watermelon Promotion Board
in Orlando. Fla. Some have
red, flesh, while others have
yellow or orange interiors.
A new variety is debuting
this year that has a, surpris-
ing whitish-yellow skin. It's
a midsize model, about. 6 to
8 pounds, seedless with red
flesh, called Golden Dragon.
No matter which seedless
variety you choose, here are
10 fast-but-delectable things to
make with watermelons:


Adapted from National
Watermelon Promotion Board.
2. Balsamic-dream
appetizers:
Place bite-size watermelon
chunks on platter and spear
each with toothpick. Drizzle
with a little fresh lime juice
and balsamic vinegar; serve
with cheese and crackers or
bread slices on the side. Or
for a more elegant approach
used by Chef Rick Tramonto,
author of "Amuse-Bouche"
(Random House, $35), turn
melon cubes into containers.
Cut watermelon into 1 1/2-
inch cubes. Use melon bailer
to scoop a small cavity on one
side. Arrange cavity-side up
on platter and squeeze a little
lime juice on each. Add a little
aged balsamic vinegar to each
cavity and serve.
3. Watermelon gazpacho:,
This cold and colorful
soup makes a great summer-
time starter. Rather than a
tomato base, this gazpacho
uses pureed watermelon.
The pure is augmented with
more traditional gazpacho
ingredients such as. cucum-
ber, bell pepper and celery. It
can be prepared four hours
in advance and refrigerated
(recipe included).
4. Spiked watermelon a
salad or dessert:
Place about 16 cups bite-
size watermelon pieces (about
an 8-pound watermelon) in
large ceramic or glass bowl.
In separate bowl, whisk 1 cup
fresh lemon juice and 2/3 cup
sugar, until sugar dissolves.
Whisk in 1/2 cuip vodka. 6
tablespoons creme de cassis
Black currant liqueurl and
salt to taste. Pour over water-
melon, cover and chill at least,
1 hour or up to 4 hours. Divide
between 8 bowls and sprinkle
with chopped fresh mint.
(Adapted from Bon App6tit
magazine.)
5. Berry-melon smoothies:
' Freeze 2 cups watermelon
chunks. Place watermelon, 1
cup sliced strawberries and
1/4 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
in blender. Cover and blend.
until smooth. Pour into 2 tall
glasses and serve.
6. Spicy snack:
Forget the potato chips -
spicy watermelon can be even


more addictive. Cut water-
melon into bite-size chunks
and sprinkle to taste with
either pico de gallo seasoning
(a' chili-mixture available in'
Latin American markets) or
an Asian chili salt (a mixture,
of salt and chilies available
in Asian markets, such as the
Vietnamese Bon Bon brand).
7. Ice cold and
"sake-fled":
Watermelon and dry sake
(Japanese wine) team up to
make a delicious sorbet. In
a food processor fitted with
metal blade or blender, add
4 cups watermelon chunks,
2/3 cup sugar and 1/2 cup
inexpensive dry sake; process
until smooth. Taste. If too
sweet, add a little fresh lime
juice. Chill thoroughly, then
process in ice cream machine
according to manufacturer's
directions. -
Adapted from "Ripe For
Dessert" by David Lebovitz
(Harper Collins, $34.95).
8. Melon in spiced syrup:.
In medium saucepan,
combine 2/3 cup water and
2/3 cup sugar. Bring to sim-
mer on medium heat, stirring
until sugar dissolves.' Add 1
teaspoon grated fresh ginger,"
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
and 1 cinnamon stick. Gently
simmer 8 minutes. Cool and
strain. Place 4 cups water-
melon chunks and 4 cups can-
taloupe or honeydew melon
chunks in -bowl. Pour syrup
on melons and gently toss.
Cover and chill. Garnish with
chopped fresh mint and a few
blueberries. If serving as a
dessert, accompany with crisp
cookies.
9. Cheese 'n' melon good
for breakfast or dessert:
Place wedge of chilled
watermelon on plate. Next to-
it place a small wedge-of either
feta cheese or goat cheese.
Make two small piles next to
the cheese, one of walnuts or
candied walnuts. one of dried
cranberries or candied ginger.
10. Curried crab salad on
sleek watermelon
triangles: :
A tangy mixture of cooked
apples and onions team with
curry powder and mayonnaise
to make an. irresistible dress-
ing for the seafood. The salad


sits atop lightly salted water-
melon, which lends sweet-
ness as well as crunch (recipe
included). Cooked chicken can
.be substituted for crab.


Place
4 cups
watermel-
on chunks
in blend-
er; pro-
cess until
smooth.
Transfer to
large glass
or ceramic
bowl. Finely
dice remain-
ing 1 cup
watermelon
and add to
pure. Add
f, remaining
7 ingredients
except gar-
nish. Stir
to combine.
Cover and
refrigerate
until cold,
at least 1 hour or up to 4
hours.
Divide between 4 soup
bowls for larger servings, or 8
small glasses for smaller serv-
ings. Garnish each with dollop
of sour cream, and if desired,
either a small sprig of mint or
a mint leaf.
Nutritional information
(per small serving without gar-
nish): Calories 180 (less than
2 percent from fat), protein 4
g, carbolhydrates 41.7 g, fat Ig
(saturated 0.1g), cholesterol 2
mg, sodium 65 mg, fiber 3.2 g,
Source: Bon App6tit maga-
zine and chef/author Cat Cora


w -


Watermelon And
Cucumber Gazpacho
Yield: 4 large servings, or
'8 smaller appetizer servings
5 cups seedless watermel-
on chunks, divided use
1 small cucumber, peeled,
seeded, finely diced
1 medium red bell pepper.
cored, seeded, finely diced
1 medium 'yellow bell
pepper, cored, seeded, finely
diced
I small jalapefio chili,
seeded, minced; see cook's
notes
3 pale green inner celery
stalks, finely diced
1/2 small red onion, finely
diced ;
1/4 cup finely chopped.
fresh mint

3 tablespoons fresh lime
juice
2 tablespoons red wine
vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt
Garnish: sour cream
Optional garnish: fresh
mint sprigs
Cook's notes: Use caution
!when working with)fresh chil-
.ies; wash hands and work sur-
face thoroughly upon comple-
tion and do NOT -touch eyes
or face. If you prefer a milder
version, use 1/2 of the chili
instead of the whole amount
called for in the recipe.
Procedure:


CATHEY




(850) 648-5100

PROFESSIONLCNSRCIONSRIE


1. Easy-peasy pie
a la mode:
You don't need to heat up
the oven to make this refresh-
ing dessert. Cut store-bought
pound cake into 1/2-inch-thick
pie-shape wedges. Cut water-
melon into 3-inch-thick slices
and cut off rind. Cut water-
melon slices into pie-shape
wedge, the same size as cake
slices. Place cake slices oil-six
dessert plates. Top each with
- watermelon slice. Place large
scoop of vanilla frozen yogurt
or caramel-swirl ice cream (or
dulce de .leche ice cream) on
top. Drizzle with strawberry
syrup or sweetened fresh ber-
ries.


Commercial
Residential
Multi-Family


* General Contractor
* Construction Management
* Design / Build


For all your construction needs call Cathey Construction & Development. With over
ten years experience building projects that have helped shape the Florida Panhandle,
Brian Cathey and the CC&D Team can meet all of your construction needs!

Cathey Construction & Development
103 North 30th Street
P.O. Box 13107
Mexico Beach, FL 32410


Phone: (850) 648-5100
xcdAdbu f zdpot uwdqjpo/dpn !


Fax (850)648-5105
xxx/dbU f zdpot uwdqLpo/dpn


Curried Crab And
Watermelon Salad
Yield: 4 servings
3 tablespoons, extra-virgin
olive oil, divided use
.2 tablespoons' corecd,'
peeled and finely chopped
Granny Smith apple
1 tablespoon finely
chopped onion
1 1/2 teaspoons mild
curry powder
1 teaspoon water
1. 2 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon 'finely


Live music returns to the
Thirsty Goat all summer long


6pm 'I# they get lred of playing


August 4h-FIrst Fridays
121h-John and Tom
26th GeoCge and Cielus


July 71h- rst Fridays
15Ih-John and Tom
9th Geoorge and Ciefus





Geora and CTm -9th
John and Tom -16th


5,0 Mnuen Aene aHw 98 & 7
229-POT '67)


-ig


c -e II I


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding arebs for 68 years


12(TheSta, Prt t. oeFL-ThrdyJuy2, 06


chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon finely
chopped fresh mint leaves
Salt and freshly ground
pepper to taste
1 pound lump crabmeat,
picked over to remove carti-
lage; see cook's notes
4 (1/2-inch thick) half-
round watermelon slices
from a large watermelon, rind
removed
2 tablespoons plus 1 tea-
spoon fresh lime juice, divided
use
1 bunch arugula, about 5
ounces, large stems discarded
Cook's notes: Crabmeat
is available in lump, flaked or
claw meat. Lump meat con-
sists of larger, choice pieces
from the body of the crab. If
desired, to reduce calories,
divide ingredients among 6
plates, increasing the amount
of watermelon wedges, but
using smaller amounts of crab
mixture. If you wish, cooked,
cooled (boneless, skinless)
chicken meat can be substi-
tuted for crabmeat.'
Procedure:
In small saucepan, heat
1 tablespoon oil on medium-
high heat. Add apple, onion
and curry powder; cook, stir-
ring occasionally, until onion
softens, about 5 minutes.
Remove from heat and stir in
water. Cool.
Combine cooled apple
mixture and mayonnaise in
blender or food processor fit-
ted with metal blade. Whirl
until smooth. Transfer to
medium bowl. Add cilantro,
mint, salt and pepper. Add
crab and gently fold.
Cut each half circle of
watermelon into 2 triangles.
Place 2 triangles on each of
4 plates. Drizzle watermelon
on each plate with about 1
teaspoon lime juice. Mound
crab on watermelon. In medi-
um bowl, toss' arugula with
remaining 2 tablespoons oil
and 1 tablespoon lime juice.
Arrange arugula around the
watermelon and crab on each
plate; serve.
Nutritional information
(per serving): Calories 467 (39
percent from fat), protein 20.5
g, carbohydrates 47.1 g, fat
19.7 g (saturated 5.8 g), cho-
lesterol 61 mg, sodium 525
mg, fiber 2.1 g
Source: "Food & Wine
Annual Cookbook 2004"
(American Express, $29.95)




Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 YEAR 75, NUMBER 50 BOCC, NFCD agree on path for courthouse By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m County commissioners had two weeks to consider Sharon Gaskin’s vision for restoring and maintaining the historic courthouse in Wewahitchka. Tuesday they unanimously agreed that they like what they saw so far. Commissioners approved a short-term agreement with Gaskin and North Florida Child Development, Inc. with an eye on a long-term lease for the courthouse in Wewahitchka that served for decades as the county seat. “It is a treasure to the county,” said Commissioner Joanna Bryan. “I think the county should work with Ms. Gaskin to restore that building.” The issue is pressing. The county has moved staff and constitutional of cers out of the courthouse and will stop paying for utilities when the scal year begins Oct. 1. As Commissioner Ward McDaniel noted, the building could only “go down” from that point unless maintained. Gaskin, president and CEO of NFCD, and her company, which operates from Gulf County but provides early childhood learning and other services in ve counties, have proposed partnering to avoid that deterioration. In her latest proposal to the BOCC Gaskin asked for a 10-year lease at $1 per month. NFCD – which currently pays $2,200 a month in rental payments – would also assume all utility bills and any basic upkeep and maintenance. The lease would also contain language by which the county and NFCD agree to pursue funding, especially grant funding, to help restore the courthouse, which is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. “We’ve got to keep that building,” said Commissioner Ward McDaniel. “That is our history. I think we are very close (to an agreement).” The courthouse also has pressing maintenance issues. See COURTHOUSE A3 Sheriff’s Of ce investigating shooting Star Staff Report The Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce is investigating a shooting that occurred in the early morning hours Sunday in Wewahitchka. The victim, whose name is not being released pending the conclusion of the investigation, sustained critical injuries and underwent surgery, but is expected to recover, according to a GCSO press release. The investigation is attempting to determine whether the shooting was intentional or accidental. Sheriff Mike Harrison said Monday that investigators would need several days to interview all those present or who witnessed the incident. Investigators were nally able to speak to the victim Monday, Harrison said he hoped to have the investigation concluded and the ndings released by week’s end. Real estate signs positive in Gulf County By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m If suddenly you feel like you see a new home being built every time you turn around in Gulf County, you’re not crazy. According to numbers provided by the Gulf County Building Department, 60 single family home building permits have been issued so far this year with a $16.5 million valuation, up from last year’s 38 total permits totaling $9.5 million. “There’s a marked increase in permits, and it’s going to keep going,” said Steve Newman, managing member of Big Fish Construction. “One of the reasons is the pin-up demand and every aspect of building a home is cheaper now.” Natalie Shoaf, a realtor with the Gulf the Coast Real Estate Group agreed. “It’s up,” she said. “It’s easier to get lot loans. Some local banks are doing them and it makes life a lot easier.” Shoaf said that so far in 2013, lot sales were currently at 214 sold, up from last year’s 203 with an average price tag of See REAL ESTATE A3 BILL FAUTH | Special to The Star Local photographer Bill Fauth snapped this gorgeous shot of last week’s harvest moon as it burnished the evening sky over Indian Pass last week. Moon over Indian Pass Cabin burns at state park Star Staff Report A cabin at the T.H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park burned to the ground last week. The cabin was occupied but no one was injured in the blaze, which was reported just after 2 a.m. ET Thursday morning, according to the park manager. Occupants of the cabin were on the beach when they noticed the cabin burning. The cabin was a total loss. The re is under investigation by the State Fire Marshal’s Of ce. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m For some, Gulf County has it all: beautiful beaches, a friendly community and a charming, small-town feel. Others feel that the addition of a cultural arts building would be the icing that’s missing from the cake. A full-time cultural arts building would allow Gulf County to play host to traveling exhibits, local art showcases and evening entertainment including theatre productions or public speaking engagements. It would also give creative minds a place to converge, meet and share their passions with others. Former president of the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition Natalie Shoaf spent years examining this cultural void and regularly sought out ways to ll it. After years of scouting locations and holding conversations, she believes she may have found the right place...but she can’t do it alone. Shoaf said that there are several opportunities available in downtown Port St. Joe, but a building would need to be rented full-time until it could become selfsustaining and those interested in having such a building in the community will need to help out. “When people visit Gulf County, they want something to do and something for their kids to do,” said Shoaf. “When I travel, I see cultural things and we need to insert that into our community.” In 2015, the Forgotten Coast Plein Air paint-out event will celebrate its 10th anniversary. Franklin and Gulf County trade hosting duties each year, and while Franklin is home to the Center for History, Culture and Art, Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka do not have a permanent installation. Shoaf fears that if there’s nowhere to hold the Plein Air event, it won’t be in Gulf County at all. For the 2013 Plein Air celebration, George Duren donated a storefront on Reid Avenue and during a week in May, the building was packed to the gills with the art, music and cultural appreciation. Now, that same structure sits dark and empty. Lorinda Gingell works at the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, and like Shoaf, sees the bene t of a cultural arts building in Port St. Joe. “We need a cultural art center in order to move the community into a rst-class place to live,” said Gingell. “Lots of people who moved here are retired and never got a chance to appreciate art and would love to get involved.” Shoaf and Gingell are gauging community interest for such a building, especially from those willing to donate funds, those with experience in fundraisers or area residents who may have ideas for cultural events that would bene t both kids and adults within the community. “There are people here who have a wealth of knowledge when it comes to this stuff,” said Shoaf. “We need them to stand up and help.” It’s clear that Shoaf and Gingell are passionate about arts and Locals call for cultural arts building in Port St. Joe WES LOCHER | The Star A building on Reid Ave. was loaned to the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition for the Plein Air festivities, but now sits vacant. See CULTURAL A8 ‘A beautiful cause,’ B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5 Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . A5 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B5 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B6-B7

PAGE 2

Thursday, September 26, 2013CAROL AND BOb B COX PHOTOGRAp P HY The MBARA constructs articial reef habitats to enhance sustainable sheries in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. !! & 4/9... #&! )# 7;=/1 4/95/89;78 4/=90;; 45/9=<= 4/5;9.== 4/970191<. 2 2 !! & 4/... !$&)" ,' 7;=/ 4==59.7; 4==59.7; &# #(&'( 4=95=/ 4<8; 4. 4<.. 4/.9;<< #' # $&()&' 4<9;78 4<9;78 &#' (!(,' 401.908< 401.908< #'' # &"(' 4519<
PAGE 3

Local The Star| A3 Thursday, September 26, 2013 There is a leaking back wall and a problem with mold in the rear of the build ing, rendering that area unsafe. Further, there is water in the basement of the build ing that is near electrical infrastructure. County administrator Don Butler suggested any lease agreement dene where NFCD can and can not be within the courthouse. Commissioners also wanted county attorney Jer emy Novak, who was absent, to sign off on any lease con tract, and Butler suggested a Monday meeting. In the interest of more deliberation in the process, Bryan moved and commis sioners approved – Commis sioner Warren Yeager was also absent – a motion that allows NFCD to assume re sponsibility for monthly util ity payments Oct. 1. “That will keep the doors from closing,” Gaskin said. “We can work out a longterm lease. I need to make sure the building is safe for my employees, too. “I’m excited about it. I’m ready to work on it. I’m glad they made the decision to move forward.” Bryan’s motion included direction that NFCD will op erate on a month-to-month lease for up to six months while the county and NFCD work through a lease agreement. Two weeks ago Gaskin likened the importance of the Old Courthouse on the north end of the county to the south-end landmark the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Operating Head Start and Early Head Start among other programs in ve coun ties, NFCD has an overall budget more than $4 mil lion. She said 70 percent of her operations are in Gulf County. She said if the courthouse became an untenable loca tion she might have to move her headquarters to another county. Primarily, though, Gaskin made clear the attachment to the courthouse. “I will take it on to save it,” she told commissioners. “I would hate to see it be closed. I don’t want to see that happen.” The commissioner most vocally opposed to turning over a public building to a private entity, Commission er Carmen McLemore ex pressed support for Gaskin’s vision. “I really have no issue with it,” McLemore said. “I think it is the best thing go ing for the north end of the county. I just want to make sure the attorney is okay with it.” Wewahitchka Clerk, Tax Collector ofces During the coming week, the new Wewahitchka of ces for the Clerk of Courts and Tax Collector, to be lo cated in the old Health De partment Building on N. 3rd Street, will be equipped with a new phone system. Until the system is up and running the Clerk’s of ce can be contacted at 2275630 and the Tax Collector at 227-5628. Lawsuit The federal lawsuit led by a local political ac tion committee against the BOCC and three individual commissioners roiled an other meeting as commis sioners considered how to pay the $10,000 legal bill. The discussion led to an outburst from McLemore saying Bryan was a member of the PAC – she is not a listed member on the website nor has been – and adding that she jeopardized the county’s position in another lawsuit with recent comments to the contractor on the Americus Ditch project. McLemore also criti cized Bryan for approving a motion several meetings back – which passed 3-2 with McLemore and Commis sioner Tan Smiley dissenting – that moved the county for ward on research to explore the potential for a return to county-wide voting. Bryan said, “The truth is an absolute defense” as it pertained to threatened litigation and that she does not work for the county at torney, does not work for McLemore, and “I am not playing this game with you.” She said criticism of BOCC action pertaining to the Voter’s Rights Act dem onstrated that McLemore didn’t understand the law or disregarded it. The discussion, which consumed the rst 15 min utes of the meeting, was the latest salvo what has been a prickly relationship between Bryan and McLemore. ( 1* $0. $'$ $-( $ '. $( / ($.( .2 1 .. $ $1 %$ 0 '$ &2! 1 $' $' $ $&& $ 1. &$. $' 2$.1 . # " # '$ 1%$0 *1.'$ &2 3377 '+ ,' 2, ''6 ,),'1 3,6+$ &72 $ 3 '66 2, 3)3'6 '7 7' (, 32+' 37, 3 7'3 +', 32 ,'6 #6, 2,3, ,)3 ,+$ ,'6 7' (, ',,+ ,'6 32+''6 .7 3377 +,3 % 3,6+ ,'7 '))$ &* 7, 6* ')) 6373,+ 3 3, 32+''6$ 3)6+31 )2,)5$ ',7, ))6,* 73377 ','1, +'36 ('6'), ,' ''6 ,),'1 3,6+ &! 3 &$ ++33 '6 3, 0$ --$----! % $ 00$----! % &$ 0$----! % & -$----! % % ', '))', ", $ & ', (4,) )2'1, ' 37, ,, )6+ ,+), ,'31 2, ')) '6 '5 63+' 3 +333 '6 '5$ 7,7(, " .( 1' ($2 # '$ 11 $ 0 $ )) Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-268-7718 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders Single T ooth Implant $ 1 7 95 Dentur e Implants $ 1 495 $ 1 8 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upper Ar c h 20144-1-T4 111 4 4 1 4 COURTHOUSE from page A1 $61,000-$78,000 for Gulf County. “St. Joe Beach is up and we’re selling more in WindMark,” said Shoaf. Shoaf reported that the highest lot price this year checked in at $1.8 million. According to numbers provided by Shoaf, lots in St. Joe Beach, Mexico Beach and Beacon Hill were up in number of sales but down in average price for the area with 59 sold between the three areas and an average price of $63,000. This is an increase from last year’s 47 lots, but a lower price tag than the $68,000 average in 2012. In Cape San Blas, South Gulf County and Indian Pass there was a slight decrease in the number of lots sales but prices have risen and 2013 saw 112 sales between the three areas with an average price of $111,000. In 2012 the area had 115 sales and the average price was on the low side with $73,000. Shoaf reported a decline in both lot sales and prices within Port St. Joe, falling from 26 to 14 this year and the average price sank from $27,000 to $17,000. Wewahitchka was up in sales and price, the 2013 total showing 29 sales with an average price of $14,000, up from last year’s 15 lot sales and $13,000 average. Gulf County wasn’t hit only by the economic downturn of 2008 but also by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Bo Spring, managing member of Big Fish Construction and president of the Forgotten Coast Builders Association said that the 18 months following the oil spill were full of uncertainty and the number of local construction companies had dwindled down to ve. Spring said that things are beginning to climb again and said that in addition to Big Fish, there are now 8-9 companies serving Gulf and Franklin counties. Zach Childs at 98 Real Estate Group concurred with the growth in sales, and said that home purchases in the area have started moving into the recovery phase as well. “In general, the closer a property is to white sand, the more of a recovery in value it is seeing,” said Childs. “The number of single family homes on the market has seen the biggest reduction and most demand. “This has been great for builders as many people looking for homes in the area nd they can build a brand new home for less than an existing one in some situations.” Childs reported 453 home sales so far in 2013 and is on track to have the most closings of any year since 2005. He said that markets like North Gulf County have yet to see much of a rebound but a high sales volume will drive the number of properties on the market down and value up. “Now is the time to buy a lot and build your beach house,” said Newman. He added that raw material and lumber costs are down, but uctuate with the market, making for an ideal time to begin construction. Of the projects completed in 2013 by Big Fish, 100 percent of buyers were also end users who planned to live in the home for at least several months out of the year. Newman said that 100 percent of homes were also within walking distance of the water. “People go to Destin and Panama City and in the end they want that old Forgotten Coast style of living,” said Spring. “This is the Florida vacation they remember from their childhood.” Newman and Spring both gave praise the Gulf County Tourist Development Council for their work in rebranding the area and helping to bring in tourists who ultimately decide to settle down in Gulf County. “Our economy is driven by tourism and construction,” said Newman. “The TDC is doing a great job and what they’re pushing ts in with what we do.” REAL ESTATE from page A1 WES LOc C HER | The Star Gulf County has experienced the highest lot sale numbers since 2005.

PAGE 4

Page 4 Thursday, September 26, 2013 Clearing the air on Eglin, state forests Life Divots USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com A Section I taught an American government class this past week at the high school. Well, taught might be a little misleading. It was Constitution Week and Mrs. Beard was kind enough to ask me to come out and regale the students with all I know about that famed document. It didnt take long. It was a class of seniors. They impressed me with their attentiveness, their youthful energy and their politeness. Of course, it was a required class. Maybe they were just trying to get through the moment! And, oh my gosh, how young they looked! I was talking about Thomas Jefferson, King George III and the Boston Tea Party.. but I was thinking Was I ever this bright and alert? Did I ever move with this ease and bounce? Was I ever wrinkle free? I had running shoes older than some of these students! They seemed so self-assured. Comfortable. At ease. Innocent. As I pointed out the short comings of the Articles of Confederation and headed into the Preamble, my mind catapulted back to my last year in high school. I was trying as hard as the dickens to put up the Hey man, Im cool attitude. But, the truth was, I wasnt so cool. The thought of graduation was both exhilarating and intimidating. It was a big world. And, I was just smart enough to know it was about to change for me. My doubts and fears had doubts and fears! They were drafting 18 years olds for Vietnam in 1965. College cost more money than I had. The home that Id been bragging about growing up and leaving, all of a sudden, didnt really look that bad. The little town that Id been telling folks for years that I couldnt wait to get shed of, was after all, really pretty niceand friendlyand safe. As I was explaining how Georgia and some of the other less populated colonies werent about to accept the Virginia Plan, I wondered what was really going on in the minds of these wonderful young people. Have they even thought of the future? Do they realize the cauldron they are headed for? They seemed pretty hip. but life has some dips and curves not evident in an American Democracy class. Maybe they were putting up that same front I displayed. Down amongst the freedom of speech, press and religion discussion, it crossed my mind that I might be giving this talk in the wrong direction. I was shelling down the corn on what used to be and how it all came about but I might should have been aiming toward their future. These young people need to comprehend what awaits them. The bounty is plentiful for those who earnestly seek it. But the pitfalls, potholes and potential catastrophes of life also loom on the horizon. How do you cling to the good and avoid the bad? How do teenagers sort out the wheat from the chaff? It can be a razor thin line for some between success and failure. I should have been less inclined to extol the history and virtues of the United States Constitution and spent the time explaining how this revered document has been tweaked, interpreted, misinterpreted and even stretched on occasionto meet the special needs of a speci c group, situation or crisis. Flexibility is certainly not a bad thing. Our forefathers clearly understood and allowed for that. But, so often the ex is in the eye of the beholder. Teenagers today need to be wise beyond their years to gure out and function appropriately in this tilt-awhirl universe they are diving head rst into. Its not like all the good guys wear white hats and you simply avoid the rest. I hear con icting arguments in political debates and think they are both right.. Course, I also hear lots of political vexing, and Im pretty sure they are both wrong. Some days, I cant tell the Republicans from the Democrats or the sincere, earnest friends from the diabolical shysters. And were asking high school seniors to graduate with a smile and a handshake and step into this arena! I wonder if it is too late to start a class right now for them on how to x the mess the last generation left behind. We are still the greatest nation on earth, and I will ght any man that says different. We are still the land of opportunity..if you dont believe that, check the immigration ow. Rags to riches story still abound in this country. There is not a state in the union that doesnt have something special to offer. I want the youth of our nation to exploit every opportunity to the fullest. But, at the same time, I have some serious doubts about our direction. Listen, weve got more of everything that you can name on the face of the earth between the redwood forest and the Gulf Stream waters. We ought to be living large and enjoying life! But we seem, as a nation, to keep getting in our own way. Do you reckon weve over stretched the freedoms weve been given? Our elected folks often haggle more than they leadand there is so much anger. Has the tail begun to wag the dog? Are we still being governed by the consent of the people? I wonder if Jefferson, Washington, Madison and the boys would recognize the government they founded. Surely, we are not measuring our current society by how many days out of the year our ags y at half-mast. Those fresh, eager young faces have got to gure it out, and soon! They thanked me profusely as the closing bell rang. Many stopped for a chat. Everyone left me with a smile and a nod. And, their laughter and joy lingered as they exited into the hall. I hope and pray it will always be thus. Respectfully, Kes Oh Say, Can THEY See HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert It was Labor Day and I had unsuccessfully tried to cut my finger off; I was happy I failed. My buddies called from the golf course and asked if I would like to meet them at the 10th hole. Knowing my bandaged finger would not hurt my already pitiful golf game, I agreed. The only thing I could figure was that they were probably playing very badly and needed someone who would make them look and feel better about their game. I have a way of doing that for others on the golf course; I do not mind. I find satisfaction in hitting golf balls into the woods if they are straight and sound nice. Heading out immediately, I beat them to the 10th hole and had plenty of time to sit in the shade and ponder life, love and almost losing the middle finger of my right hand. Okay, it really wasnt that bad, but it bled a lot and took four off-brand band aids to cover up. As I sat in the shade of a tree near the place to tee off for the 10th hole, I studied a rack of those bottles you use to fill your divots. The bottles have sand and grass seeds in them and are usually on the golf cart so you can thoughtfully repair the damage you cause on the course. Perhaps the 10th hole is a good place to swap these out if you were digging a lot of holes on the first nine holes. Not taking golf seriously at all, I started thinking about some of the divots I have either dug into others or had dug out of me. Divot is a word that generally applies to the holes or marks dug out by golf clubs or horse hooves (and the part that is dug out), but I think life divots could be pretty applicable to everyone. A divot in golf is not a bad thing I have learned; in other words, there are good divots and bad divots and a good golfer learns to read their divots. I do not bother to get a dollar bill out and measure or attempt to read my divots on the golf course. If I keep the ball on the course and enjoy the scenery, it is a good day for me. In pondering these life divots, I started thinking about what could be poured on them to speed the healing process of the hole in the ground or in you or me. Apologies sometimes make more divots, but they are something that I thought should be considered. Time is usually a good divot healer, but then I started thinking about the good divots and not wanting to repair them. Honestly, I didnt get very far with this line of thought. Like many of my tee shots, my shade tree psychology ended up in the woods straight and true and sounding really nice, but in the woods. The best comparison I could come up with was a stain on a clean shirt. You know the shirt is clean, but the stain is still there. Stains, like divots shouldnt bother us. They may bother some folks, but they are the owner of the shirts to deal with. Then I started thinking about the stains I caused and decided I better just quit thinking. We ramble on, living with the joy and sorrow that we have experienced and caused. When my buddies showed up, I did not tell them what I was thinking about sitting in the shade. I gave them their moneys worth, hitting two balls far into the woods. I would like to note that the two drives were perfectly straight into the woods and they both sounded sweet when I hit them. Parring only one hole on this afternoon, I felt really good about my golf game. I wore a clean white shirt with a noticeable stain on it the next day to work. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Special to The Star Allow me to clarify the Air Forces intent regarding Eglin Air Force Bases efforts to use the Blackwater River State Forest and Tates Hell State Forest for occasional, non-hazardous military activities. Id like to make clear that the U.S. Air Force is not pursuing control, authority, or land exchange of state property. We simply are looking to share the forests with you. Our goal is to be completely compatible with current forest uses. The Florida Forest Service will maintain complete control and authority over the forests and must approve each and every Air Force activity. That means we will not conduct any operation that keeps you, as a member of the public, from enjoying your forest exactly as you do today. Hopefully you wont even notice we were there. By going through the National Environmental Policy Act process, it ensures our activities result in little, to no impact to the environment. We started that process by issuing a Notice of Intent to publish an Environmental Impact Statement in the Federal Register Aug. 12, 2013. We ran advertisements in the Pensacola News Journal, the Northwest Florida Daily News, the Panama City News Herald and the Tallahassee Democrat both on Aug. 9 and Aug. 16. We also ran an ad in the Apalachicola Times on Aug. 22. In these ads, we invited the public to our scoping meetings in Milton, Blountstown, and Apalachicola on Aug. 27, 28 and 29 respectively. Over time, youll see more of these announcements and well look for other ways to get the word out about future meetings and releases. These meetings have already been invaluable to us as weve learned a tremendous amount about what is important to you. We learned you love your forests and you want them to stay in pristine condition for many generations to come, and we agree with that 100 percent. Here at Eglin AFB, we recovered the Red Cockaded Woodpecker population and championed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services upgrade of the Okaloosa Darter from Endangered to Threatened, on the way to removing it from the Endangered List altogether. We are very proud of our stewardship record, and we completely understand why thats important to you. We grow these species along with more than 22 Threatened and Endangered species, and host more than 17,000 hunters, campers and hikers annually in the middle of one of the Department of Defenses most heavily used ranges. The types of occasional activity that may take place at Blackwater and Tates Hell vary from CV-22s conducting landings and takeoffs to dropping off small teams of four to six people who would use communication tools and maneuver through the forest, hopefully unnoticed. Some of the Air Force Special Operations Commands smaller aircraft may also be able to conduct landings and take-offs on existing forest roads when those areas are not open to recreational activities. And again, we want to leave no footprints behind. Each time we enter your forests, all of these activities will be fully coordinated, scheduled, and approved by our partners in the Florida Forestry Service. In our Draft document, which we hope to have ready for review this fall, youll see a careful analysis of all the potential impactsfrom traf c to water quality to noise and more. But thats just our analysiswe strongly urge you to continue adding your input. In fact, well consider your comments until a decision is made as we want to make the best, most informed decision possible. I look forward to more discussion and encourage you to stay informed on our process by going online at http://grasieis. leidoseemg.com/. Dear Editor, The veterans of Franklin County would like to extend our appreciation to the following merchants/ individuals who supported our annual reunion on Sept. 14. Thanks for Remembering. WOYS Radio, Gulfside IGAWayne and Jan Dooley, Franklin County Sheriffs Department, Durens Piggly Wiggly, C&S Trim Charles and Susan Stancell, Nadine Lee, Franklin County Parks and Recreation, Aloha Bugs Pest Management, Apalachicola Times, Sun Coast Vacation Rentals, Ronnie Wilson, Johnny Turner, Tony Phillips, Pete Adams, Ken and Bridgette Schroeder, Ronald Duggar, Kim Wilson McBrayer, Jody Wilson, Gorrie Wilson, Carolyn Wilson, Charles Collins, Brady Creamer, Gil Autrey and Dean Caassiter. Thank YOU COL. SHAWN MOORE 96th Civil Engineer Group Commander

PAGE 5

By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The members of the Port St. Joe Christian rock band Thirty-Three always considered themselves to be a tight-knit group. Now theyve welcomed a new member to the family. Keyboard player Shad Tracy has joined as a fulltime member and will be tickling the ivories for the bands upcoming concerts. Tracy moved to Gulf County two years ago and is in the eighth grade at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. He comes to the band well-prepared, having played the piano since age five. Why the piano when most kids go for drums, guitars or trombones? Mom made me, Tracy joked. It was that same mother, Gina Tracy, who was in St. Joe music to purchase a saxophone for her youngest son when she and store owner Tom McEniry got to talking about pianos and Tracys talents were revealed. McEniry mentioned that Thirty-Three wanted to add a keyboardist to their lineup and invited Gina and Tracy to attend the bands next practice. The remainder of the band is made up of vocalist Brianna Butler, guitarist Zack McFarland, bassist Cole Haddock and drummer Joel Bogaert a group of 11and 12-yearolds with a passion for music and a strong belief in their faith. Tracy had seen the other members of the group in passing and knew Haddock from school, but it wasnt until he attended the bands rehearsal that everything fell into place and he was invited to join as a member. Its been such a good opportunity for him, said Gina. Hes grown musically by playing with a group and gets along well with everyone. Were very excited! Gina has a degree in music and said that Tracys younger brother Jacob is also musically inclined. Tracy currently takes piano lessons from Matthew White at Long Avenue Baptist Church. While Tracy has never performed with a band prior to joining ThirtyThree and will be the first to admit to being nervous, he said he was glad that the keyboard player is usually in the back during the shows. Thirty-Three is the result of a six-week project that started with the St. Joe Music and Performance Program, founded in August 2012 by McEniry and area musician and choir director, Phil Densmore. The goal of the program was to get kids performing together in a band and have them learn and perform three cover songs. By the end of program, the chemistry that formed among band members was too strong to let go. The band continued to gain traction and popularity in Gulf and Bay counties as they played church services and area events. Throughout the spring months, the band spent some quality time at RSR Recording Studio where they recorded its first original song, Jesus Loves You and I Love You Too. The single was released digitally in June through the popular music service iTunes. In addition to countless shows at area churches, the group recently played the annual Scallop and Music Festival at George Core Park and are gearing up for the release of a two new original singles in the fall. Thirty-Threes original songs are penned by local songwriter Doug Roberts, who was brought in to aid the band. He had written a few Christian-based songs that he taught to the group and was pleasantly surprised with how quick they picked up the structures and progressions. The band is managed by the Joes father, David Bogaert, who takes care of the business and booking side of things. Kids looking to be involved in the St. Joe Music and Performance program can contact McEniry at St. Joe Music for more information. Visit the ThirtyThree band online at www.33band.com. Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 5 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LOCAL www.starfl.com A Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Ask Sarah House a direct question concerning the impact of the Semper Fi Sisters and the reply is a soliloquy. House, rather Sgt. Sarah House of the U.S. Marine Corps, has seen and experienced much of what was beyond her horizons after her graduation from Port St. Joe High School, she wrote in an email this week. But that does not mean a touch of home, whether stationed as she currently is in California or has been and will be again in the near-future in Afghanistan, is not manna. The Semper Fi Sisters are a saving grace, House wrote. It is always uplifting to receive things from home. It is always great receiving anything from anyone supporting the troops, but when it is something sent from home it makes it even more special. It is always a great feeling to have the familiar around you when you are surrounded by the unfamiliar. The Semper Fi Sisters is gearing up for another visit to Gulf County next month to bask in the sunny and sandy beaches for their fth annual Beach Blast. From a gathering of 12 Marine mothers, grandmothers, wives and sisters in the rst year, the Beach Blast has grown to include more than 70 women last year, related by marriage or blood to the handful of military branches in which loved ones serve. And where that rst group packed some three dozen care packages for troops deployed in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, last year the ladies and friends packed nearly 1,200 of what have become known as Boxes of Love, partnering with the Soldiers Angels organization for shipping information around the globe. During a packing party in the Centennial Building, to the music of the songwriters in town for Blast on the Bay, the ladies and folks from the community construct an assembly line to reach out and touch. Whether by sending packages, cards or just sending up an extra prayer at night or during the day for us, it reminds us of what and who we ght for, why we wear this uniform and what makes our country so great, House wrote. The biggest thing I can say to our supporters is thank you from the bottom of my heart. Those Boxes of Love, however, do not ll themselves and the effort which well continue to detail in the coming weeks leading up to the Oct. 17 Beach Blast is truly continental, if not a bit global. On the home front in Gulf County, items are needed to send a dash of Gulf County to troops overseas, but the Semper Fi Sisters are also in need of monetary donations for shipping. Consider the math: last year nearly 1,200 boxes were sent out at $14.85 a pop on the discounted rate from the U.S. Postal Service. We will ship as many boxes as we have donations to ship, said Brenda Garth, president of Semper Fi Sisters, which now spans across the country. With military missions and events changing the Semper Fi Sisters goal has also, in a signi cant sense, expanded. As much as the organization is dedicated to reaching out to troops, extending a hand to family members back home, aiding returning soldiers, wounded and not, the Sisters also have an educational bent. I believe that the American people havent forgotten just that the war in Afghanistan isnt on the front burner anymore with events in Syria and other events taking precedence, Semper Fi Sisters do help keep the spirit alive and help remind the community and also remind the troops that there is still support back home in the States and help keep the troop morale high, House wrote. BOXES OF LOVE Donations for the Boxes of Love campaign can be dropped at any branch of Centennial Bank, Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe and Harolds Auto Parts in Wewahitchka. An account has been set up at Centennial Bank for any donations to defray shipping costs. For more information visit Semper Fi Sisters on Facebook. A saving grace Fifth annual Boxes of Love for the troops kicks off SPECIAL TO THE STAR Shad Tracy (in blue) has joined Thirty-Three as a full-time keyboard player. The band is currently in the studio working on two new original singles. Local band Thirty-Three adds new member SARAH HOUSE Marine Sgt. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Top: Last year more than 70 Semper Fi Sisters packed nearly 1,200 Boxes of Love. Above: The Sisters will turn the Centennial Building into an assembly line during this years packing party Oct. 19. We will ship as many boxes as we have donations to ship Brenda Garth president of Semper Fi Sisters

PAGE 6

Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y WEEKL Y ALM ANA C ST JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W ES T P ASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 227-7847 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu S ept 26 87 70 10 % F ri, S ept 27 84 68 0 % S a t S ept 28 83 67 0 % Sun, S ept 29 82 71 0 % M on, S ept 30 83 72 0 % T ues O c t 1 81 72 30 % W ed O c t 2 82 72 30 % Page 6 Thursday, September 26, 2013 Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Special to The Star Now that summer is over we are going to start the fall season with a super island clean up. This is your chance to see and help preserve the beauty of St. Vincent Island. This event, sponsored by Friends of St Vincent, will take place on Friday, Oct. 11. We are looking for a limited number of hardy volunteers (at least 20) to clean up the unspoiled beaches of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. These beaches, even though unmarred and untrampled by tourists, receive large amounts of manmade debris and all sorts of otsam and jetsam of modern life. This debris that people carelessly cast into the gulf is washed onto the beaches where it adversely affects the wildlife on St Vincent Island, especially the nesting sea turtles, birds and marine life. The cleanup will focus mainly on small debris bottles, cans, plastic, paper that can be recycled. This cleanup is made possible by the help from three individuals: • Fonda Davis with Franklin County Solid Waste and Recycling for removing the collected debris from the island; • Shelley Stiaes, refuge manager, for providing transportation to and from the island; • Mike Turrisi, a St. Vincent volunteer, for organizing the cleanup event; All debris collected will be transported by FWS to be collection point where it will be picked up by Franklin County Solid Waste and Recycling. Everything that can be recycled will be recycled. Volunteers will be transported to St Vincent Island on the US Fish and Wildlife Service barge which will leave from their dock at Indian Pass at 8 a.m. ET. There will be two returns from the island, one at 12 p.m. noon, and the other at 4 p.m. When you volunteer be sure to let us know when you would like to return. This is not a hop-in or hop-out beach cleanup. You will need to choose what is best for you in terms of time and stamina. You will need to bring your own water, food, bug spray, sun screen, appropriate clothing and large black garbage bags for collecting the debris. Please remember it is a refuge and conditions can be extreme (heat, bugs, etc.). This cleanup is not for the faint of heart. If you can make it, you will have the reward of knowing that you helped return one of Florida’s last great jewels to its natural state. To register for the cleanup email supportstvin@hotmail.com by Oct. 4 – and thank you for your help! Turtle season is winding down and it has been a record breaking year on the island. There have been 104 recorded sea turtle nests! Of those nests 23 have been “adopted” by individuals who are interested in supporting the turtle program on the island. The red wolf breeding program is not faring as well. The Red Wolf program which has been ongoing on St. Vincent Island since 1989 has had another disappointing year. One breeding pair of red wolves is kept on the island to produce pups each spring. In the winter the pups are trapped, their health checked, and they are tted with radio tracking collars. The pups remain with their family until they are 18 months old. They are then trapped and relocated to Alligator River NWR in North Carolina where they are reintroduced into the wild. The staff and volunteers that track the wolves have found no evidence of pups again this year. If there are no pups this spring the two wolves on the island will be swapped out for another pair with the hope that they will be more productive. Fall and winter on the island always includes three scheduled hunts. The rst hunt, the Archery Hunt takes places Nov. 20-24. The popular Sambar Deer Hunt is scheduled for Dec. 4-8 and the Primitive Weapons Hunt is set for Jan. 22-26, 2014. Hunters can apply for any of these hunts at www.myfwc.com/license. The FWC website also has tips and advice on how to prepare for each hunt. Island cleanup scheduled on St. Vincent ISLAND TOURS The monthly island tours resume in the month of October. All tours are on the second Wednesday of each month. The dates for the fall, winter, spring tours are as follows – Oct. 9 (tour already lled), Nov. 13, Dec. 11, Jan. 8, Feb. 12, March 12, April 9, and May 14. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on “Island Tour Sign Up”. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web at www.stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive – bring everything you need, including drinking water – and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit our web page for more information and volunteer opportunities – www.stvincentfriends.com and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM One never knows what they might nd on St. Vincent Island. By Tim Croft 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will host Park Appreciation Day from 2-6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28. The event is part appreciation and part membership drive for the “Friends”, a non-profit organization that provides support to a host of missions at T. H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. The day is also part of the National Public Lands Day celebration. Events begin with a morning shoreline cleanup from 10 a.m. until noon, with free beverages provided to all volunteers. Family activities include a sandcastle building contest which begins at noon ET. There will also be environment displays and there will be music from Sonic Tonic and entertainment beginning at 2 p.m. at Eagle Harbor which can be enjoyed by boat or from the harbor beaches. A low country shrimp boil will begin at 2 p.m. and is open to the public for a $5 donation. The boil is free for current Friends members and park staff. There will be free ice cream for kids provided by Scallop Cove. Attendees can also learn about and register to become a member of the Friends organization. T.H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park is home to a shoreline named in 2002 as the top beaches in the world. Last summer, a destination website America’s Best Online, named St. Joseph Peninsula State Park the top state park in the country. Additional information is available through the Gulf County Tourist Development Council at www.visitgulf.com or by calling 850-229-7800. Star Staff Report The 2013 recreational season for bay scallops closed Wednesday, Sept. 25. The nal day of harvesting was Sept. 24. FWC scallop researchers will conduct underwater surveys now that the season is closed to reassess the scallop population. While the season was open, scallop harvesters could assist researchers by completing an online survey at http://svy.mk/bayscallops, indicating where they harvested scallops, how many were collected and how long it took to harvest them. Participants can email BayScallops@MyFWC.com to ask questions or send additional information. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Bay Scallops” to learn more. Recreational bay scallop season closed Sept. 25 St. Joseph State Park Appreciation Day on Saturday SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the Car Body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder. SPECIAL TO THE STAR St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will celebrate Park Appreciation Day Sept. 28. BIRD’S-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND

PAGE 7

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section Page 7 Thursday, September 26, 2013 6 0 2 H i g h w a y 9 8 P o r t S t J o e F L | ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 9 0 0 0 0 9 7 7 2 ) 2 0 5 8 L | ( F e o J t t S r o P 8 y 9 a w h g i 2 H 0 6 Di n n e r o n t h e G o F a mi l y D in n er fe e d s 4 fo r $ 24 95 i n c l u d e s E n t r e S al ad & Br e ad P i c k u p at Su n se t a n d t a k e h o m e S e e W e b s i t e o r F ac e b oo k f o r E ac h W e e k s S p e ci a l C a l l i n o n M o n d a y o r T u e s d a y M u s t h a v e t h e o r d e r b y 2 : 1 5 p m o n T u e s d a y fo r p i c k u p a t 5 : 1 5 p m o r 6 p m T u e s d a y 1 1 13270 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 1 5 / *1, 4 4 1*, % ( +, ( ) ( (*1 41 1, ,( 4 ( 4 0 0 1* ( 4 ( 1 ( $ 3! ( +1/ ( 5 &" 4 1 1 / , 1 0 ( 1 0 4, 4 ,1 / / 1 ( 1/ 1 1 ( 05 ( ( + 1 1 ( 4 4, / 1 ( ) 1* ( ( / ,5 0 1 1 1 (+ (* 0 1/ ( 1 ) ,1 3 (* 3 2 1, 0 1* 1 ( ( ( / ,5 ,5 ( 4 $ ( 4," 3 1 ( /" ( 1 4 ,5 ( 4 11* ,( 1 / ( , ( 5 3 1 ( *, ( ( + 5 1* 5 ( 4/ ( 5 ,+ 4 41* 41 1 5 1* *, + , ( 5 ( 0 ( 1 ,5 ( 4 ( 1+, # ,1 ,5 ( 4 %" 1 4 4, 4 ( (+1, 1 1 11 (*, 1' $ 1 3 4, ( 5 ( / , ( 5 , +1* ( 4 3 1 ( ( + 0 5 4 515 9 0 2 NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 10-15-13 CODE: By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe football Coach Chuck Gannon said last week’s visit to Jefferson County was an early test for his young squad, which has just seven seniors on the roster. The Tiger Sharks passed with ying colors. Port St. Joe went out of the county for the rst time this season and won its second-straight 38-7 to improve to 3-1. The road gets no easier as the Tiger Sharks visit Chipley this week, but the long excursion to Monticello highlighted that this year’s squad is no easy mark. “We talked about it as coaches on the way over and we just had a tremendous week of practice,” Gannon said. “Maybe the best week this year. We put in a lot of defensive adjustments because (Jefferson County) throws a lot, but the kids were focused and worked hard. “And as the game kept going along we kept getting stronger. We are really pleased with the way they focused and played.” The Tiger Sharks won with a familiar game plan. They ran the ball well, rushing 44 times for 215 yards with Cole Cryderman (12 carries, 62 yards) and Dwayne Griggs (9 for 56) leading the way, while getting support from Carter Thacker’s 45 yards and ve other backs who had positive rushing yards. “We took care of the ball and ate up the clock,” Gannon said. The Tiger Sharks also found a passing game, thanks in part, Gannon said, to an observation by assistant Coach Kenny Parker. Gannon said Parker noticed that a Jefferson County safety followed a Shark going in motion across the formation, possibly opening up the tight end on the back side down the seam of the defense. Sure enough, tight end Aaron Paul found open space twice on the same play – once before halftime, the second early in the third quarter – for a pair of touchdowns covering a combined 88 yards. Quarterback Drew Lacour nished 4 of 5 for 106 yards with one interception. “We thought we had a good game plan coming in,” Gannon said. “We thought we could do some things passing. We played good defense and moved the ball well in spots.” The Tiger Sharks, on the road, were also called for just one penalty, for 10 yards. The defense bottled Jefferson County up until it scored its lone touchdown late in the third quarter after the game was securely in the win column for the Tiger Sharks. The Tiger Sharks had seven tackles for loss, forced one fumble and recovered two and intercepted three passes. Helping lead the defensive charge as they have the past few weeks were brothers Marquez and Marcell Johnson, both linebackers. Marcell had 15 tackles – he has been in double digits in tackles three weeks running – including 10 solo tackles. Marquez added six tackles, including ve solos. An interception by Marquez set up one touchdown and late in the game he tipped a pass which Marcell gathered in at the Jefferson County 12 and carried into the end zone to score. “We just played good defense,” Gannon said. “We were around the ball a lot.” The defense, Gannon said, may have turned in the key sequence of the game late in the second quarter. Port St. Joe went up early on a 27-yard eld goal by Lacour. The rst of the two connections between Lacour and Paul made it 10-0 after Lacour’s extra point kick – he hit all ve for the night – but Port St. Joe fumbled at the Tiger Shark 6 to give the hosts a chance to close the gap. The Tiger Sharks stuffed three consecutive runs and a pass to the tight end on fourth down was dropped and Port St. Joe had a 10-0 shutout at intermission. Lacour and Paul connected again on the rst drive of the second half, Cryderman and Griggs added rushing touchdowns and Marcell Johnson’s interception return completed the scoring. Tiger Sharks rock Jefferson County Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School varsity volleyball team continued its winning ways with a pair of victories to run its record to 9-4 overall, 2-1 in district play. The week began with a home match against district foe Franklin County and a straight-set victory by scores of 25-15, 25-14 and 25-18. Addison Rice’s season high 12 aces helped pace the victory, which Coach Wayne Taylor, characterized as “impressive.” Rice also had six kills as did teammate Shannon Pridgeon. Alyson Johnson had 16 serve receives and 10 digs. The junior varsity dropped what Taylor called, “a hard-fought match” 2514, 16-25 and 12-15. Halie Jasinski was 100 percent in serves with 12 serves in and four aces. Two nights later, the Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Bozeman in Bay County, the varsity coming away with a 25-15, 25-14 and 25-11 win. Nicole Endres with seven serving aces and Pridgeon had eight kills. The junior varsity also won, taking the sets 25-17 and 25-21. Ashely Kennedy had seven aces and Teiyahna Hutchinson ve kills. Port St Joe Junior Varsity and Varsity volleyball teams suffered defeats Monday night against the visiting Lady Bulldogs of Liberty County. Both matches were similar in that Port St Joe won the opening set of each match but lost successive sets to lose their matches. The JV scores were 25-12, 22-25 and 8-15 while varsity scores were 25-18, 23-25, 2125 and 18-25. For the JV, Jasinski had eight total kills and for the varsity Pridgeon had 10. The varsity traveled to West Gadsden on Tuesday and the next home match is tonight against North Bay Haven. PSJ volleyball varsity splits week TIM CROFT | The Star Left: Linebacker Marcell Johnson had 15 total tackles and returned an interception for a touchdown against Jefferson County. Right: Tight end Aaron Paul caught two passes for 88 yards and two touchdowns.

PAGE 8

Thursday, September 26, 2013 Local A8 | The Star culture awareness within the community, but a step back in time reveals the reason. Gingell grew up in St. Louis and recalled her el ementary school class being taken on eld trips to see the St. Louis Symphony Orches tra. She said that it gave her such an appreciation for mu sic that she tried to go back on her own time whenever possible. “Children need the op portunity to be touched by art,” Gingell said “This is an opportunity to give a lasting impression…an opportu nity to look to the future and give the whole community a venue that will increase the quality of life and spawn ad ditional art.” Shoaf said that she and her seven siblings were ex pected to have an apprecia tion for art and family out ings often included tours of Miami’s museums. “My passion is the fact that we, as a community, have to look long-term,” said Shoaf. “We can change the world for the community and art is one way to do it. “We have a choice to make this a fabulous place. Fine arts are a pathway but we need knowledge and money that we don’t have.” Shoaf and Gingell agreed that they didn’t expect one person to step in and help pay for everything, and said that lots of people with a little bit of money can easily have the same effect. Shoaf said that the Cham ber of Commerce, Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and the Forgotten Coast Cul tural Coalition are already on board; the city simply needs a dedicated facility to get the ball rolling. Members of the communi ty who may be willing to help nance a cultural arts build ing can contact Shoaf at nat alieshoaf@gmail.com. With enough interest, a meeting will be scheduled to gure out the next step “A cultural arts building would raise the quality of life here another notch,” said Gingell. “It’s the perfect an chor for downtown.” WES LOCHER | The Star Several attempts were made to purchase the historic Port Theatre to use as a cultural arts center, but a price could not be agreed upon. CULTURAL from page A1 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The Mexico Beach Ar ticial Reef Association is about to make some up grades to an already-spe cial reef. Proceeds from the 98 Real Estate Group Ling Ding Tournament which took place in the spring totaling $5,500 were do nated to the MBARA for use in expanding the John Thompson Memorial Reef. The upgrades will allow the Bell Shoals-based reef to draw in more cobia sh and other sea life. Once word got around that the money would be put toward Thompson’s reef, additional private do nations were made. The winners of the tour nament, Mitch Coleman and Captain Dave Mullis, who are also former MBA RA members and friends with Thompson, also donated their winnings back to the fund. “It’s a credit to John’s memory and what he did in the community,” said Bob Cox, President of the MBARA. The funds will be used to add to the complexity of Thompson’s reef which will draw in additional bait sh and ultimately the co bia who feed on them. “It allows us to estab lish the bottom of a food chain,” Cox said. Thompson’s wife, Bo nita, was appreciative of the donation and the com munity’s support for her husband. The reef was de ployed in April 2012 in his favorite shing spot and the installed plaque has his favorite cobia jig dried into the cement. “It was built with at tracting cobia in mind,” Bonita said. “John loved cobia shing. It was his passion.” The average cost of a reef is $1,600 and once MBARA has collected all funds for the project they will work with reef-build ers Walter Marine to con struct a tting addition for the memorial. “It takes a lot of time and effort to create the reefs, there’s a lot of lo gistics, organization and management,” Cox said. “If people hadn’t supported the tournament or donated their money, we wouldn’t be able to add to the reef. “People will remember this. It will make marine life better. It’s a service to the economy, the com munity and underwater recreation. It’s a labor of love.” The Ling Ding tourna ment was popular in the ‘70s and ‘80s and tourna ment director John Wiley restarted the event three years ago. Zach Childs of the 98 Real Estate Group came on as assistant tourna ment director. WES LOCHER | The Star MBARA president Bob Cox and Bonita Thompson accept a donation from Ling Ding organizers Zach Childs and John Wiley. Ling Ding proceeds allow MBARA to add to memorial reef P l e a s e g i v e t o t h e U n i t e d W a y o f N W F L a t ( 8 5 0 ) 7 8 5 7 5 2 1 o r o n l i n e a t w w w u n i t e d w a y n w f l o r g N o w m o r e t h a n e v e r

PAGE 9

C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) What two years did “The Twist” by Chubby Checker hit the top of the charts? 1959/63, 1960/62, 1961/64, 1965/67 2) Hieronymous Bosch was an internationally famous Dutch? Boxer, King, Singer, Artist 3) In internet lingo what’s the abbreviation for “face to face”? ETE, F2F, FYI, MYM 4) With what is touch most associated? Fencing, Farming, Framing, Financing 5) Reportedly what color beard grows the fastest? Black, Gray, Blonde, Red 6) How many wings does a ea have? Zero, 1, 2, 3 7) What is/was Diana, also known as Artemis, the goddess of? Underworld, Ocean, Wind, Hunt 8) Of these which isn’t a member of the Hebrew alphabet? Kaf, Vav, Hei, She 9) Which sea surrounds the U.K.’s eastern coast? North, Mediterranean, Red, Black 10) From which animal do we ordinarily get coney fur? Chinchilla, Mink, Fox, Rabbit 11) How many astronauts manned each Apollo ight? 2, 3, 4, 5 12) What is haboob a type of? Hair style, Snow ake, Sandstorm, Tree 13) Legendary jazz performer John Coltrane was best known for what instrument? Clarinet, Trumpet, Saxophone, Trombone 14) In what same state were Johnny Carson, Elijah Wood, and John Wayne born? Iowa, Nebraska, Indiana, Wisconsin ANSWERS 1) 1960/62. 2) Artist. 3) F2F. 4) Fencing. 5) Blonde. 6) Zero. 7) Hunt. 8) She. 9) North. 10) Rabbit. 11) 3. 12) Sandstorm. 13) Saxophone. 14) Iowa. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Thursday, September 26, 2013 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Sacred Heart Medical Group is of cially in Wewahitchka. During a ceremony Monday, president of Sacred Heart Hospitals Roger Hall cut the ribbon on the new primary care center on State Road 22 in the Health Department building. This is the latest step in the expansion of Sacred Heart services for Gulf and Franklin counties. “We now have Sacred Heart Hospital in Wewahitchka,” Hall said. “It’s important for the community, and it’s a privilege to serve them. “It’s a great day to make a difference in health care.” Hall added that the lab, which offers X-rays and blood work, would be an important addition as patients wouldn’t need to drive to Panama City or Port St. Joe for certain tests. Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner Nancy Anderson will lead the primary care services set to include woman’s health screenings and lab and X-ray services. Anderson has a master’s degree in science of nursing from Northwestern State University and completed her Doctor of Nursing Practice at the University of Alabama. A Florida-licensed ARNP, she has been practicing since 1995. She spent 17 years practicing in southern Alabama; all the while, Gulf County was her vacation destination of choice. Once she decided to relocate permanently, she joined Sacred Heart in 2012. “My rst love is primary care,” Anderson said. “I love the community aspect here and the chance to be part of it. I feel like I’m where I’m supposed to be.” ARNPs are advanced practice nurses with extensive training, including a master’s degree and clinical experience. ARNPs diagnose and treat diseases, provide appropriate education for patients and prescribe medications. ARNPs often serve as a patient’s primary health care provider and see patients of all ages. Paulina Pendarvis, Physician and Volunteers Services advocate for Sacred Heart, praised the advantages of new radiation diagnostics equipment which will allow test results to be shared with the hospital locations in Port St. Joe, Destin and Pensacola instantaneously. “It’s the wonders of digital medicine,” Pendarvis said. Women’s health screenings will be available from 7-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-4 p.m. CT Monday-Friday. Appointments can be made by calling 568-1053. Lab and X-ray services will continue from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. CT Fridays. No appointment is needed for lab and X-ray services. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Mexico Beach is considered by some to be one of the most picturesque cities along the Forgotten Coast, and the Community Development Council set out to prove it with its annual photo contest. More than 165 photos were submitted, and a panel of judges determined the winners across categories that included Sunrise and Sunset, Around Mexico Beach, Fishing and Boating, the Beaches, Florida and Animal Life, and People. “We received a large selection of pictures for this year’s contest,” said CDC executive director Kimberly Shoaf. “Each picture was unique, and we enjoyed looking at Mexico Beach through others’ eyes. All pictures submitted had to be taken in the Mexico Beach area, and it’s fun to see what you don’t always see. “We appreciate everyone who entered and will enjoy showing off the pictures to everyone who comes into the Welcome Center.” All winning photographs will be on display in the Mexico Beach Welcome Center until next year’s contest. Photos that didn’t win will be included in albums on display inside the welcome center. Winning photographs can be viewed at www.mexicobeach.com. AROUND MEXICO BEACH 1. Rosie Gammell of Inverness 2. Cindy Yost of Brooksville 3. Bill Fauth of Mexico Beach. SUNRISE & SUNSET 1. Lisa Gaines of Richmond Hill, Ga. 2. Marty Moore of Belpre, Ohio 3. Gloria Sanchez of Mexico Beach THE BEACHES 1. Nancy Walker of Clear Lake, Iowa 2. Marty Moore 3. Bill Fauth KRISTINA LEEANN ‘CRICKET’ RUSSELL Cricket Fund honors a beautiful spirit Star Staff Report “I don’t have an expiration date.” That is what Kristina LeeAnn “Cricket” Russell of Port St. Joe told her family while battling an aggressive form of breast cancer at the young age of 22. The comment, those who knew her said, revealed wisdom beyond her years. And thanks to those who love her, Russell’s spirit of caring and giving lives on as the inspiration of The Cricket Fund. The Cricket Fund is the brainchild of Anna Hicks, a radiology/CT/mammography technologist at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Hicks, who joined the hospital when it opened in 2010, was employed in CT and transferred to SHHG’s Women’s Center earlier this year. The fund will provide free mammograms to women in need in Gulf and Franklin counties. Russell had no insurance at the time of her diagnosis on March 12, 2012. Hicks believed it is important to provide a fund like The Cricket Fund. “There are lots of women without health insurance and women are bad about putting themselves last,” she said. “If they have an extra $200, they won’t spend it on a mammogram for themselves; they will spend it on food, electricity, clothes for their children.” Like many others, Hicks was inspired by Cricket’s strength. “My husband worked with Cricket’s father, and my brother was close to her,” she said, adding she got to know Russell after her diagnosis. “She was full of life and tried to make everyone feel better about her situation. Even on her worst days, she still had a huge smile on her face.” Joe and MaryAnn Russell described their daughter with words such as “fun-loving” and “carefree,” “beautiful inside and out.” “People would gravitate to her; her smile was contagious,” MaryAnn said. “She never met a stranger, and she was always willing to help people. “She was attending Gulf Coast State College and was studying to be a nurse when she was SPECIAL TO THE STAR Rosie Gammell took home rst place for her “Around Mexico Beach” submission. Mexico Beach photo contest winners named See PHOTO B6 Sacred Heart begins primary care in Wewahitchka WES LOCHER | The Star President of Sacred Heart Hospitals Roger Hall cuts the ribbon on a new primary care center in Wewahitchka. At right District 1 County Commissioner Carmen McLemore congratulated Hall after the ceremony. See ‘CRICKET’ B6

PAGE 10

B2 | The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 Water is becoming a precious resource for Floridians, even if this particular summer might make one think otherwise. As home gardeners, we should make it a point to use only as much water in the garden as we need, and never allow a wasteful surplus to run. If we waste water now, home gardeners may have to give up watering their gardens in the future, to conserve water for more basic needs of the population. Of course, we all hope that’ll never happen, but it is possible. As we begin thinking about the fall vegetable garden, we also need to think about ways to cut back on the amount of water we use in the garden, and nd ways of growing vegetables with as little water as possible. One way to save water is to plant fast growing, early-maturing vegetables. The sooner a plant matures the less water it will need. The longer the garden is occupied, the more water it will take. Another tip is to plant the garden during periods of adequate rainfall. For Florida gardeners, this leaves a fairly wide choice of planting dates. This fall, for example, gardener should have no problem with adequate soil moisture. Try to improve the water-holding capacity of the soil. Most Florida gardens contain coarse soil particles, such as sand. That doesn’t hold water very well. Applying generous amounts of organic materials such as compost, manures, and cover crops, will help the soil hold water better. Another way to save water is to use a watering method that applies water just in the root zone, where it’s needed. Overhead sprinkling may be time saving for you, but it wastes a lot of water, by wetting areas between rows and by losing water to the wind. If you set your plants far enough apart, they can be individually watered by hand. Try to use drip or trickle irrigation, if you can. Our IFAS Specialist tells us that drip irrigation produces vegetables just as well as overhead sprinkling does, but with eighty percent less water. If you aren’t using the drip method, a general rule is to water the garden thoroughly twice weekly. This will encourage deep rooting of the plants. Another tip is to avoid simply over watering your garden. Young plants don’t need as much water as older plants do. There’s a limit to how much water plants can use. Any more than that run off, is wasted, or stays around to cause root rot problems. Another way to save water is to keep weeds out of the garden. Weeds use water for their own growth and transpire large amounts of water to the air. You’ll be surprised how much less water the garden will need, if weeds aren’t allowed to grow. Mulch can be a big help in conserving soil moisture. Use hay, straw, leaves, or plastic. Finally always use good judgment when running water, and remember that the water you waste today may become the water you wish you had tomorrow. For more information on conserving water in the vegetable garden contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas. u.edu or www.http://edis.ifas. u.edu and see Publication SP 103, SL339; or Master Gardener Handbook: North and Central Florida. Volume 1, 2 and 3; Drip Irrigation Systems for Small Conventional Vegetable Farm. P a n d o r a i s a 4 8 # 1 y r P l o t t H o u n d S h e i s a l i t t l e t i m i d a r o u n d n e w p e o p l e b u t w a r m s u p q u i c k l y P a n d o r a w a l k s v e r y w e l l o n a l e a s h s i t s a n d i s l e a r n i n g o t h e r c om m a nds. S he l i k e s k ids a d u l t s o t he r d o g s a n d e v e n t o l e r a t e s k i t t i e s P a n d o r a i s c r a t e t r a i n e d s p a y e d a n d u p t o d a t e on va c c i ne s. F R E E S P A Y O R N E U T E R F O R T H E D O G S O F 3 2 4 56 ZI P P l e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n s e n d h s di r e c t o r @ gm a i l c om o r a do pt b a y s t j o e @ g m a i l .c o m o r c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e A p p l i c a t i o n s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y o r g W e r e q u i r e a l l p o t e n t i a l a d o p t e r s t o c o m p l e t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r m A d o p t i o n f e e s i n c l u d e o ur c o s t of s p a y / ne u t e r a nd c ur r e n t va c c i n a t i on s. O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 4 p m F a i t h s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o l u n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n Po r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t he r e s o on I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y or g bBB O WB ] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e Y o u ma y c o n t a c t u s b y e ma i l at c a m pg o r d o n j o h ns t o n @ f a i r po i n t n e t o r c a l l ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 8 5 7 5 F o r fu r t h e r i nf o r mat i o n o n N at i o na l M u se u m D a y p l e ase vis i t S m i t hs o n ia n ma g a z i n e c o m / mu se u m d a y C o m e C e l e b r a t e w i t h u s €} @ qŠ  G “ {  L €  • ™  g g J J P › • } › Š ‚ • q  q “ ™  ~ ™ € } E ˆ  “ ‚ { q g  “ ˆ { g q “ J J I } “ ‚ ™ q } “ q ‚ ˆ F T h e C a m p G or don J oh ns t on A s s o c iat i o n is a 5 0 1 c ( 3 ) n o t f or p ro t c or por at i on d e d i c at e d t o p r e s er v in g t h e hi s t o r y o f t h e A m p hi bi o u s So ld ie r s o f W W I I w h o t r ai n ed in F r a n k l in C o u n t y F l o ri d a a n d i s f u n d e d i n p a r t b y t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v e l o p m e n t C o u n c i l a n a t u r a l e s c a p e c o m T our ist D ev elopmen t C ouncil T his m a r k s the s e v e nth c o n s e c u tiv e y e a r th at the C a m p G o r d o n J o h n s t o n W WI I M u s e u m h a s b e e n a s k e d t o pa r tici pat e i n the S m i th s o ni a n M a g a z i ne ’ s A nn u a l N a t i o n a l M u s e u m Da y T h e m u s e u m i s l o c a te d i n t h e C a r r a b e l l e M u n i c i p a l C o m p l e x a t 1 0 01 G r a y A v e C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i d a W e w i l l b e w e l c o m i n g v i s i t o r s f r o m 9 A M u n t i l 4 P M C o m e v ie w ou r e v e r g r o w i ng e x hi b i t s I f his he a l th a l l o w s a u th o r K e n ne th T u c k e r W W I I B 1 7 T a i l G u n n e r b o r n i n E a s t P o i n t FL w i l l b e s i g n i n g b o o k s O u r g i f t s h o p w i l l b e o p e n a l l d a y H e a r l i v e m u s i c a n d e n j o y f r e e r e f r e s h m e n t s A s a l w a y s a d m i s s i o n i s b y d o n a t i o n Y o u c a n l e a r n m o r e a b o u t t h e C a m p G o r d o n J o h n s t o n W W I I Mu s e um a n d d o wn l o a d d i r e c t i o n s a t w w w c a m p g o r d o n j o h n s t o n. c o m Society Conserving water in the vegetable garden ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Special to The Star Joint efforts of the GFWC Wewahitchka Woman’s Club, Inc., the City of Wewahitchka, VFW Chapter 8285, and Fisher’s Hardware resulted in the City of Wewahitchka obtaining a new ag pole, American ag, the State of Florida ag, and a spot light. The new ags and ag pole were erected in the “V” next to the Sheriff’s substation in Wewahitchka. Pictured are Bob Shipman, VFW Chapter 8285; Patsy Whiteld, Teresa Lykins, Tunnie Miller, Betty Holloway, Dianne Semmes, Pat Stripling, and Carolyn Watson of the GFWC Wewahitchka Woman’s Club, Inc.; Sheriff Mike Harrison; Tom Semmes, VFW Chapter 8285; City Commissioner Bob Pettis, and Ms. Nellie Wade. A special thanks goes to Ralph Fisher and employees of Fisher Hardware for installing the ag pole and the foundation. Star Staff Report An All-Class Reunion for Wewahitchka High School will be held on Saturday, Oct. 19. Everyone in the community is invited, so make plans to come and enjoy seeing old friends and catching up with one another. We would like to get the word out to everyone, so please pass along this information to any classmate/friend that you have contact with. The reunion will be held at the Honeyville Community Center in Honeyville beginning at 10:30 a.m. CT. If you would like to attend please send a check for $17 (per person) to Dianne (Lester) Semmes, 1730 CR 386 North, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. If you need further information or would like to assist in any way, please contact Dianne at 639-5345 (home) or 227-6425 (cell), or via email: Wewamama@yahoo.com Food and beverages will be provided, but donations of desserts are requested. The deadline for checks is Oct. 7. Wewahitchka Public Library Gets New Flag Special to The Star The GFWC Wewahitchka Woman’s Club, Inc., donated a new American ag to the Charles Whitehead Wewahitchka Public Library. Patty Fisher, Chairman of the Woman’s Club Patriotic Project, is shown presenting the ag to Buella Harrison of the library. The GFWC Wewahitchka Woman’s Club, Inc., also sponsors the Patriotic Project which includes the ags along State 71 and State 22. These ags are own during special patriotic holidays. If you would like to purchase a ag and have it placed on one of the light poles in town the cost is $35, which includes the brackets and a small marker under the ag. This marker can read In Honor Of, or In Memory Of the name of the person you want on the marker, or your business name. Please contact either Patty Fisher, 639-9794, or Dianne Semmes, 639-5345. Wewahitchka High School all-class reunion 2013 Wewa gets new, ag agpole

PAGE 11

The Star| B3 Thursday, September 26, 2013 Special to The Star Gulf Coast State College is hosting an Open House for the Advanced Technology Center from 1:30-4 p.m. CT Oct. 11. The ATC Open House showcases all of the academic programs and entrepreneurial opportunities available in this new, history-making facility. Attendees will have a chance to speak with faculty and staff about the programs and equipment inside the ATC. The event is free and open to the public. “We are excited to have this game-changing facility completed and opened for students,” said GCSC President Dr. Jim Kerley. “We believe this facility will help attract new high-tech, high-paying jobs to our area, and are pleased to share the nished product with our region. We extend a special invitation for everybody to join us as we celebrate the top ATC in the country.” The 93,500-square-foot facility promotes innovative partnerships across key sectors of business, industry, government and education within a “futureforward” framework. It functions as a talent pipeline with training and programs directly targeting the local skills gap, leading to lucrative careers in advanced technologies. For more information, email Loel Davenport at ldavenport@gulfcoast.edu or call 873-3583. Special to The Star The Education Foundation of Gulf County recently received a $2,000 Youth Literacy grant from the Dollar General Literacy Organization to support its literacy programs. Specically, the grant will provide technology support and materials to the Reading Intervention classroom at Port St. Joe Elementary School. “We are so grateful to Dollar General for supporting the children of Gulf County Schools and know that these dollars will directly impact children struggling to read at grade level,” said Donna Thompson Port St. Joe Elementary School. “Youth literacy grants from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation are awarded at the beginning of the academic year to help make a distinct impact on the communities we serve by supporting programs that improve education and enhance literacy,” said Rick Dreiling, Dollar General’s chairman and CEO. “At Dollar General, we are passionate about our mission of serving others, and it’s exciting to see the real difference literacy and learning makes in people’s lives.” Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2013, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation is proud to support initiatives that help others improve their lives through literacy and education. Since its inception in 1993, the foundation has awarded more than $84.9 million in grants to nonprot organizations, helping more than 4.8 million individuals take their rst steps toward literacy or continued education. For more information on the Dollar General Literacy Foundation and a complete list of grant recipients, visit www. dgliteracy.org. O ur local r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in R eal Esta t e P icks! (I n this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an Blas S t G eor ge Island C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S T I NG S HERE! (850)22 7-7847 | tgold en@pcnh. com S O L D ## ## $ ( % % ) )$ * $ $ $ ) & )$ $ $ (( ) $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ " $ +$ $ $ $ + $ $ 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S SOUTHERN SUND A Y RANDY ST ARK K ONKRETE SOUL RANDY ST ARK S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE CR O W’S NEST K ARA OKE W E HA VE MOVED T O: 327 REID A VE (CORN E R OF 4TH St & REID A VE.) 850-227-3472 HOU RS MONDA Y T O W EDN ESDA Y 8 AM T O 6 PM THU RSDA Y T O SA TU RDA Y 8 AM T O 8 PM SU NDA Y 11 AM T O 6 PM ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! !' !""" % % % % *B O ARD CER TIFIED CIVIL TRI AL L A WYER O F CO UNS EL "!" " & $"!'( School News Field trips are an important part of the learning process. The K5 class is studying community helpers. To enhance their study, they took a tour of Rafeld Fisheries. Thank you, Mr. Eugene Rafeld, for opening your business to the K5 class of Faith Christian School. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR PP SJ EE LEMENTARY RECEIVEsS DONATIONsS PECIAL TO THE sS TAR Thanks to the Costa family, owners of our local McDonald’s restaurant, our kindergarten classrooms were equipped with Apple at-screen TV’s. It is the generosity of the Costa family and their willingness to develop a community partnership with Port St. Joe Elementary School that has made this possible. We look forward to continuing this relationship to benet our students. DADA ZZ LINLIN G DOLPHINDOLPHIN S SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR This week’s Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Callee Wray, Avery Turner, Hannah Riley and Dustin Raker. Back row: Dawson Fisher, Laura Beth Hill, Hailey Harriman, Jahiem Ash and Donovan Miniat. GCSC to host tech center open house Education Foundation of Gulf County receives $2,000 grant The Lion’s Tale

PAGE 12

FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g 4514217 Bruce Hodge, P astor 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net Thursday, September 26, 2013 Islam and the Middle East explored at Lifetree Caf Special to The Star Commonly-held misconceptions about Islam and the Middle East will be debunked at 7 p.m. CT Monday, Sept. 30 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled On the Brink: Islam and the Middle East, features a film of Carl Medearis, an international expert in the field of Arab-American and Muslim-Christian relations. Medearis will address misconceptions about Islam and Middle East. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U. S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. The old you Who you were before you got saved, was nailed to the cross one day. Jesus paid the price for our sins, long before we came this way. If the old you is dead, why does it keep on kicking? Because Satan is a sore loser, and he hates to take a licking. The old you reacts to sin, almost like a re ex act. The old you does and says things, that we just cant take back. Just like a dead body will quiver, hair and nails show action of life. Even though sin rears its ugly head, with all its trouble and strife. Theres no way to put life in a dead body, no matter how many actions of life its giving. If youre cruci ed with Christ, theres no way the old you can go on living. Billy Johnson Special to The Star Zion Fair hosts Unity Day celebration The Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church Family cordially invites the community to attend and participate in their rst Unity Day Celebration. Our goal is to come together as a diversi ed group to build a stronger community through fellowship with gulf county citizens, religious groups, government agencies/elected of cials, and business leaders. The Unity Day event will be held at 12 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 28. The church is located on 280 Avenue C, Port St. Joe. Point of Contact: Sister Margaret Hall, First Lady (850) 425-2862; Deaconess Amy Rogers, (850) 229-8515; Sister Tammy Welch, (850) 896-4505. FUMC Mens Club BBQ Chicken Supper The First United Methodist Mens Club will host a BBQ Chicken Supper on Friday, Oct. 4 from 4 p.m. 6 p.m. ET. Half chicken, beans, slaw, bread and tea will be served for $8 a plate. Carry-out or eat-in. The First United Methodist Womens Bake Sale will be happening simultaneously. St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club Spaghetti Dinner Cannolis, Tiramisu, Ameretti, Cioccolato and Pizzelles are Italian desserts that will be served at the St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club annual Spaghetti Dinner 5-7 p.m. ET on Saturday, Oct. 5. This wonderful annual event will take place in the church hall, just east of the church on 20th. Street in Port St. Joe. In addition to the great spaghetti, Italian beer and wine and the desserts, entertainment and door prizes are included. Tickets are limited to the rst 200 buyers, so get yours soon at the Church Hall (227-1417), Hannon Insurance, No Name Caf, or call President Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Faith EVENTS Star Staff Report Sandra Bailey Lowery, a Port St. Joe artist, will present and autograph copies of her poetry collection Touching All Walks of Life from 3-5 p.m. ET on Thursday, Sept. 26 at the Gulf County Public Library in Port St. Joe. The library is located at 110 Library Drive. Lowery is the wife of the deceased Kloskia Lowery and a mother and grandmother who has overcome many challenges in life. Her faith and belief led her to touch others lives through her poetry. She is a 1979 graduate of Port St. Joe High School. She is presently a member of 2nd Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church of Springfield, Rev. Rawlis Leslie, pastor. She is a former member of New Bethel AME Church, Port St. Joe, Florida. Local Artist to sign books at library SANDRA B. LOWERY

PAGE 13

The Star| B5 Thursday, September 26, 2013 S o m e t i m e s w e h a v e t o b e a s s t r o n g a s a l i o n t o t a k e o n t h e c h a l l en g e s o f L if e . A n d s o m e t i m e s w e h a v e t o b e m ee k a s a l amb t o u n d e r s t an d W e a r e h e r e t o h e l p wi t h t h o s e c h a l l en g e s H o l l y H i l l F u n e r a l H o m e 2 7 7 5 G a rris o n A v e n u e P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 29 1 9 29 (! ! & !! ! !! ! & & ! ( ( % ( & & !! ! % ( ! ( (! & ( (! # $ $ ! ( ( % T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y Beth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL Paula Jeanette Presnell was born on Dec. 4, 1968, in Port St. Joe, Fla., and passed away Sept. 16, 2013, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. She was a life-long resident of Port St. Joe and a graduate of Port St. Joe High School. Paula was a diehard, “bled orange and blue” Gator fan, and she enjoyed spending time with her grandbabies more than anything. Granny will be missed very much by both Kiley and Khloie. Paula was preceded in death by her father, Paul Presnell. She is survived by her daughter, Kortney Presnell, and her daughter, Khloie; her son, Ryan Paul Presnell, and his daughter, Kiley; all of Gulf County. She is also survived by her sisters Beth Presnell and Amy Chavous, as well as ve nieces and one nephew. A memorial service will be held 4 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, at Oak Grove Church. The family asks that anyone who wants to share any pictures of Paula, please bring them to the service. Paula Jeanette Presnell Funeral services for Mr. Theodore Daniels will be held Saturday, Sept. 28, at 11 a.m. ET at New Bethel AME Church at Highway 98 and Ave. C in Port St. Joe. Viewing for family and friends will be held from 10-11 a.m. ET. Theodore Daniels “She is more precious than rubies: and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. Length of days [is} in her right hand; [and} in her left hand riches and honour.” Proverbs 3: 15-16 KJV A Life Well-Lived Gillian Lee McNair, known to her family and friends as Gillie, was born in Iron City, Ga., on Aug. 19, 1919, to parents Louanna Perry and Hosea Doston. She was an only child. Her mother died when she was 2 months old. She was raised in part by John and Minnie Lee Kirk and later by Cora and Ed Lawrence. She grew up in Port St. Joe, Fla., where she was educated in the St. Joe School system and was a very good student. She later studied clothing construction under the tutelage of the late Mrs. Susie Cooper and received her Certicate of Completion in 1968. She met and later married Damon McNair, Sr., on Feb. 7, 1937. To that union 11 children were born. It lasted 56 years before Damon’s death in 1992. She was a devoted wife, mother and homemaker. “Miss Gillie,” as she was affectionately called by many, accepted Christ at an early age and united with New Bethel A.M.E. Church, where she was a long-time, active member. She loved gospel music and singing for the Lord; often times singing herself happy. She served for many years as President of the Minnie K. Weston Women’s Missionary Society & New Bethel A.M.E. Senior Choir, a Stewardess and Class leader. However, her devoted service extended beyond the walls of New Bethel A.M.E as she was very active in city-wide events and community activities. Her repertoire included: Worship Director of West Florida African Methodist Episcopal Conference Branch Missionary SocietyMember of lona Davis Area Missionary Society (Davis, Wood, Roulhac Area), Treasurer of Eastern Star, Sheba No. 13A, President & Vice-President of City Wide Choir, Vice-President of Jolly Seniors, Member of City Wide Mission Society, President of Port St. Joe Chapter-American Cancer Society, Member of Concerned Christian Society & Golden Angels, an advocate and charitable supporter of The American Red Cross, “Feed The Children,” St. Joseph’s Indian School, and Disabled American Veterans. “Miss Gillie” was preceded in death by her husband, Damon McNair, Sr., two sons, Marshall (Mike) and Albert McNair, and grandson Joseph Patrick Quinn. She leaves to cherish her memory, three sons, Dr. Clarence McNair (Janice) of Tampa, Fla., Damon McNair, Jr. (Big Boy) of Port St. Joe, Fla., Charles McNair (Sandra) of Tallahassee, Fla.; six daughters, Carol Hill and Paulette Beachum of Port St. Joe, FL, Gwendolyn Parker of Panama City, Lorene (Red) Tunstalle (Raymond) of Los Angeles, Ca., Patricia Walker (Willie Joe) of Apalachicola, Fla., and Cora Curtis (Tommy) of Orlando, Fla.; special brothersand sisters-in-law Willie James and Marian McNair (Bill and Beck) of Port St. Joe, Fla., Mercedes Dickson of Washington, D.C., Mildred Dickson of Virginia, Ruth McNair of Tampa, Fla., and Bessie McNair of Los Angeles, Ca.; and, our “seventh sister” Helen Hamilton; 28 grandchildren, 35 greatgrandchildren, 14 greatgreat-grandchildren; a host of nieces, nephews, many cousins, other relatives and friends. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Gillian Lee McNair Tracy Marsha Barr was born on Nov. 10, 1980, in Panama City, Fla., to Charles H. Barr and Jacqueline Marsha Julius Barr. She attended public school in Port St. Joe and Huntsville, Ala., where she graduated. She earned a bachelor’s degree with honors from Alabama A&M University. She was preceded in death by her parents, Charles H. Barr and Jacqueline Marsha Julius Barr; grandparents, Eddie and Tinnie Julius and Clara Barr; a cousin Calvin “Bug” Julius, Jr.; an uncle, Rudolph W. Julius; an aunt, Doris Gibson; and a stepbrother, Antron Lewis. Tracy leaves to cherish her memories a son, Dylan M. Burwell of Huntsville AL; a brother, Andre Thomas of Panama City; a grandmother, Annette Julius Fagan of Apalachicola; stepmother, Gale Addison of Havana, Fla.; a host of aunts, uncles, cousins and a best friend, Latia Crutcher, Huntsville, Ala. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. ET Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, at Thompson Temple First Born Church in Port St. Joe. Interment followed in Forest Hill Cemetery. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Tracy Marsha Barr CPO Marion A. Cherry passed away on Aug. 30 at the nursing home in Port St. Joe. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte Walker Cherry; son, Matt Cherry of Panama City; daughter, Michelle Cherry, who lives in Pennsylvania; and two sisters and a brother, who live in Louisiana. The Cherry family asks that in lieu of owers, donations be made to the Saint Joseph Bay Humane Society. Marion A. Cherry Glenda D. Carr, 72 of Port St. Joe passed away Friday, Sept. 20, 2013, in Panama City. Mrs. Carr was born Dec. 28, 1940, to the late William C. and Mildred Wilson in Thomaston, Ga. She was a member of Oak Grove Assembly of God for over 50 years. She enjoyed sewing and ceramics. Mrs. Carr is preceded in death by a son, Terry Carr; a granddaughter, Laney Haynes; and a brother, William C. Wilson. Mrs. Carr is survived by her beloved husband of 44 years, Richard Carr; two sons, Fred R. Carr (Alyson) of Fletcher, N.C., Robert N. Carr (Arron) of Panama City, Fla.; a daughter, Becky Carr-Land (Dallas) of Port St. Joe, Fla.; nine grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Graveside funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013 in Holly Hill Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com Glenda D. Carr Raye Nell Benton, 83, of Mexico Beach, Fla., passed away on Sept. 12, 2013, at DCH Regional Medical Center, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Mrs. Benton was born April 6, 1930, in Union Springs, Ala. She was the daughter of the late Walter Rufus Wilkins and Trudie Cope Wilkins of Union Springs. She lived much of her life in Tifton and Toccoa, Ga., and Dadeville, Ala., before retiring in Mexico Beach, Fla., in 1992. She had been visiting in the Tuscaloosa area at the time of her death. Her husband, the late Owen Franklin Benton, preceded her in death in 2010 and her sister, Wilda Sudduth, preceded her in death in 2003. Mrs. Benton is survived by two sons, Walter (Donna) Benton of Devereaux, Ga. and Mickey (Rhonda) Benton of Northport, Ala.; two daughters, Sandra Fowler of Toccoa, Ga., and Susan (John) McClellan of Rome, Ga.; one brother, Walter Wilkins of Lineville, Al;. 15 grandchildren, Lori (Adam) Bacot of Greenwood, S.C.; Rob Benton of Thomasville, Ga.; Andrew Benton of Devereaux, Ga.; Allison Hiland, Amy Fowler, Daniel Fowler, and David Fowler, all of Toccoa, Ga.; Kevin McClellan of Sharpsburg, Georgia; Karen McClellan of Athens, Ga.; Kyle (Stefaniane) McClellan of Rome, Georgia; Brittany (Michael) McCants of Chelsea, Ala.; and Austin Benton, Cole Benton, Dawson Benton, and Eli Benton, all of Northport, Ala.; six greatgrandchildren, Mason Bacot and Alex Bacot, both of Greenwood, S.C.; Layton McCants of Chelsea, Ala.; Emilee Deal and Heath Hiland, both of Toccoa, Ga.; and Brooklyn McClellan of Rome, Ga. Graveside services were conducted on September 15, 2013 in Oak Hill Cemetery in Union Springs, Alabama. Gray Funeral Home of Union Springs had charge of arrangements. Raye Nell Benton R aA YE NE llLL BE ntNT O nN Obituaries

PAGE 14

Local B6 | The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 45 1 43 0 8 G u i t a r A m p S o u n d S y s t e m & I n s t r u m en t R epa i r S t J o e M u s i c C o & R S R R e c o rd i ng S t u d i o 21 0 W i l l i a m s A v e P o r t S t J o e ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 2 4 s a l es @ s t j o e m u s i c com 2088543 A d m i s si o n = F R E E P a r k i n g = F R E E Coin Dealers from all over the southeast will be set up. Buy-Sell-Trade, Coins, Paper Money, Tokens, Medals. Numismatic literature available while supplies last. Don’t Miss The Fun! For additional info: Dave (850 ) 936-489 2 or Bill (850) 865 -0529. Co in Sh ow sp on so re d by F t W al t o n B e a c h C o i n C l u b. Sat urd ay Sep tem ber 29, 10 am 5 pm and S u n d a y S e p t e m b e r 3 0 10 am 4 pm. In t h e Atrium of Westwood Retir ement Resort, 1001 MarWalt Drive, FWB, FL (across fr om FWB Medi ca l Center). F R E E C o i n t o a l l A t t e n d e e s s i g n i n g i n @ Welcom e Table. 2 0 97 1 61 S a t u r d a y Se p t e m b e r 2 8 1 0 a m – 5 p m a n d S u n d a y Se p t e m b e r 2 9 1 0 a m – 4 p m D a v e ( 8 5 0 ) 9 32 0 9 3 3 o r ( 8 5 0 ) 5 1 2 4 9 0 4 SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Lisa Gaines from Richmond Hill, Ga., was named the winner in the “Sunrise and Sunset” category. PHOTO from page B1 FI sS HING & BOATING 1. William Campbell of Mexico Beach 2. Everett Roll of Panama City Beach 3. Nancy WalkerPP EOPLE 1. Nancy Walker 2. DragonFly Photography of Stone Mountain, Ga. 3. Lisa Gaines of Richmond Hill, Ga. FLORA & AA NIMAL LL I fF E 1. Bill Fauth 2. DragonFly Photography 3. Charlene Miles of Chatsworth, Ga. diagnosed. She was very close to her grandparents — called them ‘G & P’ for Granny and Pop. They have some health issues, so she wanted to be able to help them.” Cricket Russell was always able to make the best of a bad situation, and her battle with stage 4 breast cancer was no different, according to her family. That family includes a brother, Blake Gill, and two sisters, Jill and Megan Russell. During her battle with cancer, Cricket touched many lives, including many staff members at both SHHG and SHHEC. Her family, friends and staff knew her to be strong and courageous during her treatment program, which included chemotherapy and radiation. “She was trying to be strong for everybody else; she was actually our rock; she was the glue that held it all together,” MaryAnn said. “Her strength was amazing. She never complained, and I told her that God chose her because she was strong.” MaryAnn and Joe Russell expressed gratitude for Sacred Heart’s support of their daughter through her short journey with cancer. “She put her full faith in God and Dr. Mose Hayes and the nurses and other caregivers at Sacred Heart on the Emerald Coast and Sacred Heart on the Gulf,” MaryAnn said. “They stood by and fought with us even before there was any insurance. Dr. Hayes accepted her even before her insurance was in the works. “He is nothing short of a saint. She was in the ICU at Sacred Heart in Destin on her birthday on Nov. 24, 2012, and the staff threw her a huge birthday bash. There were 20 or 30 people; she had a cake and balloons.” On the afternoon of her birthday, Cricket was transferred to Panama City for radiation treatment. “She went to Heaven that following Tuesday at 5:36 a.m.,” MaryAnn said. “She touched so many. We are very honored that Anna Hicks brainstormed and created The Cricket Fund. “I love that people in this community cared enough to honor her in that way, and to know that it’s going to help someone else. It is an amazing fund that will help so many in the future, and that’s all she ever wanted to do. Cricket didn’t know that she was going to leave this legacy.” For more information about The Cricket Fund, call Hicks at 229-5680 or nurse Shelly Cannon at 229-5680. ‘CRI cC KE tT ’ from page B1 B6 | The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 92436S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2011-CA -000278 RBC BANK (USA) F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BELSER, CHAUNCEY, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA000278 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO RBC BANK (USA) RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, BELSER, CHAUNCEY, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 AM ET, on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property: LOT 2, BEACON BY THE SEA, PHASE III, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 5th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK ROAD FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 File No. 20851.0624/ RBerkam IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at PO BOX 826, MARIANNA, FL 32448, 850-718-0026, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Sept 19, 26, 2013 92442S JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2008-CA -000135 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE ALT 2006AR5 Plaintiff, SHARON TRACEY WELLS; ROBERT E. BERRY; KATHERYN D. BERRY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 3, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA-000135 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida. HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE ALT 2006-AR5 is Plaintiff and SHARON TRACEY WELLS; ROBERT E. BERRY; KATHERYN D. BERRY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at IN THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN BOULEVARD, PORT ST. JOE IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA 32456, at 11:00 A.M. ET, on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: START AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN WEST 660 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH TO WHAT IS KNOWN AS NILES ROAD OR MADISON STREET, CONTINUE, OF OAK GROVE SUBDIVISION THE CENTER LINE OF SAME AS NOW RUNS; THENCE SOUTH 30 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THENCE WEST 90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 131 FEET; THENCE EAST 90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 131 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk This Notice is Provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least (7) seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954)382-3486 Fax: (954)382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 10-02205 OWB Sept 19, 26, 2013 92472S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO:2013CA0036 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHELLY L. PERSAUD; FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB; SUNIL T. PERSAUD; UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 27th day of August, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2013CA0036, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and SHELLY L. PERSAUD; FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB; SUNIL T. PERSAUD and UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM ET on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described &UHDPHUV7UHH 6HUYLFH &DOO-DVRQ# 7H[W)/WR Elderly Care Will do Elderly Care PSJ area call Karen 850-229-8992 Text FL65749 to 56654

PAGE 15

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, September 26, 2013 The Star | B7 JOB NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following volunteer position:Planning and Development Review Board MemberPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications can be found on our website cityofportstjoe. com. PDRB Members are appointed by the City Commission and meet on the second Tuesday of each month at 4:00 P.M. EST. The PDRB utilizes the Land Development Regulations and City Ordinances to review complex development requests. PDRB members must live within the City limits and/or own a business within the City limits. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 229-8261. The Position will close on September 27, 2013, at 3:00 P.M. EST. This is a non paid position. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace.4514301 1114756 Experienced Cable Installers & Supervisor Innovation. Technology. Communications NOW HIRING Ft. Walton Beach, FLRequirements: Must have truck, van, or SUV, ladders, meter, necessary tools, and safety equipment required for cable installation (triple play). Triage Partners is a national technology based services company servicing telecommunications and cable industries. We are expanding into the Ft. Walton Beach area. Interested candidates please contact: Kim Kerbs at 813-868-1282 or send resume to: kkerbs@triage-partners.com 1113125 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS € pipe WeLDerS X-ray WeLDerS OutSiDe MachiniStS inDuStriaL Marine eLectricianS Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center RepresentativePanama City, FLHalifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: € 2 years previous sales experience, preferably in a Call Center environment € Ability and desire to sell € Strong communication skills € Prociency with all Microso applications € Detail oriented team player with a passion for helping customers Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/AD&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. In addition, we oer: € Performance/ Incentive Based Pay Scale € Friendly Team Environment € Supportive & Motivating Sta to help you succeed € Positive, Professional and Upbeat work environment € We Promote from within! Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1113131 Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265881 Text FL65881 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps The Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of America’s top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at the West corner of Lot 6, Block 17, YON’S ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 45, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence North 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along the Northeast right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 98 for 580.00 feet; thence South 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West a distance of 100.00 feet to the Southwesterly right-ofway line of U.S. Highway 98; thence North 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along the Southwesterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 98 for 111.94 feet to the iron rod and cap marking the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right-of-way line, North 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West, 16.02 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way line, South 44 degrees 59 minutes 41 seconds West, 249 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeasterly along said mean high water line to a paint on a line that bears South 45 degrees 02 minutes 28 seconds West of the Point of Beginning; thence leaving said mean high water line, North 45 degrees 02 minutes 28 seconds East, 249 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 10th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 File No. 11-11813 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m Sept 19, 26, 2013 92488S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-45-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN GRINSLADE and ANGELIA M. GRINSLADE, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 17, 2013 at 11:00 am Eastern Time in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 1, Block A, Unit Number 1 of Red Bull Island, Gulf County, Florida, further described as follows: Commence at the Southeast Corner of U.S. Government Lot No. 2 of Fractional Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run North 145.4 feet along the Lot line; thence run N8505’W 137.0 feet along the South right of way line of Red Bull Island Drive; thence run S2546’E 225.4 feet, thence run N4002’E 60.0 feet along the Northwest Bank of the Chipola River to the Point of Beginning. This Notice dated this 11th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk, of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept 19, 26, 2013 95365S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-000248-CA Civil Division HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi Bank, Plaintiff, vs. FORGOTTEN COAST PROPERTY, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company, ROBERTB. LINDSEY, an individual, and JOSEPH D. ADAMS, an individual, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated on or about August 20, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012 CA000248 in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Hancock Bank is Plaintiff, and Forgotten Coast Property, LLC, Robert B. Lindsey and Joseph D. Adams, are the Defendants. The Gulf County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL32456, at 11:00 a.m. ESTin accordance with § 45.031, Florida Statutes, on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, in Gulf County, Florida, commonly known as 104 Sunray Court (a/k/a 110 Sunray Court), Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, and described more particularly as: LOT16 Commence at the concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 3, of the Block Northeasterly of Palm Street, as shown on the plat of BEACON HILL, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 41-A of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida thence along the Northeasterly right-of-way line of said Palm Street South 45 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds East, 112.62 feet, thence North 47 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East 93.80 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue North 47 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East, 96.00 feet, thence South 44 degrees 46 minutes 12 seconds East 124.10 feet, thence South 45 degrees 13 minutes 48 seconds West, 95.93 feet, thence North 44 degrees 46 minutes 12 seconds West, 127.73 feet, to the Point Of Beginning. Said lands being a portion of Lots 1 and 2 of the Block Northeasterly of Palm Street and the 25 foot vacated alley between said lots of said plat of BEACON HILLand a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West Gulf County, Florida and containing 0.277 acre, more or less. Said lands being subject to an Ingress and Egress Easement over the Northwesterly 12.50 feet of the above described lands and also subject to a 5.00 foot wide Utility Easement over the Southeasterly 5.00 feet of the Northwesterly 17.50 feet of the above described lands. Real Property Tax Identification Number 03761-085R. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the date of sale. If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florid4 32402, or by phone at 850-747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or other court activity, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.fl courts.org REBECCAL. NORRIS Clerk of Court Gulf County, Florida By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk Published: Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95405S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2013-CA-000026 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 724 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: UNIT C: A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR 1265.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID SECTION LINE FOR 1010.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 434.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 1124.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 520.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 619.66 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 127.44 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 75.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 551.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 560.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 283.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1292.44 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 168.85 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 22.43 FEET ALONG THE CHORD OF A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 6442.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 59 SECONDS; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST, 168.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, 22.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 24th day of June, 2013. Rebecca L.Norris Clerk of the Court By: B.A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F13000564 Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95391S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice to Receive Sealed Bids The City of Wewahitchka in Gulf County Florida will accept seal bids from asphalt companies that are approved by the State of Florida to remove asbestos material from a building. Bids must be sealed and marked Asbestos Removal. A scope of services can be picked up at the City Annex located 318 South 7th St. All bids must be turned in to the City Clerk before 12 noon CT October 7, 2013 at 318 South 7th St. All bids will be opened on October 7, 2013 at 1pm CT at the old City Hall located at 109 South 2nd St. The City of Wewahitchka is an Equal Opportunity Employer/ Handicapped Accessible/ Fair Housing Jurisdiction. The City of Wewahitchka reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Connie Parrish City Clerk Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95425S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-45-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN GRINSLADE and ANGELA M. GRINSLADE, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 17, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 1, Block A, Unit Number 1 of Red Bull Island, Gulf County, Florida, further described as follows: Commence at the Southeast Corner of U.S. Government Lot No. 2 of Fractional Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run North 145.4 feet along the Lot line; thence run N8505’W 137.0 feet along the South right of way line of Red Bull Island Drive; thence run S2546’E 225.4 feet, thence run N4002’E 60.0 feet along the Northwest Bank of the Chipola River to the Point of Beginning This Notice dated this 11th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk, of Circuit Court By: B.A. Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95497S PUBLIC HEARING The Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) Committee will hold a meeting on Friday, September 27, 2013, in the Commission Chambers of City Hall at 12 Noon for the purpose of discussing the Benny Roberts Park Grant Request. All persons are invited

PAGE 16

B8 | The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4510161 1113601 4514220 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND, UTILITIES INCLUDED ............... $1200 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 3 BR / 2 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ............. ............... ....................... $700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT/ 2 LOTS ................................. $650 HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGECOMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 4514221 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE FOR LEASE @ 151-A Commerce Park 12x12 ofce/bath/ with 800 sq. ft. warehouse space... make this your new business location...$575.00 per month/ 1 year lease call Gina @ 229-8014 today... Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps The Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266378 Text FL66378 to 56654 to attend this meeting. The Board of City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe will not provide verbatim recordings of this meeting. September 26, 2013 95499S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 15th day of October, 2013, at 6:00 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA RELATING TO CEMETERIES, PROVIDING FOR CERTIFICATE OF INTERMENT, PROVIDING FOR FEES, PROVIDING FOR STANDARDS FOR INTERMENT WITHIN CITY OWNED CEMETERIES, PROVIDING FOR MAINTENANCE AND LANDSCAPING REQUIREMENTS, PROVIDING FOR RESTRICTIVE COVENANTS IN CEMETERY DEEDS, PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY TO ESTABLISH RULES, PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES, PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 229-8261, Est. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: S/ MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: /s/ Charlotte M. Pierce Clerk September 26, 2013 95527S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-29 CA PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendant. RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2013, and entered in Civil Action No. 13-29-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and the Defendant, GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 10th day of October, 2013, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Lot 3, of Port St. Joe, Commerce Park Phase II, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, at Page(s) 54 and 55 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 19th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 Downtown Apalach 31 Avenue E, corner of Hwy 98 and Market St. Saturday Only 8am -???Yard SaleEverything!!! Text FL66681 to 56654 GUN SHOW Sept. 28th and 29th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL66361 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL63024 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH! Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeCarpet/Vinyl Installers Must be qualified. Call 850-670-4211 and ask for the Manager. Web Id 34265176 Text FL65176 to 56654 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City, Callaway, Parker, Springfield. Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com OR Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34266642 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Full Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed for TYNDALL AFB Base Access a plus but not necessary Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com OR Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34266644 For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Mexico Beach 2 Story duplex, bottom unit avail. 1/2 block off beach. Comp furn, 2br/1ba, $900/mo., util incl. 1st & last, yrly lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652. 2 Br 1.5 Ba. Screened in porch and yard. W/D included. Jacuzzi Bath. $650 per month. 1 year lease. $500 deposit & refrncs. 404-710-4078 Text FL65926 to 56654 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Wewahitchka2br/2ba 156 Patrick St. Single Family, 1,112 sq ft. Fixer upper. Lease or Sale, $100 Down $240 month (877) 500-9517 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW 4514326 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514327 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014

PAGE 17

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 1 2013 SP75887 FRANKLIN, GULF & MEXICO BEACH

PAGE 18

Page 2 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 22 6, 22 013 2013 T op 3 Winners In Each Cat eg or y Category First Place Second Place Thir d Place A ccountant Ralph Roberson Kim Bentle y F r iedman Financial Air Conditioning / Heating Miller Heating & Air Pr uet t Air Conditioning Philco A C & Heating Antiques / F ur nit ur e The Tin Shed J oseph ’ s Cot tag e Tif n’ s Ar t / Decor ating J oseph ’ s Cot tag e P or tside T r ading The P eculiar P elican Asian Gr eat W all Golden Dr ag on Hong K ong Bistr o At t or ne y Gor don Shuler J er em y No v ak Kr isty Banks A ut o Services BJ’ s A ut o 5 Star Collision CNS A ut o Repair Bank / Cr edit Union Cent ennial Bank Emer ald Coast F eder al Cr edit Union T yndall F eder al Cr edit Union Bar Eddy T eac h ’ s Ra w Bar Owl Caf e T ap Room Har ry A ’ s Barbecue P aul Gant’ s AJ’ s Hog Wild Beac h Supplies Dollar Gener al Bluew at er Outr igg ers Island A dv ent ur es Best Place t o Shop Gr ady Mar k et Bluew at er Outr igg ers Dollar Gener al Best Place t o W or k Resor t V acation Pr oper ties F r anklin County Sher if f’ s Of ce Ba yside Bur g ers Boat Repair Indian P ass Mar ine Marshall’ s Mar ine Mar quar dts Books No Name Apalac hicola Bookst or e Do wnt o wn Books Br eakf ast The Owl Caf e Shar on’ s Caf e El J alisco Builder / Contr act or Big Fish Combs Constr uction P olor onis Constr uction Car Sales W at erfr ont A ut o The T r uc k Link Nice Car Sales Car pet Cleaner Xtr eme Clean Stanle y St eamer Dir t Bust ers Cat er ing Pr o visions P aul Gant AJ’ s Neighbor hood Bar & Gr ill Char t er Captain D ann y T ank ersle y / Lady J Char t ers J or don T odd Clint T a ylor Chir opr act or Dr Zoe ’ s Bac k and Nec k Car e Gulf County Chir opr actic D a vid O akle y Chur c h Relat ed Apalac hicola T our of Homes Unit ed Methodist Chur c h Eastpoint Chur c h of God Clothing / Thr if t Shop Bluew at er Outr igg ers Goodwill Gr ady Mar k et D a y Spa / Massag e Spa Pur The Cut Salon D a vid O akle y Deli / Sandwic h Mason Dix on Ba yside Bur g ers The Owl Caf e Dentist F r ank D Ma y J ames P adg et t D a vid List er Der mat olog y Gulf Coast Der mat olog y Spa Pur Ar mond Cognet ta Electr ician Cur r ent Solutions K enn y Str ang e Mik e Cat es Electr ic Electr onics A CE Radio Shac k F estiv al / Ev ent Flor ida Seaf ood F estiv al St Geor g e Island Chili Cook of f Scallop F estiv al Fine Dining The Owl Caf e Sunset Coastal Gr ill T amar a’ s Fishing Guide D ann y T ank ersle y J or don T odd Br et t Mar tina Fishing T our nament Kids Win Big Bend Saltw at er Classic Kids T our nament Eastpoint Floor ing Car pet Country Seller ’ s Tile & Floor ing K elly Contr acting Flor ist Ba yside Flor ist Designs b y Dor ann Flo w ers By Deidr a F ood T r uc k Mason Dix on Doug’ s Gour met b y the Ba y (cont. on pag e 4)

PAGE 19

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 3 P o r t S t. J o e W e w a hi t c hk a E a s t p o int 5 0 2 W o o d w a r d A v e 1 0 1 E a s t R i v e r R o a d 2 4 8 U S H i g h w a y 9 8 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 1 1 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 63 9 5 0 2 4 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 7 0 1 1 9 9 T h a n k y o u f o r v o t i n g u s i n t h e B e s t o f t h e F o r g o t t e n C o a s t f o r B a n k / C r ed i t U n i o n T ol lF r e e : 1 8 7 7 8 7 4 0 0 0 7 l E m a i l : e m e r a l d c o a s t @ f a i r p oi nt n e t w w w e mer ald c o a s t f c u c o m

PAGE 20

Page 4 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 26, 2013 2013 T op 3 Winners In Each Cat eg or y Category First Place Second Place Thir d Place F r ied Chic k en Dur en’ s Piggly Wiggly AJ’ s Neighbor hood Bar & Gr ill Ba yside Bur g ers Gener al / F amily Medicine Elizabeth Cur ry Gulf Co Health Dept. Shor eline Medical Gif ts / J ew elry / Souv enirs Riv er lilly T w o Gulls J oseph ’ s Cot tag e Golf Course St. J oseph Ba y St. J ames Ba y Gr ocery Dur en’ s Piggly Wiggly Publix Apalac hicola Piggly Wiggly Hambur g er Ba yside Bur g ers Blue P ar r ot AJ’ s Neighbor hood Bar & Gr ill Har dw ar e / Supply A CE T a ylor ’ s Building Supply Gander ’ s Har dw ar e Health Club / Kar at e Apalac hicola Fitness Cent er One W a y Fitness Fit As A Fiddle Hot Dog Ba yside Bur g ers Beac hcombers T w o Al’ s Ice Cr eam A unt Ebb y ’ s Old Time Soda F ountain Blue Bell Insur ance Hannon Insur ance Mar k’ s Insur ance The Butler A g ency Italian J oe Mama’ s BJs Pr o visions Kar aok e Look Out Loung e T apas F athoms Local Band / Musician The Cur rys Bo Spr ing Band CR67 Lodging Resor t V acation Pr oper ties Cape Escape V acation Rentals Pr istine Pr oper ties Mar ina P or t St J oe Mar ina Scipio Cr eek The Moor ings Mexican P epper ’ s El J alisco Most In uential Mar cia J ohnson Br enda LaP az Mar tha Sanbor n Outdoor / Spor ting Goods Bluew at er Outr igg ers A CE Fisher man’ s Choice Oyst ers Indian P ass Ra w Bar Boss Oyst er P apa J oe ’ s Phar macy CVS Buy Rit e Car r abelle Medical Phar macy Phot ogr apher Kim St one J ohn Spohr er Debbie Hooper Pizza BJ’ s Pizza J oe Mama’ s Hungry Ho wie ’ s Plumbing Williams Plumbing Miz e Plumbing King’ s Plumbing P ools St. J oe P ools Atlantis Coastal P ools Realt or Zac h Childs 98 Real Estat e Gr oup Helen Spohr er Salad The Owl Caf e Pr o visions Mason Dix on Salon / Stylist / Mak e-Up Salon Lux Spa Pur The Cut Seaf ood P apa J oe ’ s The Owl Caf e Killer Seaf ood Seaf ood Mar k et 13 Mile Seaf ood Doug’ s Seaf ood L ynn’ s Seaf ood Skin Car e Spa Pur Mer le Nor man Andr ea Duv al St eak / Pr ime Rib The Owl Caf e Sunset Coastal Gr ill Ronnie B’ s W ebsit e Mar k eting 2k W eb Gr oup K er ig an Mar k eting Bluew at er i.net W edding Planner P anac he / Cla y K eels Am y Pr ice Ba yside Flor ist Wine / Liquor Hone y Hole The P or t Wine and Spir its Haughty Her on Wings AJ’ s Neighbor hood Bar & Gr ill Mang o Mar le y ’ s J oe Mama’ s

PAGE 21

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 5 ou demand If y ou demand If y insist on insist on PERFECTION PERFECTION AR 5 ST AR 5 ST COLLISION CENTRE’ COLLISION CENTRE’ COLLISION CENTRE’ 5 Star Collision Centre’ 770 Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, FL 850-229-ST AR Be sure to visit our Facebook page. 5 S t a r C o l l i s i o n C e n t r e s a y s a n k Y ou t o t h e m a n y r e a d e r s w h o v o t e d u s as o n e o f t h e B e s t Au t o S e r v i c e s P r o v i d e r on t he F or go t t e n C o a s t!

PAGE 22

Page 6 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 26 6 2013 850-229-AUTO "# # (2886) T hank y ou f or recogn izi n g us as one of the Best of the F org otten Coast recipients! 1 3 M i l e B r a n d S e a f o o d T h a n k y ou f o r v o ti n g u s a s o n e o f t h e “ B e s t o f t h e F o r g o tte n C o a s t ” S e a f o o d M a r k e t s V i s i t u s a t 1 3 M i le S e a f o o d M a r k e t ou r w e b s i te a n d o n F a c e b o o k w h e r e i t s no t j u s t s e a f o o d i t s a t r a d i tio n 2 2 7 W a t e r S t r e e t A p a l ac h i c ol a F l o ri d a ( 8 5 0 ) 65 3 1 39 9 ht t p : / / w w w 1 3 m i l e b r a n d com 2013 2013 FRANKLIN, GULF & MEXICO BEACH Congratulations to all of the winners and nominees

PAGE 23

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 7 4 51 4 3 12 3 4 0 M a r i n a D r P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 9393 / (8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 9 3 9 4 ( F a x) w w w P S J MAR I NA c o m TH A N K Y O U f o r v o t i n g f o r u s i n t h e “ B e s t o f t h e F o r g o t t en C o a s t ” f o r M a rina The staff at Miller Heating and Air Conditioning would like to e xpress our appreciation for your votes in “The Best of the Forgotten Coast”. It means so much to us! Thank Y ou for voting us as one of the best golf courses for the 2013 edition of The Best of the For gotten Coast. Gr eat Golf away fr om the cr owds In the Heart of the For gotten Coast St. Joseph’ s Bay Golf Club 700 Country Club Road Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Pr o Shop/Pool: (850) 227-1751 Snack Bar/Of ce (850) 227-1757 info@stjoebaygolf.com www .stjoebaygolf.com Apalachicola: 850-653-2161 | T allahassee: 850-668-6162 See us f or your insurance needs at 61 A v e. E, A palachicola, FL 32320 Thank you for voting us as one of the “ B e s t o f t h e Forgotten Coast” Insurance Agencies!

PAGE 24

Page 8 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 26, 2013



PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 YEAR 75, NUMBER 50BOCC, NFCD agree on path for courthouseBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com County commissioners had two weeks to consider Sharon Gaskins vision for restoring and maintaining the historic courthouse in Wewahitchka. Tuesday they unanimously agreed that they like what they saw so far. Commissioners approved a short-term agreement with Gaskin and North Florida Child Development, Inc. with an eye on a long-term lease for the courthouse in Wewahitchka that served for decades as the county seat. It is a treasure to the county, said Commissioner Joanna Bryan. I think the county should work with Ms. Gaskin to restore that building. The issue is pressing. The county has moved staff and constitutional of cers out of the courthouse and will stop paying for utilities when the scal year begins Oct. 1. As Commissioner Ward McDaniel noted, the building could only go down from that point unless maintained. Gaskin, president and CEO of NFCD, and her company, which operates from Gulf County but provides early childhood learning and other services in ve counties, have proposed partnering to avoid that deterioration. In her latest proposal to the BOCC Gaskin asked for a 10-year lease at $1 per month. NFCD which currently pays $2,200 a month in rental payments would also assume all utility bills and any basic upkeep and maintenance. The lease would also contain language by which the county and NFCD agree to pursue funding, especially grant funding, to help restore the courthouse, which is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Weve got to keep that building, said Commissioner Ward McDaniel. That is our history. I think we are very close (to an agreement). The courthouse also has pressing maintenance issues.See COURTHOUSE A3Sheriffs Of ce investigating shootingStar Staff ReportThe Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce is investigating a shooting that occurred in the early morning hours Sunday in Wewahitchka. The victim, whose name is not being released pending the conclusion of the investigation, sustained critical injuries and underwent surgery, but is expected to recover, according to a GCSO press release. The investigation is attempting to determine whether the shooting was intentional or accidental. Sheriff Mike Harrison said Monday that investigators would need several days to interview all those present or who witnessed the incident. Investigators were nally able to speak to the victim Monday, Harrison said he hoped to have the investigation concluded and the ndings released by weeks end.Real estate signs positive in Gulf CountyBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com If suddenly you feel like you see a new home being built every time you turn around in Gulf County, youre not crazy. According to numbers provided by the Gulf County Building Department, 60 single family home building permits have been issued so far this year with a $16.5 million valuation, up from last years 38 total permits totaling $9.5 million. Theres a marked increase in permits, and its going to keep going, said Steve Newman, managing member of Big Fish Construction. One of the reasons is the pin-up demand and every aspect of building a home is cheaper now. Natalie Shoaf, a realtor with the Gulf the Coast Real Estate Group agreed. Its up, she said. Its easier to get lot loans. Some local banks are doing them and it makes life a lot easier. Shoaf said that so far in 2013, lot sales were currently at 214 sold, up from last years 203 with an average price tag of See REAL ESTATE A3BILL FAUTH | Special to The StarLocal photographer Bill Fauth snapped this gorgeous shot of last weeks harvest moon as it burnished the evening sky over Indian Pass last week. Moon over Indian Pass Cabin burns at state parkStar Staff ReportA cabin at the T.H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park burned to the ground last week. The cabin was occupied but no one was injured in the blaze, which was reported just after 2 a.m. ET Thursday morning, according to the park manager. Occupants of the cabin were on the beach when they noticed the cabin burning. The cabin was a total loss. The re is under investigation by the State Fire Marshals Of ce.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com For some, Gulf County has it all: beautiful beaches, a friendly community and a charming, small-town feel. Others feel that the addition of a cultural arts building would be the icing thats missing from the cake. A full-time cultural arts building would allow Gulf County to play host to traveling exhibits, local art showcases and evening entertainment including theatre productions or public speaking engagements. It would also give creative minds a place to converge, meet and share their passions with others. Former president of the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition Natalie Shoaf spent years examining this cultural void and regularly sought out ways to ll it. After years of scouting locations and holding conversations, she believes she may have found the right place...but she cant do it alone. Shoaf said that there are several opportunities available in downtown Port St. Joe, but a building would need to be rented full-time until it could become selfsustaining and those interested in having such a building in the community will need to help out. When people visit Gulf County, they want something to do and something for their kids to do, said Shoaf. When I travel, I see cultural things and we need to insert that into our community. In 2015, the Forgotten Coast Plein Air paint-out event will celebrate its 10th anniversary. Franklin and Gulf County trade hosting duties each year, and while Franklin is home to the Center for History, Culture and Art, Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka do not have a permanent installation. Shoaf fears that if theres nowhere to hold the Plein Air event, it wont be in Gulf County at all. For the 2013 Plein Air celebration, George Duren donated a storefront on Reid Avenue and during a week in May, the building was packed to the gills with the art, music and cultural appreciation. Now, that same structure sits dark and empty. Lorinda Gingell works at the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, and like Shoaf, sees the bene t of a cultural arts building in Port St. Joe. We need a cultural art center in order to move the community into a rst-class place to live, said Gingell. Lots of people who moved here are retired and never got a chance to appreciate art and would love to get involved. Shoaf and Gingell are gauging community interest for such a building, especially from those willing to donate funds, those with experience in fundraisers or area residents who may have ideas for cultural events that would bene t both kids and adults within the community. There are people here who have a wealth of knowledge when it comes to this stuff, said Shoaf. We need them to stand up and help. Its clear that Shoaf and Gingell are passionate about arts and Locals call for cultural arts building in Port St. JoeWES LOCHER | The StarA building on Reid Ave. was loaned to the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition for the Plein Air festivities, but now sits vacant. See CULTURAL A8 A beautiful cause, B1Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5Letters to the Editor . . . . . . .A5Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B5Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B6-B7

PAGE 2

Thursday, September 26, 2013CAROL AND BOb B COX PHOTOGRAp P HYThe MBARA constructs articial reef habitats to enhance sustainable sheries in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. BudgetSummaryCityofPortStJoe-FiscalYear2013-2014 THETENTATIVEADOPTED,AND/ORFINALBUDGETS&AREONFILEINTHEOFFICEOFTHEABOVEMENTIONEDTAXINGAUTHORITYASAPUBLICRECORD. NOTICEOFPROPOSEDTAXINCREASETheCityofPortSt.Joehastentativelyadoptedameasuretoincreaseits propertytaxlevy. Lastyearspropertytaxlevy: A.Initiallyproposedtaxlevy.$1,129,892 B.LesstaxreductionsduetoValueAdjustmentBoard andotherassessmentchanges......$139,502 C.Actualpropertytaxlevy....$990,390 Thisyearsproposedtaxlevy.....$1,002,774 Allconcernedcitizensareinvitedtoattendapublichearingonthetax increasetobeheldon: (DATE)September30,2013 (TIME)5:01P.M. (MEETINGPLACE)CityHall 305CecilG.CostinSr.,Blvd. PortSt.Joe,Florida32456 AFINALDECISIONontheproposedtaxincreaseandthebudget willbemadeatthishearing. LocalA2 | The StarFWC awards $60,000 grant to MBARABy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association continues to set the standard for the building and deployment of reefs in the state of Florida. Last week, the volunteer organization received a $60,000 grant from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to supply federal aid in sport sh restoration. The MBARA will supply a local match expenditure of $25,000 for a total of $85,000. The money will be used toward the building and deployment of at least 45 concrete and limestone modules totaling 112 tons of inhabitable reefs. We have an outstanding rapport with the FWC, said MBARA President Bob Cox. Were very successful (with the grant) each year. For 10 years the MBARA and the FWC have worked closely and shared information to better understand the sea life that inhabits the waters of the Gulf. Cox described the relationship with the FWC as symbiotic, and said that in return for its support, the MBARA provides photos, research and valuable reef monitoring information. At the 2010 articial reef summit held in Cocoa Beach, the MBARA was recognized for being one of the most active reef organizations in the state of the Florida. Were active, engaged, we care and we help, said Cox. Cox said that current plans were to begin building the 45 reefs by April of next year and have them in the water by August. In May, the MBARA received a grant from Duke Energy and are currently pursuing opportunities from the Fish America Foundation, Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) and the RESTORE Act.Star Staff ReportA change has been made for the reunion of the Saddlin Seminoles coming up Oct. 5 at Parker Farms. Due to the number of attendees coming from out of town, the event will be catered, so no need to bring a covered dish or beverage. Attendees are asked to send $10 to Albaleee Parker, 440 Parker Farm Road, Wewahitchka 32465. Please bring any old photos and newspaper clippings from the Saddlin Seminoles as the group comes together to socialize and swap stories. Saddlin Seminoles reunion is Oct. 5

PAGE 3

LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, September 26, 2013There is a leaking back wall and a problem with mold in the rear of the building, rendering that area unsafe. Further, there is water in the basement of the building that is near electrical infrastructure. County administrator Don Butler suggested any lease agreement dene where NFCD can and can not be within the courthouse. Commissioners also wanted county attorney Jeremy Novak, who was absent, to sign off on any lease contract, and Butler suggested a Monday meeting. In the interest of more deliberation in the process, Bryan moved and commissioners approved Commissioner Warren Yeager was also absent a motion that allows NFCD to assume responsibility for monthly utility payments Oct. 1. That will keep the doors from closing, Gaskin said. We can work out a longterm lease. I need to make sure the building is safe for my employees, too. Im excited about it. Im ready to work on it. Im glad they made the decision to move forward. Bryans motion included direction that NFCD will operate on a month-to-month lease for up to six months while the county and NFCD work through a lease agreement. Two weeks ago Gaskin likened the importance of the Old Courthouse on the north end of the county to the south-end landmark the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Operating Head Start and Early Head Start among other programs in ve counties, NFCD has an overall budget more than $4 million. She said 70 percent of her operations are in Gulf County. She said if the courthouse became an untenable location she might have to move her headquarters to another county. Primarily, though, Gaskin made clear the attachment to the courthouse. I will take it on to save it, she told commissioners. I would hate to see it be closed. I dont want to see that happen. The commissioner most vocally opposed to turning over a public building to a private entity, Commissioner Carmen McLemore expressed support for Gaskins vision. I really have no issue with it, McLemore said. I think it is the best thing going for the north end of the county. I just want to make sure the attorney is okay with it.Wewahitchka Clerk, Tax Collector ofcesDuring the coming week, the new Wewahitchka ofces for the Clerk of Courts and Tax Collector, to be located in the old Health Department Building on N. 3rd Street, will be equipped with a new phone system. Until the system is up and running the Clerks ofce can be contacted at 2275630 and the Tax Collector at 227-5628.LawsuitThe federal lawsuit led by a local political action committee against the BOCC and three individual commissioners roiled another meeting as commissioners considered how to pay the $10,000 legal bill. The discussion led to an outburst from McLemore saying Bryan was a member of the PAC she is not a listed member on the website nor has been and adding that she jeopardized the countys position in another lawsuit with recent comments to the contractor on the Americus Ditch project. McLemore also criticized Bryan for approving a motion several meetings back which passed 3-2 with McLemore and Commissioner Tan Smiley dissenting that moved the county forward on research to explore the potential for a return to county-wide voting. Bryan said, The truth is an absolute defense as it pertained to threatened litigation and that she does not work for the county attorney, does not work for McLemore, and I am not playing this game with you. She said criticism of BOCC action pertaining to the Voters Rights Act demonstrated that McLemore didnt understand the law or disregarded it. The discussion, which consumed the rst 15 minutes of the meeting, was the latest salvo what has been a prickly relationship between Bryan and McLemore. Implants&CrownsAffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.WilliamC.Knapke,DDS,GeneralDentistPanamaCitySquare617West23rdStreet,PanamaCityFL CallForInformation1-888-268-7718 Feeseffectivethrough11/22/13.Additionalfeesmaybeincurred dependingonindividualcases.Same-dayCrownservicemaynot beavailableincertaincases.AffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.Ofce#:(850)872-6155. Great vs.other Dental providersSingleToothImplant$1,795Denture Implants$1,495$1,895 Same-DayCrowns$695LowerArch UpperArch20144-1-T4 1114414 COURTHOUSE from page A1$61,000-$78,000 for Gulf County. St. Joe Beach is up and were selling more in WindMark, said Shoaf. Shoaf reported that the highest lot price this year checked in at $1.8 million. According to numbers provided by Shoaf, lots in St. Joe Beach, Mexico Beach and Beacon Hill were up in number of sales but down in average price for the area with 59 sold between the three areas and an average price of $63,000. This is an increase from last years 47 lots, but a lower price tag than the $68,000 average in 2012. In Cape San Blas, South Gulf County and Indian Pass there was a slight decrease in the number of lots sales but prices have risen and 2013 saw 112 sales between the three areas with an average price of $111,000. In 2012 the area had 115 sales and the average price was on the low side with $73,000. Shoaf reported a decline in both lot sales and prices within Port St. Joe, falling from 26 to 14 this year and the average price sank from $27,000 to $17,000. Wewahitchka was up in sales and price, the 2013 total showing 29 sales with an average price of $14,000, up from last years 15 lot sales and $13,000 average. Gulf County wasnt hit only by the economic downturn of 2008 but also by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Bo Spring, managing member of Big Fish Construction and president of the Forgotten Coast Builders Association said that the 18 months following the oil spill were full of uncertainty and the number of local construction companies had dwindled down to ve. Spring said that things are beginning to climb again and said that in addition to Big Fish, there are now 8-9 companies serving Gulf and Franklin counties. Zach Childs at 98 Real Estate Group concurred with the growth in sales, and said that home purchases in the area have started moving into the recovery phase as well. In general, the closer a property is to white sand, the more of a recovery in value it is seeing, said Childs. The number of single family homes on the market has seen the biggest reduction and most demand. This has been great for builders as many people looking for homes in the area nd they can build a brand new home for less than an existing one in some situations. Childs reported 453 home sales so far in 2013 and is on track to have the most closings of any year since 2005. He said that markets like North Gulf County have yet to see much of a rebound but a high sales volume will drive the number of properties on the market down and value up. Now is the time to buy a lot and build your beach house, said Newman. He added that raw material and lumber costs are down, but uctuate with the market, making for an ideal time to begin construction. Of the projects completed in 2013 by Big Fish, 100 percent of buyers were also end users who planned to live in the home for at least several months out of the year. Newman said that 100 percent of homes were also within walking distance of the water. People go to Destin and Panama City and in the end they want that old Forgotten Coast style of living, said Spring. This is the Florida vacation they remember from their childhood. Newman and Spring both gave praise the Gulf County Tourist Development Council for their work in rebranding the area and helping to bring in tourists who ultimately decide to settle down in Gulf County. Our economy is driven by tourism and construction, said Newman. The TDC is doing a great job and what theyre pushing ts in with what we do. REAL ESTATE from page A1 WES LOc C HER | The StarGulf County has experienced the highest lot sale numbers since 2005.

PAGE 4

Page 4 Thursday, September 26, 2013Clearing the air on Eglin, state forestsLife Divots USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionI taught an American government class this past week at the high school. Well, taught might be a little misleading. It was Constitution Week and Mrs. Beard was kind enough to ask me to come out and regale the students with all I know about that famed document. It didnt take long. It was a class of seniors. They impressed me with their attentiveness, their youthful energy and their politeness. Of course, it was a required class. Maybe they were just trying to get through the moment! And, oh my gosh, how young they looked! I was talking about Thomas Jefferson, King George III and the Boston Tea Party.. but I was thinking Was I ever this bright and alert? Did I ever move with this ease and bounce? Was I ever wrinkle free? I had running shoes older than some of these students! They seemed so self-assured. Comfortable. At ease. Innocent. As I pointed out the short comings of the Articles of Confederation and headed into the Preamble, my mind catapulted back to my last year in high school. I was trying as hard as the dickens to put up the Hey man, Im cool attitude. But, the truth was, I wasnt so cool. The thought of graduation was both exhilarating and intimidating. It was a big world. And, I was just smart enough to know it was about to change for me. My doubts and fears had doubts and fears! They were drafting 18 years olds for Vietnam in 1965. College cost more money than I had. The home that Id been bragging about growing up and leaving, all of a sudden, didnt really look that bad. The little town that Id been telling folks for years that I couldnt wait to get shed of, was after all, really pretty niceand friendlyand safe. As I was explaining how Georgia and some of the other less populated colonies werent about to accept the Virginia Plan, I wondered what was really going on in the minds of these wonderful young people. Have they even thought of the future? Do they realize the cauldron they are headed for? They seemed pretty hip. but life has some dips and curves not evident in an American Democracy class. Maybe they were putting up that same front I displayed. Down amongst the freedom of speech, press and religion discussion, it crossed my mind that I might be giving this talk in the wrong direction. I was shelling down the corn on what used to be and how it all came about but I might should have been aiming toward their future. These young people need to comprehend what awaits them. The bounty is plentiful for those who earnestly seek it. But the pitfalls, potholes and potential catastrophes of life also loom on the horizon. How do you cling to the good and avoid the bad? How do teenagers sort out the wheat from the chaff? It can be a razor thin line for some between success and failure. I should have been less inclined to extol the history and virtues of the United States Constitution and spent the time explaining how this revered document has been tweaked, interpreted, misinterpreted and even stretched on occasionto meet the special needs of a speci c group, situation or crisis. Flexibility is certainly not a bad thing. Our forefathers clearly understood and allowed for that. But, so often the ex is in the eye of the beholder. Teenagers today need to be wise beyond their years to gure out and function appropriately in this tilt-awhirl universe they are diving head rst into. Its not like all the good guys wear white hats and you simply avoid the rest. I hear con icting arguments in political debates and think they are both right.. Course, I also hear lots of political vexing, and Im pretty sure they are both wrong. Some days, I cant tell the Republicans from the Democrats or the sincere, earnest friends from the diabolical shysters. And were asking high school seniors to graduate with a smile and a handshake and step into this arena! I wonder if it is too late to start a class right now for them on how to x the mess the last generation left behind. We are still the greatest nation on earth, and I will ght any man that says different. We are still the land of opportunity..if you dont believe that, check the immigration ow. Rags to riches story still abound in this country. There is not a state in the union that doesnt have something special to offer. I want the youth of our nation to exploit every opportunity to the fullest. But, at the same time, I have some serious doubts about our direction. Listen, weve got more of everything that you can name on the face of the earth between the redwood forest and the Gulf Stream waters. We ought to be living large and enjoying life! But we seem, as a nation, to keep getting in our own way. Do you reckon weve over stretched the freedoms weve been given? Our elected folks often haggle more than they leadand there is so much anger. Has the tail begun to wag the dog? Are we still being governed by the consent of the people? I wonder if Jefferson, Washington, Madison and the boys would recognize the government they founded. Surely, we are not measuring our current society by how many days out of the year our ags y at half-mast. Those fresh, eager young faces have got to gure it out, and soon! They thanked me profusely as the closing bell rang. Many stopped for a chat. Everyone left me with a smile and a nod. And, their laughter and joy lingered as they exited into the hall. I hope and pray it will always be thus.Respectfully,KesOh Say, Can THEY See HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert It was Labor Day and I had unsuccessfully tried to cut my finger off; I was happy I failed. My buddies called from the golf course and asked if I would like to meet them at the 10th hole. Knowing my bandaged finger would not hurt my already pitiful golf game, I agreed. The only thing I could figure was that they were probably playing very badly and needed someone who would make them look and feel better about their game. I have a way of doing that for others on the golf course; I do not mind. I find satisfaction in hitting golf balls into the woods if they are straight and sound nice. Heading out immediately, I beat them to the 10th hole and had plenty of time to sit in the shade and ponder life, love and almost losing the middle finger of my right hand. Okay, it really wasnt that bad, but it bled a lot and took four off-brand band aids to cover up. As I sat in the shade of a tree near the place to tee off for the 10th hole, I studied a rack of those bottles you use to fill your divots. The bottles have sand and grass seeds in them and are usually on the golf cart so you can thoughtfully repair the damage you cause on the course. Perhaps the 10th hole is a good place to swap these out if you were digging a lot of holes on the first nine holes. Not taking golf seriously at all, I started thinking about some of the divots I have either dug into others or had dug out of me. Divot is a word that generally applies to the holes or marks dug out by golf clubs or horse hooves (and the part that is dug out), but I think life divots could be pretty applicable to everyone. A divot in golf is not a bad thing I have learned; in other words, there are good divots and bad divots and a good golfer learns to read their divots. I do not bother to get a dollar bill out and measure or attempt to read my divots on the golf course. If I keep the ball on the course and enjoy the scenery, it is a good day for me. In pondering these life divots, I started thinking about what could be poured on them to speed the healing process of the hole in the ground or in you or me. Apologies sometimes make more divots, but they are something that I thought should be considered. Time is usually a good divot healer, but then I started thinking about the good divots and not wanting to repair them. Honestly, I didnt get very far with this line of thought. Like many of my tee shots, my shade tree psychology ended up in the woods straight and true and sounding really nice, but in the woods. The best comparison I could come up with was a stain on a clean shirt. You know the shirt is clean, but the stain is still there. Stains, like divots shouldnt bother us. They may bother some folks, but they are the owner of the shirts to deal with. Then I started thinking about the stains I caused and decided I better just quit thinking. We ramble on, living with the joy and sorrow that we have experienced and caused. When my buddies showed up, I did not tell them what I was thinking about sitting in the shade. I gave them their moneys worth, hitting two balls far into the woods. I would like to note that the two drives were perfectly straight into the woods and they both sounded sweet when I hit them. Parring only one hole on this afternoon, I felt really good about my golf game. I wore a clean white shirt with a noticeable stain on it the next day to work. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardSpecial to The StarAllow me to clarify the Air Forces intent regarding Eglin Air Force Bases efforts to use the Blackwater River State Forest and Tates Hell State Forest for occasional, non-hazardous military activities. Id like to make clear that the U.S. Air Force is not pursuing control, authority, or land exchange of state property. We simply are looking to share the forests with you. Our goal is to be completely compatible with current forest uses. The Florida Forest Service will maintain complete control and authority over the forests and must approve each and every Air Force activity. That means we will not conduct any operation that keeps you, as a member of the public, from enjoying your forest exactly as you do today. Hopefully you wont even notice we were there. By going through the National Environmental Policy Act process, it ensures our activities result in little, to no impact to the environment. We started that process by issuing a Notice of Intent to publish an Environmental Impact Statement in the Federal Register Aug. 12, 2013. We ran advertisements in the Pensacola News Journal, the Northwest Florida Daily News, the Panama City News Herald and the Tallahassee Democrat both on Aug. 9 and Aug. 16. We also ran an ad in the Apalachicola Times on Aug. 22. In these ads, we invited the public to our scoping meetings in Milton, Blountstown, and Apalachicola on Aug. 27, 28 and 29 respectively. Over time, youll see more of these announcements and well look for other ways to get the word out about future meetings and releases. These meetings have already been invaluable to us as weve learned a tremendous amount about what is important to you. We learned you love your forests and you want them to stay in pristine condition for many generations to come, and we agree with that 100 percent. Here at Eglin AFB, we recovered the Red Cockaded Woodpecker population and championed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services upgrade of the Okaloosa Darter from Endangered to Threatened, on the way to removing it from the Endangered List altogether. We are very proud of our stewardship record, and we completely understand why thats important to you. We grow these species along with more than 22 Threatened and Endangered species, and host more than 17,000 hunters, campers and hikers annually in the middle of one of the Department of Defenses most heavily used ranges. The types of occasional activity that may take place at Blackwater and Tates Hell vary from CV-22s conducting landings and takeoffs to dropping off small teams of four to six people who would use communication tools and maneuver through the forest, hopefully unnoticed. Some of the Air Force Special Operations Commands smaller aircraft may also be able to conduct landings and take-offs on existing forest roads when those areas are not open to recreational activities. And again, we want to leave no footprints behind. Each time we enter your forests, all of these activities will be fully coordinated, scheduled, and approved by our partners in the Florida Forestry Service. In our Draft document, which we hope to have ready for review this fall, youll see a careful analysis of all the potential impactsfrom traf c to water quality to noise and more. But thats just our analysiswe strongly urge you to continue adding your input. In fact, well consider your comments until a decision is made as we want to make the best, most informed decision possible. I look forward to more discussion and encourage you to stay informed on our process by going online at http://grasieis. leidoseemg.com/. Dear Editor, The veterans of Franklin County would like to extend our appreciation to the following merchants/ individuals who supported our annual reunion on Sept. 14. Thanks for Remembering. WOYS Radio, Gulfside IGAWayne and Jan Dooley, Franklin County Sheriffs Department, Durens Piggly Wiggly, C&S Trim Charles and Susan Stancell, Nadine Lee, Franklin County Parks and Recreation, Aloha Bugs Pest Management, Apalachicola Times, Sun Coast Vacation Rentals, Ronnie Wilson, Johnny Turner, Tony Phillips, Pete Adams, Ken and Bridgette Schroeder, Ronald Duggar, Kim Wilson McBrayer, Jody Wilson, Gorrie Wilson, Carolyn Wilson, Charles Collins, Brady Creamer, Gil Autrey and Dean Caassiter. Thank YOU COL. SHAWN MOORE96th Civil Engineer Group Commander

PAGE 5

By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The members of the Port St. Joe Christian rock band Thirty-Three always considered themselves to be a tight-knit group. Now theyve welcomed a new member to the family. Keyboard player Shad Tracy has joined as a fulltime member and will be tickling the ivories for the bands upcoming concerts. Tracy moved to Gulf County two years ago and is in the eighth grade at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. He comes to the band well-prepared, having played the piano since age five. Why the piano when most kids go for drums, guitars or trombones? Mom made me, Tracy joked. It was that same mother, Gina Tracy, who was in St. Joe music to purchase a saxophone for her youngest son when she and store owner Tom McEniry got to talking about pianos and Tracys talents were revealed. McEniry mentioned that Thirty-Three wanted to add a keyboardist to their lineup and invited Gina and Tracy to attend the bands next practice. The remainder of the band is made up of vocalist Brianna Butler, guitarist Zack McFarland, bassist Cole Haddock and drummer Joel Bogaert a group of 11and 12-yearolds with a passion for music and a strong belief in their faith. Tracy had seen the other members of the group in passing and knew Haddock from school, but it wasnt until he attended the bands rehearsal that everything fell into place and he was invited to join as a member. Its been such a good opportunity for him, said Gina. Hes grown musically by playing with a group and gets along well with everyone. Were very excited! Gina has a degree in music and said that Tracys younger brother Jacob is also musically inclined. Tracy currently takes piano lessons from Matthew White at Long Avenue Baptist Church. While Tracy has never performed with a band prior to joining ThirtyThree and will be the first to admit to being nervous, he said he was glad that the keyboard player is usually in the back during the shows. Thirty-Three is the result of a six-week project that started with the St. Joe Music and Performance Program, founded in August 2012 by McEniry and area musician and choir director, Phil Densmore. The goal of the program was to get kids performing together in a band and have them learn and perform three cover songs. By the end of program, the chemistry that formed among band members was too strong to let go. The band continued to gain traction and popularity in Gulf and Bay counties as they played church services and area events. Throughout the spring months, the band spent some quality time at RSR Recording Studio where they recorded its first original song, Jesus Loves You and I Love You Too. The single was released digitally in June through the popular music service iTunes. In addition to countless shows at area churches, the group recently played the annual Scallop and Music Festival at George Core Park and are gearing up for the release of a two new original singles in the fall. Thirty-Threes original songs are penned by local songwriter Doug Roberts, who was brought in to aid the band. He had written a few Christian-based songs that he taught to the group and was pleasantly surprised with how quick they picked up the structures and progressions. The band is managed by the Joes father, David Bogaert, who takes care of the business and booking side of things. Kids looking to be involved in the St. Joe Music and Performance program can contact McEniry at St. Joe Music for more information. Visit the ThirtyThree band online at www.33band.com.Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 5 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LOCAL www.starfl.com ASectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Ask Sarah House a direct question concerning the impact of the Semper Fi Sisters and the reply is a soliloquy. House, rather Sgt. Sarah House of the U.S. Marine Corps, has seen and experienced much of what was beyond her horizons after her graduation from Port St. Joe High School, she wrote in an email this week. But that does not mean a touch of home, whether stationed as she currently is in California or has been and will be again in the near-future in Afghanistan, is not manna. The Semper Fi Sisters are a saving grace, House wrote. It is always uplifting to receive things from home. It is always great receiving anything from anyone supporting the troops, but when it is something sent from home it makes it even more special. It is always a great feeling to have the familiar around you when you are surrounded by the unfamiliar. The Semper Fi Sisters is gearing up for another visit to Gulf County next month to bask in the sunny and sandy beaches for their fth annual Beach Blast. From a gathering of 12 Marine mothers, grandmothers, wives and sisters in the rst year, the Beach Blast has grown to include more than 70 women last year, related by marriage or blood to the handful of military branches in which loved ones serve. And where that rst group packed some three dozen care packages for troops deployed in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, last year the ladies and friends packed nearly 1,200 of what have become known as Boxes of Love, partnering with the Soldiers Angels organization for shipping information around the globe. During a packing party in the Centennial Building, to the music of the songwriters in town for Blast on the Bay, the ladies and folks from the community construct an assembly line to reach out and touch. Whether by sending packages, cards or just sending up an extra prayer at night or during the day for us, it reminds us of what and who we ght for, why we wear this uniform and what makes our country so great, House wrote. The biggest thing I can say to our supporters is thank you from the bottom of my heart. Those Boxes of Love, however, do not ll themselves and the effort which well continue to detail in the coming weeks leading up to the Oct. 17 Beach Blast is truly continental, if not a bit global. On the home front in Gulf County, items are needed to send a dash of Gulf County to troops overseas, but the Semper Fi Sisters are also in need of monetary donations for shipping. Consider the math: last year nearly 1,200 boxes were sent out at $14.85 a pop on the discounted rate from the U.S. Postal Service. We will ship as many boxes as we have donations to ship, said Brenda Garth, president of Semper Fi Sisters, which now spans across the country. With military missions and events changing the Semper Fi Sisters goal has also, in a signi cant sense, expanded. As much as the organization is dedicated to reaching out to troops, extending a hand to family members back home, aiding returning soldiers, wounded and not, the Sisters also have an educational bent. I believe that the American people havent forgotten just that the war in Afghanistan isnt on the front burner anymore with events in Syria and other events taking precedence, Semper Fi Sisters do help keep the spirit alive and help remind the community and also remind the troops that there is still support back home in the States and help keep the troop morale high, House wrote. BOXES OF LOVEDonations for the Boxes of Love campaign can be dropped at any branch of Centennial Bank, Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe and Harolds Auto Parts in Wewahitchka. An account has been set up at Centennial Bank for any donations to defray shipping costs. For more information visit Semper Fi Sisters on Facebook.A saving grace Fifth annual Boxes of Love for the troops kicks off SPECIAL TO THE STARShad Tracy (in blue) has joined Thirty-Three as a full-time keyboard player. The band is currently in the studio working on two new original singles.Local band Thirty-Three adds new member SARAH HOUSEMarine Sgt.SPECIAL TO THE STARTop: Last year more than 70 Semper Fi Sisters packed nearly 1,200 Boxes of Love. Above: The Sisters will turn the Centennial Building into an assembly line during this years packing party Oct. 19.We will ship as many boxes as we have donations to ship Brenda Garth president of Semper Fi Sisters

PAGE 6

Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST) Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) BWOHuntingHeadquarters: CAMOARRIVINGDAILY WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Sept.2687 7010% Fri,Sept.2784 68 0% Sat,Sept.2883 67 0% Sun,Sept.2982 71 0% Mon,Sept.3083 72 0% Tues,Oct.181 7230% Wed,Oct.282 7230% Page 6 Thursday, September 26, 2013 Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Special to The StarNow that summer is over we are going to start the fall season with a super island clean up. This is your chance to see and help preserve the beauty of St. Vincent Island. This event, sponsored by Friends of St Vincent, will take place on Friday, Oct. 11. We are looking for a limited number of hardy volunteers (at least 20) to clean up the unspoiled beaches of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. These beaches, even though unmarred and untrampled by tourists, receive large amounts of manmade debris and all sorts of otsam and jetsam of modern life. This debris that people carelessly cast into the gulf is washed onto the beaches where it adversely affects the wildlife on St Vincent Island, especially the nesting sea turtles, birds and marine life. The cleanup will focus mainly on small debris bottles, cans, plastic, paper that can be recycled. This cleanup is made possible by the help from three individuals: Fonda Davis with Franklin County Solid Waste and Recycling for removing the collected debris from the island; Shelley Stiaes, refuge manager, for providing transportation to and from the island; Mike Turrisi, a St. Vincent volunteer, for organizing the cleanup event; All debris collected will be transported by FWS to be collection point where it will be picked up by Franklin County Solid Waste and Recycling. Everything that can be recycled will be recycled. Volunteers will be transported to St Vincent Island on the US Fish and Wildlife Service barge which will leave from their dock at Indian Pass at 8 a.m. ET. There will be two returns from the island, one at 12 p.m. noon, and the other at 4 p.m. When you volunteer be sure to let us know when you would like to return. This is not a hop-in or hop-out beach cleanup. You will need to choose what is best for you in terms of time and stamina. You will need to bring your own water, food, bug spray, sun screen, appropriate clothing and large black garbage bags for collecting the debris. Please remember it is a refuge and conditions can be extreme (heat, bugs, etc.). This cleanup is not for the faint of heart. If you can make it, you will have the reward of knowing that you helped return one of Floridas last great jewels to its natural state. To register for the cleanup email supportstvin@hotmail.com by Oct. 4 and thank you for your help! Turtle season is winding down and it has been a record breaking year on the island. There have been 104 recorded sea turtle nests! Of those nests 23 have been adopted by individuals who are interested in supporting the turtle program on the island. The red wolf breeding program is not faring as well. The Red Wolf program which has been ongoing on St. Vincent Island since 1989 has had another disappointing year. One breeding pair of red wolves is kept on the island to produce pups each spring. In the winter the pups are trapped, their health checked, and they are tted with radio tracking collars. The pups remain with their family until they are 18 months old. They are then trapped and relocated to Alligator River NWR in North Carolina where they are reintroduced into the wild. The staff and volunteers that track the wolves have found no evidence of pups again this year. If there are no pups this spring the two wolves on the island will be swapped out for another pair with the hope that they will be more productive. Fall and winter on the island always includes three scheduled hunts. The rst hunt, the Archery Hunt takes places Nov. 20-24. The popular Sambar Deer Hunt is scheduled for Dec. 4-8 and the Primitive Weapons Hunt is set for Jan. 22-26, 2014. Hunters can apply for any of these hunts at www.myfwc.com/license. The FWC website also has tips and advice on how to prepare for each hunt.Island cleanup scheduled on St. Vincent ISLAND TOURSThe monthly island tours resume in the month of October. All tours are on the second Wednesday of each month. The dates for the fall, winter, spring tours are as follows Oct. 9 (tour already lled), Nov. 13, Dec. 11, Jan. 8, Feb. 12, March 12, April 9, and May 14. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web at www.stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive bring everything you need, including drinking water and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit our web page for more information and volunteer opportunities www.stvincentfriends.com and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COMOne never knows what they might nd on St. Vincent Island.By Tim Croft227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will host Park Appreciation Day from 2-6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28. The event is part appreciation and part membership drive for the Friends, a non-profit organization that provides support to a host of missions at T. H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. The day is also part of the National Public Lands Day celebration. Events begin with a morning shoreline cleanup from 10 a.m. until noon, with free beverages provided to all volunteers. Family activities include a sandcastle building contest which begins at noon ET. There will also be environment displays and there will be music from Sonic Tonic and entertainment beginning at 2 p.m. at Eagle Harbor which can be enjoyed by boat or from the harbor beaches. A low country shrimp boil will begin at 2 p.m. and is open to the public for a $5 donation. The boil is free for current Friends members and park staff. There will be free ice cream for kids provided by Scallop Cove. Attendees can also learn about and register to become a member of the Friends organization. T.H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park is home to a shoreline named in 2002 as the top beaches in the world. Last summer, a destination website Americas Best Online, named St. Joseph Peninsula State Park the top state park in the country. Additional information is available through the Gulf County Tourist Development Council at www.visitgulf.com or by calling 850-229-7800. Star Staff Report The 2013 recreational season for bay scallops closed Wednesday, Sept. 25. The nal day of harvesting was Sept. 24. FWC scallop researchers will conduct underwater surveys now that the season is closed to reassess the scallop population. While the season was open, scallop harvesters could assist researchers by completing an online survey at http://svy.mk/bayscallops, indicating where they harvested scallops, how many were collected and how long it took to harvest them. Participants can email BayScallops@MyFWC.com to ask questions or send additional information. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Bay Scallops to learn more.Recreational bay scallop season closed Sept. 25St. Joseph State Park Appreciation Day on Saturday SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the Car Body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder. SPECIAL TO THE STARSt. Joseph Peninsula State Park will celebrate Park Appreciation Day Sept. 28. BIRDS-EYE VIEWFROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND

PAGE 7

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASectionPage 7 Thursday, September 26, 2013 602Highway98,PortSt.Joe,FL|(850)227.7900 0097.72) 2058L | (, Feo. Jtt Sro, P8y 9awhgi2 H06 DinnerontheGoFamilyDinner feeds4for$2495includesEntre,Salad&Bread*PickupatSunsetandtakehomeSeeWebsiteorFacebookforEachWeek'sSpecial CallinonMondayorTuesday. Musthavetheorderby2:15pmonTuesday forpick-upat5:15pmor6pmTuesday. 1113270 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER VincentIvers,M.D.BCIM CSSKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit. CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening. www.iversmd.com VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070Mon-Tue-Thurs&Fri 9am-6pm Wed&Sat 9am-2pmALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED SERVICES 4515902 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:10-15-13CODE: By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe football Coach Chuck Gannon said last weeks visit to Jefferson County was an early test for his young squad, which has just seven seniors on the roster. The Tiger Sharks passed with ying colors. Port St. Joe went out of the county for the rst time this season and won its second-straight 38-7 to improve to 3-1. The road gets no easier as the Tiger Sharks visit Chipley this week, but the long excursion to Monticello highlighted that this years squad is no easy mark. We talked about it as coaches on the way over and we just had a tremendous week of practice, Gannon said. Maybe the best week this year. We put in a lot of defensive adjustments because (Jefferson County) throws a lot, but the kids were focused and worked hard. And as the game kept going along we kept getting stronger. We are really pleased with the way they focused and played. The Tiger Sharks won with a familiar game plan. They ran the ball well, rushing 44 times for 215 yards with Cole Cryderman (12 carries, 62 yards) and Dwayne Griggs (9 for 56) leading the way, while getting support from Carter Thackers 45 yards and ve other backs who had positive rushing yards. We took care of the ball and ate up the clock, Gannon said. The Tiger Sharks also found a passing game, thanks in part, Gannon said, to an observation by assistant Coach Kenny Parker. Gannon said Parker noticed that a Jefferson County safety followed a Shark going in motion across the formation, possibly opening up the tight end on the back side down the seam of the defense. Sure enough, tight end Aaron Paul found open space twice on the same play once before halftime, the second early in the third quarter for a pair of touchdowns covering a combined 88 yards. Quarterback Drew Lacour nished 4 of 5 for 106 yards with one interception. We thought we had a good game plan coming in, Gannon said. We thought we could do some things passing. We played good defense and moved the ball well in spots. The Tiger Sharks, on the road, were also called for just one penalty, for 10 yards. The defense bottled Jefferson County up until it scored its lone touchdown late in the third quarter after the game was securely in the win column for the Tiger Sharks. The Tiger Sharks had seven tackles for loss, forced one fumble and recovered two and intercepted three passes. Helping lead the defensive charge as they have the past few weeks were brothers Marquez and Marcell Johnson, both linebackers. Marcell had 15 tackles he has been in double digits in tackles three weeks running including 10 solo tackles. Marquez added six tackles, including ve solos. An interception by Marquez set up one touchdown and late in the game he tipped a pass which Marcell gathered in at the Jefferson County 12 and carried into the end zone to score. We just played good defense, Gannon said. We were around the ball a lot. The defense, Gannon said, may have turned in the key sequence of the game late in the second quarter. Port St. Joe went up early on a 27-yard eld goal by Lacour. The rst of the two connections between Lacour and Paul made it 10-0 after Lacours extra point kick he hit all ve for the night but Port St. Joe fumbled at the Tiger Shark 6 to give the hosts a chance to close the gap. The Tiger Sharks stuffed three consecutive runs and a pass to the tight end on fourth down was dropped and Port St. Joe had a 10-0 shutout at intermission. Lacour and Paul connected again on the rst drive of the second half, Cryderman and Griggs added rushing touchdowns and Marcell Johnsons interception return completed the scoring.Tiger Sharks rock Jefferson County Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School varsity volleyball team continued its winning ways with a pair of victories to run its record to 9-4 overall, 2-1 in district play. The week began with a home match against district foe Franklin County and a straight-set victory by scores of 25-15, 25-14 and 25-18. Addison Rices season high 12 aces helped pace the victory, which Coach Wayne Taylor, characterized as impressive. Rice also had six kills as did teammate Shannon Pridgeon. Alyson Johnson had 16 serve receives and 10 digs. The junior varsity dropped what Taylor called, a hard-fought match 2514, 16-25 and 12-15. Halie Jasinski was 100 percent in serves with 12 serves in and four aces. Two nights later, the Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Bozeman in Bay County, the varsity coming away with a 25-15, 25-14 and 25-11 win. Nicole Endres with seven serving aces and Pridgeon had eight kills. The junior varsity also won, taking the sets 25-17 and 25-21. Ashely Kennedy had seven aces and Teiyahna Hutchinson ve kills. Port St Joe Junior Varsity and Varsity volleyball teams suffered defeats Monday night against the visiting Lady Bulldogs of Liberty County. Both matches were similar in that Port St Joe won the opening set of each match but lost successive sets to lose their matches. The JV scores were 25-12, 22-25 and 8-15 while varsity scores were 25-18, 23-25, 2125 and 18-25. For the JV, Jasinski had eight total kills and for the varsity Pridgeon had 10. The varsity traveled to West Gadsden on Tuesday and the next home match is tonight against North Bay Haven. PSJ volleyball varsity splits week TIM CROFT | The StarLeft: Linebacker Marcell Johnson had 15 total tackles and returned an interception for a touchdown against Jefferson County. Right: Tight end Aaron Paul caught two passes for 88 yards and two touchdowns.

PAGE 8

Thursday, September 26, 2013 LocalA8 | The Starculture awareness within the community, but a step back in time reveals the reason. Gingell grew up in St. Louis and recalled her elementary school class being taken on eld trips to see the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. She said that it gave her such an appreciation for music that she tried to go back on her own time whenever possible. Children need the opportunity to be touched by art, Gingell said This is an opportunity to give a lasting impressionan opportunity to look to the future and give the whole community a venue that will increase the quality of life and spawn additional art. Shoaf said that she and her seven siblings were expected to have an appreciation for art and family outings often included tours of Miamis museums. My passion is the fact that we, as a community, have to look long-term, said Shoaf. We can change the world for the community and art is one way to do it. We have a choice to make this a fabulous place. Fine arts are a pathway but we need knowledge and money that we dont have. Shoaf and Gingell agreed that they didnt expect one person to step in and help pay for everything, and said that lots of people with a little bit of money can easily have the same effect. Shoaf said that the Chamber of Commerce, Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition are already on board; the city simply needs a dedicated facility to get the ball rolling. Members of the community who may be willing to help nance a cultural arts building can contact Shoaf at natalieshoaf@gmail.com. With enough interest, a meeting will be scheduled to gure out the next step A cultural arts building would raise the quality of life here another notch, said Gingell. Its the perfect anchor for downtown.WES LOCHER | The StarSeveral attempts were made to purchase the historic Port Theatre to use as a cultural arts center, but a price could not be agreed upon. CULTURAL from page A1 By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association is about to make some upgrades to an already-special reef. Proceeds from the 98 Real Estate Group Ling Ding Tournament which took place in the spring totaling $5,500 were donated to the MBARA for use in expanding the John Thompson Memorial Reef. The upgrades will allow the Bell Shoals-based reef to draw in more cobia sh and other sea life. Once word got around that the money would be put toward Thompsons reef, additional private donations were made. The winners of the tournament, Mitch Coleman and Captain Dave Mullis, who are also former MBARA members and friends with Thompson, also donated their winnings back to the fund. Its a credit to Johns memory and what he did in the community, said Bob Cox, President of the MBARA. The funds will be used to add to the complexity of Thompsons reef which will draw in additional bait sh and ultimately the cobia who feed on them. It allows us to establish the bottom of a food chain, Cox said. Thompsons wife, Bonita, was appreciative of the donation and the communitys support for her husband. The reef was deployed in April 2012 in his favorite shing spot and the installed plaque has his favorite cobia jig dried into the cement. It was built with attracting cobia in mind, Bonita said. John loved cobia shing. It was his passion. The average cost of a reef is $1,600 and once MBARA has collected all funds for the project they will work with reef-builders Walter Marine to construct a tting addition for the memorial. It takes a lot of time and effort to create the reefs, theres a lot of logistics, organization and management, Cox said. If people hadnt supported the tournament or donated their money, we wouldnt be able to add to the reef. People will remember this. It will make marine life better. Its a service to the economy, the community and underwater recreation. Its a labor of love. The Ling Ding tournament was popular in the 70s and 80s and tournament director John Wiley restarted the event three years ago. Zach Childs of the 98 Real Estate Group came on as assistant tournament director. WES LOCHER | The StarMBARA president Bob Cox and Bonita Thompson accept a donation from Ling Ding organizers Zach Childs and John Wiley.Ling Ding proceeds allow MBARA to add to memorial reef Please give to the United Way of NWFL at (850) 785-7521 or online at www.unitedwaynwfl.org Now, more than ever.

PAGE 9

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) What two years did The Twist by Chubby Checker hit the top of the charts? 1959/63, 1960/62, 1961/64, 1965/67 2) Hieronymous Bosch was an internationally famous Dutch? Boxer, King, Singer, Artist 3) In internet lingo whats the abbreviation for face to face? ETE, F2F, FYI, MYM 4) With what is touch most associated? Fencing, Farming, Framing, Financing 5) Reportedly what color beard grows the fastest? Black, Gray, Blonde, Red 6) How many wings does a ea have? Zero, 1, 2, 3 7) What is/was Diana, also known as Artemis, the goddess of? Underworld, Ocean, Wind, Hunt 8) Of these which isnt a member of the Hebrew alphabet? Kaf, Vav, Hei, She 9) Which sea surrounds the U.K.s eastern coast? North, Mediterranean, Red, Black 10) From which animal do we ordinarily get coney fur? Chinchilla, Mink, Fox, Rabbit 11) How many astronauts manned each Apollo ight? 2, 3, 4, 5 12) What is haboob a type of? Hair style, Snow ake, Sandstorm, Tree 13) Legendary jazz performer John Coltrane was best known for what instrument? Clarinet, Trumpet, Saxophone, Trombone 14) In what same state were Johnny Carson, Elijah Wood, and John Wayne born? Iowa, Nebraska, Indiana, Wisconsin ANSWERS 1) 1960/62. 2) Artist. 3) F2F. 4) Fencing. 5) Blonde. 6) Zero. 7) Hunt. 8) She. 9) North. 10) Rabbit. 11) 3. 12) Sandstorm. 13) Saxophone. 14) Iowa. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Thursday, September 26, 2013By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Sacred Heart Medical Group is of cially in Wewahitchka. During a ceremony Monday, president of Sacred Heart Hospitals Roger Hall cut the ribbon on the new primary care center on State Road 22 in the Health Department building. This is the latest step in the expansion of Sacred Heart services for Gulf and Franklin counties. We now have Sacred Heart Hospital in Wewahitchka, Hall said. Its important for the community, and its a privilege to serve them. Its a great day to make a difference in health care. Hall added that the lab, which offers X-rays and blood work, would be an important addition as patients wouldnt need to drive to Panama City or Port St. Joe for certain tests. Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner Nancy Anderson will lead the primary care services set to include womans health screenings and lab and X-ray services. Anderson has a masters degree in science of nursing from Northwestern State University and completed her Doctor of Nursing Practice at the University of Alabama. A Florida-licensed ARNP, she has been practicing since 1995. She spent 17 years practicing in southern Alabama; all the while, Gulf County was her vacation destination of choice. Once she decided to relocate permanently, she joined Sacred Heart in 2012. My rst love is primary care, Anderson said. I love the community aspect here and the chance to be part of it. I feel like Im where Im supposed to be. ARNPs are advanced practice nurses with extensive training, including a masters degree and clinical experience. ARNPs diagnose and treat diseases, provide appropriate education for patients and prescribe medications. ARNPs often serve as a patients primary health care provider and see patients of all ages. Paulina Pendarvis, Physician and Volunteers Services advocate for Sacred Heart, praised the advantages of new radiation diagnostics equipment which will allow test results to be shared with the hospital locations in Port St. Joe, Destin and Pensacola instantaneously. Its the wonders of digital medicine, Pendarvis said. Womens health screenings will be available from 7-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-4 p.m. CT Monday-Friday. Appointments can be made by calling 568-1053. Lab and X-ray services will continue from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. CT Fridays. No appointment is needed for lab and X-ray services.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Mexico Beach is considered by some to be one of the most picturesque cities along the Forgotten Coast, and the Community Development Council set out to prove it with its annual photo contest. More than 165 photos were submitted, and a panel of judges determined the winners across categories that included Sunrise and Sunset, Around Mexico Beach, Fishing and Boating, the Beaches, Florida and Animal Life, and People. We received a large selection of pictures for this years contest, said CDC executive director Kimberly Shoaf. Each picture was unique, and we enjoyed looking at Mexico Beach through others eyes. All pictures submitted had to be taken in the Mexico Beach area, and its fun to see what you dont always see. We appreciate everyone who entered and will enjoy showing off the pictures to everyone who comes into the Welcome Center. All winning photographs will be on display in the Mexico Beach Welcome Center until next years contest. Photos that didnt win will be included in albums on display inside the welcome center. Winning photographs can be viewed at www.mexicobeach.com. AROUND MEXICO BEACH1. Rosie Gammell of Inverness 2. Cindy Yost of Brooksville 3. Bill Fauth of Mexico Beach.SUNRISE & SUNSET 1. Lisa Gaines of Richmond Hill, Ga. 2. Marty Moore of Belpre, Ohio 3. Gloria Sanchez of Mexico BeachTHE BEACHES 1. Nancy Walker of Clear Lake, Iowa 2. Marty Moore 3. Bill Fauth KRISTINA LEEANN CRICKET RUSSELLCricket Fund honors a beautiful spiritStar Staff ReportI dont have an expiration date. That is what Kristina LeeAnn Cricket Russell of Port St. Joe told her family while battling an aggressive form of breast cancer at the young age of 22. The comment, those who knew her said, revealed wisdom beyond her years. And thanks to those who love her, Russells spirit of caring and giving lives on as the inspiration of The Cricket Fund. The Cricket Fund is the brainchild of Anna Hicks, a radiology/CT/mammography technologist at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Hicks, who joined the hospital when it opened in 2010, was employed in CT and transferred to SHHGs Womens Center earlier this year. The fund will provide free mammograms to women in need in Gulf and Franklin counties. Russell had no insurance at the time of her diagnosis on March 12, 2012. Hicks believed it is important to provide a fund like The Cricket Fund. There are lots of women without health insurance and women are bad about putting themselves last, she said. If they have an extra $200, they wont spend it on a mammogram for themselves; they will spend it on food, electricity, clothes for their children. Like many others, Hicks was inspired by Crickets strength. My husband worked with Crickets father, and my brother was close to her, she said, adding she got to know Russell after her diagnosis. She was full of life and tried to make everyone feel better about her situation. Even on her worst days, she still had a huge smile on her face. Joe and MaryAnn Russell described their daughter with words such as fun-loving and carefree, beautiful inside and out. People would gravitate to her; her smile was contagious, MaryAnn said. She never met a stranger, and she was always willing to help people. She was attending Gulf Coast State College and was studying to be a nurse when she was SPECIAL TO THE STARRosie Gammell took home rst place for her Around Mexico Beach submission.Mexico Beach photo contest winners namedSee PHOTO B6 Sacred Heart begins primary care in WewahitchkaWES LOCHER | The StarPresident of Sacred Heart Hospitals Roger Hall cuts the ribbon on a new primary care center in Wewahitchka. At right, District 1 County Commissioner Carmen McLemore congratulated Hall after the ceremony.See CRICKET B6

PAGE 10

B2 | The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013Water is becoming a precious resource for Floridians, even if this particular summer might make one think otherwise. As home gardeners, we should make it a point to use only as much water in the garden as we need, and never allow a wasteful surplus to run. If we waste water now, home gardeners may have to give up watering their gardens in the future, to conserve water for more basic needs of the population. Of course, we all hope thatll never happen, but it is possible. As we begin thinking about the fall vegetable garden, we also need to think about ways to cut back on the amount of water we use in the garden, and nd ways of growing vegetables with as little water as possible. One way to save water is to plant fast growing, early-maturing vegetables. The sooner a plant matures the less water it will need. The longer the garden is occupied, the more water it will take. Another tip is to plant the garden during periods of adequate rainfall. For Florida gardeners, this leaves a fairly wide choice of planting dates. This fall, for example, gardener should have no problem with adequate soil moisture. Try to improve the water-holding capacity of the soil. Most Florida gardens contain coarse soil particles, such as sand. That doesnt hold water very well. Applying generous amounts of organic materials such as compost, manures, and cover crops, will help the soil hold water better. Another way to save water is to use a watering method that applies water just in the root zone, where its needed. Overhead sprinkling may be time saving for you, but it wastes a lot of water, by wetting areas between rows and by losing water to the wind. If you set your plants far enough apart, they can be individually watered by hand. Try to use drip or trickle irrigation, if you can. Our IFAS Specialist tells us that drip irrigation produces vegetables just as well as overhead sprinkling does, but with eighty percent less water. If you arent using the drip method, a general rule is to water the garden thoroughly twice weekly. This will encourage deep rooting of the plants. Another tip is to avoid simply over watering your garden. Young plants dont need as much water as older plants do. Theres a limit to how much water plants can use. Any more than that run off, is wasted, or stays around to cause root rot problems. Another way to save water is to keep weeds out of the garden. Weeds use water for their own growth and transpire large amounts of water to the air. Youll be surprised how much less water the garden will need, if weeds arent allowed to grow. Mulch can be a big help in conserving soil moisture. Use hay, straw, leaves, or plastic. Finally always use good judgment when running water, and remember that the water you waste today may become the water you wish you had tomorrow. For more information on conserving water in the vegetable garden contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas. u.edu or www.http://edis.ifas. u.edu and see Publication SP 103, SL339; or Master Gardener Handbook: North and Central Florida. Volume 1, 2 and 3; Drip Irrigation Systems for Small Conventional Vegetable Farm. Pandoraisa48#1yrPlottHound.She isalittletimidaroundnewpeoplebut warmsupquickly.Pandorawalksvery wellonaleash,sitsandislearningother commands.Shelikeskids,adultsother dogsandeventolerateskitties.Pandora iscratetrained,spayedandup-to-date onvaccines. FREESPAYORNEUTERFORTHEDOGSOF 32456ZIP Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend. hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@ gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103andaskfor MelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWe requireallpotentialadopterstocompleteanapplicationform.Adoptionfeesinclude ourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectly tosupporttheanimalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturday from10am-3pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter! Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouall theresoon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere Youmaycontactusbye-mailatcampgordonjohnston@fairpoint.net orcall(850)697-8575. ForfurtherinformationonNationalMuseumDay,pleasevisit Smithsonianmagazine.com/museumday.ComeCelebratewithus! TheCampGordonJohnstonAssociationisa501c(3)notforprotcorporationdedicatedto preservingthehistoryoftheAmphibiousSoldiersofWWIIwhotrainedinFranklinCounty,Florida andisfunded,inpart,bytheFranklinCountyTouristDevelopmentCouncil. anaturalescape.com TouristDevelopmentCouncil ThismarkstheseventhconsecutiveyearthattheCampGordonJohnstonWWII MuseumhasbeenaskedtoparticipateintheSmithsonianMagazinesAnnualNationalMuseumDay.ThemuseumislocatedintheCarrabelle MunicipalComplex,at1001GrayAve.,Carrabelle,Florida.Wewillbewelcomingvisitorsfrom9A.M.until4P.M.Comeviewourever-growingexhibits.Ifhishealthallows,authorKenneth Tucker,WWIIB-17TailGunnerborninEastPoint,FL,willbesigningbooks.Our giftshopwillbeopenallday.Hearlivemusicandenjoyfreerefreshments!As always,admissionisbydonation.YoucanlearnmoreabouttheCampGordon JohnstonWWIIMuseumanddownloaddirectionsatwww.campgordonjohnston.com. SocietyConserving water in the vegetable garden ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension director Special to The StarJoint efforts of the GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club, Inc., the City of Wewahitchka, VFW Chapter 8285, and Fishers Hardware resulted in the City of Wewahitchka obtaining a new ag pole, American ag, the State of Florida ag, and a spot light. The new ags and ag pole were erected in the V next to the Sheriffs substation in Wewahitchka. Pictured are Bob Shipman, VFW Chapter 8285; Patsy Whiteld, Teresa Lykins, Tunnie Miller, Betty Holloway, Dianne Semmes, Pat Stripling, and Carolyn Watson of the GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club, Inc.; Sheriff Mike Harrison; Tom Semmes, VFW Chapter 8285; City Commissioner Bob Pettis, and Ms. Nellie Wade. A special thanks goes to Ralph Fisher and employees of Fisher Hardware for installing the ag pole and the foundation.Star Staff ReportAn All-Class Reunion for Wewahitchka High School will be held on Saturday, Oct. 19. Everyone in the community is invited, so make plans to come and enjoy seeing old friends and catching up with one another. We would like to get the word out to everyone, so please pass along this information to any classmate/friend that you have contact with. The reunion will be held at the Honeyville Community Center in Honeyville beginning at 10:30 a.m. CT. If you would like to attend please send a check for $17 (per person) to Dianne (Lester) Semmes, 1730 CR 386 North, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. If you need further information or would like to assist in any way, please contact Dianne at 639-5345 (home) or 227-6425 (cell), or via email: Wewamama@yahoo.com. Food and beverages will be provided, but donations of desserts are requested. The deadline for checks is Oct. 7. Wewahitchka Public Library Gets New FlagSpecial to The StarThe GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club, Inc., donated a new American ag to the Charles Whitehead Wewahitchka Public Library. Patty Fisher, Chairman of the Womans Club Patriotic Project, is shown presenting the ag to Buella Harrison of the library. The GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club, Inc., also sponsors the Patriotic Project which includes the ags along State 71 and State 22. These ags are own during special patriotic holidays. If you would like to purchase a ag and have it placed on one of the light poles in town the cost is $35, which includes the brackets and a small marker under the ag. This marker can read In Honor Of, or In Memory Of the name of the person you want on the marker, or your business name. Please contact either Patty Fisher, 639-9794, or Dianne Semmes, 639-5345. Wewahitchka High School all-class reunion 2013 Wewa gets new, ag agpole

PAGE 11

The Star| B3Thursday, September 26, 2013Special to The StarGulf Coast State College is hosting an Open House for the Advanced Technology Center from 1:30-4 p.m. CT Oct. 11. The ATC Open House showcases all of the academic programs and entrepreneurial opportunities available in this new, history-making facility. Attendees will have a chance to speak with faculty and staff about the programs and equipment inside the ATC. The event is free and open to the public. We are excited to have this game-changing facility completed and opened for students, said GCSC President Dr. Jim Kerley. We believe this facility will help attract new high-tech, high-paying jobs to our area, and are pleased to share the nished product with our region. We extend a special invitation for everybody to join us as we celebrate the top ATC in the country. The 93,500-square-foot facility promotes innovative partnerships across key sectors of business, industry, government and education within a futureforward framework. It functions as a talent pipeline with training and programs directly targeting the local skills gap, leading to lucrative careers in advanced technologies. For more information, email Loel Davenport at ldavenport@gulfcoast.edu or call 873-3583. Special to The StarThe Education Foundation of Gulf County recently received a $2,000 Youth Literacy grant from the Dollar General Literacy Organization to support its literacy programs. Specically, the grant will provide technology support and materials to the Reading Intervention classroom at Port St. Joe Elementary School. We are so grateful to Dollar General for supporting the children of Gulf County Schools and know that these dollars will directly impact children struggling to read at grade level, said Donna Thompson Port St. Joe Elementary School. Youth literacy grants from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation are awarded at the beginning of the academic year to help make a distinct impact on the communities we serve by supporting programs that improve education and enhance literacy, said Rick Dreiling, Dollar Generals chairman and CEO. At Dollar General, we are passionate about our mission of serving others, and its exciting to see the real difference literacy and learning makes in peoples lives. Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2013, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation is proud to support initiatives that help others improve their lives through literacy and education. Since its inception in 1993, the foundation has awarded more than $84.9 million in grants to nonprot organizations, helping more than 4.8 million individuals take their rst steps toward literacy or continued education. For more information on the Dollar General Literacy Foundation and a complete list of grant recipients, visit www. dgliteracy.org. OurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks! (Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas, St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS SOUTHERNSUNDAY RANDYSTARK KONKRETESOUL RANDYSTARK S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA ONTHEPOOPDECK UPCOMINGEVENTS -INTHECROWSNESTKARAOKE WEHAVEMOVEDTO: 327REIDAVE (CORNEROF4THSt&REIDAVE.) 850-227-3472 HOURS MONDAYTOWEDNESDAY8AMTO6PM THURSDAYTOSATURDAY8AMTO8PM SUNDAY11AMTO6PM *BOARDCERTIFIEDCIVILTRIALLAWYER OFCOUNSEL School NewsField trips are an important part of the learning process. The K5 class is studying community helpers. To enhance their study, they took a tour of Rafeld Fisheries. Thank you, Mr. Eugene Rafeld, for opening your business to the K5 class of Faith Christian School. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR PPSJ EELEMENTARY RECEIVEsS DONATIONsS PECIAL TO THE sS TARThanks to the Costa family, owners of our local McDonalds restaurant, our kindergarten classrooms were equipped with Apple at-screen TVs. It is the generosity of the Costa family and their willingness to develop a community partnership with Port St. Joe Elementary School that has made this possible. We look forward to continuing this relationship to benet our students. DADAZZLINLING DOLPHINDOLPHINS SPECIAL TO TT HE STARThis weeks Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Callee Wray, Avery Turner, Hannah Riley and Dustin Raker. Back row: Dawson Fisher, Laura Beth Hill, Hailey Harriman, Jahiem Ash and Donovan Miniat. GCSC to host tech center open house Education Foundation of Gulf County receives $2,000 grant The Lions Tale

PAGE 12

FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org 4514217BruceHodge, Pastor 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net Thursday, September 26, 2013Islam and the Middle East explored at Lifetree Caf Special to The StarCommonly-held misconceptions about Islam and the Middle East will be debunked at 7 p.m. CT Monday, Sept. 30 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled On the Brink: Islam and the Middle East, features a film of Carl Medearis, an international expert in the field of Arab-American and Muslim-Christian relations. Medearis will address misconceptions about Islam and Middle East. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U. S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. The old youWho you were before you got saved, was nailed to the cross one day. Jesus paid the price for our sins, long before we came this way. If the old you is dead, why does it keep on kicking? Because Satan is a sore loser, and he hates to take a licking. The old you reacts to sin, almost like a re ex act. The old you does and says things, that we just cant take back. Just like a dead body will quiver, hair and nails show action of life. Even though sin rears its ugly head, with all its trouble and strife. Theres no way to put life in a dead body, no matter how many actions of life its giving. If youre cruci ed with Christ, theres no way the old you can go on living. Billy Johnson Special to The StarZion Fair hosts Unity Day celebrationThe Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church Family cordially invites the community to attend and participate in their rst Unity Day Celebration. Our goal is to come together as a diversi ed group to build a stronger community through fellowship with gulf county citizens, religious groups, government agencies/elected of cials, and business leaders. The Unity Day event will be held at 12 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 28. The church is located on 280 Avenue C, Port St. Joe. Point of Contact: Sister Margaret Hall, First Lady (850) 425-2862; Deaconess Amy Rogers, (850) 229-8515; Sister Tammy Welch, (850) 896-4505.FUMC Mens Club BBQ Chicken SupperThe First United Methodist Mens Club will host a BBQ Chicken Supper on Friday, Oct. 4 from 4 p.m. 6 p.m. ET. Half chicken, beans, slaw, bread and tea will be served for $8 a plate. Carry-out or eat-in. The First United Methodist Womens Bake Sale will be happening simultaneously.St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club Spaghetti DinnerCannolis, Tiramisu, Ameretti, Cioccolato and Pizzelles are Italian desserts that will be served at the St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club annual Spaghetti Dinner 5-7 p.m. ET on Saturday, Oct. 5. This wonderful annual event will take place in the church hall, just east of the church on 20th. Street in Port St. Joe. In addition to the great spaghetti, Italian beer and wine and the desserts, entertainment and door prizes are included. Tickets are limited to the rst 200 buyers, so get yours soon at the Church Hall (227-1417), Hannon Insurance, No Name Caf, or call President Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Faith EVENTSStar Staff ReportSandra Bailey Lowery, a Port St. Joe artist, will present and autograph copies of her poetry collection Touching All Walks of Life from 3-5 p.m. ET on Thursday, Sept. 26 at the Gulf County Public Library in Port St. Joe. The library is located at 110 Library Drive. Lowery is the wife of the deceased Kloskia Lowery and a mother and grandmother who has overcome many challenges in life. Her faith and belief led her to touch others lives through her poetry. She is a 1979 graduate of Port St. Joe High School. She is presently a member of 2nd Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church of Springfield, Rev. Rawlis Leslie, pastor. She is a former member of New Bethel AME Church, Port St. Joe, Florida.Local Artist to sign books at library SANDRA B. LOWERY

PAGE 13

The Star| B5Thursday, September 26, 2013 Sometimeswehavetobeasstrongas aliontotakeonthechallengesofLife... Andsometimeswehavetobe meekasalambtounderstand. Weareheretohelpwiththosechallenges. HollyHillFuneralHome 2775GarrisonAvenue PortSt.Joe,Florida32456 (850)229-1929 Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL Paula Jeanette Presnell was born on Dec. 4, 1968, in Port St. Joe, Fla., and passed away Sept. 16, 2013, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. She was a life-long resident of Port St. Joe and a graduate of Port St. Joe High School. Paula was a diehard, bled orange and blue Gator fan, and she enjoyed spending time with her grandbabies more than anything. Granny will be missed very much by both Kiley and Khloie. Paula was preceded in death by her father, Paul Presnell. She is survived by her daughter, Kortney Presnell, and her daughter, Khloie; her son, Ryan Paul Presnell, and his daughter, Kiley; all of Gulf County. She is also survived by her sisters Beth Presnell and Amy Chavous, as well as ve nieces and one nephew. A memorial service will be held 4 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, at Oak Grove Church. The family asks that anyone who wants to share any pictures of Paula, please bring them to the service. Paula Jeanette PresnellFuneral services for Mr. Theodore Daniels will be held Saturday, Sept. 28, at 11 a.m. ET at New Bethel AME Church at Highway 98 and Ave. C in Port St. Joe. Viewing for family and friends will be held from 10-11 a.m. ET.Theodore DanielsShe is more precious than rubies: and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. Length of days [is} in her right hand; [and} in her left hand riches and honour. Proverbs 3: 15-16 KJV A Life Well-Lived Gillian Lee McNair, known to her family and friends as Gillie, was born in Iron City, Ga., on Aug. 19, 1919, to parents Louanna Perry and Hosea Doston. She was an only child. Her mother died when she was 2 months old. She was raised in part by John and Minnie Lee Kirk and later by Cora and Ed Lawrence. She grew up in Port St. Joe, Fla., where she was educated in the St. Joe School system and was a very good student. She later studied clothing construction under the tutelage of the late Mrs. Susie Cooper and received her Certicate of Completion in 1968. She met and later married Damon McNair, Sr., on Feb. 7, 1937. To that union 11 children were born. It lasted 56 years before Damons death in 1992. She was a devoted wife, mother and homemaker. Miss Gillie, as she was affectionately called by many, accepted Christ at an early age and united with New Bethel A.M.E. Church, where she was a long-time, active member. She loved gospel music and singing for the Lord; often times singing herself happy. She served for many years as President of the Minnie K. Weston Womens Missionary Society & New Bethel A.M.E. Senior Choir, a Stewardess and Class leader. However, her devoted service extended beyond the walls of New Bethel A.M.E as she was very active in city-wide events and community activities. Her repertoire included: Worship Director of West Florida African Methodist Episcopal Conference Branch Missionary SocietyMember of lona Davis Area Missionary Society (Davis, Wood, Roulhac Area), Treasurer of Eastern Star, Sheba No. 13A, President & Vice-President of City Wide Choir, Vice-President of Jolly Seniors, Member of City Wide Mission Society, President of Port St. Joe Chapter-American Cancer Society, Member of Concerned Christian Society & Golden Angels, an advocate and charitable supporter of The American Red Cross, Feed The Children, St. Josephs Indian School, and Disabled American Veterans. Miss Gillie was preceded in death by her husband, Damon McNair, Sr., two sons, Marshall (Mike) and Albert McNair, and grandson Joseph Patrick Quinn. She leaves to cherish her memory, three sons, Dr. Clarence McNair (Janice) of Tampa, Fla., Damon McNair, Jr. (Big Boy) of Port St. Joe, Fla., Charles McNair (Sandra) of Tallahassee, Fla.; six daughters, Carol Hill and Paulette Beachum of Port St. Joe, FL, Gwendolyn Parker of Panama City, Lorene (Red) Tunstalle (Raymond) of Los Angeles, Ca., Patricia Walker (Willie Joe) of Apalachicola, Fla., and Cora Curtis (Tommy) of Orlando, Fla.; special brothersand sisters-in-law Willie James and Marian McNair (Bill and Beck) of Port St. Joe, Fla., Mercedes Dickson of Washington, D.C., Mildred Dickson of Virginia, Ruth McNair of Tampa, Fla., and Bessie McNair of Los Angeles, Ca.; and, our seventh sister Helen Hamilton; 28 grandchildren, 35 greatgrandchildren, 14 greatgreat-grandchildren; a host of nieces, nephews, many cousins, other relatives and friends. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Gillian Lee McNairTracy Marsha Barr was born on Nov. 10, 1980, in Panama City, Fla., to Charles H. Barr and Jacqueline Marsha Julius Barr. She attended public school in Port St. Joe and Huntsville, Ala., where she graduated. She earned a bachelors degree with honors from Alabama A&M University. She was preceded in death by her parents, Charles H. Barr and Jacqueline Marsha Julius Barr; grandparents, Eddie and Tinnie Julius and Clara Barr; a cousin Calvin Bug Julius, Jr.; an uncle, Rudolph W. Julius; an aunt, Doris Gibson; and a stepbrother, Antron Lewis. Tracy leaves to cherish her memories a son, Dylan M. Burwell of Huntsville AL; a brother, Andre Thomas of Panama City; a grandmother, Annette Julius Fagan of Apalachicola; stepmother, Gale Addison of Havana, Fla.; a host of aunts, uncles, cousins and a best friend, Latia Crutcher, Huntsville, Ala. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. ET Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, at Thompson Temple First Born Church in Port St. Joe. Interment followed in Forest Hill Cemetery. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Tracy Marsha BarrCPO Marion A. Cherry passed away on Aug. 30 at the nursing home in Port St. Joe. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte Walker Cherry; son, Matt Cherry of Panama City; daughter, Michelle Cherry, who lives in Pennsylvania; and two sisters and a brother, who live in Louisiana. The Cherry family asks that in lieu of owers, donations be made to the Saint Joseph Bay Humane Society.Marion A. CherryGlenda D. Carr, 72 of Port St. Joe passed away Friday, Sept. 20, 2013, in Panama City. Mrs. Carr was born Dec. 28, 1940, to the late William C. and Mildred Wilson in Thomaston, Ga. She was a member of Oak Grove Assembly of God for over 50 years. She enjoyed sewing and ceramics. Mrs. Carr is preceded in death by a son, Terry Carr; a granddaughter, Laney Haynes; and a brother, William C. Wilson. Mrs. Carr is survived by her beloved husband of 44 years, Richard Carr; two sons, Fred R. Carr (Alyson) of Fletcher, N.C., Robert N. Carr (Arron) of Panama City, Fla.; a daughter, Becky Carr-Land (Dallas) of Port St. Joe, Fla.; nine grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Graveside funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013 in Holly Hill Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. comGlenda D. CarrRaye Nell Benton, 83, of Mexico Beach, Fla., passed away on Sept. 12, 2013, at DCH Regional Medical Center, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Mrs. Benton was born April 6, 1930, in Union Springs, Ala. She was the daughter of the late Walter Rufus Wilkins and Trudie Cope Wilkins of Union Springs. She lived much of her life in Tifton and Toccoa, Ga., and Dadeville, Ala., before retiring in Mexico Beach, Fla., in 1992. She had been visiting in the Tuscaloosa area at the time of her death. Her husband, the late Owen Franklin Benton, preceded her in death in 2010 and her sister, Wilda Sudduth, preceded her in death in 2003. Mrs. Benton is survived by two sons, Walter (Donna) Benton of Devereaux, Ga. and Mickey (Rhonda) Benton of Northport, Ala.; two daughters, Sandra Fowler of Toccoa, Ga., and Susan (John) McClellan of Rome, Ga.; one brother, Walter Wilkins of Lineville, Al;. 15 grandchildren, Lori (Adam) Bacot of Greenwood, S.C.; Rob Benton of Thomasville, Ga.; Andrew Benton of Devereaux, Ga.; Allison Hiland, Amy Fowler, Daniel Fowler, and David Fowler, all of Toccoa, Ga.; Kevin McClellan of Sharpsburg, Georgia; Karen McClellan of Athens, Ga.; Kyle (Stefaniane) McClellan of Rome, Georgia; Brittany (Michael) McCants of Chelsea, Ala.; and Austin Benton, Cole Benton, Dawson Benton, and Eli Benton, all of Northport, Ala.; six greatgrandchildren, Mason Bacot and Alex Bacot, both of Greenwood, S.C.; Layton McCants of Chelsea, Ala.; Emilee Deal and Heath Hiland, both of Toccoa, Ga.; and Brooklyn McClellan of Rome, Ga. Graveside services were conducted on September 15, 2013 in Oak Hill Cemetery in Union Springs, Alabama. Gray Funeral Home of Union Springs had charge of arrangements. Raye Nell Benton RaA YE NEllLL BEntNTOnN Obituaries

PAGE 14

LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 4514308Guitar,Amp,SoundSystem &InstrumentRepairSt.JoeMusicCo&RSRRecordingStudio210WilliamsAve,PortSt.Joe(850)227.7224 sales@stjoemusic.com 2088543Admission=FREEParking=FREE. CoinDealersfromalloverthesoutheastwillbe setup.Buy-Sell-Trade,Coins,PaperMoney, Tokens,Medals.Numismaticliteratureavailable whilesupplieslast.DontMissTheFun! Foradditionalinfo: Dave(850)936-4892orBill(850)865-0529.CoinShowsponsoredby Ft.WaltonBeach CoinClub.Saturday,September29, 10am-5pmand Sunday,September30, 10am-4pm.IntheAtriumofWestwoodRetirementResort, 1001MarWaltDrive, FWB,FL(acrossfromFWBMedicalCenter). FREECointoallAttendeessigningin @WelcomeTable. 2097161 Saturday,September28, 10am5pmand Sunday,September29, 10am4pm. Dave(850)932-0933or(850)512-4904 SPECIAL TO TT HE STARLisa Gaines from Richmond Hill, Ga., was named the winner in the Sunrise and Sunset category. PHOTO from page B1FIsSHING & BOATING 1. William Campbell of Mexico Beach 2. Everett Roll of Panama City Beach 3. Nancy WalkerPPEOPLE1. Nancy Walker 2. DragonFly Photography of Stone Mountain, Ga. 3. Lisa Gaines of Richmond Hill, Ga.FLORA & AANIMAL LLIfFE 1. Bill Fauth 2. DragonFly Photography 3. Charlene Miles of Chatsworth, Ga. diagnosed. She was very close to her grandparents called them G & P for Granny and Pop. They have some health issues, so she wanted to be able to help them. Cricket Russell was always able to make the best of a bad situation, and her battle with stage 4 breast cancer was no different, according to her family. That family includes a brother, Blake Gill, and two sisters, Jill and Megan Russell. During her battle with cancer, Cricket touched many lives, including many staff members at both SHHG and SHHEC. Her family, friends and staff knew her to be strong and courageous during her treatment program, which included chemotherapy and radiation. She was trying to be strong for everybody else; she was actually our rock; she was the glue that held it all together, MaryAnn said. Her strength was amazing. She never complained, and I told her that God chose her because she was strong. MaryAnn and Joe Russell expressed gratitude for Sacred Hearts support of their daughter through her short journey with cancer. She put her full faith in God and Dr. Mose Hayes and the nurses and other caregivers at Sacred Heart on the Emerald Coast and Sacred Heart on the Gulf, MaryAnn said. They stood by and fought with us even before there was any insurance. Dr. Hayes accepted her even before her insurance was in the works. He is nothing short of a saint. She was in the ICU at Sacred Heart in Destin on her birthday on Nov. 24, 2012, and the staff threw her a huge birthday bash. There were 20 or 30 people; she had a cake and balloons. On the afternoon of her birthday, Cricket was transferred to Panama City for radiation treatment. She went to Heaven that following Tuesday at 5:36 a.m., MaryAnn said. She touched so many. We are very honored that Anna Hicks brainstormed and created The Cricket Fund. I love that people in this community cared enough to honor her in that way, and to know that its going to help someone else. It is an amazing fund that will help so many in the future, and thats all she ever wanted to do. Cricket didnt know that she was going to leave this legacy. For more information about The Cricket Fund, call Hicks at 229-5680 or nurse Shelly Cannon at 229-5680. CRIcCKEtT from page B1 B6| The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 92436S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2011-CA -000278 RBC BANK (USA) F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BELSER, CHAUNCEY, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA000278 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO RBC BANK (USA) RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, BELSER, CHAUNCEY, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 AM ET, on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property: LOT 2, BEACON BY THE SEA, PHASE III, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 5th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK ROAD FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 File No. 20851.0624/ RBerkam IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at PO BOX 826, MARIANNA, FL 32448, 850-718-0026, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Sept 19, 26, 2013 92442S JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2008-CA -000135 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE ALT 2006AR5 Plaintiff, SHARON TRACEY WELLS; ROBERT E. BERRY; KATHERYN D. BERRY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 3, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA-000135 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida. HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR DEUTSCHE ALT 2006-AR5 is Plaintiff and SHARON TRACEY WELLS; ROBERT E. BERRY; KATHERYN D. BERRY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at IN THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN BOULEVARD, PORT ST. JOE IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA 32456, at 11:00 A.M. ET, on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: START AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN WEST 660 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH TO WHAT IS KNOWN AS NILES ROAD OR MADISON STREET, CONTINUE, OF OAK GROVE SUBDIVISION THE CENTER LINE OF SAME AS NOW RUNS; THENCE SOUTH 30 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THENCE WEST 90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 131 FEET; THENCE EAST 90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 131 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk This Notice is Provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least (7) seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954)382-3486 Fax: (954)382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 10-02205 OWB Sept 19, 26, 2013 92472S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO:2013CA0036 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHELLY L. PERSAUD; FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB; SUNIL T. PERSAUD; UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 27th day of August, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2013CA0036, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and SHELLY L. PERSAUD; FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB; SUNIL T. PERSAUD and UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM ET on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described Elderly CareWill do Elderly Care PSJ area call Karen 850-229-8992 Text FL65749 to 56654

PAGE 15

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 26, 2013 The Star | B7 JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following volunteer position:Planning and Development Review Board MemberPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications can be found on our website cityofportstjoe. com. PDRB Members are appointed by the City Commission and meet on the second Tuesday of each month at 4:00 P.M. EST. The PDRB utilizes the Land Development Regulations and City Ordinances to review complex development requests. PDRB members must live within the City limits and/or own a business within the City limits. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 229-8261. The Position will close on September 27, 2013, at 3:00 P.M. EST. This is a non paid position. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace.4514301 1114756 Experienced Cable Installers & SupervisorInnovation. Technology. CommunicationsNOW HIRINGFt. Walton Beach, FLRequirements: Must have truck, van, or SUV, ladders, meter, necessary tools, and safety equipment required for cable installation (triple play).Triage Partners is a national technology based services company servicing telecommunications and cable industries. We are expanding into the Ft. Walton Beach area. Interested candidates please contact: Kim Kerbs at 813-868-1282 or send resume to: kkerbs@triage-partners.com 1113125 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:ShipfitterS pipefitterS pipe WeLDerS X-ray WeLDerS OutSiDe MachiniStS inDuStriaL Marine eLectricianSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center RepresentativePanama City, FLHalifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: 2 years previous sales experience, preferably in a Call Center environment Ability and desire to sell Strong communication skills Prociency with all Microso applications Detail oriented team player with a passion for helping customers Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/AD&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. In addition, we oer: Performance/ Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Sta to help you succeed Positive, Professional and Upbeat work environment We Promote from within! Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1113131 Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a:Graphic ArtistCandidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265881 Text FL65881 to 56654 SalesSales RepsThe Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of Americas top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriateall administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at the West corner of Lot 6, Block 17, YONS ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 45, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence North 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along the Northeast right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 98 for 580.00 feet; thence South 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West a distance of 100.00 feet to the Southwesterly right-ofway line of U.S. Highway 98; thence North 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along the Southwesterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 98 for 111.94 feet to the iron rod and cap marking the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right-of-way line, North 45 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West, 16.02 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way line, South 44 degrees 59 minutes 41 seconds West, 249 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeasterly along said mean high water line to a paint on a line that bears South 45 degrees 02 minutes 28 seconds West of the Point of Beginning; thence leaving said mean high water line, North 45 degrees 02 minutes 28 seconds East, 249 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 10th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 File No. 11-11813 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m Sept 19, 26, 2013 92488S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-45-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN GRINSLADE and ANGELIA M. GRINSLADE, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 17, 2013 at 11:00 am Eastern Time in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 1, Block A, Unit Number 1 of Red Bull Island, Gulf County, Florida, further described as follows: Commence at the Southeast Corner of U.S. Government Lot No. 2 of Fractional Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run North 145.4 feet along the Lot line; thence run N85W 137.0 feet along the South right of way line of Red Bull Island Drive; thence run S25E 225.4 feet, thence run N40E 60.0 feet along the Northwest Bank of the Chipola River to the Point of Beginning. This Notice dated this 11th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk, of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept 19, 26, 2013 95365S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-000248-CA Civil Division HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi Bank, Plaintiff, vs. FORGOTTEN COAST PROPERTY, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company, ROBERTB. LINDSEY, an individual, and JOSEPH D. ADAMS, an individual, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated on or about August 20, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012 CA000248 in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Hancock Bank is Plaintiff, and Forgotten Coast Property, LLC, Robert B. Lindsey and Joseph D. Adams, are the Defendants. The Gulf County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL32456, at 11:00 a.m. ESTin accordance with 45.031, Florida Statutes, on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, in Gulf County, Florida, commonly known as 104 Sunray Court (a/k/a 110 Sunray Court), Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, and described more particularly as: LOT16 Commence at the concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 3, of the Block Northeasterly of Palm Street, as shown on the plat of BEACON HILL, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 41-A of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida thence along the Northeasterly right-of-way line of said Palm Street South 45 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds East, 112.62 feet, thence North 47 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East 93.80 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue North 47 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East, 96.00 feet, thence South 44 degrees 46 minutes 12 seconds East 124.10 feet, thence South 45 degrees 13 minutes 48 seconds West, 95.93 feet, thence North 44 degrees 46 minutes 12 seconds West, 127.73 feet, to the Point Of Beginning. Said lands being a portion of Lots 1 and 2 of the Block Northeasterly of Palm Street and the 25 foot vacated alley between said lots of said plat of BEACON HILLand a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West Gulf County, Florida and containing 0.277 acre, more or less. Said lands being subject to an Ingress and Egress Easement over the Northwesterly 12.50 feet of the above described lands and also subject to a 5.00 foot wide Utility Easement over the Southeasterly 5.00 feet of the Northwesterly 17.50 feet of the above described lands. Real Property Tax Identification Number 03761-085R. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the date of sale. If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florid4 32402, or by phone at 850-747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or other court activity, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.fl courts.org REBECCAL. NORRIS Clerk of Court Gulf County, Florida By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk Published: Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95405S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2013-CA-000026 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 724 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: UNIT C: A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR 1265.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID SECTION LINE FOR 1010.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 434.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 1124.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 520.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 619.66 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 127.44 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 75.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 551.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 560.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 283.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1292.44 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 168.85 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 22.43 FEET ALONG THE CHORD OF A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 6442.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 59 SECONDS; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST, 168.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, 22.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 24th day of June, 2013. Rebecca L.Norris Clerk of the Court By: B.A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F13000564 Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95391S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice to Receive Sealed Bids The City of Wewahitchka in Gulf County Florida will accept seal bids from asphalt companies that are approved by the State of Florida to remove asbestos material from a building. Bids must be sealed and marked Asbestos Removal. A scope of services can be picked up at the City Annex located 318 South 7th St. All bids must be turned in to the City Clerk before 12 noon CT October 7, 2013 at 318 South 7th St. All bids will be opened on October 7, 2013 at 1pm CT at the old City Hall located at 109 South 2nd St. The City of Wewahitchka is an Equal Opportunity Employer/ Handicapped Accessible/ Fair Housing Jurisdiction. The City of Wewahitchka reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Connie Parrish City Clerk Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95425S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-45-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN GRINSLADE and ANGELA M. GRINSLADE, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 17, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 1, Block A, Unit Number 1 of Red Bull Island, Gulf County, Florida, further described as follows: Commence at the Southeast Corner of U.S. Government Lot No. 2 of Fractional Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run North 145.4 feet along the Lot line; thence run N85W 137.0 feet along the South right of way line of Red Bull Island Drive; thence run S25E 225.4 feet, thence run N40E 60.0 feet along the Northwest Bank of the Chipola River to the Point of Beginning This Notice dated this 11th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk, of Circuit Court By: B.A. Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95497S PUBLIC HEARING The Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) Committee will hold a meeting on Friday, September 27, 2013, in the Commission Chambers of City Hall at 12 Noon for the purpose of discussing the Benny Roberts Park Grant Request. All persons are invited

PAGE 16

B8| The Star Thursday, September 26, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4510161 1113601 4514220 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND, UTILITIES INCLUDED ............... $1200 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 3 BR / 2 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ................................................... $700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT/ 2 LOTS ................................. $650 HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGECOMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 4514221OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE FOR LEASE @ 151-A Commerce Park 12x12 ofce/bath/ with 800 sq. ft. warehouse space... make this your new business location...$575.00 per month/ 1 year lease call Gina @ 229-8014 today... Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experiencedSales ManagerWho will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. Communicates and advocates the companys vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solutions ROI for the client. Requirements: Bachelors degree or comparable experience. Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. Successful record of team building and leadership. Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 SalesSales RepsThe Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriateall administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266378 Text FL66378 to 56654 to attend this meeting. The Board of City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe will not provide verbatim recordings of this meeting. September 26, 2013 95499S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 15th day of October, 2013, at 6:00 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA RELATING TO CEMETERIES, PROVIDING FOR CERTIFICATE OF INTERMENT, PROVIDING FOR FEES, PROVIDING FOR STANDARDS FOR INTERMENT WITHIN CITY OWNED CEMETERIES, PROVIDING FOR MAINTENANCE AND LANDSCAPING REQUIREMENTS, PROVIDING FOR RESTRICTIVE COVENANTS IN CEMETERY DEEDS, PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY TO ESTABLISH RULES, PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES, PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerks Office at (850) 229-8261, Est. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: S/ MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: /s/ Charlotte M. Pierce Clerk September 26, 2013 95527S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-29 CA PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendant. RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2013, and entered in Civil Action No. 13-29-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and the Defendant, GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 11:00 oclock a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 10th day of October, 2013, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Lot 3, of Port St. Joe, Commerce Park Phase II, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, at Page(s) 54 and 55 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 19th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 Downtown Apalach 31 Avenue E, corner of Hwy 98 and Market St. Saturday Only 8am -???Yard SaleEverything!!! Text FL66681 to 56654 GUN SHOWSept. 28th and 29th Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL66361 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLOctober 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407Text FL63024 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH!Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeCarpet/Vinyl InstallersMust be qualified. Call 850-670-4211 and ask for the Manager. Web Id 34265176 Text FL65176 to 56654 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City, Callaway, Parker, Springfield. Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.comOR Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34266642 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESFull Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed for TYNDALL AFB Base Access a plus but not necessary Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.comOR Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34266644 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Mexico Beach 2 Story duplex, bottom unit avail. 1/2 block off beach. Comp furn, 2br/1ba, $900/mo., util incl. 1st & last, yrly lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652. 2 Br 1.5 Ba. Screened in porch and yard. W/D included. Jacuzzi Bath. $650 per month. 1 year lease. $500 deposit & refrncs. 404-710-4078 Text FL65926 to 56654 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Wewahitchka2br/2ba 156 Patrick St. Single Family, 1,112 sq ft. Fixer upper. Lease or Sale, $100 Down $240 month (877) 500-9517 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 4514326OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514327OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014

PAGE 17

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 1 2013 SP75887FRANKLIN, GULF & MEXICO BEACH

PAGE 18

Page 2 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 22 6, 22013 2013 Top3WinnersInEachCategory Category FirstPlace SecondPlace ThirdPlace Accountant RalphRoberson KimBentley FriedmanFinancial AirConditioning/Heating MillerHeating&Air PruettAirConditioning PhilcoAC&Heating Antiques/Furniture TheTinShed JosephsCottage Tifns Art/Decorating JosephsCottage PortsideTrading ThePeculiarPelican Asian GreatWall GoldenDragon HongKongBistro Attorney GordonShuler JeremyNovak KristyBanks AutoServices BJsAuto 5StarCollision CNSAutoRepair Bank/CreditUnion CentennialBank EmeraldCoastFederalCreditUnionTyndallFederalCreditUnion Bar EddyTeachsRawBar OwlCafeTapRoom HarryAs Barbecue PaulGants AJs HogWild BeachSupplies DollarGeneral BluewaterOutriggers IslandAdventures BestPlacetoShop GradyMarket BluewaterOutriggers DollarGeneral BestPlacetoWork ResortVacationProperties FranklinCountySheriffsOfceBaysideBurgers BoatRepair IndianPassMarine MarshallsMarine Marquardts Books NoName ApalachicolaBookstore DowntownBooks Breakfast TheOwlCafe SharonsCafe ElJalisco Builder/Contractor BigFish CombsConstruction PoloronisConstruction CarSales WaterfrontAuto TheTruckLink NiceCarSales CarpetCleaner XtremeClean StanleySteamer DirtBusters Catering Provisions PaulGant AJsNeighborhoodBar&Grill CharterCaptain DannyTankersley/LadyJChartersJordonTodd ClintTaylor Chiropractor Dr.ZoesBackandNeckCare GulfCountyChiropractic DavidOakley ChurchRelated ApalachicolaTourofHomes UnitedMethodistChurch EastpointChurchofGod Clothing/ThriftShop BluewaterOutriggers Goodwill GradyMarket DaySpa/Massage SpaPur TheCutSalon DavidOakley Deli/Sandwich MasonDixon BaysideBurgers TheOwlCafe Dentist FrankD.May JamesPadgett DavidLister Dermatology GulfCoastDermatology SpaPur ArmondCognetta Electrician CurrentSolutions KennyStrange MikeCatesElectric Electronics ACE RadioShack Festival/Event FloridaSeafoodFestival StGeorgeIslandChiliCookoffScallopFestival FineDining TheOwlCafe SunsetCoastalGrill Tamaras FishingGuide DannyTankersley JordonTodd BrettMartina FishingTournament KidsWin BigBendSaltwaterClassic KidsTournamentEastpoint Flooring CarpetCountry SellersTile&Flooring KellyContracting Florist BaysideFlorist DesignsbyDorann FlowersByDeidra FoodTruck MasonDixon Dougs GourmetbytheBay(cont.onpage4)

PAGE 19

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 3 PortSt.JoeWewahitchkaEastpoint 502WoodwardAve101EastRiverRoad248USHighway98 (850)227.1156(850)639.5024(850)670.1199Thankyouforvotingusinthe "BestoftheForgottenCoast" forBank/CreditUnion Toll-Free:1.877.874.0007lEmail:emeraldcoast@fairpoint.net www.emeraldcoastfcu.com

PAGE 20

Page 4 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 26, 2013 2013 Top3WinnersInEachCategory Category FirstPlace SecondPlace ThirdPlace FriedChicken DurensPigglyWiggly AJsNeighborhoodBar&GrillBaysideBurgers General/FamilyMedicine ElizabethCurry GulfCo.HealthDept. ShorelineMedical Gifts/Jewelry/Souvenirs Riverlilly TwoGulls JosephsCottage GolfCourse St.JosephBay St.JamesBay Grocery DurensPigglyWiggly Publix ApalachicolaPigglyWiggly Hamburger BaysideBurgers BlueParrot AJsNeighborhoodBar&Grill Hardware/Supply ACE TaylorsBuildingSupply GandersHardware HealthClub/Karate ApalachicolaFitnessCenter OneWayFitness FitAsAFiddle HotDog BaysideBurgers Beachcombers TwoAls IceCream AuntEbbys OldTimeSodaFountain BlueBell Insurance HannonInsurance MarksInsurance TheButlerAgency Italian JoeMamas BJs Provisions Karaoke LookOutLounge Tapas Fathoms LocalBand/Musician TheCurrys BoSpringBand CR67 Lodging ResortVacationProperties CapeEscapeVacationRentalsPristineProperties Marina PortStJoeMarina ScipioCreek TheMoorings Mexican Peppers ElJalisco MostInuential MarciaJohnson BrendaLaPaz MarthaSanborn Outdoor/SportingGoods BluewaterOutriggers ACE FishermansChoice Oysters IndianPassRawBar BossOyster PapaJoes Pharmacy CVS BuyRite CarrabelleMedicalPharmacy Photographer KimStone JohnSpohrer DebbieHooper Pizza BJsPizza JoeMamas HungryHowies Plumbing WilliamsPlumbing MizePlumbing KingsPlumbing Pools St.JoePools Atlantis CoastalPools Realtor ZachChilds 98RealEstateGroup HelenSpohrer Salad TheOwlCafe Provisions MasonDixon Salon/Stylist/Make-Up SalonLux SpaPur TheCut Seafood PapaJoes TheOwlCafe KillerSeafood SeafoodMarket 13MileSeafood DougsSeafood LynnsSeafood SkinCare SpaPur MerleNorman AndreaDuval Steak/PrimeRib TheOwlCafe SunsetCoastalGrill RonnieBs WebsiteMarketing 2kWebGroup KeriganMarketing Bluewateri.net WeddingPlanner Panache/ClayKeels AmyPrice BaysideFlorist Wine/Liquor HoneyHole ThePortWineandSpirits HaughtyHeron Wings AJsNeighborhoodBar&Grill MangoMarleys JoeMamas

PAGE 21

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 5 ou demand If y ou demand If y insist on insist on PERFECTION PERFECTION AR5 ST AR5 ST COLLISION CENTRE COLLISION CENTRE COLLISION CENTRE 5Star CollisionCentre770Hwy98 PortSt.Joe,FL850-229-STARBesuretovisitourFacebookpage. 5StarCollisionCentre'saysankYoutothemanyreaderswhovotedusasoneoftheBestAutoServicesProvider ontheForgottenCoast!!

PAGE 22

Page 6 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 26 6, 2013 850-229-AUTO(2886)ThankyouforrecognizingusasoneoftheBestoftheForgottenCoastrecipients! 13MileBrandSeafoodThankyouforvotingusasoneofthe BestoftheForgottenCoastSeafoodMarkets! Visitusat13MileSeafoodMarket,ourwebsiteandon Facebookwhere"it'snotjustseafood,it'satradition!227WaterStreet,Apalachicola,Florida(850)653-1399http://www.13milebrand.com 2013 2013 FRANKLIN,GULF&MEXICOBEACH Congratulations toallofthewinnersandnominees

PAGE 23

Thursday, September 26, 2013 | Forgotten Coast | Page 7 4514312340MarinaDr.,PortSt.Joe,FL32456 (850)227-9393 / (850)227-9394(Fax) www.PSJMARINA.com THANKYOU forvotingforusinthe BestoftheForgottenCoast forMarina. ThestaffatMillerHeatingandAir Conditioningwouldliketoexpress ourappreciationforyourvotesin TheBestoftheForgottenCoast. Itmeanssomuchtous! ThankYouforvotingusasoneofthebestgolfcourses forthe2013editionofTheBestoftheForgottenCoast.GreatGolfawayfromthecrowdsIntheHeartoftheForgottenCoastSt.JosephsBay GolfClub700CountryClubRoadPortSt.Joe,FL32456 ProShop/Pool: (850)227-1751 SnackBar/Ofce (850)227-1757 info@stjoebaygolf.com www.stjoebaygolf.com Apalachicola:850-653-2161|Tallahassee:850-668-6162 Seeusforyourinsuranceneedsat 61Ave.E,Apalachicola,FL32320Thankyouforvotingus asoneoftheBestofthe ForgottenCoast InsuranceAgencies!

PAGE 24

Page 8 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 26, 2013