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 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 10, 1951
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00773

Full Text






PORT ST. JOE
A Progressive
Community With a
Modern, Progressive
Weekly Newspaper
i -. -


VOLUME XIV


THE


STAR


THE STAR
Official Paper for Gulf
County, Devoted To the
Continued Development
of the Entire County


"Port St. Joe -The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


NUM1iK '+At!


Two Candidates

Qualify for City

Commission Race


Terms of Two Commission-
ers and Mayor Expire;
Election Sept. 11


With the terms of two city com-
missioners and the mayor expiring
shortly, interest is beginning to pick
up in the annual city election, which
this year is to be held on Septem-
ber 11.
Mayor Jake Belin was the first
to qualify, having filed July 18 for
re-election as mayor. Denver Miller,
a newcomer to local politics, was
next in line, filing last Friday as a
-.candidate in Group 1. B. B. Conk-
lin, present member of the board,
-is holding his seat in Group 1, but
as yet has not announced for re-
election, though we can be pretty
sure that he will, for once in poli-
-tics these boys just can't seem to
get out. B. B. is acting mighty se-
cretive about his intentions and
probably has something up his
sleeve.
There are rumors of other pos-
sible entries in the field, but as yet
no one has come right out and
qualified. Last day to file is Mon-
.day, August 27.
Watson Smith, in Group 2, has
not qualified for re-election, but
odds are he will. Commissioners I.
C. Nedley and Franklin Chandler
don't t have to worry about competi-
tion this year, since, their terms do'
not expire until 1952.

Martin Theaters Planning
Construction of Drive-In

Frank Brady of Columbus, Ga.,
property manager for the Martin
Theaters, was in St. Joe Tuesday
to acquire a site for the construc-
tion of a drive-in theater, it was an-
nounced by P. V. Player, manager
of the Port Theater.
It is hoped to locate it west of
the city on Highway 98 if the neces-
sary land can be obtained from the
St. Joe Paper Company.
Construction will start as soon as
government regulations permit, said
Player, who went on to say that the
drive-in would have a capacity of
300 cars with individual speakers
for each car, a modern concession
stand, large screen tower, and the
latest in sound and projection equip-
ment.

CALL ISSUED FOR BIDS ON
UPKEEP OF SCHOOL BUSES
In this issue of The Star appears
a notice from the county' board of
public instruction .calling for bids
on the upkeep of the county's school.
buses for the 1951-52 school'year.
Bids will be received by the board
up until 2 p. m. OST, August 22.

Return To Home In Georgia-
Mrs. Emmie Bbowen and grand-
daughters, Carolyn and Judy Ken-
nedy, returned to their home in
Lyons, Ga., yesterday after a visit
of two weeks here and at Over-
street. They were accompanied to
.Lyons by Mrs. Bowen's daughter
and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Pervis
A. Howell.
------- '
Here On Short Leave
Cpl. Will Ramsey, stationed .at
Fort Jackson, S. C., spent three
.days here this week with his wife
and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley
Ramsey. His wife accompanied him
back to Fort Jackson to spend a
month.


Grim Reaper Calls

Mrs. Minnie Lupton

Funeral Services Held Sunday for
Long-Time Resident of
This Section

Funeral services were held Sun-
day afternoon at 3 o'clock from the
First Methodist Church for Mrs.
Minnie Idell Lupton, 77, who died
early Saturday morning following a
lengthy illness. Rev. W. J. Lindsey,
pastor of the church, officiated, and
the Comforter Funeral Home was
in charge of arrangements.
Burial was in Jehu Cemetery at
Wewahitchka. Pallbearers were B.
E. Parker, Pervis Howell, Earl Rol-
lins, Joe Ferrell, Silas Stone and
Joe Grimsley.
Mrs. Lupton is survived by four
sons, Arthur, Osgood and Isbell of
this city and Albert of Wewahit-
chka, and four sisters, Mrs. Addle
Nicholson of Molino, Mrs. Annie
Gulledete of Orlandb, Mrs. Olga
Carney of Pensacola, and Mrs. Ella
Gilbert of Chipley.
Mrs. Lupton and her husband,
the late Charles Lupton, acted as
keepers of the Cape San Bias light
from 1895 to' 1902, when they were
transferred to the Beacon Hill light,
serving as keepers there until 1928,
at which time Mr. Lupton retired
from service.


County Judge Tells

Of New Changes In

Driver Licenselaw

Motorists Must Have New Permits
By October 1; Special Pro-
vision for Servicemen

According to County Judge Earl
Pridgeon, the 1951 legislature made
the following changes in the Flor-
ida drivers' license law:
Every operator's and chauffeur's
license shall expire at midnight,
September 30, of each year, unless
that date falls on Sunday (which it
does this year), in which case the
license shall expire at midnight on
October 1.
Every such license shall be re-
newable on or before its expiration
upon application :and payment of
the required fee and may be re-
newed without examination, unless
it is- believed that the licensee is
no longer qualified to receive a li-
cense..
Any time within 11 months after
the expiration date of said license
it may be renewed upon paymaot of
a delinquent fee of $1 in lieu of an
examination, the fee of $1 to be
forwarded by the county judge to
the department of public safer.y,
where n t will be placed in the re-
tirement fund for highway patrol-'
men.
Any person in the qrmed forces
of the United States holding a valid
Florida driver's license and being
out of the state due to military ser-
vice at the' time' said license ex-
pires' nmay renew the license at any
time within three months after be-
ing discharged from service or upon
being stationed at a military estab-
lishment inFlorida, without paying
the delinquent fee or, taking an ex-
amination.unless the'department of
public safety has reason to believe
that the licensee is no longer'quali-
fled to receive a license, upon mak-
ing proof by affidavit of the fact of
such military service and the date
of discharge.
-
Circuit Court Convenes Monday
The fall term of the Gulf county
circuit court will open Monday at
the courthouse in Wewahitchka.


AdmissionTax

Ordinance Gets


Board Re-advertising

Part of County Budget


Sof Cit ine and Forfeiture Fund Boosted
OK of07 Ciy Di ds Due To Changes In Expenses
of Sheriff's Office


Favor Trailer Park To Care
for Influx of Workers On
Mill Expansion Job

The city commission Tuesday eve-
ning put its stamp of approval on
an ordinance providing for a levy
on admissions to all types of enter-
tainment within the city limits, in-
cluding moving picture shows, cir-
cuses, traveling shows, theatrical
performances and other entertain-
ment of a like nature, prize fights,
boxing matches and other athletic
contests and exhibitions.
The ordinance does not apply to
any events in which local school
children perform for the benefit of
their school or athletic association.
The rate is Ic on each admission
exceeding 8c but not exceeding 25c;
2c on each admission exceeding 25c
but not exceeding 50c,' and 3c on
each admission exceeding 50c.
.Among other matters approved
by the city dads was the purchase
of a basal metabolism machine for
the Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital
at a cost of $330.
The commissioners 'talked over
the matter of establishing a city-
owned trailer .park with'water, sew-
age and electric facilities, to care
for the anticipated influx of work-
ers on the '$25,000,000 expansion
program of.the paper-mill., No ac-
tion was taken at this time, but it
was pointed out that some arrange-
ment of this sort must be made.
The board also went on record as
being willing to pave Woodward
Avenue if a proposed FHA home
building project now on the fire for
that section of the city requires the
paving in order to have the badly-
needed homes constructed.
----->--~---

Franklin Bridge Plans

Get Overwhelming Vote

Island Resort Development Project
Passed Favorably By Vote
of 1,119 To 34

With slightly more than half of
the county's 2,220 qualified voters
going to the polls Tuesday, Frank-
lin county's proposal to construct
bridges to St. George and Dog Is-
lands was okehed by a vote of 1,119
to 34.
Estimated cost of the proposed
bridges and roads, 30 miles on St.
George and 7 on Dog, is placed at
$3,500,000.
The bridge to St. George will con-
nect with the mainland near the
end of Gorrie Bridge at Apalachi-
cola, while the bridge to. Dog Is-
land will extend out from Carra-
belle, thus opening these two beau-
tiful islands with their Gulf beaches
to development. :
Oonstruction-;:wil,-be fina ced, 'ty
the-issuance of revenue certificates
to be redeemed with tolls charged
on the two bridges and the county's
share of secondary gasoline tax
money.

CITY REGISTRATION BOOKS
WILL BE OPENED AUGUST 22
The city registration books will
bq opened at the city hall Adgust
29 for the purpose of registration of
all qualified electors preparatory to
the annual city election to be held
September 11.
The books will be at the city hall
and will be open from 9 a, m. to 12
noon and from 2 to 5 p. m. daily, ex-
cept Sundays and holidays,


Due to the fact that the tempor-
ary budget for Gulf county was ad-
vertised before a copy of the sher-
iff's new fee bill was received, the
board of county commissioners in
this issue of The Star is re-adver-
tising the proposed fine and for-
feiture fund.
The budget as published on July
13 was based on the old fee bill,
says Clerk George Core. The new
bill gives Sheriff Byrd Parker 15c
per-mile against the old rate of
12%c per mile. Guard pay is in-
creased from $5 to $8 per day, and
several other of the $5 fee rates
have been jumped to $8. The feed-
ing of prisoners has also been in-
creased 25c per day per prisoner.
The only two items increased in
the new fine and forfeiture budget
is the sheriff's costs, from $8000 to
$10,000, and pay for a guard at the
jail, from $1,800 to $2,920.
This boost in the fine and forfei-
ture fund, from $22,395 to $25,715,
boosts the total proposed county
budget from $161,077 to $164,397.
------4-

Many Prospective

Candidates Mentioned

For Governor Race

Dan McCarty and Bill H Hdri :Are
Only Two To Date With
Hats In Ring

Gubernatorial gossip, speculation
and rumor mount as the time draws
near when the next crop of candi-
dates for governor may be expected
to emerge. But at this point the
only men actually running are Dan
McCarty of Fort Pierce, guberna-
torial runner-up in 1948, and Bill
Hendrix, Tallahassee, grand dragon
of the state Ku Klux Klan.
Final decisions remain to be made
by State Senator Henry S. Baynard
of St. Petersburg, Comptroller
Clarence M. Gay, former U. S..Sen-
ator Claude Pepper, Road Chairman
Alfred A. McKethan, Senate Presi-
dent Wallis Sturgis, State Senator
Leroy Collins of Tallahassee, for-
mer Governor Millard F. Caldwell,
and former representative Brailey
Odham, president of the Florida
Junior Chamber of Commerce. All
of these are at least thinking of
running.
The name of Alto Adams, state
supreme court justice, is also in the
wind, although not heard with the
same frequence as the others. For-
mer Congressman Peterson's name
was heard a few months ago, but
reports are current that he is in-
clined against running.

CITY DADS TO SIT AS
EQUALIZATION BOARD
Thbe'bi.oard of city conwiissioners
will meet as a board, of equaliza-
tioa, August 21 at 7 p. m. at the city
hall for the purpose of hearing any-
one who has a kick about their
property assessment.
Anyone having a complaint must
file same with City Clerk Ben H.
Dickens Jr., on or before August 20.

Expecting Overseas Duty
Sgt. and Mrs. Henry Raiford ar-
rived in St. Joe Monday from Great
Falls, Mont., where Henry has been
stationed for several months past.
After a visit here with relatives,
the sergeant will leave for Califor-
nia and from there will leave for
overseas duty.


FORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1951


i
--


Virginia Concern

Named To Handle

Mill Expansion


Texas Company Lands Con-
tract for Construction of
Box Plant Building

Harry Saunders, production man-
ager of the St. Joe Paper Company,
announced yesterday that the gen-
eral contractor for the $25,000,000
mill expansion program will be the
Tidewater Construction Company of
Norfolk, Va. Engineering will be
handled by Cummins & Barnard,
Inc., of Ann Arbor, Mich., and the
contract for construction of the new
box plant building,, with a floor
space of 100,000 square feet, has
been awarded The Austin Company
of Houston, Texas.
The engineers are already on the
job, and it is expected that the con-
tractors will start moving in men
and equipment by the middle of this
month. Plans call for completion of
the project in September 1952.
When the modernization and ex-
pansion project is completed it is ex-
pected the mill will have an output
of approximately 1200 tons of kraft
paper daily, as against the present
400 tons a day, and it is anticipated
that it will require an extra 367,500
cords of pulpwood annually to take
care of the increased output.
In order to assure sufficient wa-
ter for operation of the greatly ex-
panded' -plant, -which r-ow is using
some 9,000,000 gallons daily, a pipe-
line will be laid to a location on the
Chipola River which will be sup-
plied from a large settling basin.

Branka Car Wrecked In
Collision Near Hosford

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Branka re-
ceived severe bruises and cuts and
suffered from shock as the result of
an accident near Hosford Saturday
morning when their car was struck
by an on-coming automobile. Their
car, which turned over thrce times,
is a total loss.
The accident occurred as they
were returning to St. Joe from Ma-
con, Ga. After being given first aid
treatment they were brought here
by Mrs. Branka's mother and bro-
ther, Mrs. E. C. Cason and Emory
Cason.
Mr. Branka returned to Macon,
where they expect to make their fu-
ture home, but Mrs. Branka is re-
maining here with her mother for
a few days.

DR. CANNING WILL LECTURE
AT HIGHLAND VIEW CHURCH
Dr. Harold B. Canning of Wewa-
hitchka, who spent four years in
Africa as a medical missionary, will
lecture at the Bayview Methodist
Church in Highland View Sunday
evening, August 12, at 8 o'clock on
his work in this field.
Dr. Canning, who is a very able
speaker, will use motion pictures to
illustrate his talk.
The public is cordially invited to
attend.

Bill Trawick Promoted
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Trawick re-
ceived word this week from their
son, Bill, that he had been promoted
to the rank of sergeant. He is at
present stationed at Oxford, Eng-
land.
-----^----
It's Now Corporal Plair
Mrs. Ralph Plair received word
this week that her husband had
been promoted to corporal. Ralph
is stationed in Wurzburg, Germany,


NUMIBEB 4tb


c--'',








PAGE TWO THE STIR. PORT ST. JOE, GULF C0U~-JTY FLORIDA FRIDAY, AUGUST 10


Social Activities

Personals Clubs Churches

MYRTICE O. SMITH, Editor PHONE 51


Odd Fellows Install Baptist W. M. U. Holds
Officers for Year Monthly Business Meet
At the last regular meeting of The Woman's Missionary Union
Samaritan Lodge No. 40, I. O. O. F., of the First Baptist Church met at
the following officers were installed the church Monday afternoon for
for the ensuing year: J. F. Miller, its regular monthly business meet-
noble grand; John Blount, vice- ing with Mrs. E. C. Cason, presi-
grand; Theo Bishop, financial sec- dent, in charge.
retary; Charles Smith, recording The meeting was opened with
secretary; C. W. Long, warden; B. the year song, "Jesus Calls Us,"
B. Conklin, right supporter to noble followed with prayer by Mrs. W. J.
grand; W. H. Weeks, left supporter Daughtry and the devotional by
to noble grand; "Red" Fuller, right Mrs. C. A. McClellan and Mrs. L.
supporter to vice-grand; Emmett E. Voss from I Cor. 13th chapter.
Daniels, left supporter to vice- The secretary, Mrs. J. ., Bag-
grand; James Gibson, right scene gett, read the minutes of the July
supporter; H. A. Davis, left scene meeting, the treasurer's report was
supporter; W. C. Forehand, chap- given, and reports received from
lain; J. H. Greer, conductor; T. W. other officers and chairmen.
Thompson, inner guard, and W. B.
Mrs. E. R. DuBose spoke ott the
White, outer guard.
White, outer guard. G. A. camp held last week and
Following the installation, 'usual urged the ladies to begin now to
refreshments were served, plan for next year's camp, as it
The newly-installed noble grand, means so much to the girls who
J. F. Miller, announces that a spe- attend. She suggested that the or-
cial meeting will be held August ganization have a birthday box and
16 for the purpose of conferring de- use the monies for a camp fund.
agrees of the order upon a number A report from the nominating
of candidates. committee was received and ac-
n cepted. the following names being
Local G. A. Members Receive placed in nomination: Mrs. W. J.
Awards At Summer Camp Ferrell, president; Mrs. W. C. Prid-
Mrs. E. R. DuBose, counselor for geon. first vice-president; Mrs. Mil-
the Girls' Auxiliary of the Baptist ton Chafin, second vice-president;
W. M. U., reports a grand week at Mrs. Wesley Ramsey, third vice-
the G. A. summer camp held at the president; Mrs. J. O. Baggett, re-
Baptist Assembly grounds near Pan- cording secretary; Mrs. E. C. Ca-
ama City last week. Following is a son, corresponding secretary; Mrs.
list of the awards given the local W. S. Smith, treasurer.


girls:
Marietta Chafin was chosen as
the star camper from 147 Intermedi-
ate girls from over the state. She
was the only camper to receive this
award.
Faye Parker and Marietta Chafin
won awards in handicraft, choir and
dramatics for the Intermediate G.
A.'s.
Junior G. A.'s receiving awards
were Gail Bateman, Barbara In-
-gram, Patsy Daniells and Frances
Jones, dramatics. Gail Bateman,
Barbara Williams, Marjorie Rogers,
Martha Ray, Elaine Musselwhite,
Peggy Scott, Patty Ingram, Celia
Tomlinson and Rose Mary Tomlin-
son, choir. Barbara Kay, Martha
Ray, Marjorie Rogers, Peggy Scott,
Elaine Musselwhite, Mary Brooks,
Carolyn Byrd, Celia Tomlinson and
Rose Mary Tomlinson, handicraft.
Awards for games went to Bar-
bara Williams, Susan Gainous, Rose
Mary Tomlinson, Celia Tomlinson
and Judy Poitevint.
All girls from the local G. A.
were given awards as honor camp-
ers, and are already planning to at-
tend camp next year.'
K. V at
TOM *BYRNE' TO HOLD SERVICE
SUNDAY AT ST. JAMES'CHURCH
The Venerable Thomas B. Byrne,
newly-appointed archdeacon of the
western convocation of the Diocese
of Florida of the Protestant Episco-
pal Church, will make his first visi-
tation as archdeacon to St. James'
Church, his former pastorate, 'on
'Snday, August 12. :
The Ven. Mr. Bytrne wili'be'tiie
celebrant at service 'of the holy,
coinmunion at 7:'30 'a:. m. He will
also be the speaker at the monthly
Laymen's League breakfast immedi-
ately following the service:

LEGION AUXILIARY SCHOOL
OF INSTRUCTION TO BE HELD
A school of instruction for mem-
bers of the American Legion Auxil-
iary will be held in Tallahassee on
August 25, beginning at 10:30 a. m.,
primarily for newly-elected officers
of the various units in this area.
A district president is to be se-
lected at this meeting, says Mrs.
Zola Maddox, president of the local
unit, and urges all members that
can possibly attend this meeting to
do so.


The meeting was dismissed witn
prayer by Mrs. W. S. Smith.

Episcopal Church Plans
Vacation Bible School
"The Christian Soldier's Armor"
will be the theme of the vacation
Bible school to be held at St. James'
Episcopal Church next week. The
school will begin Wednesday, Au-
gust 15, and continue through Fri-
day, August 24, with the exception
of Saturday and Sunday.
A program of worship, study and
handicraft will be presented each
morning from 9 until 11:30. Chil-
dren over two years of age, of all
denominations, are cordially in-
vited to attend. Each child is re-
quested to bring five cents daily in
order to cover the cost of refresh-
ments.
The staff of the Bible school will
include Mrs. W. D. Dare, Mrs. H.
B. Douglas Jr., Mrs. J. L. Fuller,
Mrs. B. E. Kenney Jr., Mrs. B. H.
Munn, Mrs. R. E. Rich, Mrs. A. L.
Ward and Misses Jacquelyn and
Ann Kenney. The chaplain will be
H. B. Douglas Jr., the missioner in
charge of St. James' Church.

GIRJ.S', AUXILIARY MEETS
...The.Virginia Hagood Girls' Aux-
iliary of the, Baptist. W. M.. U. met-
at the, church .Monday afternoon
-with 14 members present. The meet-
ing was opened with the year song,
"We've. A Story. To Tell To the Na-
tions," after. .which the watchword
and allegiance were repeated in uni-
son. Prayer was offered by Barbara
,Ingraim that all-rmembers would be
more faithful in their G., A. work.
The devotional was given by Mrs.
E. R. DuBose, counselor, her sub-
ject being. "Go .Ye and Teach All
Nations." The program for the next
meeting was given out, and Mrs.
DuBose urged all to prepare their
parts to be given by memory. The
meeting was closed with prayer by
Gail Bateman.

Expect To Leave On Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon and
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Harris expect to
leave Sunday for a few days' vaca-
tion in Birmingham, Ala., where
they will visit with friends and rel-
atives. Mrs. Pridgeon's father, .W.
M. Upshaw, will return to St. Joe
with them for an extended visit.


GULF COUNTY

Boys 4-H Club

Meetings

>****~6*S*****
White City-Friday after the first
and third Sundays. 8 p. m. at Com-
munity Building. Jack Hall, local
leader.
Wewahitchka-Monday after the
first and third Sundays. 7:30 p. m.,
at high school. Bill Roemer, local
leader.
Kenney's Mill-Monday after the
second and fourth Sundays. 8 p. m.
at Leman Wise's home. Jack Hall,
local leader.

HELLO, WORLD!
No new arrivals to report this
week-weather is too hot for such
activities.

Visitors From Philadelphia
Mrs. Oscar Gilmore and son, Cpl.
John L. Gilmore, Mrs. Earl Gilmore
and Miss Katherine Munjat, all of
Philadelphia, Pa., stopped by The
Star office early Wednesday morn-
ing en route to their home in the
North from Bradenton, where they
were called by the death of Mrs.
Oscar Gilmore's brother, Fred Lud-
lum. Mrs. Gilmore renewed her sub-
scription to The Star and said to
keep it coming as she enjoys. it
immensely.

Spend Week-end In Georgia
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. DuBose and
Mr. and Mrs. Blake Thomason spent
last week-end in Sylvester, Ga.,
with relatives and friends. The.:
were accompanied home by Mrs.
DuBose's sister, Mrs. G. S. Walker,
who returned to her home in the
Georgia city Wednesday.

SExpect To Leave for Tampa
Mrs. J. B. Trawick and daughter
Carolyn expect to leave today for
Tampa, where they will visit for a

week with Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Burch. We see where J. B. again
goes on a diet of canned pork and
beans.

Pastor Off On Vacation
Rev. S. J. Allen, pastor of the St.
Joe Presbyterian Church, has left
for Philadelphia, Pa., on a vacation
of two weeks. He is scheduled to
preach in the church in which he
was raised, on two Sundays, Au-
gust 12 and 19.

Visit Patient In Hospital
Mrs. Charles W. Roberts and Mrs.
Charles W. Roberts Jr., of Hosford
visited Saturday with Mrs. Joe
Johnson at the municipal hospital.
Mrs. Johnson underwent an opera-
tion last Friday.

Bible School Enjoys Picnic
The White City community Bible
school held its picnic at Wayside
Park, Mexico Beach, Monday after-
noon. About 80 persons, including
65 children and young people, were
present and report a good time.

Convalescing After. Appendectomy
, Jimmy Howell is..convalescing- at
his home on Eighth Street:after un-
dergoing an.operation for acute ap-
pendicitis Thursday night of 'last
week at the municipal hospital.

..Hom. From. Visit In Georgia
SMr. and Mrs. Sam Ford returned
Wednesday night from a short visit
in Sylvester, Ga., with the former's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ford.

CARD OF THANKS
We are taking .this means to ex-
press our deepest appreciation to
all our friends fr' their sympathy
and practical help during the time
of our sadness in the loss of our
loved one.
Mrs. D. W. Dean.
Grady Dean.
William Dean.
SCarl Dean.

CARD OF THANKS
May we extend to our friends and
neighbors our sincere appreciation
and thanks for the many kindnesses
extended our dear mother and us
during her long illness and death.
Arthur Lupton.
Albert Luptori.
Osgood Luptoo.
Isbell Lupton.


To Attend Wedding of Niece
Mrs. Mary F. Babb expects to
leave August 18 for Gainesville to
attend the wedding of her niece,
Miss Esther Ferguson, to John M.
Starling on August 19.

Coal ranks next to gold in value
of Alaskan mineral deposits.



Dr. Joseph B. Spear

OPTOMETRIST

Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted
Broken Lenses Duplicated

APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA


A Martin Theatre


THURSDAY and FRIDAY








with MELVYN DOUGLAS ....o..."o


SATURDAY ONLY

DOUBLE FEATURE

PROGRAM

--- FEATURE No. I --



,N,



"RAIDERS OF TOMAHAWK
CREEK" with SMILEY BURNETTE .W-

--- -FEATURE No. 2---

VINCENT PRICE

ELLEN DREW

in -

"THE BARON OF

ARIZONA"
For One Woman He Stole the
State of Arizona
--- Plus ---

Chapter 9 of Serial

"THE JAMES BROTHERS

OF. MISSOURI"
and Cartoon, 'LITTLE MOTHS
S BIG FLAME'


Visiting Here From Blountstow}
Mrs. Percy Corbin and son Fini
of Blountstown arrived here W'
nesday for a visit of several de
with Mr. and Mrs. C. A. McCleli,
and Miss Erline McClellan.
\


Dr. Charles Reicherter )
OPTOMETRIST
EYES EXAMINED
GLASSES FITTED

RITZ THEATRE LDING
FIRST FLOOR
HoURS B TO 5 PHONE 5665
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
CLOSED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOONS


'Port St. Joe, Fla.


SUNDAY MONDAY

GARYCOOPER

JANGREER
At





--- Also ---
LATEST NEWS and Cartoon,
"THE DUCKSTERS"
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY.


FRANK ,I
LOVEJOY A WASNER BROS.PICTURE
Also
--- Also ---
Cartoon, "PLEASED TO EAT
YOU," and

latest March of Time


THURSDAY FRIDAY


VAN JOHNSON wmi m
HEROES of the 442nd REGIMENTAL COMBAT TEA
A METRO-GODWYN.MAYER PICTLW

-- Plus ---
LATEST NEWS and
Cartoon, "TIMID PUP"
CC 000*0**** 64


oeot to 0 4 0 0U 0 00 0 0EWU*4*t


NOTICE


McCoy's Food Store will be closed Tuesday

and Wednesday, August 14th and 15th, in

order to move into new location adjoining

Buzzett's Drug Store under the name of


McCOY'S SUPER- MARKET








Port Theatre


"DEDICATED TO COMMUNITY SERVICE"

THEATRE OPENS SATURDAYS SUNDAYS AT 1:00 P. M.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE DAILY AT 2:45 P. M.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, .


THE CZTR. PORT ST. JCE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


I (
,,


6
/


11







TOTP


FRIDAY AUGUST 10 1951


CHURCH
ANNOUNCEMENTS
AND SUNDAY SERVICES
.,. .. . . .....o;:.::.;:, .^.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:15 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
6:00 p. m.-Youth Fellowship.
In the absence of Rev. S. J. Al-
len, who will be away on vacation,
Rev. John H. Harper, pastor of the
First Presbyterian Church, George-
town, Ky., will preach at 11 a. m.
Sunday, August 12.
Dr. Harold B. Canning of Wewa-
hitchka, former Baptist missionary
to Africa, will preach at 11 a. m.
Sunday, August 19.
ST. JAMES' EPISCOPAL CHURCH
The week of the Twelfth Sunday
after Trinity-August 12, 1951.
7:30 a. m.-Holy communion and
meditation.
9:45 a. m.-Sunday school and
young people's confirmation class.
11:00 a. m.-Morning prayer and
sermon.
Wednesday, 9 a. m.-Daily vaca-
tion Bible school. 7:30 p. m.-Choir
practice.
Thursday, 9 a. m.-Daily vacation
Bible school. 7:30 p. m.-Adult con-
firmation class at the rectory.
Friday, 9 a. m.-Daily vacation
Bible school.
KENNEY MILL BAPTIST
Rev. W. B. Holland, Pastor
9:45 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Worship service.
6:30 p. m.-Training Union.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.
Prayer service Tuesday evenings
at 7:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. L. J. Keels, Pastor
9:45 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning service.
6:45 p. m.-Training Union,
8:00 p. m.-Evening worship.
Prayer service Wednesday at 8
p. m.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
W. J. Lindsey, Pastor
9:45 a. m.-Church school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
6:30 p m.--Youth Fellowship.
8:00 p. m.-Evening worship.
ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
Fr. Robert O'Sullivan, Priest
Mass the first Sunday of each
month at 8 a. m. Other Sundays at
10:30 a. m.
MRS. JONES HONORS SMALL
DAUGHTER ON" BIRTHDAY
Mrs. G. E. Jones honored her
small daughter, Judy, on her fourth
birthday on Thursday of last week
with a party at the Jones home.
Early arrivals were entertained
by working picture puzzles, and
when all guests were present sev-
eral interesting indoor and outdoor
games were enjoyed.
After the honoree had opened the
many gifts presented her, cookies,
cake, ice cream, punch and candy
were served to Patsy and Gwen
Parrot of Panama City, Ann Carol
Willis, Jackie Fay Price, Billy and
Bobby Antley, Linda Price, Sandra
Baxley, Wayne Pate, Betty, Curtis
and Eric Hammond, Elaine Sherril,
Ronnie and Coleman Tharpe, Patsy
and Junior Davis and Janet Staf-
ford.
Assisting Mrs. Jones in enter-
taining and serving the. children
were Mesdames Joe Parrott, E. J.
Baxley, Frank Pate, Victor Willis,
O. C. Hammond, J. C. Price, Janet
Sherrill.and E. L. An'tley.
SHIRLEY-HAMMOCK
Mrs. Jessie Mae Hammock and
H. H. Shirley, both of this city,
were quietly married in Panama
City on July 11. They are at home
to their friends on Woodward Ave-
nue.
"Square Meal"
The expression, "square meal,"
originated in New England, where
\most of the food was prepared in
square tins.


COME ON IN TO'COSTIN'S' FOR OUR'FINAL'


SUMMER


To Clear Our Stocks of Summer Merchandise, We Have Disregarded Profit!!!

SALE STARTS THURSDAY MORNING, AUG. 9th *


ALL CHILDREN'S
SUMMER SANDALS
up to size 12

Now $1.50

ALL SUMMER
SHEER GOODS

59c yd.

EYELET EMBROIDERY
Several Shades

98c yd.
Reg. $1.95

ALL LADIES'
SUMMER BLOUSES

/3 OFF!

ALL CHILDREN'S
TEE SHIRTS

/3 OFF!

ALL LADIES'
TEE SHIRTS

1/3 OFFF

MEN'S
'FORTUNE' SPORT
SHOES

$5.95
Reg. $9.95

MEN'S
'FLORSHEIM' SPORT
SHOES

s12.95
Reg. $17.95


SAVE

MONEY

By Buying At


ALL LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S

BATHING SUITS


REDUCED


13


ALL LADIES' SHORTS

REDUCED V3

ALL LADIES' SUMMER DRESSES

REDUCED TO 1/2 PRICE!

ALL CHILDREN'S SUMMER DRESSES

REDUCED 1/3

CHILDREN'S PLAY SUITS

Reg. $1.59 NOW $1.00


MEN'S NYLON CORD SUITS

REDUCED TO $15.00
1 PAIR PANTS'
Sizes Left 2135, 2[36, 3|39, 1 37, 1 44 Regulars


MEN'S RAYON SUITS

REDUCED TO $15.00
1 PAIR PANTS
Sizes Left 1 35, 3 37, 1 38, I139, 1 40, 1142 Regular

MEN'S SUMMER SPORT COATS

.EJ`CED TO 1$ 3.95

MEN'S SUMMER PANTS

$4.99 and $5.99
WHILE THEY LAST!

MEN'S AND BOYS' SWIM SUITS


REDUCED


$1.95 Now
$1.30


$2.95 Now
$1.97


1/3


$3.95 Now
$2.64


$4.95 Now
$3.30


81 x 99 SHEETS

$1.95 ea.
Reg. $2.95

ALL BOYS'
SPORT SHIRTS

/3 OFF!

MEN'S WHITE
SPORT SHIRTS

$1.79
Reg. $2.25

BOYS' SHORTS

$1.00 Pair

CHILDREN'S ANKLETS

15c Pair

ALL LADIES'
SUMMER HANDBAGS

$1.00

'LEE' OVERALLS

$3.95
'LEE' DUNGAREES

$2.95 Pair

ALL CHILDREN'S
WHITE SUMMER
DRESS SHOES

$2.95
Reg. $3.95 to $5.25

5 Yards Unbleached
36" SHEETING

for $1.00


P9RT ST.

JOE,

FLORIDA


,_~~__~~ _~_~___~~__,,, ~._ nrrrnn~--iir.- r-- ----I h,-...rr~~L-~~-. L1P~---- --r--~e)lP~Flb-I~--


PAGE THREE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


r








FAUIM r VUII


THE STAR
Published Every Friday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St.
Joe, Florida, By The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITr Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Man, Floor Man, Columnist,
-Reporter, Proof Reader and Bookkeeper
Entered l as pcond-class matter, December 10, 1937, at the
l'ostoffice, I'.rt St. Joe, L:la., under Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR $2.00 SIX MONTHS $1.00
THREE MONTHS $127.15
--. TELEPHONE 51 }.--
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of erroror omissions jn adver-
tisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for
damages further than amount received. for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word
is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts;
the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

NATION'S MOST FANTASTIC PROJECT
Did you know that the citizens of Florida face
a heavy new federal tax burden in the amount
of $26,777,000 which would be imposed upon
them to subsidize private landowners in Arizona?
Did you know that the average subsidy for
the 420 largest Arizona landowners involved
would be $550,000 each?
Did you know that you and your fellow tax-
payers are expected to support an irrigation
scheme that would spend $1,838 an acre to put
water on land worth only $300 an acre?
Did you know that this extravagant expendi-
ture of federal funds would go exclusively to
landowners in Arizona, who would pay less than
1 per cent of the $2,075,729,000 interest cost of
the project, while the residents of the other 47
states would pay 99 per cent?
Those are a few of the startling facts disclosed
in a booklet received by The Star, "The Nation's
Most Fantastic Project," concerning the most
expensive irrigation project ever proposed under
your friend (he ain't ours) Harry Truman's ad-
ministration-or any other administration, for
that matter.
Getting down to the local level, this project
would mean that people of the city of Port St.


Joe would be assessed $26,893 for a project al-
most 3000 miles away, while it would cost Gulf
county as a whole $72,769.07.
There can be no justification for special inter-
est legislation of this character. It is inflationary
and dangerous. The United States senate voted
in favor of the Central Arizona Project legisla-
tion, Senate Bill 75, on June 5. That action now
leaves it up to the house of representatives to
hold the economy line and protect the welfare
of the nation's taxpayers by decisively rejecting
"The Nation's Most Fantastic Project" legislation.
If you don't want to pay this unjust assessment,
write to Congressmen Bob Sikes and J. Hardin
Peterson and ask them to oppose passage of this
fantastic measure.

CEILINGS DON'T MEAN A THING
A Wall Street Journal news story quotes an of-
ficer of a midwest department store chain as say-
ilg: "Ceilings don't mean a thing." He went on
to explain that observation in these words: "Most
of the goods we sell are below ceiling. When
you're trying to unload high inventories, you
worry about prices that will bring in customers,
not about ceilings you know you can't reach."
Many other retailers, dealing in goods as varied
as haberdashery and automobiles, expressed sim-
Silar views, and this situation illustrates one all-
important fact-and that is simply that maximum
production and aggressive competition do more
to put the brakes on inflation than any political
controls which have occurred to the mind of man.
As a matter of fact, under certain circum-
stances (meat, for example), controls can ac-
tually be inflationary. They can undermine com-
petition-if everyone has to sell at the same price,
why should any merchant work his head off try-
ing to do a better job than the competitor down
the street? They create artificial scarcities and
black markets. They burden all mercLants with
costly, time-consuming red tape. They make it
harder for the small man to progress and grow.
Anything which throws monkey wrenches into
the workings of the supply-and-demand system
of producing and selling goods must, in the long
run, hurt all concerned-including the consumer.


STARDUST and

MOONSHINE
m
We've always been sort of a lucky
gazabo all our life, and the past
two week-ends were no exception.
. Two weeks ago, when the wife
and I went up to Stardust Lodge on
the Dead Lakes, we took along a
can of varnish stain to use on three
doors that had not yet been fin-
ished. That was Friday afternoon.
We had fully intended to start on
the doors Saturday morning, but
discovered that our paint brush had
become rock-hard from not being
cleaned the last time we used it.
So we hied ourselves in to
Wewahitchka and purchased the
necessary brush from Jack Prid-
geon.. When we got back, it had be-
gun to rain and our wife, apparently
sort of superstitious, informed us
that the doors couldn't be painted
during wet weather .... Happily,
it also rained Sunday. Much to our
disgust? ? ?
Last Saturday, after much hint-
ing and finally an outright out-
'birst, our wife managed to drive us
to drink-pardon us, to the varnish
can-and we managed to do two of
the doors, which we proudly stood
back and admired for an hour or
two. By that time it was too late to
do more varnishing, so we decided
to wait until Sunday .... And again
it rained!
Yup, we're sure lucky. With
the present rainy season on, looks
like we're going to have a hard
time getting those other two doors
varnished.
But our luck didn't give out there
-we were hit up by a neighbor
living in that neck o' the woods
who was in need of a little cash for
beans, bacon and bread, wanting
the chore of cutting the weeds
on our south forty. ... We had
been working at them desultorily
for a couple of months (week-ends,
that is) and had managed to get at


least 10 square feet hoed off, inci-
dentally losing some 15 or 18 lbs.
in the process So we figured
it would be a heap easier to sit on
our porch with a cool glass at our
elbow and watch someone else do
the work-which we are doing.
Yup, we're sure a lucky guy.
Got a letter from a couple of fel-
lows up in Atlanta, Ga., who had
looked over the town Saturday and
,Sunday and wanted to buy The
Star. They had been around to The
Star office Saturday and Sunday
looking for us, but couldn't find us,
naturally, since we were up on the
lakes lazing about .... Who'd want
to sell a setup like The Star, where
one can work four days a week and
loaf three? We admit we are
dumb looking-but not that dumb!
----------
Nearly everybody can find a good
excuse for what one wishes not to
do.


THE LEADER SHOE
SHOP
L. J. HERRING, Owner
Phone 363 Port St. Joe


TEN YEARS AGO
From the Files of The Star

J. T. McNeill Taken By Death
Janfes Thomas McNeill, 83, died
Saturday at his Indian Pass home
after a lingering illness of more
than two years' duration. Funeral
services were held Sunday from the
First Methodist Church, with Rev.
D. E. Marietta officiating. Interment
was in Jehu Cemetery near Wewa-
hitchka.
W. C. Stokes Drowns
William Clay Stokes, 32, an em-
ploye of the St. Joe Lumber & Ex-
port Company, drowned Sunday af-
ternoon while swimming in the gulf
at Beacon Hill. He was seized with
cramps and went under before on-
lookers could reach him.
Birth Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. Fred McLean are
announcing the arrival of a 9%-
pound son on August 1 at their
home on McClellan Avenue.
Hardy Patterson
Announcement is being made of
the marriage of Miss Vivian Patter-
,son, niece of Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
Patterson of this city, to J. Lamar
Hardy at St. Joseph's Rectory, St.
Petersburg, on August 5. Mr. Hardy
is an employee of the St. Joe Paper
Company.
Authorize Phone Service Extension
After work was stopped several
weeks ago by an injunction filed by
the Southeastern Telephone Com-
rpany of Tallahassee, the St. Joseph
Telephone & Telegraph Company of
this city has been granted author-
ity by Governor Holland to oper-
ate telephone service in Wakulla
and Leon counties.
Wins Place In Poetry Volume
Mrs. Ruth Alien Smith of St. Joe
is one of the authors whose poems
are included in "The Book of Mod-
ern Poetry, 1941," an 800-page vol-
ume just released by a New York
publishing house.


CREDIT CJRBS


Now you can own this big, new






as low as 34 a month


(with a postwar trade-in in good condition)

Now, under new credit terms, you get more
time to pay, and pay less, far less every month!
Own the Fashion Award Car of the year
for as little as $34 a month...no cash down
payment needed if your trade-in car is a
late model! Today's best buy is the Henry J-
and the time to buy is today!





See your Kaiser*Frazer Dealer today!


01O 61 KAISER-FRAZER SALES CORPORATION. WILLOW RUN. MICHIGAN


M. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE Monument Avenue Phone 6


LIFTED!


--


FRIDAYY AUGUST 10, 1951


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOURn









THESTRDPOTYT.,OEAULFGONTSFORDAPAEIV


Prominent Communist

Coming To Port St. Joe

Matt Cvetic, Working for the FBI,
Hated for Nine Years By
Relatives and Friends

















.,










MATT CVETiC, Communist
Little did Matt Cvetic, a. United
States Employment Service inter-
viewer in Pittsburgh, realize when
his application for admission to the
U. S. Army Intelligence had been
rejected for physical reasons, that
this move was to be the first link
in a chain of events which later
wreaked havoc within the ranks of
the Communist party operating in
this country.
Because he was in a position to
place Communists in vital indus-
tries, the FBI considered him an
ideal key man for getting the goods
on suspected Reds. They asked him
if he'd consent to do his country a,
great service by mingling with the
Communists and reporting their ac-
tivities to the agency.
Cvetic was reminded of an exist-
ing threat to his life that would be
connected with this work, also the
fact that his assignment was to re-
main a secret from even his closest
relatives who during the nine years
that followed hated him as a man
Who had "sold out" to the Commies.
Cvetic agreed to the job-a job
that wasn't finished until the top 11
Communist leaders were tried in
New York two years ago.
When Cvetic's startling reports
of his experiences were made pub-
lic in a series of articles in the Sat-
urday Evening Post, Warner Bros.
immediately began negotiations to
film his life among the Commun-
ists, and now present a screen story
of the most timely topic of today
in "I Was A Communist for the F.
B. I.", the true-to-life drama which
plays at the Port Theater Tuesday
and Wednesday, August 14 and 15.
'C--


Don Kumm Attending
F.S.U. Summer School

Don J. Kumm, teacher of physi-
cal education at St. Joe high school,
is attending summer school at Flor-
ida State University, Tallahassee,
where he is enrolled in a seminar
on public relations for physical ed-
ucation, the course to continue thru
Wednesday of next week. This is
the first seminar of its kind ever
attempted by any college or univer-
sity.
Don is working toward his mas-
ter's degree in physical education,
which he hopes to receive in Feb-
ruary.
____r----
Uncle Josh Operating Station
J. F. Miller is in charge of the
'Sinclair service station on High-
way 98 during the absence of E. A.
Loy, who was called to Chicago
last week due to the death of his
mother.

Visitors From Holmes County
Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Goodson and
children of Holmes county spent
Sunday here with Mr. and Mrs. E.
C. Cason and other relatives and
friends.


i spending the summer here with his
sister and family, Mr. and Mrs. C.
HIGHLAND VIEW NEWS 'D. Clristmas.
By MARJORIE ROGERS The Misses Martha Thomason
and Betty Hobbs of Florala, Ala.,
are visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Bill


Mr. and Mrs. John Williams of
Pensacola spent Sunday here with
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Williams.
Pfc. Henry T. Patterson, son of
Mrs. M. L. Patterson, who has been
stationed in Germany with the
armed forces, has been transferred
to a station in France.
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Williams and
children and Mr. and Mrs. P. G.
Strange visited in St. Petersburg
last week with Mr. and Mrs. John
Hellins.
O. L. Worley and children of
Florala, Ala., are visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. H. A. Butts.
Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Richards of
Marathon, Fla., are visiting with
Mr. and Mrs. T. 0. Richards.
C. L. Pridgeon of Chicago, Ill., is


Garrett.
Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Land of Grace-
ville are visiting here with Mr. and
Mrs. H. W. Starling.
Billy Joe Richards has returned
c'p --s"" "a


WANNA CAB?

Call

"RED'S" TAXI


PHONE 114

FOR DEPENDABLE
SERVICE


from an extended visit in Marathon,
Fla., with his uncle and aunt, Mr.
and Mrs. H. P. Richards.
We welcome Mr. and Mrs. H. B.
Pigott to our community.

Speed at Equator
Due to the earth's daily rotation,
a fixed object at the equator moves
with a speed of about 1,037 miles
per hour.


NOTICE
For First Class
WATCH REPAIRING
bring your watch to the G. M.
Bishop Jewelry Store. All work
guaranteed. If you break your
glasses, bring them in, we re-
place broken lenses, bows, etc.
G. M. BISHOP, Jeweler
Opposite Port Theater
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Houseguest From Mississippi
Mr. and Mrs. Willston Chason
have as their house guest the lat-
ter's sister, Miss Flora Lane Ham-
mond of Louisville, Miss.

Two Unemployed Receive $60
The state industrial commission
states that two unemployed work-


ers in Gulf county received a total
of $60 for the week ending July 28.


4 kr L '


FALL TR


yields a fortune of flattery

at a small budget price....


h
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.5;: ,s ~~~~~~_;_il~~:~,~? a-: ~. "'reBs~sp~p~p~**ePParesScr
-------" '''''''~ 1 ,._ ~i tl
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--- -~-~-~~aw.ePo
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2s, ~- r ~i~. Cb

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PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


a. The short-sleeved shirtwaist takes
on slender, dressy airs with a graceful
side-drape. Black, Laurel Gree:,
Plum or Blue rayon crepe.
b. An afternoon dress of rayon crepe
softly collared and draped for every
autumn event. Black, Navy, Laurel
Green or Blackberry.
c. Dainty fagotting enhances the
bodice of this slim classic for
day-through-evening wear. Grey,
Black, Navy or Grape rayon crepe.
d. Important tabs march down this
slim rayon crepe afternoon dress,
slimming and flattering for all
occasions. Black or Navy.
Sizes 14V to 22 1.


Other Martha Manning
dresses in Petites and
Half-Sizes from $8.95




As Seen in
VOGUE


Gunte8ed
IGood Houekeepll




10.98


FOR RELIABLE


PLUMBING

At Reasonable Rates


CALL 54-J
T. O. POITEVINT
LICENSED PLUMBER


Ig~llru~ux--Wn-.ri)YI (~XP~-~iLPI ~-LI1-~--- --I-II-I*---


PAGE FIVE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


njnY -llrn ll% 1in 5 Wi. .


I









! f_ I .HE SU0


No Rent-Gouging of

Servicemen In Gulf

Area, Says Director

Will Take Action Against Monthly
Rentals of $100 and the
Outdoor Privies

Gulf and Bay counties, under rent
control regulations since World
War II days, will continue to be free
of the exhorbitant prices and ser-
viceman gouging which previously
have plagued a great portion of the
nation, says William S. Wilson,
area rent director-attorney.
"Rent in this section never sky-
rocketed," he said, "and the people
of the two counties co-operated
Wonderfully with the housing ex-
pediter's office. Service personnel
here have never been forced to live
in shacks and pay the $12-per-day
reported in other sections."
Tighe E. Woods, national director
of rent stabilization, last week
promised to concentrate his efforts
upon an effective rent control pro-
gram around military installations
and critical defense housing areas.
He blasted low living conditions
members of the armed forces were
subjected to in some areas, "places
that are a horror to the eye and an
offense to health."
The Gulf-Bay area director has
stressed that few tenants will be
hit by the full 20 per cent rent in-
crease allowed over 1947 ceilings
by the new defense production act.
"Increases already granted have ab-
sorbed most of the margin." Wilson
reports.
In Woods' release he said: "Every
excessive rent that stands out like
a sore thumb is going to be knocked
down, and we shall proceed against
the horrors of the $100 monthly
rentals and the outdoor privies."

Winning Coaches Are Bound
To Producei-Winning Teams

.It has long been advocated that
one reason a winning school usually
continues to win through the years
is that its record draws "winning
type" athletes.
This old adage was carried still
further at Florida State University,
Tallahassee, this summer. It would
appear that the Seminoles' fine
record in athletics (plus the out-
standing physical education staff)
drew winning coaches to take
courses in summer school.
Sixteen of these high school
coaches, including Marion Craig of
the Port St. Joe high school, only a
portion of those attending summer
school at F. S. U., were rounded up
to get information for this story.
These men were head coaches or
assistant coaches in football, bas-
ketball, golf, tennis, track, baseball
and other sports. All of them had
some duties in football and basket-
ball, or both.
Asked to give the won and lost
records of the teams they were con-
nected with, the coaches came up
with the following figures: Foot-
ball-Won 48 games, lost 20 (the
teams included several conference
and mythical state championships).
Basketball-Won 49 games, lost 26
(here again the list included cham-
pionship -teams).

S Visitors From Georgia
Misses Myrtice and Lois Whittle
of Eastman, Ga., arrived here Sun-
day for a week's visit with Mr, and
Mrs. Youal Wages at their home in
Oak Grove.
------Sr----


This on your printing is a sign of quality.
V4b-< e e 0 -0

* Electrical Contracting

S eand Repairing

A Estimates Cheerfully :
* Given |

SST. JOE ELECTRIC ;,

SHOP i
a Opposite Port Theater *
*Iso*a a '-t ***0.


Maybe You Can Figure
This Out; It's Beyond Us

The editor of The Star received
the following interesting but baffl-
ing epistle in the mail this week.
We can't do much with it, but per-
haps our readers can dope it out:
My Dear Mister--If you please
so kind send me 2-copies, Yours
News Paper;-to resale in Phila-
delphia.
As the resale price for News to
order more.
If their cheep land not inpruf-
ment.
If their window cleaner to wash
windows?
I'll be than you for that very
much. Yours Trully.
You-all can take it from there.
We did manage to infer the fact
that our correspondent wanted two
copies of The Star, mainly due to
the fact, however, that he enclosed
three three-cent stamps.
For the best translation, interpre-
tation, or what-have-you, The Star
will present a genuine hand-cro-
cheted soup ladle.

Home From Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Hall and chil-
dren, Norman and Margie, returned
Sunday from a week's vacation
spent in South Florida, where they
visited relatives and friends in
Tampa, Jacksonville and Daytona
Beach. They report having a won-
derful time.

Advertising doesn't cost, it PAYS!


GARDEN NOTES
PORT ST. JOE GARDEN CLUB


Comes now the time when inter-
est in the garden flags; when we
are grateful for flowering shrubs
that, more or less, look out for
themselves, and for marigolds and
zinnias and other "toughies" that
flaunt their gay colors in spite of
heat and drought. Crepe myrtles
wave their pink plumes, and if cut
back in August often put on a fresh
burst of bloom. If powdery mildew
crumples and distorts buds and new
growth, dust or spray with acme
wettable sulphur. Watch chrysan-
themums for aphis, small plant lice,
black, brown or green, closely
packed on stems and tips of new
growth. Spray twice weekly with
Isatox or Blackleaf 40.
Put delphinium, pansy, schizan-
thus, shasta daisy, sweet pea and:
snapdragon seed in the refrigera-


ICE
COLD


DRAFT BEER


NOW ON
TAP


ST. JOE BAR AND BILLIARDS
Phone 114 Port St. Joe, Florida


A A


GROWING MASH

25 Pounds


$1.29

A A


LAYING PELLETS


100 lbs. $5.17

A A


LAYING MASH


25 lbs. $1.29

A A


SSCRATCH FEED

100 Ibs. $4.79

A A

20%

DAIRY FEED


100 Ibs. $4.64





r-

321 Reid Avenue
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


MIIDAY, AUGUST 10, 19511


PAGE SIX


tor to pre-chill for late August or i August gardening is a time for
early September planting in flats planning rather than planting. Gar-
or shaded beds. These are worth den chores this month consist
trying for early flowers but do not mostly of maintenance. We can
take the place of the main. plant- not repeat too often that a thorough
ing in October and later, soaking once a week does more
Continue to feed hibiscus a quar- good for lawn and shrubbery than
ter pound of grotone per plant per daily sprinkling.
month.
Y d 1 Seoul's Papers
You may move spider lilies any Seoul's Papers
You may move spider ldies any Seoul, Korea, had three large
time after the foliage dies down dailies, the largest being "Dong-A-
preferably between now and mid- Daily," with about 20,000 circula-
August. tion.



Come in for a Game of Pool and a Glass of .


.








PAGE SEVEN


fIA. UUT 0 91 H TAPRTS.JEGL CUT, LRD


Smokey Says:


Your State and National Forest and
Park Services provide nice recrea-
tion areas for YOU! ... be nice too
-keep it green and clean!


Here for Week's Visit
Mr. and Mrs. James Plair and
children of Cantonment arrived
Monday for a week's visit here with
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Plair.
---+-----
Colorado's PeakL
there are 30 peaks in Colorado
that are higher than Pikes Peak,
which comes 31st.
U -


You're


b vilted

- fo meet the



KAHN
TAILORING CO.
SPECIALIST



T. REID LAUTERBACK

AT OUR STORE


Friday and Saturday

August 17 and 18


Bringing you the
latest in'-
TAILORED TO MEASURE
fashions and fabrics.

See these newest and lines
ideas in Fall and Winter
suits and topcoats for men
and women. Then make
your choice and have your
measurements taken for de-
livery at any time you
specify.


COSTING'S

Department Store

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
Phone 148


Controls Proposition

Gets Louder, Funnier

and Daily More Costly

Merchants Handed Double-Talk By
Bird-Brained Officials With In-
structions To Comply or Else

By RUSSELL KAY
Right now we are hearing a lot
about controls. God knows, we have


dealt with in plain, everyday, run-
of-the-mill language, but when
dished out by super-educated, light-
headed, Jegal lights that infest gov-
ernment bureaus and try to earn
their stipend by creating a back-
lash of words like the above, it
makes life one long headache for
the ordinary merchant or business-
man who never went to Harvard
Law School and -never learned to
talk in circles or took a course in
mind reading.
The guy who wrote the above ef-


plenty of 'em now, but Mr. Truman fusion probably thinks it is as clear
wants a lot more. Remember, the and understandable as "two-and-
more controls we have, the more two-makes-four." He groans under
bureaucrats, the more inspectors, the responsibility he carries in tell-
the more directives and regulations. ing you how to run your business
The whole thing gets louder and and thinks life would be a whole lot
funnier and the cost at the end of easier if you weren't such a dumb,
the day is tremendous. Simple creature .. But put that
The little grocer or merchant is same guy to running a store or a
just as good an American and just business and he'd go broke in a
as patriotic as any of the dim- week.
witted pencil pushers and half- ------
baked lawyers who sit in Washing- Pepper Apparently Going
ton office buildings and operate the
cumbersome control machine, but To Be in Some Kind of Race
the average little guy, trying to
make an honest living, never has The Miami Herald said'recently
learned anything but English, and that if former Governor Millard
he just goes stark, staring mad or Caldwell runs again in 1952, former
out of business after he has wrest- Senator Claude Pepper "probably
led witlr a directive like this for an will be his opponent." If Caldwell
hour or so. does not run, the story said, Pepper
- Here is an actual sample of a re- will probably oppose Senator Spes-
cent control regulation. How would sard L. Holland in the senate race.
you like to have 'double-talk like "I have been urged- by many
this thrown at you every day or so friends to run for both senator and
by some bird--brained official, with governor," Pepper was quoted as
instructions to comply with it or saying. "I have not made any de-
else! cision. But I have given very serious
Sec.'35. Rule 4. Articles belong- consideration to the suggestions
ing to a category listed on your and I am still seriously considering
chart but having a net cost be- them." Pepper was in Miami to
tween two-net costs listed for attend a hearing before the state
that category. (a) If the article railroad and public utilities com-
you are pricing has a net cost be- mission.


tween two net costs lstead run e -th
category (except between the two Husky Appetite
lowest net costs for the category) Huskies, said to be the toughest
in column 2 of your chart, you dogs in the world, have stomachs
compute your ceiling price by that match their reputation. These
multiplying the net cost of the sturdy dogs have been known to haul
article by the lower'~of i) the heavy loads up to 50 miles g day on
percentage mark-up listed in col- a diet of frozen walrus hide. Unlike
umn 4 for the net cost next coddled domestic pets, they will eat
lower than the one you are pric- anything. In oe instance a team of
ing, or (2) the average percent the dogs broke loose and, within a
ng, or (2) the average percent- few minutes, had devoured a pair
age mark-up listed for that cate- of skin boots, part of a sleeping
gory in column 1, and adding the bag, the-hide straps from ski boots,
result to the net cost. gloves, and a sealskin hood, plus
Controls are bad enough when a month's supply of dog food.


N4TUBALLY, they're important to you. That's why we
want you to see these invitations for yourself. And
:they're hot too costly, as we place our orders with one of
the largest engraving concerns in the South. Check
the perfect form of these invitations with people who
really know! Come in we will
be happy to show you our com-
Seha'e eo csl plete line of Wedding Stationery.

es Os'e""d PRICED As Low As $7.95 FOR 50!
Select from a large, variety of
Il distinctive type faces.

THE STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY


Pt


TIDES FOR ST. JOSEPH BAY


Aug. 9
Aug. 10_
Aug. 11
Aug. 12.
Aug. 13
Aug. 14
Aug. 15-
Aug. 16-
Aug. 17-
Aug. 18-
Aug. 19-
Aug. 20-
Aug. 21


HIGH
1:16 a. im.
1:54 a. m.
S2:45 a. m.
3:43 a. m.
4:47 a. m.
6:00 a. m.
7:21 a. m.
S8:42 a. m.
.9:56 a. m.
...11:05 a. m.
..12:06 p..m.
11:57 p. m.
1:32 p. m.


Luxury Liner
rTh qq Prp Tqiriti JTrc k c n-u-


LOW Ile iT r ~oslusi dent ac uson is pow-
1:37 p. m. ered by cross-compound turbines. Its
2:57 p. m. cruising speed of 19 knots will per-
3:49 p. m mit the ship to circumnavigate the
4:38 p. in. world in 14 weeks.
5:27 p. m.
6:13 p. m CALL FOR BIDS
6:58 p. m. The Board of Public Instruction,' Gulf
7:40 p n m. County, Florida, will receive bids until 2:00
8:19 p. i o'clock 1'. M., CST, August 23, 1951, to fur-
nisl gasoline, oil, greasing, tires, labor,
-- parts and accessories for school buses for
12:08 a. m. the 1951-52 school year.
7:43 bBidders may bid on all or any part of the
7: 43 p. m above.
5:54 a. m. The board reserves the right to reject any
5: 36 p. m. and all bids.
7:44 a. I. J. A. WHITFIELD,
71 Chairman.


Cape San Blas-Minus 1:00.
CS.---- / NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the
Sheep may become infected with Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
rabbit fever, tularemia. County, Florida, have found it necessary to
amend the temporary budget for the Fine
and Forfeiture Fund for the fiscal year be-
N 0 T I C E ginning October 1, 1951, and ending Sep-
Notice is hereby given that the city tax tmher 30, 1952, said budget having been
assessment roll for the City of Port St. Joe, published according to law in The Star, is-
Florida, for the year I 51, will be ubmitel sue of July 13, 1951, and that the board
to the Equalizing Board for approval on the will be in session on September 4, 1951, at
21st dav of August A. 1). 1951, at the City nine o'clock for the purpose of hearing coin-
Hall at 7:00 P1. IM. All persons desiring to plaints from any person or persons, firms or
have corrections made in such roll, whether corporations, that are dissatisfied with said
in the listing, valuation of property or other- budget, and for the purpose of final adop-
wise, are requested to file with the under- tion of said budget, to-wit:
signed on or before the 20th day of August, Fine and Forieiture Fund
1951, their petition setting forth their oh- Sheriff's Cost ........... $10,000.00
jections to such assessment and the correc- County Judge's Cost ...... 3,000.00
tions which they desire to have made. Feeding Prisoners ........ 2,500.00
Witness my hand and the official seal of Circuit Court Cost ....... 400 00
the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, this 7th Attorney's Salary ........ 600.00
day of August A. D. 1951. Attorney's Fees for Convic-
B. H. DICKENS, Jr., tions................. 2,000.00
(SEAL) City Auditor and Clerk I Witnesses and Jurors in
8-10 17 as Ex-officio Tax Assessor. County and Circuit Court 800.00
-- Court Reporter Insolvent
NOTICE OF REGISTRATION Cases ............... 200.00
Notice is hereby given that the Registra- Servant Around Jail ...... 1,095.00
tion Books of the City of Port St. Joe, Flor- Guard Around Jail .... 2,920.00
ida, will be open for the purpose of registra- Game and Fresh Water Fish
tion of all qualified electors who are quali- 'Oommission, ........... 500.00
field under Ordinance No. 107X and Chapter Care of Convicts ........ 500.00
27833, Laws of Florida, Acts of 1951.
Said books will be opened on August 22, TOTAL APPROPRL4TIONS. $24,515.00
1951, and will remain open for registration Reserve for Contingencies 1,200.00
purposes until August 31, 1951, between the
hours of 9:00 o'clock A. M. aind 12:00 TOTAL BUDGET .........$2b,715.00
o'clock noon, and 2:00 o'clock P. M. and Done and authorized in open session this
5:00 o'clock P. M. each day except Sundays 6th day of August, A. D 1951.
and holidays. i B. E. KENNEY,
All persons desiring to register shall call Chairman, Board County
at thlie City Hall for such purpose. Commissioners.
B H. DICKENS, Jr., Attest: Gulf County, Florida.
(SEAL) Registration Officer, GEORGE Y. CORE,
8-10 24 City of Port St. Joe, Florida. Clerk Circuit Court. 1


: MS:S NEW ?39

PHIL''
R..di.o.Ph.a
I. If y~~)ou own the Oldes e,.
ator egiste, r a th aest refris,
,s'oXragtFf his7snref




Pus 19* Other c~streswyouro/de dtCi
valuable prizes I








St. Joe Hardware Co.


PORT ST. JOE


PLORIDA


I


I --I -C s '=' I I I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1951


i


- --


i


1

i


Phone 51


Port St. Joe, Flor~ida








PAGE EIGHT tHE STAR,-- POTS. OGUFCUNY LOIAFRDY AGS 1,15


Returns To Home In Pensacoia
Mrs. Olga Carney returned to her
home in Pensacola Monday after
being called here due to the illness
and death of her sister, Mrs. Min-
nie Lupton.

Enjoy East Coast Breezes
-Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Maxwell and
children spent this week on the east
coast enjoying the ocean breezes.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR "SALE
FOR SALE-New 18 ft. skiff, 3/2
h. p. Evinrude motor, 21z K. W.
light plant. Inquire of Mrs. L. R.
Holliday. 8-10ttc
FOR SALE--1950 Evinrude motor,
33 h.p., six hours running time
since factory overhaul. A bargain!
Henry Geddie, phone 271. 8-10*
FOR SALE-Savage Spin-Dry wash-
ing machine, baby bed and Handy
Hot portable washing machine.
Phone 248 J. 8-3tf
FOR SALE-DeJur Versatile II en-
larger with f4.5 lens and easel;
$40. Telephone 51. tf
FOR RENT
STORE AND SERVICE STATION
FOR RENT-At Beacon Hill
Will sell stock and lease store and
equipment. Inquire C. L. Costin,
Beacon Hill. 8-17*
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Round Bulova ladies' wrist
watch, rose gold, black face. Lost
at Wayside Park Wednesday last
week. Reward. Return to Iva Mae
Herring at Danley's Store. 1*
SALESMEN WANTED
LOCAL RAWLEIGH BUSINESS
AVAILABLE In Gulf County-
Full or part time. Start immediate-
ly. Selling experience helpful, lbut
not required. Car necessary. Write
at once for particulars. Rawleigh's,
Dept. FAH-101-251, Memphis,, Tenn.
8-10 31 9-14 21*
HELP WANTED
FURNITURE SALESMAN "and col-
lector; prefer man with experi-
ence. Danley Furniture Company,
Phone 56. 7-20tf
SPECIAL SERVICES
RECAP YOUR OLD TIRES
Rubber is getting scarce! Help the
war effort by having your old tires
recapped. We guarantee all work.
Prices reasonable.
ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
RECAP SHOP
Phone 37 Port St. Joe, Fla.
FOR QUICK SERVICE
and Quality Workmanship on
Roll Film, Try
MAIGE PHOTO LAB
HOUSEHOLD GOPDS FOR SALE
USED FURNITURE AT
BARGAIN PRICES
1 Washing Machine....------ $39.95
4 Pair Double Springs, ea..... $ 5.95
3 Double Cotton Mattresses $ 8.95
2 Gas Ranges, ea. .......------ $39.50
1 Servel gas refrigerator-- ... $49.50
1 reconditioned glider with
new cushions $39.95
1 secondhand electric range,
as is ,$19.95
1 2nd hand table top oil range $29.95
DANLEY FURNITURE CQ.
Phone*56 Port St. Joe, Fla.
LODGE NOTICES
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. 0.
O. F.-Meets first and third Thurs-
days, 7:30 p. m.in Masonic Hall. All
members grged to attend; visiting
brethren invited. J. F. Miller, G.;
John Blount, V. G.; Theo Bishop,
Secretary.
AMERICAN LEGION Willis V.
Rowan Post 116, meets first and'
third Mondays, 8 p. m., Legion Hall.
Visiting Legionnaires invited to at-
tend. Denver C. Miller, commander;
W. S. Smith, adjutant.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
ing companions welcome. J. L. Wil-
son, High Priest; H. R. Maige, Sec.
MELODY REBEKAH LODGE NO.
22, I. 0. O. F.-Meets 2nd and 4th
Wednesday at 8 p. hi. in Masonic
hall. Mary B. Forehand, N.G.; Mary
E. Weeks, V.G.; Fannie Brown, Sec.
MA'SONIC TEMPLE F & A M-
sort St. Joe Lodge 111. Regular
meetings 2nd and 4th Frl,
days each month, 8:00 p. m.
Members urged to attend;
visiting brothers welcome. Milton
Chafin, W. M.; G. C. Adkins, Sec.


Wakuila County May Be

"Home" of Fox Hunters

State Association, Loosely Knit In
the Past, Seeking Permanent
Headquarters

If proposed plans materialize, Wa-
kulla county may be the permanent
home of the Florida Fox Hunters
Association, says Joe Malpas in the
Wakulla County News.
At the last meeting of the cham-
ber of commerce, Guy Little, form-
erly of Port St. Joe, who is a mem-
ber of the organization and who at-
tends the meetings and hunts each
year, stated that the group was
seeking a permanent home-where
:hey could build dog kennels and
shelters for the horses, and an area
)f several thousand acres of land,
here they might for a week each
year turn their dogs out and hunt


foxes.
Little pointed


out that the hunts


were conducted beautifully, that lowing their hobby of hunting foxes.
there was absolutely nothing out of ; -----
the way or rowdy about the group Week-ender From Cottondale
of several hundred hunters, and Mrs. Lee Shores of Cottondale
that he personally was very proud spent last week-end here with her
to be associated with the men and mother, Mrs. Kate Harrell, and sis-
women of the group. ter and family, Mr. and Mrs. W. H.
He stated that the present cus- Howell.


tom was to wait for invitations to
stage the hunt each year, and when
the invitation had been extended,
the group accepted if the area was
suitable, and the hunt was then
held, but in recent months the as-
sociation had been wanting to have
a "home." Little seemed to feel
that Wakulla, and perhaps Liberty
or Franklin counties, had the neces-
sary area for 300 to 500 dogs to
chase foxes in, and certainly this
section had a bountiful supply of
fox.
If details can be arranged, it
would mean that for one week each
year, in September or October, that
some 300 men and their wives and
families would come to Wakulla
county for the sole purpose of fol-


*u1


-w


In Texas, 183 out of 254 counties
are producing oil and natural gas.


Return Home After Visit Here
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Miller left
last Friday to return to their home
in Waverly, Fla., after a visit of
several days here with Mr. and Mrs.
W. J. Daughtry and friends.

Malleable Nickel Uses
The malleable nickel produced in
the United States is used principally
for radio, television and for anodes
in plating.


COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME
24- HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE


601 Long Avenue


Phone 326 Day or Night


ILit


Another Day ?


- THERE'S no reason under the sun'
S .why you should postpone the
extra satisfaction of owning a Pontiac.
Stop in as soon as you can, we'll work
out a deal-and then you'll know
what we mean by the extra satisfac-
tion of a Pontiac!
You'll notice it first in the pride you
take in your Pontiac's distinctive
beauty, for there's nothing else like it.
You'll notice it every mile you drive,.


for your Pontiac will perform
brilliantly, year after year.
You'll notice it, too, in the admiring
glances of others, for Pontiac is always
sought after, always popular, always
valuable.
But best of all you'll notice it very
pleasantly on the price tag-for the
extra satisfaction of a Pontiac costs
nothing! If you can afford any new car
you can afford a wonderful Pontiac!


q~I~vpin '. accqc.oies amed tnay ilaurated are siaed to change wit/,os t aejice.


SAmerlca's Lowest-Prieed Straight Elght
Lowest-Priced Car with GM Eydr-MNa le Drive
S(Otiofi. a extram cost)
Your Cholee of Silver Strfak ~pagles-
Strlagh* Bigh* or Six s

The Most Beautiful Thiag Pn Whplel
Unlisteel Body by Fglher
.5,..*A.


Dollar for Dollar

-you cant beat a.


I1


C


BARRIER & WIMBERLY PONTIAC COMPANY


201 Monument Avenue


Phone 94


Port St. Joe, Florida


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE,, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1951


PAGE EIGHT


r


~J7


101