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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00779
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 21, 1951
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00779

Full Text









PORT ST. JOE
A Progressive
Community With a
Modern, Progressive
'Weekly Newspaper
*- '


THE


STAR


"Port St. Joe The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


THE STAR
Official Paper for Gulf
County, Devoted To the
Continued Development
of the Entire County
>


VOLUME XIV PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951 NUMBER 52
S T2


Sharks Open Grid State Leads In
uI, -J.


Season Tonight


Against Quincy


Many Regulars Are Missing
From Lineup; Only Six
Lettermen Back

The St. Joe Sharks open the 1951
football season tonight at Centen-
nial,Field under the lights with the
Quincy Tigers, the kickoff being
Asset for 8 o'clock.
Among the crack gridders miss-
ing from the Shark fold via the
graduation route are Philip Chat-
ham and Ray Lawrence, the '50 co-
) captains; Bill Quarles and George
Harper, ends; Earl McCormick and
Carlton Padgett, centers; Tom Mad-
dox and Ted Beard, guards; John
Rich and Loyd Tubb, tackles, and
Don Parker, halfback.
Six lettermen are available for
duty from last year's team. Only
Captain Bobby Gibson was a regu-
lar performer. The other numeral
players are Freddie McCall and
Roberb Walters, halfbacks; Benny
Hudson and Bo Bray, centers, and
Tim Elder, guard.
Several newcomers are making
determined bids to help the Sharks.
Ferrell Allen is showing excellent
form at tackle, although this is his
first season of football. Bill Gailli-
ard and Ronnie Chism lobm as the
Sflankien for the opener, but' Frank
Dennis is making them step for po-.
sition. Marion Parker has shown
much spirit at left guard, and Gene
Duren is making a strong bid for
Sthe right halfback position. Marion
Smith is one of the hardest running
backs on the squad and is ticketed
for duty at the fullback spot. Lin-
coln Hall, the fastest man on the
.squad, is fighting for the left half-
S"back spot.
Bo Bray, 230-pound tackle, is ex-
pected to display the form right-
i'ly belonging to a man of his
physical stature. Bob Gibson will
handle the passing, kicking and sig-
nal calling. He is the key man in
the Shark attack.
Phil Tomlinson, Sonny McLaw-
hen, Bob McKnight, Cleo Maddox,
Ed Creamer, Jim Marlow and Gene
Raffield are expected to aid the
Shark cause before the season is
over. Joe Adams will help greatly
once is eligibility has been estab-
lished.
Quincy has a powerful team and
still carries memories of the 1949
game heie when the Sharks held
them to a tie in a bitterly fought
clash. The locals enter- the fray a
decided, underdog, but are deter-
mined to give a good account of
themselves.
The starting lineups, as given us
by Coach Marion Craig, will be as
'follows:
Quincy Port St. Joe
Dorsey _--...... LE ...-..-.... Chism
Freemni -- LT ... .--...... Bray
Chesser ------.. LG ..----.... Parker
,Swing .. :--.. C ..------.... Hudson
Curry ---...--.. R ...---...--... Elder
McCall -....-----. RT --....---. ..... Allen
Presnell ---- RE .... -- Gailliard
Holley _--\ QB ..--..-. Gibson
,Bevis -..--.... LLH ....-- Hall
Barber ..- FB .--....-- Walters
Sheffield -- ..-- RH ......-...... McCall
A good crowd is anticipated for
this opening game, and everyone is
urged to turn out and lend their
support to the Sharks.
-------4------
Clerking At Postoffice
S. R.' Grice is now employed as a
substitute clerk at the postoffice.


Wooad


s Burning


Fires Take Toll of 4,818,259 Acres
With Greatest Loss In Those Areas
Lacking OrganiZed Protection

Forest fires took a toll of 4,818,-
259 acres of Florida timberland in
1950. This was the highest loss re-
ported by any state, arid 92% of
the loss, occurred on the more than
7,000,000 acres of state and private
timberland still without organized
protection from fire.
A total of 32,250 fires were re-
ported during the year. This was
an increase over the number re-
ported in 19.49, when 30,157 fires
burned 3,216,301 acres of Florida
timberland.
Incendiarism continues to be a
principal cause of fire in the state.
Willful woods burners started 6,904
forest fires on lands under organ-
ized protection last year. This was
2000 more than were reported the
previous year. Careless debris burn-
ers and smokers were the next
worst offenders.
Commenting on Florida's serious
forest fire losses in 1950. J. C. Mlc-
Clellan, chief forester for the Am-
erican Forest Products Industries,
'stressed the need for continued em-
phasis on woodland protection. He
pointed out that the rate of forest
fire loss on unprotected land was
21 times greater than on land un-
der organized protection.
"Man's most effective tool in pre-
venting forest fires is education,"
McClellan declared. "An alert pub-
lic, aware of its collective respon-
sibility for preventing fire -in the
woods, can keep America's forests
green, growing and productive."


In Traditional March
At Judson College

Miss Norma Jean Lewis of this
city was among the seniors of Jud-
son College, Marion, Ala., who led
the march on the traditional "Rose
Sunday" commemorating founding
of the college 114 years ago. The
seniors, in their academic caps and
gowns, which were brightened by a
rose, marched under a chain of ivy
held by the underclassmen as they
marched down Jewett' Walk to the
Siloam Baptist Church.
Judson's founder and first presi-
dent was Milo P. Jewett who later
was instrumental in the founding
of Vassar College at Poughkeepsie,
N. Y., of which he was president.
---------
WON'T RUN FOR GOVERNOR
State Senator LeRoy Collins of
Tallahassee has removed himself as
a possible candidate for governor of
Florida next spring. The'Leon at-
torney said he will support Dan Mc-
Carty, as he, did four years ago.
----+-----
Home On Leave
Aubrey L. 'Hardy, SA, arrived
Monday on a 14-day leave to be
spent with his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
H. A. Hardy. He is stationed at the
San Diego, Calif., navy base, and
upon returning west he will report
for orders.

Enters F. S. U.
Mr. and Mrs. Everett McFarland
accompanied their daughter, Miss
Mary Ann McFarland, to Tallahas-
see Sunday, where she entered
Florida State University as a fresh-
man. She was the winner of the
Lewis scholarship in teaching.
--4-
Here On Vacation
Mrs. Carl Robinson and son Ken-
neth, of Macon, Ga., are spending
a two weeks' vacation here with
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. F.
IDavis.


Outlook Good


For Improved


Mail Service


Four Times Daily Bus Service
To Link Tallahassee
and Pensacola

Improved mail service for Port
St. Joe and this entire section of
Northwest Florida was promised by
Congressman Bob Sikes last Satur-
day while he was attending a Shrine
meeting in Panama City.
He said that although the postof-
fie department budget was cut
this year, the department recog-
nized the need for modern postal
bus service between Pensacola and
Tallahassee, via Panama City and
Port St. Joe, and that department
officials recently made an inspec-
tion tour of this rapidly-growing
section of Florida.
According to Sikes, bus service,
twice daily, will be installed as soon
as possible, which will definitely
improve the mail service into Port
St. Joe.' which now has but two de-
liveries daily -this new service
would boost it to six.
These "rolling postoffices" would
leave each end of the proposed run
twice daily.
With our rapidly growing city,
this wpuld be almost a #ecessity,
and, -too, with city delivery to be
established soon, a big load will be
taken off the local postoffice which
at present is sadly lacking in 'box
facilities to handle the demand for
this type of service. Many of the
present lock-boxes are used by from
two to four families.

Postmaster Costin Sees
House Mail-Delivery

Appearing before the city com-
missioners Tuesday night, Acting
Postmaster Chauncey Costin said
that city delivery for Port St. Joe
was assured if the city would co-
operate in some matters, such as
improving several streets and per-
haps having a few sidewalks im-
proved.
Postmaster Costin was assured
by the city dads that full co-opera-
tion will be forthcoming from the
city and agreed to do anything that
is necessary to bring this improve-
ment to our city.

Chaplain To Speak At
Meeting of Men's Club

The Methodist Men's Club will
meet Tuesday night at 7:30 in the
church, at which time dinner will
Ibe served by the ladies of the
church.
Rev. Wills,.chaplainn at the Tyn-
dall Air Base, will be the speaker,"
and all men of the community are
invited to be present, partake of
the dinner and hear this forceful
and interesting speaker.

Return To Home In New Jersey
Major and Mrs. E. C. Wimberly
and family left Saturday to return
to their home in Fort MonmOuth,
N. J., after a very pleasant visit
here with Mr. and Mrs. George Wim-
berly and Mrs..Sally Costin..and
other relatives and friends.
-- .' ----
Visitors From South Florida
Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Clements of
Tampa and Mrs. Clara Tyler and
daughter of Lakeland ar the guests
this week of Mr. and Mrs. Nick'
Comforter. Mrs. Cleiments is Mrs.
Comforter's sister, Mrs. Taylor i.s
a niece.


National Kids' Day City Tax Rate Is

To Be Observed Here S A 1.
Set At 16.1 Mills


City's Youngsters Will Be Enter-
tained Tomorrow By Kiwanis
Club Committee

Formation of a special National
Kids' Day committee for the Port
St. Joe Kiwanis Club is announced
by Ben Dickens Jr., president of
the local service organization.
This committee, which will be in
charge of all activities for the cele-
bration here of Kids' Day on Satur-
day, September 22 (tomorrow), has
elected Gordon Hallmark as its
chairman. Other committee mem-
bers are John Blount, Paul Von
Player, S. R. "Mickey" Stone and
Vic Anderson.
ChAirman Hallmark stated that
all funds collected in a fund-raising
drive to be conducted in connection
with Kids' Day observation would
be used to help the underprivileged
children of the community.
Plans for the Kids' Day celebra-
tion, in addition to the fund-raising
campaign, include crowning of the
king and queen, prizes for the tack-
iest-dressed boy and girl, bike rac-
ing, roller skafe racing and games
of every kind. In addition to prizes
awarded each winner will receive
two free passes to the Port Theater
through the courtesy of Manager
Player.
All kids of Port St. Joe and ad-
jacent communities are invited to
turn out tomorrow and participate
in the festivities.
---

Science Cub' Orgai;eLd
At St. Joe High School

A 10-B Science Club was organ-
ized at the high school last week
with Mr. Phillips, the biology in-
structor, as the head and the fol-
lowing officers: Elaine Green,pres-
ident; Virginia Swatts, vice-presi-
dent; Sally Lanier, secretary; Etta
Martin, treasurer, and June Wise,
reporter.
The club will set aside certain
days for viewing films on science
and for taking field trips for scien-
tific observation. All grades taking
biology or science will also have
science clubs made up of students
maintaining an A or B average from
the grade clubs participating.
-------------
DR. CANNING TO PREACH
Dr. Harold B. Canning of Wewa-
hitchka will preach at the Port St.
Joe Presbyterian Church at the 11
a. m. service. Everyone is cordially
invited to hear him.
-----------
Vacationing In Carolinas
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Howell left
Wednesday for a 10-day vacation to
be spent in the Carolinas. They will
go to Charlotte, N. C., thence to
Concord where they will visit rela-
tives for a couple. of days before
going on to Ashford and the Great
Smoky Mountains.
,,------------
Home From Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Ellis have re-
turned from a two. weeis' vacation
spent in Atlanta, Ga., Detroit, Mich.,
and Canada, visiting relatives and
friends.
----+-------
Takes Position In Georgia
Mrs. Elenor Blan has accepted a
position in the credit department of
the Montgomery-Ward store in Col-
umbus, Ga., and will reside in that
city in future.

Return From Baltimore
Mrs. J. B. Stafford and little
daughter Janet returned home Mon-
day from Baltimore, Md., where


By Commission


New. Lights Authorized For
Reid and Monument; Call
For Voter Re-registration

The proposed budget for the city
of Port St. Joe for the ensuing year,
as submitted to the city commission
by Ben Dickens, city auditor and
clerk, calls for $136,912.86, which is
to be raised by a millage of 16.1 on
an assessed property valuation of
$4,361.081.00
This is a reduction of .8 mill over
last year's tax rate, which was 16.9
mills. The tax rate has been drop-
ping steadily during the past few
years, the rate being 23 mills in
1948, 18 mills in 1949 and 16.9 mills
last year.
Comparing the present estimated
budget, which will be found else-
where in this issue of The Star,
we find that it is $8,347.63 greater
than that of last year, which came
to $128,565.23. The 1949 .cost of op-
erating the city was $131,800.
Greatest portion of this money,
$110,188, goes to the general fund,
with $26,724.86 being "set aside for
interest, bond refunding and con-
struction.
Among other matters passed on
by the city dads was authorization
of the Florida Power Corporation
to install new type overhanging
street lights on Monument and Reid
Avenues from First Street to Fifth
Street. These lights will be of 6000
lumens, as against the present rat-
ing of 1000 lumens. Due to the fact
that steel standards are not avail-
able at the present time, the lights
will be hung from brackets on the
power poles, but will be transferred
to special standards when they be-
come available.
The commission also ordered the
city attorney to draw up an ordin-
ance providing for re-registration of
the city's voters, there being such
a large number now on the lists
who have moved away or died. The
ordinance will allow the registra-
tion books to remain open until a
short time before the next city
election-almost 12 months-which
should allow plenty of time for all
qualified electors to get their names
on the books.
*-----C---
Revival To Open At
Oak Grove Church

H. H. Jones, new pastor of the
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church,
announces that a two-week revival
will be held beginning on Monday,
September 24. The evangelist will
be M. G. Barfield of Phenix City,
Alabama.
A cordial invitation to attend is
extended to everyone in this area.
-k-
------c-C-----
Resumes Studies At Judson
Mrs. Ethel Westbrook and Mrs.
W. M. Howell returned home last
Friday from a trip to Alabama.
They accompanied the former's
daughter, Miss Norma Jean Lewis,
to Marion, Ala., to resume her
studies at Judson College, where
she is a senior this year. They re-
turned by way of Mobile, where
they visited their brothers, C. T.
and T. B. Boswell.
-- S-------
Vacationing From Virginia
Mrs. Jimmy Spotts and children,
Rodney and Marie, arrived this
week from Norfolk, Va., to spend a
month's vacation with her parents,


they were called by the death of Mr. and Mrs. Carter Ward of White
Mrs. Stafford's brother. City, and other relatives and friends.









HTCFT


PAGF TWO


I Social Activities

Personals Clubs Churches

MYRTICE O. SMITH, Editor PHONE 51


Educational Seminar
Is HeldBy W. S. C. S.
The district educational seminar
of the Woman's Society of Chris-
tian Service of the Methodist Church
which met Thursday of last week
in Blountstown, was, according to
reports of those present from the
Port St. Joe society, well attended
and most inspirational.
The meeting was held for the pur-
pose of introducing to the local so-
cieties the mission and Bible studies
for the year 1951-52 and suggesting
ways of presenting them. Two of
these studies were presented by
conference officers, "The Book of
Acts" by Mrs. E. C. Rogers of Pen-
sacola, and "Mission To America"
by Mrs. William Sherrer, also of
Pensacola. The other studies, "The
Family A Christian's Concern"
and the Latin-American study, "We
Americans: North and South," were
presented by Mrs. George Grace of
Graceville and Mrs. W. T. Moore of
Chipley, respectively.
In regard to the presentations, the
Port St. Joe president, Mrs. Ralph
Swatts, stated: "I was thrilled!
Each presentation was so well done
that I felt an urge to hurry back to
St. Joe and get the studies started
here. And I was very proud to have
thirteen people from St. Joe an-
swering the roll call." One of these
members, Mrs. Warren Lindsey,
represented the Wesleyan Service
Guild.
Attending the seminar from this
city were Mesdames A. M. Jones, J.
C. Laney, Josh Miller, H. T. Brin-
son, Gus Creech, George Anchors,
R. W. Smith, T. H. Stone, Fennon
Talley, B. H. Dickens, Paul Blount,
Warren Lindsey and Ralph Swatts.

Gladiolus Circle Meets
With Mrs. P. L. Fleishel
The Gladiolus Circle of the Port
St. Joe Garden Club met Thursday
of last week in the home of Mrs.
Percy Fleishel, with Mrs. Charles
Brown as co-hostess. Twelve mem-
bers and one visitor were present,
and three new members were added
to the roll at this time.
It was announced by Mrs. George
Cooper, circle chairman, that the
district meeting would be held in
Milton October 24 at the First Bap-
tist Church, with registration at
9:30, a. m., and she urged that, as
many as possible attend.
Mrs. G. A. Patton presented an
interesting discussion on seed plant-
ing and also told the group the seed
that should be planted now.
Mrs. C. S. Carmack won the door
prize, a box of bulbs. First prize in
flower arrangement was won by
Mrs. I. C. Nedley, and second went
to Mrs. George Cooper.
After the meeting adjourned, the
group was ushered to a beautifully
appointed tea table where sherbet.,
punch and cake were served.
I '.. at I *st
JUNIOR WOMAN'S CLUB TO
INSTALL NEW OFFICERS
The Port St. Joe Junior Woman's
Club will hold, its first meeting of
the new club year next Tuesday,
September 25, at 8 p. in., with Mrs.
W. J. Strickland in her home at
1002 Garrison Avenue.
Installation of the new officers
will take place at this time, and all
members are urged to be present.

BAPTIST CIRCLE ONE MEETS
Baptist W. M. U. Circle I met
Monday afternoon with Mrs. A. V.
Bateman with six members present.
Mrs. J. J. Clements, chairman of
the circle, opened the meeting with
prayer and gave the devotional, af-
ter which a yearly report was given
by all committee chairmen. The
meeting was closed with prayer by
Mrs. Bateman, after which she
served sandwiches, cookies and
cokes to those present.


Baptist Circle 6 Meets
SWith Mrs. Dewey Davis
Circle VI of the Baptist W. M. U.
met Monday afternoon with Mrs.
Dewey Davis in her home on 7th
Street. Mrs. Davis, the program
chairman, opened by reading Rom.
8:18-30. She then asked each one
present to tell what pleasure and
benefit they had received from the
circle meetings and the W. M. U. as
a whole throughout the year. Mrs.
W. I. Cardin offered prayer for the
mission study to be held at the
church this week, after which a
thank-you card was read from Miss
Eunice DeSouza for the gift from
the circle.
This being the last circle meeting
for the church year, each expressed
their pleasure for having been to-
gether in Circle VI.
A lovely piece of pottery was pre-
sented to the chairman, Mrs. W. S.
Smith, for her services during the
year. She appropriately thanked the
members for the lovely surprise.
The meeting was closed with
prayer by Mrs. E. H. Vanlanding-
ham, after which the hostess served
tuna salad in tomato cups, potato
chips, ritz crackers, cookies and
iced drinks to Mrs. W. S. Smith,
Mrs. T. O. Poitevint, Mrs. W. I. Car-
:in, Mrs. Dave Smith and Mrs. E.
H. Vanlandingham, and one visitor,
Mrs. Robert Buchert.

RECENT BRIDE HONOREE
AT 'CALLING SHOWER'
Mrs. James Horton and Mrs. Er-
nest Lightfoot were hostesses Wed-
nesday afternoon from 4 to 6 when
they honored Mrs. Robert Creamer,
a recent bride, with a "calling
shower" at the home of Mrs. Hor-
ton in Oak Grove. An alphabet quiz
was enjoyed by all. After refresh-
ments were served, the honoree
opened her many lovely and useful
gifts.
Present were Mesdicmes Dennis
I Norris, Perry Elliott, W. W. Ensley,
SRichard Hanlon, Ralph Nixon, L.
W. Cox, Avril McKenzie, Anderson
Davis, Connie Gay, T. 0. Poitevint,
J. F. Pitts, Curtis Gwaltney and Leo
Kennedy.


CHURCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS
AND SUNDAY SERVICES

ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH
Oak Grove
H. H. Jones, Pastor
10:00 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:45 p. m.-Evening worship.
Thursday, 7:45 p. m. -Midweek
prayer service.
Saturday night-Young Peoples'
night.
*
ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
Fr. Robert O'Sullivan, Priest
Mass the first Sunday of each
month at 8 a. m. Other Sundays at
10:30 a. m.
at
METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. W. J. Lindsey, Pastor
Sunday, September 2
11:00 a. m.-Holy communion will
be observed.
7:00 p. m.-Young people, Sen-
iors, Intermediates and Juniors.
8:00 p. m.-Evening services.
Wednesday, 7:45 p. m.-Prayer
meeting. 8:15-Choir rehearsal.
r.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. L. J. Keels, Pastor
9:45 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning service.
6:45 p. m.-Training Union.
8:00 p. m.-Evening worship.
Prayer service Wednesday at 8
p. m.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
W. J. Lindsey,.Pastor
9:45 a. m.-Church school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
6: 3 p. m.-Youth Fellowship.
8:00 p. m.-Evening worship.
*V
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. S. J. Allen, Pastor
10:00 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning service.
Wednesday: Choir practice 7 p.
m.; Bible study and prayer 8 p. mn.
I rn V
SPECIAL W. M. U. MEETING
Mrs. E. C. Cason, president of the
Baptist W. M. U., urges all mem-
bers to be present at the church
next Monday for the royal service
program and business meeting, at
which time the names of members
will be drawn to form new circles
for the ensuing year's work. She
urges all to be present in order
that they may know to what circle
they have been assigned.


Quick Freeze May Speed

Flower Seed Germination


To grow difficult flower seeds does
not require any magic skill, but
chiefly patience, plus the knowledge
of what special environment these
seeds require. Seeds want to grow,
if you can provide a place where
they can do so.
SFor example, trollius, hardy phlox,
dictamnus, irises, peonies and some
lilies prefer to be frozen before they
start to grow, and may be sown in
a flat, or flower pot, and left out-
doors in a sheltered place over
winter.
. A substitute for this lengthy treat-
ment can be used by any owner of
an electric ice box. Take an ice
tray from 'the refrigerator and fill
It half full of water. Float a few
seeds on the water in each compart-
ment, and freeze it. Then fill the
trays completely with water and
freeze again. The seeds will then
be encased in ice and may be left
there several days, and planted
when thawed out.
' With other slow germinating sub-
jects taking 30 days to a year to
start, use the following method:
Fill a flat or the shallow pot which
florists call a pan, with potting soil,
firm the soil and broadcast the seed,
then covering lightly and firm again.
Place the receptacle in a shaded lo-
cation where there is free circula-
tion of, air. During spring, summer
and fall, water oftenenough to pre-
vent drying out.'A mulch of peat
moss will help retain moisture. In
winter place in a protected. place
outdoors and cover with leaves. A
place under the eaves of the house
on the side away from the prevail-
ing. wind is good; or a cold frame
may be used. Eventually the seeds
will sprout and the seedlings, will
appear. They should be transplant-
ed when they make true leaves to


SoMe Varieties of Perennial Flow-
ers Grow Better After They Are
Frozen.
large. flower pots, nursery rows or
permanent location.
Experienced gardeners seldom dis-
card ,a pan or flat in which slow
germinating subjects have been
sown until at least a year has been
given for the seedlings to appear.
When moss appears on the surface
of the soil in pots and pans, sprinkle
fresh earth over it.


HELLO, WORLD!
Mr. and Mrs. George Walter Pad-
gett of this city are the proud par-
ents of a son, Donald Eugene, born
Wednesday, September 12, at the
Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital.

VIRGINIA HAGOOD G. A.'s MEET
The Virginia Hagood Junior Girls'
Auxiliary of the Baptist Church met
Monday afternoon with their coun-
selor, Mrs. E. R. DuBose, in her
home on 8th Street with 21 mem-
bers present and one visitor, Glenda
Wilson. President Elaine Mussel-
white opened the meeting by having
all repeat the watchword and al-
legiance, after which the G. A.
hymn was sung, followed with
prayer by Barbara Ingram. Due to
the illness of Mrs. Homer Lovett,
the mission study planned for this
meeting was postponed. The prayer
chairman asked all to repeat the
23rd and 100th Psalms after which
Mrs. DuBose served cookies, sand-
wiches and iced drinks to the mem-
bers present and to Mrs. Morgan
Johns, counselor helper.

Trailer Park Progressing
Work on the city-own'ed trailer
park being laid out at the corner of
Fifth Street and Garrison Avenue
is progressing rapidly, the ground
having been cleared of brush and
weeds, driveways laid out and a
concrete block community shower
house erected, complete with water
heater.

(Additional Society on page 9)


The first transcontinental tele-
graph line was completed in 1861.


Dr. Joseph B. Spear

OPTOMETRIST

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted
Broken Lenses Duplicated

APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA



Dr. Charles Reicierte"r
SPTO M ETRI ST
> EYES EXAMINED
OLABsES FITTED

RITZ THEATRE BUILDING
FIRST FLOOR
HOURS a TO 5 PHONE sees
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
CLOSED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOONS



SElectrical Contracting

and Repairing. -

* Estimates Cheerfully :
a Given 0

: ST. JOE ELECTRIC

SHOP h
S Opposite Port Theater
4 I 1 I* 1 1 se0


SPort Theatre -I


A Martin Theatre


Port St. Joe, Fla.


"DEDICATED TO COMMUNITY SERVICE"

THEATRE OPENS SATURDAYS SUNDAYS AT 1:00 P. M.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE DAILY AT 2:45 P. M.


THURSDAY FRIDAY





'- -ALL AMERICAN

S Burt LNC ASTER



--- Also ---

LATEST NEWS and Cartoon,
"THREE LAZY MICE"
..e **e 4*e es*

SATURDAY ONLY

DOUBLE FEATURE

PROGRAM
--- FEATURE No. I ---


--- FEATURE No. 2 ---

MARK STEVENS

EDMUND O'BRIEN


"Between Midnight

and Dawn"
-- Also
Chapter 3 of Serial

"RADAR PATROL vs.

THE SPY KING"

and Cartoon, "BRAVE
ENGINEER"


SUNDAY MONDAY

0 0 -0 0 0 0
CO M- OWit




MARION NN BLYTH
r0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

--- Plus -

LATEST NEWS and Cartoon,
"MISSISSIPPI SWING"


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY

JEFF CHANDLER-

EVELYN KEYS

in -


"IRON MAN"

with STEPHEN McNALLEY

Also -

Sport, "FIGHTING TARPON"
and "MOVIE MEMORIES"

* 0 ** ***** *'
THURSDAY and FRIDAY



DAYI NIlEN
VERA .MEN
CESAR ROMERO





Plus -

LATEST NEWS and
Cartoon, "GIDDYAP"


-rHE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951


p







FRIAY SETEBE 21 195 TH STAR POR ST. JOE G-LF COUNTY,- FLRD PAG THREE -


Sil t* ulent than in 1948 when he lost 49
lent Sit Down electoral votes to the States Rights
Strike C ns ed ticket. Almost all of them expect
Strke Considered Mr. Truman to be running again,
I.. e-...L.,, DlY. and few of them look for any modi-


Lsy bouinern Disio


Anti-Trumanites of Dixie Consider
New Strategy for Civil Rights
Fight In Party Convention
Anti-Truman Southerners are con-
sidering a plan for a silent sit-down
if the 1952 Demoncratic national
convention doesn't soften the party's
1948 civil rights pledge.
This idea, as" yet Only in the dis-
cussion stage among.leaders oppos-
ing -President Truman's renomina-
tion, would have the balking Dixie
members retain their convention
seats and thus prevent their being
filled by pro-administration substi-
tutes.
If the plan were adopted, the
Southerners would sit silent through
roll calls, including those for presi-
dential and vice-presidential nomi-
.nations.
.The maneuver is being advocated
by some influential Southern lead-
ers in lieu of either a convention
walkout or an attempt to run a
presidential candidate of their own
as they did in 1948.
Almost to a man, the Southerners
in Washington say the recent intro-
duction by Senator Humphrey and
others of ten civil rights bills has
stirred up a new wave of 'resent-
ment in Dixie.
'They contend that opposition to
President Truman is even more vir-


IONA LARGE TENDER

SWEET PEAS


13o


SULTANA
FANCY SHORT GRAIN

RICE
RI C E

S3 lbs. 41c
'. i
i
; OSAGE YELLOW FREESTONE

S PEACHES
; No. 2./2 425
Can 25o


LARGE RED RIPE
TOMATOES

19c Ib.


ORANGE BRAND SMOKED
TENDER HAMS
HALF 'N
WHOLE 55 lIb.




321 Reid Avenue
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


fiction of his civil rights stand.
Senator Humphrey said he is go-
ing to fight to retain intact in the
party platform the 1948 pledge for
"continuing its efforts to eradicate
all racial, religious and economic
discrimination" and spelling out
proposed civil rights legislation.
SENATOR SHANDS PLANS
TO QUIT PUBLIC OFFICE
State Senator W. A. Shands, a
power in the Florida legislature, in
a speech Monday before the Ocala
Rotary Club, said he planned to re-
tire from politics when he com-
pletes his current term.
The Gainesville senator, who was
elected to a four-year term in 1950,
was a candidate for governor in
1948 and is known as the father of
the sales tax. He was chairman of
the senate appropriations commit-
tee in the 1947 legislature and also
chairman of the finance and tax-
ation committee in 1949 and 1951.
-------K------
Inflation can be whipped if all of
us buy only for cash.


NOTICE OF FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that the under-
iigned, pursuant to the "Fictitious Name
Statute," Chapter iNo. 20953, Laws of Flor-
ida, 1941, will register with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court, in and for Gulf County,
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publi-
cation of this notice, the fictitious name, to-
wit: MILADY'S BEAUTY SHOP, under which
I am engaged in business in the City of
Port St. Joe, Florida.
8-31 9-21 IiEBA PITTS YOUNG.
First publication August 31, 1951.


PASTURE WATER CONTROL
A result demonstration on water
control on permanent pastures of
white Dutch clover on the very wet
soil of Gulf county shows that shal-
low surface ditches aid in control-
ling water and increasing the pro-
duction of this. valuable pasture
crops, deports County Agent Cubie
Laird.


THE LEADER SHOE
SHOP
L. J. HE.PRING, Owner
Phone 363 Port St. Joe


LOOK THESE OVER



for the BEST


USED CARandTRUCK


VALUES IN TOWN

CARS-
1946 Chevrolet 4-Door Fleetmaster, clean $ 695.00


695.00
795.00

879.00

1095.00

295.00
139.00

395.00

139.00
249.00


1950 Chevrolet Sedan Delivery, OK guar-
anteed, clean, excellent tires $1195.00
1949 Dodge V1-Ton Pickup, OK guaran-
teed,, new paint, a real buy 945.00
1946 Chevrolet /2-Ton Pickup 695.00
1949 Chevrolet 1 2-Ten Cab, Chassis, OK
guaranteed, long wheelbase --------875.00


If you cannot select from this list, tell us what you
want, and we will get it for you.


GARRAWAY CHEVROLET COMPANY
24-Hour Wrecker Service


Phones 388 and 389


Port St. Joe, Florida-


JOIN THE CRUSADE FOR FREEDOM!
YOU CAN ENROLL AT GARRAWAYfS


Iost Everybody Agrees It Pays A

Good Fee To Shop






THE





BOYLES


A


CASH and CARRY .


No "Please


Remits" Later the BEST Way!

YOU SAVE MONEY! YOU SAVE TIME!

YOU SAVE WORRY! Try It and See!



Here's Another Tip Worth the Taking:
START YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING NOW! .... Pay
one-fourth down. .... Lay It Away.... Pay regularly
. it'll be done and paid for before you know it!
.. You can shop leisurely now .. you'll get first
choice of new Fall and Winter merchandise.. .
You'll avoid the rush, hurry and worry of last-minute
shoppers.

WE'LL GIFT WRAP YOUR PACKAGE FREE!

Do You Know of A Better Deal Anywhere?



CHECK THESE NEW ARRIVALS:
Hundreds and hundreds of pairs Children's Poll Par-
rot and Star Brand Shoes. 8 New Fall Patterns Dan
River Wrinkle-Shed Plaid Ginghams (the'yre dillies!).
Perky new Fall Hats and Bags.... New Casual Low
Heelers in Patent and Suede for the 'Teen Age Set
(did we say shoes?). ... Colorful new Ship 'n Shore
Blouses.... Hundreds of Thrilling New Dresses, Coats
and Suits for Juniors, Misses and Women.... Striking
-New Patterns in Petti Point Yard Goods for Suits and
Skirts.

30 GORGEOUS CHENILLE BEDSPREADS, twin and full
size. Simply out of this world!
MANY OTHER ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION
HAVE ARRIVED THIS MONTH. VISIT BOYLES TODAY


SHOP THE BOYLES WAY!
Cash and Carry No "Please Remits" Later.
THE BEST WAY, AFTER ALL!


'No; 303
Canr


1946 Nash 4-Door "600"
1946 Chevrolet Sport Coupe, a beauty --
1948 Nash 4-Door "600", overdrive, new
tires
1947 Buick 2,Door Sedanette, Super "8",
choice of the lot
1941 Oldsmobile 4-Door DeLuxe, with
Hydromatic ,Drive
1940 Plymouth 4-Door Sedan, runs good--
1940 Buick 4-Door Super "8", motor
overhauled
1937 Pontiac 4-Door Sedan, a good to-and-
from-work car
1939 Buick 8 Special Sedan Coupe, a steel

TRUCKS


- ----~---------~u ~a


*


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA,


PAGE THREE


'FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951


I


I I


1, 1









PAG FOU TH STAR POR ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY FLORID FRDY ET E 21, 195


THE STAR
Published Every Friday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St.
Joe, Florida, By The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Man, Floor Man, Columnist,
Reporter, Proof Reader and Bookkeeper
Entered as second -class matter, December 10, 1937, at the
P'ostoffice, Port St. Joe, Fla.; under Act of March S, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR $2.00D SIX MONTHS $1.00
THREE MONTHS $127.15

--s TELEPHONE 51 )--
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in adver-
tisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable flo
damages further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word
is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserted;
the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word "
is lost; the printed word remains.

Our Country -E Right or Wrong

WHY SCHOOL BOARD SALARIES?
portionss of the following editorial are reprinted
from the March 9 issue of The Star at the request
of a number of local citizens.)
In 1947 the state legislature passed what is
known as the "Minimum Foundation Law," guar-
anteeing specified amounts to the various coun-
ties for operation of schools on a per-pupil, per-
-teacher basis. At the same time, this law pro-
hibited salaries for members of school boards,
apparently with the thought of cutting a sliver
or two off the cost of upkeep of the schools.
Apparently a lot of counties-or, more likely, a
lot of school board members in those counties-
didn't think much of the idea, and at the 1949
legislative session 24 counties pushed through
local laws establishing salaries for school board
members in defiance of the general law.
Gulf county got on the band wagon at the
1951 legislative session with a local bill providing
salaries of $50 per month for members of the
school board and 10c per mile for traveling ex-
penses. A referendum was tacked to the bill, and
the board of county commissioners has now set
September 29 as the date for the voters to pass
or reject the measure. Why Saturday we don't


know; since we believe there will be but a 1
vote cast at any election held on a Saturday
For years and years, as far back as we car
member, prominent citizens and those who
the welfare of the schools at heart vied for
honor of serving on the local school board-
without pay. At times the campaigns were q
bitter, but generally the best man won.
The editor of The' Star may be wrong,
quite likely present members of the Gulf cou
school board will come in and tell him so, bul
have always been of the opinion that citizen
a community who offer their services on
local governing body should do so from a fee
of duty and responsibility, not for any remun
tion that may be connected with the position]
is this principle which assures only the hig
type of representation on such governing boc
We're not altogether against remuneration
members of the school board. Give 'em $]
meeting, plus mileage, since they have to
themselves to Wewahitchka for the meetings,
the proposed $50 a month, regardless of the n
ber of meetings, plus mileage, sticks in our ci
We urge every voter who has the best inter
of our county schools at heart to 'go to the 1
on September 29 and vote against this meas

As we study the new tax bill, that titilla
cigaret jingle takes on a new meaning
LS/MFT-Lord Save Me From Truman.-El
(N. J. ) Times.

The Chinese reportedly invented the revol'
bookcase, and judging by the progress the
Chinese army is making in Korea, it must
caught in one of them.

Senator Mundt said that a Dixiecrat wi
Democrat with two eyes, and both wide o]
-Asheville (N. C.) News.

Lots of self-made men forget that their w
bossed the job.

Some men are afraid they'll have to go to
-and their wives are afraid they won't.


eight b


TEN YEARS AGO
From the Files of The Star

Organize Disaster Relief Committee
At two meetings held Wednesday
afternoon and night, a disaster re-
lief committee for Gulf county was
formed under the direction of a dis-
trict Red Cross worker. The com-
mittee will function under leader-
ship of the Gulf County Red Cross
Chapter.
Freeman Acting Police Chief
Marvin 0. Freeman was named as
acting chief of police Tuesday eve-
ning by the city commission, taking
over the duties of Troy Jones, re-
signed, until applications on file
with the board for the job can be
investigated.
First Football Tilt of Season Tonite
The St. Joe high Sharks will open
the football season here tonight at
'Centennial Field under the flood-
lights when they tangle with the
Carrabelle Mullets. The team is be-
ing coached by Frank Hannon.
Sammie Davis New Scoutmaster
At a meeting of the local Boy
Scout committee Thursday evening,
Sammie Davis was named as scout-
master to replace Sammy McCall.
who has been called to active duty
in the army.
Appointed to Officers' Reserve
Word was received last Friday
from Washington that Second Lieu-
tenant Ben H. Dickens of this city
had accepted appointment to the
reserve officers' corps.
Ganal Bridge To 'Be Built Soon'
Word was receive yesterday from
the state road department that con-
struction of the bridge across the
canal at White City "would start
soon."
Birth Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Sullivan are
announcing the birth of a 6-pound
girl at a Panama City hospital on
Wednesday, September 17.
This -on your printing is a sign of quality.
This -^ on your printing is a sign of quality.


Oregon's Landowners
It is estimated that there are 43,-
500 private forest landowners in
Oregon.
h I -


MOTOR
TUNE-UP
1. Adjust Distributor Poinh
2. Clean Air Cleaner
3. Check Coil
4. Tighten Cylinder Head
S. Adjust Timing
6. Clean Battery Terminals
7. Check Condenser'
Tighten Manifold
9. Check Distributor
10. Adjust Carburetor
11. Check Voltage Control
12. Check Battery
13. Adjust Tappets
14. Clean Plugs
15. Check Octane Selector
16. Tighten Hose Connections
17. Check Vacuum Control
18. Adjust Fan Belt
19. Check Compression
20. Check Generator
21. Check Heat Control


fl0ow 04



$5.95
Parts Extra

SEPTEMBER ONLY


GARRAWAY

CHEVROLET CO.
PHONES 388 and 389
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
- u~.---------- -*muumn


THE LOW DOWN
----- from -----

WILLIS SWAMP

Editar The Starr:
In Mr. Neros time when the boss
guy wanted a littel di-vershun or
fun and amuzemint he had his
trusty sekretarys and bureau boys
whup the bushes fer another tigur
to which he cud throw a enemy. At
other times he'd cruze, in splendur,
the Rivur Tibur. His boys went a
step too fur wun day, howsumever,
in the way of having' a good time.
Their fireworks display got away
frum them and burned down the
hole dingbusted place. Thereafter
Rome's streets wuz dusty fer a 100
yeers. Nero, with no palace and no
place to show off, up and died.
Gee whiz, sez Henry, my naybor,
you no quite a lot don't you. Well,
I thank you, I sez, I thank you very
mutch.
But' gittin' bak to our own grand
land-our free and eezy-mark USA
-we ain't too menny jumps behind
Senor Nero. Fer fun and amuzemint
here our top brass sez to the agri-
kulture dept., which has one bill-
yun bucks in its jeans as spending'
munny, what's komikal today. And
the dept. waltzes in 4 Turkey Car-
vin' Expart. He demonstrates how
to karve so the bird won't skid off'n
'the platter. Oh, me-tomfulery. And
vMr. Taxpayer and his sweat little
helpmate digs up the one billyun
on inkum tax day to keep -the fuma-
diddles in fettle.
Iffen the guy, sez Henry, wud
tell me how to git a turkey and
leeve the karvin' to me-why don't
he do that? Henry, I sez, you're
even simplur than you look.
Yours with the lowdown,
JO SERRA.

Chester A. Arthur became presi-
dent when Garfield was assassi-
nated in 1881.


Yes-you can drive the smart, new
SFashion Academy Award winning Henry J
for as little as a penny a mile!

And that's because its powerful, thrifty
Supersonic Engine delivers up to a whopping
30 miles on a gallon!





drives in style for a penny a mile!



What's more, if your trade-in car is a post-war
model in good condition, you can actually
own the Henry J for as little as, $34 a
month... practically $1 a day!

All this economy in the smartest, sturdiest,
Sliveliest, best-built car in the low-price field!
No wonder thousands have switched to
Henry J today. See it. .. drive it yourself at
-'your Kaiser-Frazer dealer's!



Delivero3 at Willow Run with Federal
13 3 taxespaid. Local tax (fany)
additional Prices subject to change without notice,

xi





"'"t" IS KAER-FRAZER SALES CORP.pr! ON. 5 ML5 4 W RUX. thC.Q .1


M. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE Monument Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida
::I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF- COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 151


PAGE FOUR


TOP





FRIDAY,5 TE S PT T J, GULF FRIDA GE EVA
U 4dl~B~SQPl-~~ ~~-T-- ~~~~~~,-~~


If you thought we gave you bar-
gains at the last sale, just look at
the money saving values listed be-
low! Remember, THIS IS YOUR LAST
CHANCE .. so
COME EARLY AND STAY LATE!


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


This Final Sale
Starts Thursday,
September 20!
DOORS OPEN AT 8:30 A. M.


FINAL GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE

8 ONLY LADIES' ONE GROUP EVERY LADIES' DRESS AND
ALL WOOL OATS LADIES' COATS AND COAT EVENING GOWN
SSUITS VALUES TO $22.50
Values To $14 9 VALUES TO $37.50 YOUR
$45.00. NOW pl 99 NOW $5.00 Eqach CHOICE $3
JUST A FEW LEFT! LADIES' Blue Swan Boys' SUPER SPECIAL!
LADIES' a BOYS' WHITE COTTON
BATHING SUITS NYLON HOSE S US P A N T S DRESS SHIRTS TWILL TROUSERS
values To $7.95 REG. $1.65 VALUES The PantieYou Wear wit White and Colors REGULAR $2.98
NOW Val. $1.98, NOW
$1.00 Each Only 77c Pair Only 39c Pair $1.00 Each 1.00Pair
REGULAR $1.95 PAIR SIZES 2 TO 14
ONE TABLE WITH VALUES Boys' and Girls' MEN'S WOMEN'S CHILDREN'S
TO $3.98 SWEATERS -
YOUR 4 c SATIN JACKETS ALL AT GIVE AWAY PRICES!
CHOICE WIND-PROOF, WATER REPELLANT WAY BELOW ACTUAL COST!
Includes Sweaters, Caps, Scarfs, Hose SCHOOL COLORS ---
ONE TABE WTH VALS Purple and Gold Maroon and Gold ATTENTION FISHERMEN! -
ONE TABLE WITH VALUES Sizes 2 To 40 "Wrights" 50% Wool Shirts and
TO $1.98 Reg. $7.95. NOW---$5.97 Drawers (Longhandles)
YOUR 10 Reg. $6.95. NOW -- $4.97 REGULAR $3.49 EACH
Includes Belts, Patterns, Dickies Reg. $4.95. NOW -- $2.97 Now Oly $1.97 Each
ONE TABLE OF
1 Table of LADIES' SHOES Ladies'and Children's Shoes
Includes Oxfords, High and Medium Heel Dress Shoes. All Colors HIGH TOPS OXFORDS SANDALS
Values to $6.98 $1 97 Pr. Values to $4.98 $1 0 Pr.
ONLY -- ONLY------

Men's Jarman and Freeman MEN'S ALL-WOOL AND MANHATTAN DRESS SHIRTS
SH 0 ES MIDDLE WATE SUITS WHITES AND COLORS
VALUES TO $14.95 VALUES TO $45.00 REG. $3.95
Now $6.99 Pair Only $19.97 Each Now $2.39 Each
Ui-


,L 100 PAIRS
.N'S ALL-WOOL TROUSERS
VALUES TO $14.95
Only $4.97 Pair


One Group of
GIRLS' COATS
VALUES TO $14.95
Only $5.00 Each


GIRLS' CHENILLE
ROBES
REGULAR VALUE $2.98
Only $1.19 Each


BOYS' BLANKET
ROBES
REGULAR VALUE $2.98
Only $1.49 Each


Value $4.98


ONE DOLLAR EACH!


MEN'S AND BOYS' TENNIS SHOES
U. S. RUBBER "KEDS" BASKETBALL
Value $6.50 N 0 W $4.29
OTHER TENNIS SHOES AT $1.49. Reg. $3.49 Value


JUST


83 LEFT!


MEN'S FELT HATS


I~g ~r --~sl~~s~-sl C C~I L~- ~Pdn~ -~U~~rm~ ~asqeA I3 WIN -


_ _


~p I~P ~-bl -----~AC~I~' -~r-l~s~es~a8~~'~-,


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951






PAGE SIX


Florida's Republicans
Seek 2-Party System
Speaker Says Two-Party Govern-
ment Will Serve the People
and Not the Party
A two party system that will
strengthen Florida's national politi-
cal bargaining power is the solution
to many of the state's problems,
Charles F. Batchelder of Orlando
said at a West Florida Republican
rally held.in DeFuniak Springs.
The GOP leader said it is the in-
herent right of every American "to
think, for himself, decide who will
represent him in the political
bodies that affect his everyday liv-
ing, to protect his home and his
family with his ballot."
"Two-party government gives him
the right to protest a decision of the
present majority by its replacement
with another majority," went on
Batchelder. "Two-party government
is the only government that will
serve the people and not the party."
Janet Fitzgerld, Broward county
Republican state committeewoman,
said that "it is a little too early to
be campaigning, but we certainly
don't feel that it is too early to get
out and get rid of the men we now
have in the White House."
The speaker blamed Republicans
for President Truman being in of-
fice, claiming, "too many Republi-
cans were overconfident and didn't
work in the last presidential elec-
tion, and Truman went in by default
with less than 45 per cent of the na-
tion's total vote going to him.
"West Florida will get help from
other sections of the state in or-
ganizing Republican Clubs and get-
ting citizens out to vote in the next
election."
Mack Tyner of Okaloosa county
observed that "a good Democrat is
all right, but the trouble is we have
too many. Our purpose in meeting
here is to find ways to reduce that
number."
Wynfred E. Briggs. of .,t.:,Pierce
said that in-the- 16--counties com-
prising the Third Congressional
District there are some 178,000
white people of voting age and over
40,000 of them are not registered,
and that in the entire state there
are more than 750,000 who are not
registered.
He urged club members to go af-
ter the registered and unregistered
voters, blaming the lack of interest
in registration to citizens being op-
posed to Democrats and not encour-
aged by Republicans.
"Get busy and make voting a
privilege to cherish," he urged his
listeners.
COAST GUARD CUTTER
TO LEAVE PANAMA CITY
The 125-foot Coast Guard cutter
Boutwell, which for several years
has been stationed at Panama City,
has received orders to transfer on
October 7 to Port Isabel, Texas, to
check on extensive shrimping ac-
tivities in that area.
With exception of five years of
war service, the Boutwell has been
stationed at Panama City since
1936, and several of the ship's com-
pany have bought homes there.
The 291-ton cutter will be re-
placed by a smaller vessel.
Three Get Unemployment Checks
During the week ending Septem-
ber 8, three unemployed persons in
Gulf county received a total of $95
in unemployment compensation, ac-
cording to the state industrial com-
mission.

SOMERSET

I AXI STAND
and SANDWICH SHOP

PHONE 40
Corner Reid Avenue and
First Street


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951
- -, ~ ~UWn~~


REMEMBER, WHATEVER YOU SOW, SO SHALL YOU REAP!! -


CO STINSI II TRYST EAI I




4 DAYS STARTING THURSDAY, STEPTEMBER 20th


DAN RIVER FALL


GINGHAM


89c Yd.
Reg. $1.10 Yard

42 x 90

Organdy Curtains
Regular $4.95

$3.95
WHITE BLUE YELLOW

BOYS' TOM SAWYER
DRESS PANTS

$3.95

BOYS'
HOPALONG CASSIDY
BLACK JACKETS

$2.95
Regular $3.29

BOYS'

'LEE' OVERALLS
.SIZES 4 TO 10

$1.98

SPECIAL!
1 LOT MEN'S
SUMMER PANTS
SIZES 28 TO 33

$3.95 Pair

FIRST QUALITY 36"
"LL" SHEETING

4 Yds. $1,00

---SPECIAL!---
MEN'S 8 01.
DUNGAREESi
Regular $2.95

Now $2.69 I
DON'T MISS THIS HARVEST
DAYS SPECIAL!


SHOP

AT


S/ as seen in SEVENTEEN
SCOTTIE WESKIT SUIT
Cloud-soft corduroy spiked with authentic
clan plaid the newest Vicky Vaughn Junior
formula for an important fall season! The rib-
hugging little weskit is distinguished by an un-
expected wing collar and the whirlaway skirt has
a pair of the mail-pouch pockets you love. Ve'--ty
thin-furrowed corduroy combined with bright and
beautiful corduroy plaid. Tartan Green, Tartan


Bea or Tartan Red. Sizes 9 to 15.


$10.95


$1.00 DISCOUNT ON ANY FALL DRESS, COAT


81x99 FIRST QUALITY


SHEETS


$1.89
Regular $2.95 Value

81 x99

FINE QUALITY

SHEETS

$2.79
Regular $3.75

PILLOW CASES
2 for $1.00

LADIES'

FALL SHOES

$2.98 Pair

-- HARVEST SPECIAL! --
Avondale CHAMBRAY

65c Yard
Regular 79c Yard

-- HARVEST SPECIAL! --
4 DAYS ONLY!!
FINE WALE
CORDUROY
15 COLORS

$1.49 Yard

39"


OR SUIT IN OUR STOCK During These 4 Days A BA R D N E
w~Th J 5.7 Jra Ib gn al By flB


- USE OUR LAY-A-WAY!


MEN'S GREY WORK PANTS_----- $3.25


END'S CORK SOLE WORK SHOES


LOW SHOES

$5.00


HIGH SHOES

$6.00


BOYS'

SIDDPY PAJAMAS $1.95


Sizes 6 to 14


Regular $2.50


In Fall Shades

85c Yard
Regular 98c Yard

---S P E C I AL!---

FRUIT OF LOOM 36"

PRINTjS

45 c Yard
Regular 59c


* For Service
* Low Prices
and
* Quality Merchandise


sl---~----------- ---- --------------------- ---- ----- -- ---I I


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 195t


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA








FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE SEVEN


HIGHLAND VIEW NEWS
By MARJORIE ROGERS

SMrs. W. H. Weeks is attending
the postmasters' convention being
held in Washington, D. C., this week.
Mr. and Mrs.-H. G. Parker and
:on Dickie visited in Panama City
Sunday with her mother, Mrs. Bes-
sie Green.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Burrows of
Greenwood were week-end guests
of Miss Lullene Pittman.
Mr. and Mrs. P. O. Stewart had
as their guests Sunday Mr. and
Mrs. J. W. Stewart of Marianna and
Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Stewart of Tal-
lahassee.'
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Griffin and
sons, Jimmie and Jackie, spent the
week-end in Enterprise, Ala., with
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Suggs. They
visited Sealey Springs in Cotton-
wood, Ala., Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Story had as
their guests Sunday Mr. and Mrs.
R. L. Williams and Mrs. Mae Wil-
liams of Blountstown.
'Mrs. James Mashburn has re-
tarned from a visit in Chattahoo-
chee with her mother, Mrs. Ella
Hutchins, and sister, Mrs. May
Clayton.
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Godwin. visited
,A Blountstown Sunday with the
i:'rmer's mother, Mrs. J. L. Godwin.
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Chestnut of
Panama City visited here over the
week-end with his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Jim Chestnut.
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Syfrett of
Newport were the Sunday guests of
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Nichols.
D. L. Campbell, who left High-
land View a few weeks back, writes
that he is now in Moss Bank, Can-


FRONT END
SERVICE SPECIAL

SEPTEMBER ONLY
1-ADJUST FRONT
WHEEL BEARINGS
Z-ADJUST STEERING
WHEEL
S-ADJUST CASTER
S --ADJUST CAM
BEARING
"-ADJUST KING PIN
INCLINATION
6--ADJUST TOE-IN
7-ADJUST STEERING
GEOMENTRY
38-BALANCE WHEELS


GARRAWAY
CHEVROLET CO.
PHONES 388 and 389
PORT ST. JOE, PLA.


ada, where he is employed by the
Sacony Vacuum Oil Company.
Mr. and Mrs. John McMullon of
Panama City visited here Sunday
with Mr. and Mrs. J. D. McMullon.
BEEKEEPERS ARE MEETING
IN WEWAHITCHKA TODAY
The Tupelo District Beekeepers'
Association is holding its annual
meeting today in Wewahitchka at
the American Legion home. The
session opens at noon with a bas-
ket luncheon, the business meeting
following.
Election of officers is the main
business on the agenda, and the
matter of showing the tupelo honey
moving picture film in other states
will also be discussed.
The association has members in
Gulf, Gadsden, Franklin, Bay, Lib-
erty, Leon; Wakulla, Holmes, Cal-
houn, Walton, Okaloosa, Washing-
ton and Santa Rosa counties.
Sr--- "
A record of 60 billion eggs were
produced in the U. S. in 1950.


MRS. DuPONT NAMED ON
STATE CONTROL BOARD
Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont is the
newest member of the expanded
state board of control, having been
appointed Monday by Gov. Fuller
Warren. She is the first woman
ever to serve on the board, and her
appointment fulfills a campaign
pledge of the governor to name a
woman to the body.
The board supervises the Univer-
sity of Florida, Florida State Uni-
___ W


WANNA CAB?
Call

"RED'S" TAXI

PHONE 114
FOR DEPENDABLE
SERVICE


ANNIVERSARY


Celebrating the First Anniversary of the now


versity, Florida A. & M. College, Supper Guests
the school for the deaf and blind Mr. and Mrs. William Shores of
and the Ringling Art Museum. Cottondale were the supper guests
of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Howell last
Saturday night. Mrs. Kate Harrell,
Damage from Meteorites who had spent the summer here
In all the thousands of years that with Mr. and Mrs. Howell, accom-
meteorites have been plunging panied them back to Cottondale,
earthward. no catastrophic strike where she will spend the winter.
'has ever been known in a settled
area. Likewise, there are no au-
thentic records of a direct hit on Green'bananas will ripen quicker
any human, and relatively few ac- if placed in a paper bag for a few
counts exist of damage to property, days.


Come in for a Game of Pool and a Glass of .


ICE
COLD


DRAFT BEER


NOW ON
TAP


ST. JOE BAR AND BILLIARDS


Phone 114


Port St. Joe, Florida


SALE


famous Youngstown Kitchens Jet-Tower Dishwasherl


TAKE YOUR CHOICE


for a limited time only


0-


...when you buy a new





JET-TOWER DISHWASHER
*Not installed. Slightly higher in the West.
**Where use not contrary to current local ordinances or state laws.

Come in soon .. See the
Youngstown Kitchens ELECTREC SINK
Features famous Jet-Tower Dishwashing!
Fifty-eight jets of piping-hot, booster-
heated water shear off all food soil in
less than 10 minutes. Vigorous, top-to-
bottom Hydro-Brush Action. ,
Youngstowm Kitchens Food Wade Disposer easy instaTfed
TWO MODELS: Youngstown Kitchens 48' Electric Sink
oud Yoangstown Kitchens 27' et-Tower Dishwasher


Youngstown Kitcheis Food Waste Disposer
Banishes garbage forever. The Youngstown Kitchens Food Waste Dis-
poser lets you keep your kitchen clean as you go, and it is 3 ways best:


1 Takes continuous
.-* feed.


Self-
* dleamag.


ROCHE'S


3 Self-roversing action means i
lougIZ iife.

AUTHORIZED FRIGIDAIRE DEALER


213 Reid Avenue


Phone 291


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FIRST


i _~ ~_~_~~~__(: ~
i LL


- ---- Ye~ -~-~r I -~-I -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDAA


PAGE SEVEN


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1951









PAGE EIHT THESTAR, ORT ST JOE, GLF COUTY. FLRIOA FIDASPEBR2,15


STARDUST and

MOONSHINE

When George Cooper opened his
new barber shop he had one of
those coconut husk door mats laid
on the sidewalk in front of thedoor.
Don't know whether it was the in-
flux of customers into the tonsorial
emporium or passersby that wore
it down, but a couple of weeks ago
we noticed that the original mat,
about 18x24 inches, had worn down
to about six by eight inches, with
long stringers running in all direc-
tions-in fact it sorta looked like
the fringed top on one of those old-
fashioned surreys .... Now George
has done away with that faithful
old mat, having replaced it with a
brand new one. But it will never
be the same, as customers had be-
come so accustomed to seeing Old
Faithful lying at their feet as they
entered the shop, even though there
wasn't enough left of the old boy to
scrape the mud off a gnat's heel.
S. .Sic transit gloria mundi.
&-
Received another nice letter from
Rev. O. D. Langston from up Au-
burn, Alabama, way, who was here
a couple of weeks ago on a visiting
and fishing expedition and who sent
us a flock of fishing floats and
quills he had designed and made.
S. Haven't had time to try any
of 'em yet, since the only time we
have been fishing was when we lost
that seven-pound five-ounce bass, as
we noted in last week's column.
However, we'll get around to trying
'em out eventually. .. 0. D. says,
in part: "Sorry we failed to see you.
We knocked on your door, but fig-
ured you and Mrs. Smith had gone
to Stardust Lodge for the week-end.
We left St. Joe Monday and went-
to Mrs. Beard's place on the Dead
Lakes. The fish were on a strike!
We didn't get much,,but we enjoyed
trying..... May see you before
cold weather, as:,a friend, of, miae
here wants to go to the.Dead Lakes
fishing as he has never been there.
.Read your article in The Star
about my 'doodles.' I hope you
found some of them useful and
practical. I sold-one full card with
67 specimens on it to the Gulf Hard-
ware Co. Thanks for the writeup."
S. .Anyone wanting to see what
kind of work O. D. does-and it is
really artistic-can go down to the
Gulf Hardware or drop in at The
Star office and take a look.

Well, our city commissioner race
is over for another year, and sev-
eral candidates, as usual, were a
bit disappointed. We were going to,
write something on it, but we find
just what we need in the Wakulla
County News, written by Joe Mal-
pas. Sez Joe: "We have watched
several possible candidates get their
noses nipped this .past two. weeks
Good training :fo',rt e hopeful." Bur.
seriously, every citizen should at
one time or other run for some of-
fice. If he wins, he will finally get
over it, and if he loses he becomes
a member of a great order of "them
what tried, but didn't." And for
your own information, we are a cor-
poral in the order, having set an
all-time record years ago for get-
ting the lowest possible number of
votes ever received by any candi-
date for mayort That. record will,
no doubt, stand fir another hundred
years. But we mention this
simply to inform the hopefuls that
a political campaign is at times
rough, and after that slightly brutal
and if a guy has any personal feel-
ings that can be hurt, he had better
stay out. For some reason it has
for many years been a time-honored
custom for the office-holder to
stomp, one way or another, every
head that looks like it might be a
candidate for his office. This ex-
tends from the president on down."
Amen, Brother Malpas, you said
it! But we think we can beat
your record as a potential 'candi-
date. We ran for commissioner, at
the behest of the local merchants'
association, who said they'd do all


our politicking for us, since we had
informed them we were too tied
down to go around stumping the
city, and when the votes were tal-
lied what we then considered an
all-time record was set-13 votes.
S. And we, personally, voted for
our opponent, Jim Bounds.


TWO INJURED IN AUTO
CRASH SUNDAY NIGHT
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Kelly of this
city were, treated at the municipal
hospital Sunday night for cuts and
bruises sustained in an automobile
accident on Highway 90, according
to a report by Patrolman Farrior of
Panama City. Hugh Turner, also of
this city, driver of the other car,
was not injured.
The patrolman said Turner was
attempting to pass another car and
his vehicle went into a skid on the
wet pavement when he applied the
brakes after, seeing an oncoming
car. His machine skidded toward
the left shoulder of the road and
was rammed by the approaching
car driven'"by Kelly.
----
Vacationers From Quincy
Cpl. and Mrs. George L. Cooper
and daughters, Jo Ellen and Steph-
any Carol, arrived Tuesday from
Quincy for a vacation here with
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Cooper
and Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Gentry.
Cpl. and Mrs. Cooper will leave
about October 3 to return to Fort
Knox, Ky., where he is stationed.
NOTICE OF ELECTION
NOTICE OF ELECTION REQUIRED BY
HOUSE BILL No. 1381, AN ACT REQUIR-
ING THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS ANI THE COUNTY BOARD OF
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TO PUIULSH MINUTES OF ALL
MEETINGS AND LIST OF ALL EXPENDI-
TURES, AND HOUSE BILL No. 1399, AN
ACT TO FIX THE COMPENSATION OF THE
MEMBERS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION IN GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
NOTICE IS HEREBY 'GIVEN that the
Board of Count : Comnmissioners of Gulf
County,, lorid, id on the 4th day of Sep-
tember, A. D. 1951. in ...1 session set-
Ling, adopt a resolution .11... for an elec-
tion to be held on the i .. of Septenm-
lier. A. 1). 1951. ithe sae being the 5th
Saturday l in ai month. Purpose of s.id
election is the question of ratifying and mak-
iw: Effective the said House Bill No. 13S1,
of Florida. Acts of 1951, as follows:
AN. ACT Requiorjng tle Board of County
Comminsioners- aind the CountC t Board of
Public IInstruction of Gulf County to Pub-
lish Minutes of All Meetings and List of All
Expenditures; Providing a Referendum.
Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
Section 1 The, Board of County Con-
missioners and tie Board of Public Instrue-
tion of Gulf County shall publish minutes of
each meeting within five days after such
meeting, and before the 10th day of each
month shall publish a list of all expenditures
for the previous month, showing the voucher
number, the date, to whom paid and the
amount paid. All such publications shall be
in a newspaper of general circulation pub-
lished in the county.
Section 2. This act shall become effec-
tive upon being ratified and approved by a
majority of the electors of Gulf County vot-
ing at an election to be held for that pur-
pose on or before October 1st, 1951, and
which the County Commissioners of Gulf
County are hereby required to call and con-
duct.
Became a law without the Governor's ap-
proval. Filed in office of Secretary of, State
June .1, 1951. AND,
Sai House Bill No. 1399, Laws of Flor-
ida, Acts of 1951, as follows:
AN ACT to Fix the Compensation of 'the
Members of the County Board of Pubic In-
struction In Gulf County, Florida, and To
Provide From What Funds Same Shall Be
Paid, and To Repeal All Laws In Conflict,
With Sail Act; Providing for Referendum.
BE IT ENACTED by the Legislature of
the State of Florida:
Section 1. That each member of the
County Board of Public Instruction in Gulf
C.iutr :Sta.e 'oft Florida. shall be paid the,
mum .i[ fifty,($50.QO0) .j.ilnin per month, 'afla
ten cents (10c) per mile for their traveling
expenses to and from- whatever place they
may be called on business in the interest of
the state and county.
Section 2. That the compensation pro-
vided for in sectionn 1 hereof shall become
effective on the lot day of July, 1951, and
shall be paid to each member of said board
out of the general county school fund and
shall be paid irrespective of any budget re-
quirement, law, rule or regulation.
Section 3. That should any section or
part of section of this act be held unconsti-
tutional, the same shall not affect any other
portion thereof that is constitutional; or
any law in.force at the time of the passing
of this act.
Section 4. That all laws or parts of
,laws in conflict with this act be and the
same an e hereby repealed.
Section 5: This act shall take effect im-
mediately upon its passage and approval by
the citizens of Gulf County in an election to
be held at a time set by the Board of
County Commissioners, provided that such
election shall not be hol later than the 5th
day of November, A. D. 1951. -
Became a law without the Govemor'slp-
proval. Filed in office of Secretary of State
June 11, 1951.
The polls will be open at the voting places
at 7:00 o'clock a. m. until 7:00 o'clock p.
m.
The various polling places will be as fol-
lows:
Precinct No. 1-Mrs Emma Stone's build-
ing, Wewahitchka.
Precinct No. 2---City Hall, Wewahitchka.
Precinct No. 3-Pippin's Store, Dalkeith.
Precinct No. 4-Schoolhouse, Overstreet.
Precinct No. 5-Forehand's building, Lot
2, Block D, Highland View.
Precinct No. 6-Community House, White
City.
Precinct No. 7-Doctor's .office, Kenney's
Mil.
Precinct No. 8-City Hall, Port St. Joe.
Precinct No. .9--Centennial Building, Port
St. Joe.
/s I B. E. KENNEY, Chairman
Board County Commissioners,
Attest: Gulf County, Florida.
OGOROEI CORE,
Clerk Circuit Court. 9-7 28


WEEK

END -

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SEPT. 20 21 22


CENTER CUT

PORK HAM

ROAST


49 c lb.


REAL COUNTRY'

I SMOKED

HAMS .


39 Ib. I


PORK

SHOULDER

ROAST


39c lb.


FLORIDA ech

GRADE A F BS R S each


5
SUGAR Pounds


BRIAR CREEK COFFEE lb. 6


ALL CAN CREAM 2for -2

TOMATOES 2 No. 2 Cans 29


TREND

WASH POWDER


2 boxes 37 c


I SYRUP

GALLONS


99 c


9C


WATER MAID


I LARGE

TIDE


27c


Georgia CORN MEAL 5 Ibs. 19c


GET YOUR FRESH SEED AND PLANTS AT RICH'S


- FROZEN SPECIALS -

ORANGE JUICE 4 OZ 10c
,, Rw. CAN


GRAPE JUICE 4Z 17c


LEMONADE MIX OZ 17 c


MULLET
UNDRESSED


19c lb.


ALL KINDS OF FRESH SEA
IAA1 hAIIY


TOILET TISSUE 3 Rolls 23c
We Have A Complete Stock of -

Jewel SHORTENING 3 lbs. 79c SCHOOL SUPPLIES


FRESH VEGETABLES THE YEAR 'ROUND



DR E P U SUPER-MARKET

RlI C 1 H Port St. Joe, Florida
II


IP--~ II --P~CPI~-C~- Ir~-i~yllr -Y~~.ml-s^---:-- --~ms~~~-((AIQ~il~R~W


I


I j I I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORfOA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,, 1951


PAGE EIGHT


c EM







lbs. 34c*








PAGE NINE


FRDY SETME 21 91TESAPR T OGL ONY LRD


ADDITIONAL SOCIETY
(Continued from Page 2)


Royal Hearts Class
Nominates Officers
The Royal Hearts Sunday school
'elas_ of ,the Baptist Church met
Thursday of last week with Mrs.
Richard Saunders in her home at
Kenney's Mill. The devotional was.
given by Mrs. Bert Hall, followed
ith -prayer by Mrs. G. W. Cooper.
A business session followed dur-
ing which the nominating commit-
tee gave its report of new officers,
as follows: Mrs. Richard Saunders,
president; Mrs. Charles Gill, vice-
president; Mrs. E. F. Gunn, secre-
tajy and treasurer; Mrs. Harry Mc-
Knight, class minister.
Mrs. Homer Lovett gave a brief
review of the Sunday school lesson
that had been studied for the past
quarter, after which a quiz on the
mothers of the Bible was enjoyed
and proved most instructive.
The meeting was closed with
prayer by Mrs. George Davis, after
Which the hostess served home-
madb cookies and coca-colas to the
members present.
9 K, 4
-'BAPTIST Y. W. A..MEETS
WITH MISS JUNE SMITH
The Y. W..A. of the-First Baptist
Church met Monday night in the
home of Miss June Smith with three
regular members present and one
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PROPOSED BUDGET 1952
ESTIMATED REVENUE
General Fund
Property Taxes ........ ... ..$ 50,588 00
Licens' Taxes ............... 7,500.00
Race Track Funds ........... 3,000.00
Amusement Taxes ........... 8,000.00
Gasoline Taxes ............. 8.900.00
Cigarette Taxes ............. 20,700.00
Fines and Forefitures ......... 3,700.00
Permits, Fees, etc .......... 200.00
Garbage Collection .......... 2,800.00
MiScellaneous ................ 100.00
Trailer Park ............... 5,000.00
Utility Tax (40%) ........ 4,700.00
TOTAL General Fund ......$110,188.00
Bond Retirement and Interest Sinking Funds
Interest and Sinking Fund ....$ 11,338.81
Special Sinking Fund for Re-
funding Bonds of 1950 ..... 8,286 05
Construction Fund (60% Utility
Tax) .....-..... .......... .. 7,100.00
TOTAL ALL FUNDS ...... .$136,912.86
1951 Assessed Taxable Valuation
$4,361,081.00.
Proposed Millage for Operations
1952 -- $50,588.00 ......... 11.6 Mills
Proposed Millage Interest and Sink-
ing Fund 1952-$11,338 81... 2.6 Mills
Fund for Refunding Bonds of
1950 for 1952 $8,286.05... 1.9 Mills
Total Proposed Millage for 1952. .16 1 Mills
4 CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PROPOSED BUDGET YEAR 1952
EXPENDITURES
Proposed Budget
General Fund 1952
P..,I.-: D-.itp -,r. r .......... $ 11,400.00
-.:j i r,.c-r LD'prtment ........ 10,820.00
,E- :.jri~.e .r..;rn.ent ........ 2,120.00
Fa p l'-pirr-r. ........... .. 10,900.00
"Street Lights .......... '.'. 2,350.00
Administrative Expense ....... 6,960.00
Li-,.l Departm-i. 1.,850.00
Strri-r Mav ri'n n,.: .... 24,256.00
Park Maitnrnani :.: .... 5,622.00
M.,:eLiane.oL. E p.r,.e. .... 2,370.00
Mainterit icin1 :n li. i .i of
Mrur..ipaJ Bu,-.rlr. ..... 2,175.00
'tret nmprr,.m-rir ,-i,- r service 7,750.00
Pai-iren t Street D.-P. Truck... 1,675.00
A .... 600 00
Mur,.:'pal Huospr.-i .:! i '.Cr. St. Joe,
CaFpitatL Impro. .:m rr. ... 1,500.00
M rnh:iip:. I Bl,.'sp l .)i P',t St. Joe,
Operictn.r, ............... 8,500.00':
C,.rt .rienc.,e ............. 560.00
S, C i si st urri ...... ...... 780.00
n.rnrt rmre I'bt Service ..... 3,500.00
Trii-r Park, Operation and Main-
rt nnr.ce ........... ..... 5,000.00


'' TOTAI, GENERAL FUND ... $110,188.00
Bond Retirement and Interest.Sinking Funds
ite-ra ir.d i .r. -ia Fund ..; $ 11,338.81
p' p ,al Sk,nji, Fiund for Refund-
ing Bonds 'f I'' 0 ...:...,. 8,286.05
.)nritrutroun FPurl .......... 7,100.00
:TOTAL ALL FUNDS.. .... $136,912.86
S(E' B. H: 'OIKENS, Jr.,
(IEL ~ \i;l..r' and Clerk,
., r,' .1 Ir St:'Joe, Florida.

ORDINANCE No. 126X.
A n p .''..p r Or.l,njr ,:.- entftl.-. li
ORD[iN.ANCE R.ELATIN'a, 10,: THE s :L.C
MENT A.\r I.LET"' ,'F FAXE.F IN THE CITY
OF PORT STy .1,E FLOii,\. FriR' THE
TAX Y VR IA I' '1 LLEV.fiN, \!4 AD-
!VAI.IREM T.A-\ 'r MILL iP,:pN THE
!>OLI AR 'F ASSESSED VALUATION FOR
TF PURPoSE OFPR"OVIDING FUNDS FOR
3ti P.Y'MEL\ OF';INTEREST AND PRIN-
,CIP.ALrON THE OUTSTANDING $175,000.00
S ';' lNG: Ba-NDS OF THE CITY OF PORT
ST.\S OF 1.9 MILLS FOR THE
.'RPli--;: O:'F PROVIDING,. FUNDS FOR
TiE PAYMENT OF INTEREST AND PRIN-
CIPAL ON-THE OUTSTANDING $90,000.00
REFINDINGM B.,NDS OF 1950 OF THE
CITY "IF P,'iRT ST. JOE, AND A TAX OF
II M ILLs' FOR THE PURPOSE OF PRO-
*rIDING4 FUNDS FOR THE ORDINARY AND
REGULAR PURPOSES OF THE CITY OF
PORT Sr O)E FOR THE YEAR 1952" has
tber.i ,tr,"lu.'-.l in the City Commission of
the, City. of Port St. Joe, Florida. Said Or-
nce. No. 126X will be.acted on finally at
e regular meeting of the City Commission
St the Municipal Building at 8:00 P. M. EST
October 2 A. D. 1951. Estimates upon which
said.appropriation Ordinance is based is on
tfil leir ,r.-pection of the public at the office
of thi Cir, Auditor and Clerk.
.Witness my hand and the Official Seal of
the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, this 19th
day of .eptemb-r A. D. 1951.
SB H. DICKENS, Jr., *
(SEAL) City Auditor and Clerk,


new member, Betty Jo Tharpe.
An interesting program was pre-
sented on "State Missions," with
Sadie Arnette giving the devotional
and one verse of "Speak To My
Heart." Allie O'Brien talked on
"Italian Speaking People," June
Smith nn "Semninole Indians" and


Garden Circle Meets At
Home of Mrs. Miller
The Azalea Circle of the Port St.
Joe Garden Club met Thursday of
last week with Mrs. J. Lamar Miller
at her home on Seventh Street, with
Mrs. Miller, co-chairman, acting as


Betty Jo Thae d Wl Cn- chairman in the absence of the
Betty Jo Tharpe "Good Will Cen-
y o e circle chairman, Mrs. Paul Blount.
ters." Sentence prayers were giyen circle chairman, Mrs. Paul Blount.
for state work, after which the hos- The meeting was opened with the
tess served refreshments. reading of the minutes and report
I t I tof the treasurer. Reports were also
received from various committee
LUNCHROOM MENU chairmen. A letter was read an-
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL nouncing the first district meeting
of the year, to be held .at Milton
Monday, September 24 on October 24.
Veal Stew with Vegetables Mrs; J. C. Arbogast gave a most
Mashed Potatoes Tomato Wedges interesting program on the planting
White Bread Margarine
Stewed Prunes Milk and growing of spring bulbs.
Tuesday, September 25 On the arrangements of wild flow-
Hamburger Crumble with Muffin ers, dried leaves and seed pods,
Squares Mrs. J. L. Miller placed first, Mrs.
String Beans Spiced Beets Donald Birath second .and Mrs. C.
White Bread Margarine Milk Costin, third.
Wednesday, September 26
Wednesday, September 26 The hostess served cake, cokes
Spaghetti with Meat Sauce The hostess served cake, cokes
Raw Vegetable Salad and dainty sandwiches to the nine
Wheat Bread Margarine Milk members present.
Jello Fruit Cup Cookies I It It
Thursday, September 27 MRS. PARKER IS HOSTESS
Ham and Egg Loaf English Peas
White Bread Margarine TO BAPTIST CIRCLE TWO
Banana Pudding Milk Circle II of the Baptist W. M. U.
Friday, September 28 met Monday afternoon with Mrs.
Fish Salad on Lettuce Tom Parker at her home on Seventh
Sliced Tomatoes Boiled Potatoes
White Bread Margarine Milk Street.
Gingerbread with Lemon Sauce The meeting was opened with
-- the chairman, Mrs. Durel Brigman,
It pays to advertise-try it! reading Mal. 10:7-8, followed with


More rugged chassis,more power Easier handling, smoother riding
Every chassisunit front to rear Back a Dodge "Job-Rated"
is engineeredfor extra depend- truck into a tight spot-and
ability-for long life and low see how sharply it turns, how
maintenance on your job! Your easy it is to maneuver. Such
":Job-Rated" engine delivers features as wide front tread
increased power-it gives you and shorter wheelbases make
the right power with top econ- handling easier. Oriflow shock
omy and low upkeep in the absorbers on +-, %-, and 1-ton
toughest service! models give a smoother ride.


More all-'round safety
You get the finest truck brakes
in the industry! On many mod-
els you get new molded, tapered,
Cyclebond brake linings for
smoother, quieter, safer brak-
ing. And you'll ride in a welded
all-steel cab with "Pilot-House"
vision,, including extra-big
windshield area.

WHY A "Job-Rated" TRUCK
IS YOUR BEST BUY
A Dodge "Job-Rated" truck is engi-
neered at the factor to fit a specific
job....saveyou money... last longer.
Every unit from engine to rear axle
is "Job-Rated"-factory-engineered to
haul a specific load over the roads you,
travel and at the speeds you require.


Longer life with FLUID DRIVE
Only Dodge offers gjrol Fluid
,Drive. Available on Y-, Y-,
and 1-ton models, You start
with amazing smoothness .
tiresome gearshifting is mini-
mized .. wear is reduced oni-
vital parts' to increase truck
life. And Fluid Drive protects
your load!

Every unit that -SUPPORTS the
load-frame, axles, springs, wheels,
tires, and others-is engineered-right
to provide the strength and capacity
needed.
Every unit that MOVES the load
-engjne, .clutch, transmission, pro-
peller shaft, rear axle, and others-is
engineered right to meet a particular
operating condition.


prayer. All committees gave their producing canes and affect the
yearly reports. As this was the last quality of the blooms.
meeting of the year, all members Fall-blooming roses need a little
were urged to go to the church next special attention this month. Whe-
Monday to find what circle they their you gave them rest in midsum-
would be in for the ensuing year. mer ro not, prune them lightly,
During the social hour the hos- feed them heavily and keep them


stess served delicious chocolate
cake and cokes to the 11 members
present.


GARDEN NOTES
PORT ST. JOE GARDEN CLUB


This month the exhibition chrys-
anthemums will be putting out all
manner of side shoots. Pinch these
shoots off just as soon as they are
long enough to handle. If'left on
the plants, they weaken the flower-


well watered.
You can order Dutch irises and
Madonna lilies now. Be sure to
plant them as soon as they arrive.
Dutch irises are becoming one of
the South's favorite early spring
flowers because -they are of very
easy culture and are unsurpassed
for cutting. Any garden soil of av-
erage fertility will suit them.

The average American paid $360
in taxes last year. If you paid more,
we congratulate you on your in-
come.


COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME
24-HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE

601 Long Avenue Phone 326 Day or Night



MEET YOUR FRIENDS
S--- AT ---

LeHARDY'S BAR
Phone 52


See why --


TRUckS


ARE THE BEST BUY


v.tlhat. fis s yourjob...
eusA DODGE 4*ob-RaW


Zdp"TRUCR


McGOWIN MOTOR COMPANY

Baltzell Avenue and Fourth Street PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
: ; ',,, ,.'


THE ST AR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEM13ER 21', 191


I


ii








II T I SR P S


Enters Military College
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Quarles accom-
.panied their son, Billy, to Milledge-
ville, Ga., last week where he en-
tered Georgia Military College.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR SALE
ADDING MACHINE One 10-key
Barrett's electric adding machine
for sale. Phone 312. 21*
VACUUM CLEANER-Modern Hy-
gene vacuum cleaner, tank style.
Price reasonable. See Mrs. W. S.
Smith at The Star office. tf
HOUSEHOLD GOODS FOR SALE
FOR SALE-2-Piece living room
suite, 8-ft. Frigidaire refrigerator,
4-burner apartment-size gas range.
Clyde Parker, phone 114. 1*
FOR SALE CALL 65 OR 90-
Blonde twin bed bedroom suite,
includes chest of drawers, springs
and mattresses; 1 large oil heater;
1 gas heater; breakfast set, table
and 6 chairs; Hot-Point-hot water
heater; L & H electric stove; 1 set
porch furniture, chaise lounge and
glider. 1*
REFRIGERATOR-4 cu. ft. apart-
ment size Westinghouse electric re-
frigerator, in A-1 condition. Mrs.
Bert Munn, Phone 166. 14-21c
FOR SALE In One Lot, sufficient
furniture for five rooms; in good
condition. Reasonable. Buck Alex-
ander, 208 Sixth Street. Phone 101.
AUTOMOTIVE FOR SALE
FOR SALE-1941 Buick and 1946
8-cyl. Oldsmobile. See. W. W.
Barrier. 1*
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED TO RENT-2-bedroom
furnished house inside city limits.
Call phone 9, extension 22, 8 a. m.
to 4:30 week days. 1*
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Modern three-bedroom
Stebel home at White City, with
4 lots. Terms can be arranged. Also
have other lots for sale in Wimico
Subdivision. For appointment call
1904. 10-5*
FOR RENr
FOR RENT-Bedroom with private
entrance and bath. 205 8th Street.
Phone 104. 9-28*
FOR RENT-4-bedroom house with
screen porch, Youngstown kit-
chen, on 4th Street. See J. A. Chest-
nut, Highland View. 9-14tf
SALESMEN WANTED
LOCAL RAWLEIGH BUSINESS
AVAILABLE In Gulf County-
Full or part time. Start immediate-
ly. Selling experience helpful, but
not required. Car necessary. Write
at once for particulars. Rawleigh's,
Dept. FAH-101-251, Memphis, Tenn.
8-10 31 9-14 21*
SPECIAL SERVICES
RECAP YOUR OLD TIRES
Rubber is getting scarce! Help the
war effort by having your old tires
recapped. We guarantee all work.
Prices reasonable.
ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
RECAP SHOP
Phone 37 Port St. Joe, Fla.
FOR QUICK SERVICE
and Quality Workmanship on
Roll Film, Try
MAIGE PHOTO LAB
LODGE NOTICES
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. O.
0. F.-Meets first and third Thurs-
days, 7:30 p. m. in Masonic Hall. All
members urged to attend; visiting
brethren invited. J. F. Miller, N. G.;
John Blount, V. G.; Theo Bishop,
Secretary.
AMERICAN LEGION Willis V.
Rowan-'Post 116, meets first and
third Mondays, 8 p. m., Legion Hall.
Visiting Legionnaires invited to at-
tend. Denver C. Miller, commander;
W. S. Smith, adjutant.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
SSt. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit.
Ing companions welcome. J. L. Wil-
son, High Priest; H. R. Maige, Sec.


Corn Crop Is Best
In State's History

Production Expected To Total 10,-
890,000 Bushels for An Average
Yield of 15 Bushels Per Acre

Florida farmers are.now harvest-
ing the best corn crop in the his-
tory of the state, according to the
University of Florida agricultural
extension service.
Their production on 737,000 acres
-the largest acreage devoted to
any crop and..larger than the com-
bined acreage of all crops except
citrus-is expected to total 10,890,-
000 bushels, and their average yield
is expected to be 15. bushels per
acre or over. The average yield in
1950 was 13 bushels per acre, and


the average yield ten years ago pickers. While some corn is ground
was about 11 bushels per acre. for home use, most of that which is
The good crop this year is at- harvested is stored and fed to live-
stock.
tribute to the fact that 40 per cent F, .
I Florida's corn harvest begins in
of the acreage was planted to Dixie Flvesbe
late August and runs to December,
18, North Carolina No. 27 and other with most of the crop being har-
high-yielding hybrids, more exten- epteber an ct
vested in September and October.
sive and efficient fertilization, ed n
Field corn is grown on thousands
closer planting, and generally good F ie nro o .
crn" weather. Only 32 per cent of acres from Marion county north-
cor eater. Oy 32 per cet ward and across the entire northern
of last year's acreage of 723,000 was section of the state. In recent years
planted to hyhbrids, and only 22 per it has also become an important
cent of the 1949 acreage was feed crop in the Everglades section
planted to hybrids. of Palm Beach county, where yields
About half of the corn crop is as high as 100 bushels per acre have
"hogged off," while the other half is 'been reported from some fields.
harvested for food and feed. Hogs _-------
are in numerous fields now, break- There is o much planning for
ing down the stalks and eating the war that h know there
war that first thing we know there
grain, fattenting for fall and win- will be war.
ter markets. Other fields are being ____
harvested by hand or by mechanical his a on your iinting is a sign of quality.


YOUR PORT ST. JOE







DANLEY


FURNITURE STORE


Brings you a glamorous


New Home Fashion


Daystro m COLORAMIC


:i \'1~*


Awarded Fashion
Academy Gold Daystrom Coloramic table, 30"A48",
Medal for the extends to 30"x58" with a 10" leaf.
Second Year. Large Daystrom Coloramic comfort-
curved chair.
Today's most exciting new dinette! Daystrom COLORAMIC-plastic
sheathed tubular steel furniture with the warmth and decorative versa-
tility of wood! Smart for the most pretentious home rugged enough
for the patio or terrace because the plastic coated steel legs and the
DAYSTROMITE Wonder Top ore scratch, stain and burn resistant!
Luxuriously, cushioned chairs are washable covered with plain or
patterned, long-wearing plastic upholstery. A lovely color choice in
wood grain table tops and chairs. Legs in Bronze, Silver Gray and
Avocado Green.
*TRADEMARK





$98.50 Coo.use.e
G~oo ~lloviek"*g 3


e* U ** U OS S
1 GULF COUNTY
Boys 4-H Club

Meetings

White City-Friday after the first
and third Sundays. 8 p. m. at CB ri-
munity Building. Jack Hall, local
leader.
Wewahitchka-Monday after the
first and thirdSundays. 7:30 p. m.,
at high school. Bill Roemer, local
leader.
Kenney's Mill-Monday after the
second and fourth Sundays. 8 p.m.
at Leman Wise's. home. Jack Hall,
local leader: '":
Ready cash, it seems, is able to


outdo magicians
act.


in a disappearing


CRYSTAL WATER SET


Consists of 1 85 oz. ice lip pitcher, 6 12 oz. ice tea
glasses, 6 -9 oz. water glasses
and 6 412 oz. juice glasses 1.
1 set in a box. PER SET 1
LIMIT ONE TO A CUSTOMER


/
/~


Pe destal





Smoker


Wlcnut Fin;h


LIMITED

QUANTITY!


Chrome Trim




$1.00

One To A Customer!


Phone 56


MELODY REBEKAH LODGE NO.
22, I. O. O. F.-Meets 2nd and 4th
Thursday at 8:00 p. m. in Masonic
hall. Mary B. Forehand, N.G.; Mary
E. Weeks, V.G.; Fannie Brown, Sec.
MASONIC TEMPLE F & A M-
ort St. Joe Lodge 111. Regular
A meetings 2nd and 4th Fri-
days each month, 8:00 p. m.
Members urged to attend:
visiting brothers welcome. Milton
Chafin, W. M.; G. C. Adkins, Sec.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
MAKE YOUR. HOUSE o e
A HOME
Complete Home Furn'shings..^. j \p Y Horp.
r/ Irfiw iu coS.. Use Your Credit


-.- .. ..-- WN W,


PAGE TEN


THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21; 1951