<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00708
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 12, 1950
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00708

Full Text








PORT ST. JOE
A Progressive
Community With a
Modern, Progressive
Weekly Newspaper
p


TLE


STAR


THE STAR
Is Devoted To the Con-
tinued Development of
Port St. Joe and Gulf
County


"Port St. Joe The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


VOLUME XIII


NUMBER 33


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


Old River Boats St JoeJayces D puty s errif MN S

Were Romantic and Co orfu1 Are Planning On

-:-.- R r zl Beaten To Death

.. .. | Meeting Called for Monnday
StEvening At City Hall To Emanuel lda
Elect Officers


It


*-Tr ---. i 1 ,i-r ---M-- 1 .,E- '-1 L

. L : -. .



The "Three States" which burned at Columbus, Ga., in 1903
By HAROLD BELL 4
One of the most romantic and col- departure were events of great im-
orful aspects of the history of the portance to the people in commun-
Apalachicola River valley all the ities up and down the river. Know-
way from Columbus, Ga., to Apa- ing the schedules and the personnel


lachicola, Fla., is the ties connected
with the steamboat life and boating
industry of earlier days.
Since January 26, 1828, when of-
ficial records show the first steam-
boat, the "Fannie," coming to Co-
lumbus, more than 200 different
boats have been on the mighty
Chattahoochee and Apalachicola. It
is true that many of these were
small steamers, but many were
large and with ample accommoda-
tions for 200 or more persons at a
time.
With the golden steamboat era
being between the years 1830 and
1840, when over 51 different steam-
ers came up from Apalachicola to
Columbus, this mode of life came
to be a romantic characteristic of
the inland areas of Georgia, Florida
and Alabama. Since there were no
such things as paved roads, and few
railroad facilities, the great bulk of
transportation had to be handled by
the river boats. Their arrival and


Open House Today At

Municipal Hospital

Public Invited To Visit Institution
From 4 To 7 Marking Na-
tional Hospital Day

The public is cordially invited to
visit the Port St. Joe Municipal
.Hospital today, National Hospital
Day, from 4 to 7 p. m. -
The Hospital Auxiliary, in co-op-
eration with Mrs. Mary F. Babb,
superintendent of the institution,
will serve as hostesses for the af-
ternoon. A silver offering will be
taken to aid ini financing hospital
improvements. Mrs. Lee Graham
Jr., is serving as chairman of the
event.
Other members of the newly-or-
ganized Hospital Auxiliary'are Mrs.
J. V. Dowd, Mrs. Otto Anderson,
TMrs. J. 0. Baggett,.Mrs. C. G. Cos-
tin, Mrs. Robert Bellows, Mrs. Her-
bert Brown, Mrs. C. R. Garraway,
Mrs. J. W. Hendrix, Mrs. Basil E.
Kenney Jr., Mrs. J. Lamar Miller,
Mrs. B. E. Kenney, Mrs. Joe Paffee,
Mrs. J. L. Sharit, Mrs. Harry Saun-
ders, Mrs. L. J. Trexler, Mrs. L. W.
Tubb, Mrs. Robert Tapper and Mrs
A. L. Ward.

Visiting Son and Family
Mrs. M. R. Singletary of Talla-
hassee is visiting here with her son
and fam.ilv. Mr. ,and Mrs. T. S.
Singletary.


of most of the boats, their travels
created intense interest the year
around.
.During the period from about
1840 until about 1890 the river
boats played an increasingly large
part in the lives of the people in
the region near the river. Such
steamers as the "Shamrock," "Bar-
nett," Three States," "John Calla-
han," "Queen City" and the "Fan-
nie Fearn" helped to make the com-
mercial and social life of the valley
people more profitable and enjoy-
able. Even during the period of the
War Between the States the river
traffic continued on a small scale
most of the time. .
With the turn of the century and
a sizeable population increase in
the regions named above, the river
boats came to play an even more
important part in the lives of the
people. Land was being cleared and
made ready for farming, more peo-
(Continued on page 11)


Car Safety Check

Is Now Underway

Concerted Drive Being Made By
State Highway Patrol.To Get
Unsafe Cars Repaired


Highway Patrolman. J. R. Jordan
informs us that a check of cars in
Gulf county was started this week
to discover defective equipment and
have it corrected. A concerted drive
throughout the state is being made
by the Florida Highway Patrol.
Every item on cars, from brakes
to rear view mirror, is being ex-
amined, and Patrolman Jordan re-
liorts that leading the list so far on
the cars that have been checked
are faulty emergency brakes, head-
lights and 'stoplights.
Cars getting an okeh will receive
a windshield sticker. Owners of cars
with defective equipment will be
given a slip indicating unsafe equip-
ment and after having necessary
repairs and adjustments made will
be eligible for the safety sticker.
Slogan for the safety drive is
"Check Your Car Check Acci-
dents."

Making Home At White City
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Willis of Lake
Wales have moved to White City
to make their home. Mr. Willis is
the brother of Mrs. Ernest Rich,
and Mrs. Willis is at present em-
ployed at Rici'3s Cfurb Marfei.


At a specially called meeting held
?Mdnday evenin-g at the city hall
a mo-ve was started to reactivate
the defunct Port St. Joe Junior
Chamber of Commerce, it-being the
belief 'of those attending that the
up-and-coming city of Port St. Joe
'was definitely in need of an organi-
zation of this type.
Attending the meeting were Silas
Stone, Frank Hannon. Cecil Costin
Jr., Dr. R. E. King, Glenn Grimsley,
Ben Dickens Jr., C. J. Brown, R. F.
Maxwell. Jake Belin. George Hills
Jr., Dr. J. W. Hendrix and Harvey
Solomon, all of whom expressed
their willingness to take out mem-
berships in the organization.
Jake Belin was named temporary
chairman, and a discussion was held
on the many projects the organiza-
tion could further in the interest
of the city.
With the great amount of enthusi-
asm manifest at this meeting, it
was decided to hold a public meet-
ing at 7 o'clock next Monday in the
.city hall for the purpose of elect-
ing officers. Plans were made to
have several state Jaycee officers
present at that time.
A list of some fiftyeligible young
men was drawn up and invitations
to attend the meeting will be ex-
tended them.
Anyone interested in reorganiza-
tion of the Jaycees is extended an
invitation to be present Monday
*evening.

Mrs. Eva Roche Passed
Away Tuesday In Mobile


Brutal Beating of Officer Wednesday Afternoon At High-
land View Is Witnessed By Line Crew of Florida
Power Corporation; Slayer, Shot In Chest,
Held Under Guard At St. Joe Hospital. .


Deputy Sheriff Mose Hill died about 9:45 Wednesday night at
the Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital of head injuries inflicted
Wednesday afternoon by Emanuel Alday in an altercation at High-
land View in which Alday was shot in the chest.
Sheriff Byrd Parker, who investigated what is believed to be
one of the most brutal murders in the annals of Gulf county, said
that according to witnesses, Deputy Hill was called to Highland
View by Mrs. Walter Armstrong, who asked him to come and ar-
mrest Alday who, she said, was beat-


Senior Class Play

'Here Comes Charlie,'

At School Tonight

Curtain Rises Prmptly at 8 o'Clock
On Annual Event; Tickets
Now On Sale

The seniors of the Port St. Joe
high school will present their baby
bombshell, "Here Comes Charlie,"
at 8 o'clock tonight in the high
school auditorium. Tickets are be-
ing sold up town today and will be
available at the auditorium tonight.
To portray Jay Tobias' hilarious
characters, the following students
were picked by judges from the
try-outs:
Nora Malone, cook of the Elliott
home Virginia Boggs
Officer Tim McGrill, Nora's
sweetheart- .Timmyv amseyv


W ord w as received here Tues- '' . .-- - y u b
day that Mrs. Eva Roche, wife of Fanny Farnham, Larry's aunt by
Welton C. Roche of this city, had marriage -------.Maxine Guilford
passed away Tuesday at 9:30 at her Larry Elliott, a young business
man Frank Young
home in Mobile, Ala. She had been man Frank Young
ill for a considerable period. Ted Hartley, his old-time college
Funeral services were held Wed- pal Bobby Ramsey
nesday morning in Mobile, with in- Vivian Smythe-Kersey, Larry's
fiance Lenohr Brown
terment in a Mobile cemetery. fiance Lenohr Brown
In addition to her husband, Mrs. Uncle Aleck Twiggs, in charge of
I ad o t he husn, r Charlie .................-.Bill McFarland
Roche is survived by two small Charlie -----------B arland
sons, Michael and David. Charlie Hopps, Larry's ward ----
sons, Michael and David. M Sutton
____ ______ Merita Sutton
Mrs. Caroline Smythe-Kersey,
Kiwanians Entertain 'Vivian's mother ...-Jan Wimberly
Cub Scouts At Picnic Mortimer Smythe-Kersey, Vivi-
an's brother..------...........Gene Chism
Foregoing their usual noon lun- Mrs. Edith Stone, sponsor of the
cheon Wedneday, members of the senior class, is directing the play.
Kiwanis Club met Wednesday after- ----
noon at. Wayside Park on the beach
and entertained some 50 members Hospital Auxiliary To
of the Cub Scouts with a picnic. Hold Rummage Sale
Gordon Hallmark, cubmaster, and
J. C. Culpepper, assistant, were in The Hospital Auxiliary is holding
charge of the boys, all of whom re- a rummage sale tomorrow from 10
port a wonderful outing. a. m. to 6 p. m. in the Ward build-
Next year's goal has been set at ing next Brooks Sporting Goods.
75 boys in the Cub Scouts. All proceeds will be used to pur-
-__ chase badly needed conveniences
Visit In Wewa for the patients at the municipal
Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Braxton and hospital.
son Wayne spent Monday in Wewa- Mrs. C. R. Garraway Jr., chair-
hitchka with Mrs. Braxton's grand- man of the sale, invites everyone to
mother, Mrs. Harriet Rowell. Mrs. drop "buy." She assures all that
Rowell returned to St. Joe with bargains will be plentiful.
them and spent several days here
with her daughter, Mrs. Florazelle Attend Moose Frolic
Connell. B. B. Conklin, J. F. Lawrence,
S___ Paul J. Farmer and Austin Huggins
Bragdon Store Entered returned Sunday from Columbus.
Sheriff Byrd Parker reported yes- Ga., where they attended the Moose
terday that the J. 0. Bragdon store Legion Frolic held May 6 7. Bill
at Indian Pass was entered some Carr accompanied them and con-
time Wednesday night and approxi- tinued on to Tuskegee, where he
mately $20 taken from' the register. visited 'his parents.


ing her mother, Mrs. Kizzie Pelts.
When Hill arrived at the tumble-
down shack at the edge of the bay,
he went inside, according to mem-
bers of' a Florida Power Corpora-
tion line crew which was working
about 60 feet from the scene, and
they heard Alday shout "You-- ,
you can't come in my house."
The members of the line crew
then saw Hill come from the house,
go to his car, get a pair of hand-
cuffs and return to the shack, the
door of which was partially closed.
As Hill pushed the door open, Al-
day, who was standing to one side
of or behind the door, struck him
a number of times on the hands,
arms and head with a rusty rifle
barrel, forcing Hill out on to the
porch. Hill then drew his gun, ac-
cording to the witnesses, and shot
Alday in the right chest.
The bullet failed to stop Alday,
who continued to shower blows on
Hill, forcing him to his kness and
finally on to his back.
He struck Hill on the head sev-
eral times after he was down, the
witnesses reported, before A. F.
"Buddy" Meyers of Apalachicola, A
member of the line crew, tackled
him from behind and held him un-
til other members of the crew took
the rifle barrel from him.
The men put Hill into his car
and Alday into one of their cars,
rushing them to the hospital. Mem-
bers of the line crew were Meyer,
W. J. Howell, L. V. Moran, 0. A.
Newell and R. W. Norman of Ap-
alachicola, Bill Ervin, Dick Skiver,
W. W. Cooper and J. E. Sessions of
Tallahassee, and Jimmy Cox and
C. W. Robbins of this city.
According to local officers, Alday
had previously served a prison sen-
tence at Raiford for the killing of a
man in Blountstown several 'years
ago. He is being held under guard
at the local hospital on a charge of
murder, according to Sheriff Parker,
and will be removed to the county
jail at Wewahitchka upon his re-
covery from the bullet wound.
Mrs. Pelts and Mrs. Armstrong
are being held as material wit-
nesses pending the trial of Alday.
Mrs. Pelts stated that she was hid-
ing beneath the house when Deputy
Hill was attacked, where she had
crawled to get away from Alday.
Hill, 39, had been serving as a
deputy under Sheriff Parker for
about two years and was formerly
a member of the Port St. Joe police
force. In addition to his wife, Mrs.
Odell Hill, the slain officer is sur-
vived by three children by a pre-
(Continued on page 11)


Days *f the


i I I I Irs ~~-~--~c. --~- ------~--


f











PAGE TWO THE StARPORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MAY 12, 195G'


Mrs. Charles Brown.
The welfare department collected
two boxes of groceries to send to
the Children's Home Society in Pen-
sacola, as well as a cash donation
of $25. A donation of $25 was also
made to the Red Cross.
The Woman's Club has helped to
beautify the grounds of the munici-
pal building, having paid for $71.50
worth of plantings, and the super-
vision of the landscaping has been
aided by members of the conserva-
tion department. The continuation


sponsored by the club was held dur- of work on the municipal hospital
ing the first week of school. grounds has also been carried out.
The May fete, "The American The Port St. Joe Junior Woman's
Panorama," presented under the di- Club, which is a department of the
reaction of Mrs. Ned Porter, was senior club, has had as its senior
held in May of 1949. sponsor Mrs. Noble Stone. The ju-
The district bandmaster's rally niors have been very active, or-
was held in Port St. Joe in Decem- ganizing a municipal library, which
ber 1949, under sponsorship of the was moved to its present location
Woman's Club. in the new municipal building upon
The club gave a scholarship to a its completion, the juniors also act-
4H Club girl for the annual short ing as hostesses at the dedication
course in Tallahassee. Judith Ma- of the structure. The juniors are
hon won this scholarship. now sponsoring organization of the
Films were shown by the citizen- Brownie Scouts. They have con-
ship department, and members re- tribute to the musical education of
minded of their right and privilege a Greek girl, Litza GCania, who is
to vote by both the American citi- studying in New York through the
zenship chairman, Mrs. B. R. Gib- generosity of the State Junior Wo-
son, and the education chairman, man's Club.

KITCHEN SHOWER HONORS DEMONSTRATION COUNCIL
MISS KATHERINE JONES MEETING HELD IN WEWA
A lovely kitchen shower was A meeting of the Gulf County
given in honor of Miss Katherine Home Demonstration Council was
Jones last Saturday evening by held Tuesday at the American Le-


Mrs. Carl Norton Jr., in her home
on 13th Street. Graceful arrange-
ments of larkspur and sweet peas
were used throughout the house.
When the honoree arrived she
was presented with a beautiful cor-
sage of sweet peas and pink rose
buds by the hostess. During the eve-
ning a game called "What Every
Bride Should Know" was played,
-with the prize going to Miss Sarah
Witt.
After Miss Jones had opened her
gifts, the hostess, assisted by Miss
Alma Baggett, served a delicious
salad plate with iced tea and mints
to her guests.

LEGION AND AUXILIARY
TO INSTALL OFFICERS
Officers for the ensuing year for
Willis V. 'Rowan Post 116, Ameri-
can Legion, and Unit 116, Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary, will be in-
stalled Monday evening at 8 o'clock
at the Legion home. Following the
installation ceremonies, which will
be conducted by Capt. Bruner of
Wewahitchka for the Legion and
Mrs. Madaleine Whitaker, second


gion home in Wewahitchka with 27
members and two visitors present.
The meeting was held as the cli-
max of National Home Demonstra-
tion Week. More than, 50 articles
made by club members were on
display at this time.
A covered dish luncheon was
served at noon to all members, the
board of county commissioners and
a number of visitors.
The day was a great success and
was enjoyed hugely by 'all who at-
tended.

MRS. WHITAKER INSTALLS
AUXILIARY OFFICERS
Mrs. Madaleine E. Whitaker, sec-
ond district president, Monday eve-
ning installed the new officers of
the Smith-Kelley Unit 100, Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary, at Marianna.
A chicken supper was enjoyed and
plans for the year partly mapped
out. She was accompanied by Mrs.
Fred Perry and Mrs. W. P. Com-
forter.
Tuesday night, Mrs. Whitaker
was guest of honor at a supper of
the Willoughby R. Marks Unit in


district president, for the Auxiliary, Apalachicola, where plans were
a chicken supper will be served. made for her to meet with the unit
All Legionnaires, ex-servicemen, at its next regular meeting to start
members of the Auxiliary, their a hospital needs program. Mrs. Es-
wives, boy friends, husbands and telle Mosely, Mrs. Anne G. Hart,
girl friends are invited to attend. Mrs. W. P. Comforter, Mrs. Sybil
at I t I; Perry and Mrs. Vera Collier ac-
BAPTIST W. M. U. MEETS companies her to Apalachicola.
FOR BIBLE STUDY it at ~
The Baptist W. M. U. met Mon- J. A. M. CLUB MEETS
day afternoon at the church for the Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon Jr., was hos-
regular Bible study. The meeting 'tess Monday night to members of
was opened with song, "Christ for the J. A. M. Club in her home on


the World We Sing," followed with
prayer by Mrs. C. A. McClellan.
After a short business session,
the meeting was turned over to
Rev. L. J. Keels, who conducted the
study on the first chapter of James.
Rev. Keels then closed the meeting
with prayer.
Circles will meet next week as
follows: Circle 1 with Mrs. L. E.
Voss. Circle 2 with Mrs. J. D. Lane.
Circle 3 with Mrs. L. J. Keels. Cir-
cle 4 with Mrs. Emmett Daniells.
Circle 5 with Mrs. Lonnie Bell. Bus-
iness Woman's Circle with Mrs.
Ralph Jackson.


Third Street. Guests enjoyed the
regular activities of the club, and
after a period of visiting, the hos-
tess served a salad plate with apple
pie ala mode and iced tea to the
eight members present. Next meet-
ing of the club will be with Mrs.
W. C. Pridgeon at her home on
Monument Avenue.

Joins Husband In Texas
Mrs. Lanell Rowan left Wednes-
day via air from Panama City for
Sherman,' Texas, to join her hus-
band, "Hoot" Rowan, who is sta-
toned there with the Air Cadets.


Social Activities

Personals Clubs Churches
MYR-ICE 0. SMITH, Editor PHONE 51


Port St. Joe Woman's Club Gives Report
On Activities for Club Year of 1949-50


JACKIE FAY PRICE HONORED MAKES HONOR ROLL
ON SECOND BIRTHDAY I AT CLEMSON COLLEGE
Little Jackie Fay Price of White
City was the honoree at a birthday Information has been received by
party given May 1 by her mother, local school officials that William
Mrs. J. C. Price, to celebrate her |T. Gibson, graduate of the Port St.
second birthday. After a period of Joe high school in 1948, has made
play, the guests assembled in the the honor roll at Clemson College'
dining room, where each enjoyed for work done during the first sem-
ice cream and cake and received ester of this term.
baskets of candy and balloons as Gibson, the son of Mr. and Mrs,
favors. C. L. Gibson of this city, is a fresh-
Those present to sing "Happy man and is majoring in physical
Birthday" and enjoy this occasion education. His work at Clemson has
with Jackie Fay were Bobby and been outstanding, according to the


The Port St. Joe Woman's Club,
in summing up its activities for the
1949-50 club year, gives the follow-
lig concise report:
The club has sponsored the Girl
Scouts since the troop was first or-
ganized, with Mrs. Rush Chism,
youth conservation chairman, keep-
ing the club informed of needs and
activities of the troop. The Girl
Scouts put on their annual program
for the club in March of each year.
The annual teacher's reception


CHURCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS
AND SUNDAY SERVICES

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. L. W. Tubb, Pastor
Mother's Day will be observed
with a special service Sunday at
the 11 o'clock hour.
The cradle roll and roll call will
be presented by Mrs. Walter John-
son. The service will include spe-
cial music and 'an appropriate mes-
sage by the pastor. People are in-
vited to attend in family units.
Those not attending service-else-
where are cordially invited to wor-
ship with us.
at
ST. JAMES' EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Rev. Lee Graham, Pastor
Rogation Sunday
7:30 a. m.-Holy communion.
8:15 a. m.-Breakfast meeting of
Laymen's League.
9:30 a. m.-Sunday school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning prayer and
sermon.
Friday, May 12-Vestry meeting
8:00 p. m.
Tuesday, May 16-Meeting of the
Soule Circle of the Woman's Auxili-
ary at 8:00 p. m.
Wednesday, May 17 Choir re-
hearsal 7:30 p. m.
Thursday, May 18, Ascension Day
-7:30 a. m., holy communion; 10:30
a. m., holy communion.

BAYVIEW METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Loyd W. Tubb, Pastor
A special service will be held at
the Bayview Methodist Church in
Highland View Friday evening, May
12, at 8 o'clock.
Parents so desiring will present
their children for infant baptism.
The Sacrament of the Lord's Sup-
per will be observed, and the peo-
ple of the community are invited
to join in this service. The board of
stewards will meet following the
service, and all members are re-
quested to remain for this meeting.

0. E. S. INITIATES
At a regular meeting of the Or-
der of Eastern Star Tuesday night
a new candidate, W. A. Roberts, re-
ceived the degrees of the order in
a most impressive ceremony. His
wife, holding the station of conduc-
tress, conducted her husband thru
the initiation ceremony. The hall
was attractively decorated with
spring flowers for the occasion. Af-
ter the close of the meeting, a so-
cial hour was enjoyed, and salad,
sandwiches, cake and iced' drinks
were served to some thirty mem-
bers. J. M. Harris and George Core
of Wewahitchka were present for
the occasion.

DEPUTY PRESIDENT VISITS
MELODY REBEKAH LODGE
Melody Rebekah Lodge No. 22
was honored 'Wednesday night at
the regular meeting by a visit from
Irene Pitts of Panama City, district
deputy president, who was pre-
sented with a lovely gift by Minnie
Mahon on-behalf of the chapter.
Other visitors were Louise Camb-
bley, Ora Dean and Pastelle Allen
of Panama City, and Iva Mae Lloyd
of the Lynn Haven chapter.

QUARTERLY CONFERENCE
AT METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. L. W. Tubb announces that
the fourth quarterly conference of
the Port St. Joe charge will be held
at the Methodist Church Thursday
evening, May 18, at 8 o'clock.
Dr. George W. Kerlin will be
present and will preside over the
conference.

Visitors From Marianna
Mr. and Mrs. D. D. McCaskill and
daughter of Marianna were guests
Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Gar-
raway.

S Week-end Guest
Miss Janice Rutledge of Macon,
Ga., was the week-end house guest
of Mr. and Mrs. E. Y. Cowart.


Today! One Day Only!


P* S0. 0S060004 50004
SATURDAY

DOUBLE FEATURE

PROGRAM

--- FEATURE NO. I


ALIAN I
I ,
#GUdMEN ofABILr ME ;
--- FEATURE NO. 2 --


--- plus ----

Chapter I of NEW SERIAL

UNDERSEASS

KINGDOM"
--- Also ----


"For
5,..


Scentimental Reasons"
$ $ a o a0 I a a# ama e


SUNDAY-One Day Only




BILL 2




--- Plus ---
"HEAVENLY PUSS"


MONDAY and TUESDAY
Paraoant presents
Olivia de HAVILLAND
Montgomery CLIFT


Ralph Richardson Miriam Hopki E

--- Plus ---

LATEST NEWS EVENTS
and "SEA SALTS"


WEDNESDAY ONLY




"MY GIRL




TISA"

with -


LILI PALMER

.-- .Also ---
Chapter 15 of Serial

'King of Jungleland'

and "COMMUNITY SING"
,0 40 o 04.....
THURSDAY and FRIDAY

Robed Ba3ila
YOUNG HALE

1 ANDBABYI

SrMAKES THREE


--- Plus ----

LATEST NEWS EVENTS


MOVIES A-- TH VER!



g 4 S g 5S0


Billy Antley, Ann Carol Willis, Ed-
die and Bubba Braxton, Smitty and
Anita Smith, Johnny Shirah, Rob-
ert Sewell, Linda Price and Patty
and Gregory Mook.
Assisting Mrs. Price in entertain-
ing and serving were Mrs. Rudolph
Shirah, Mrs. George Mook, Mrs. E.
L. Antley, Mrs. Bob Smith and Mrs.
Dick Willis.
V at V
,-Returtis Home
Mrs. R. D. Prows returned home
last week after a visit of several
weeks in Baskin, La.


registrar.


Dr. Charles Reicherter
OPTOMETRIST
EYES EXAMINED
GLASSES FITTED

RITZ THEATRE BUILDING
FIRST FLOOR
HOURS: 8 TO 5 PHO-NE 560
PANAMA CITY, FLA.
Closed Wednesday Afternoon, I


Port Theatre

A Martin Theatre Port St. Joe, Fla. *

0 THEATRE OPENS SATURDAYS SUNDAYS AT 1:00 P. M.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE DAILY AT 2:45 P. M.
"Dedicated To Community Service"
"Dedicated To Community Service"


( atD~Dr~:ruSI~C~C~=~:~:c~:c~:e~:~:~:"


THE 6StAkilrPORT ST. JO-E, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950,


PACE TWO


I








FRIDAnTH S P T G TAR, PE


Stockmen Urged
To Plan Ahead for
Pappting of Grass

University of Florida Agronomist
Says Rainy Season Best
Time for Seeding
For improved pasture plantings
during the summer rainy season,
make your plans now, the Univer-
sity of Florida agricultural exten-
sion service advises stockmen and
farmers of Gulf county.
Because newly planted grasses
stand a better chance of survival if
they receive adequate moisture, the
season of regular rains in summer
is best for plantings, especially on
-well-drained soils, Agronomist Rus-
sell Henderson points out.
"Time, labor and money can be
saved if the farmer or stockman


will decide on what 'grass he is go-
ing to plant,. prepare the land, ob-
tain seed and fertilizer, and make
other plans for doing the job so he
will be ready-to begin as soon as
the weather- turns off right," he
said.
Henderson offers these sugges-
tions:
Clear land of stumps, brush and
trees not needed for shade; burn
trash and wire grass, and disk land
with a medium or heavy tandem
disk. Avoid turning poor subsoil to
surface.
Broadcast limestone at. the rate
of one ton per acre, or enough to
raise soil pH to 5.8 or 6 a few
weeks before planting.
For grasses on mineral soils, ap-
ply 300 pounds of 3-8-5, 4-10-7, or
0-8-14 or 0-8-16 per a-cre at planting
time; for grasses on peats and
mucks, apply about 300 pounds of
$-8-14 or 0-8.16 per acre at planting
time to old crop land, as much as


Y/1041C6,


Opening of Our New building

LOCATED AT 4TH STREET AND WILLIAMS AVENUE

SATURDAY, MAY 20



70% of the space in our New, Modern Building is utilized for a
LARGE SERVICE DEPARTMENT
with nine service stalls and a body and paint shop. High speed chain hoists,
Bear front-end machine, Weaver twin post lift and other up-to-date installations
have been made.- -


W. J. STRICKLAND, Service Manager
JOHN "RED" GAROOGIAN Mechanics
JACK OWENS


ERNEST O'BRIAN


*

OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT
has been modernized and inventory increased 50%. GENUINE CHEV-
ROLET PARTS AND ACCESSORIES AT NEW LOWER PRICES!
J. R. McARTHUR, Parts Manager CHARLES PIPPIN, Parts Clerk
*


O UR OFFICE
SJOE GRIMSLEY, Bookkeeper


DEP ARTMENT
MRS. DOROTHY CRAIG, Secretary,


OUR SALES DEPARTMENT
RUSH CHISM Salesmen BILL CARR


NEW CHEVROLETS AND OLDSMOBILES ON THE WAY
A NICE VARIETY OF STYLES AND COLORS WILL BE ON HAND

All of us are ready and eager to serve all the good people of Gulf and
Franklin Counties.

Everybody Come for Opening of New Building

FREE COLD DRINKS BALLOONS FOR THE CHILDREN
REGISTER FOR DOOR PRIZES!


GARRAWAY CHEVROLET CO.

C. R. GARRAWAY, Jr.
Your Chevrolet Oldsmobile Dealer


WILLIAMS AVENUE


PHONE 388


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


~1'* Wv... wr w y I- m @* ......- .- -- -- -- ---


I MOTHER'S DAY, SUNDAY, MAY 14


REMEIBEl l


MOTHER

Your Purchases Cheerfully Gift Wrapped!


LUXURIOUS SEAMPRUFE
GOWNS and SLIPS .$2.95 to $5.95

MOJUD HOSIERY $1.25 to $1.65
MARCY LEE AND PEG PALMER
Frocks for Summer $8.95 to $14.75

DAINTY, LACE-TRIMMED
BE DJ AC K ET S $1.95 to $3.95

CANNON COLORED
SH EETS- 81x99_ .-------.--.$2.95

FULL SIZE, CLOSELY TUFTED
CHENILLE SPREADS -----$4.44
SHIP 'N SHORE

BLOUSES _'----_ $2.95 to $3,95

DANIEL GREEN
HOUSE SUPPERS _$3.95 to $5,95

NATURAL RIjPGE
CASUAL SHOES -------- $6.95

PERMANENT FINISH RUFFLED
ORGANDY CURTAINS ----$3.95
WHITE and COLORS

-- SPECIAL SELECTION MOTHER'S DAY -

HANDKERCHIEFS

25c to $1.00


600 pounds to new land.
A cultipacker with seeding at-
tachment is best for planting of
grasses, but the seed can be sown
uniformly with a hand seeder, cov-
ered lightly with spike-tooth or disk
harrow, and packed with log roller.
Per acre seed requirements: Pen-
sacola Bahia and carpet grass, 10
pounds; common Bahia, 15 pounds.
Keep cattle off new grass pas-
tures for at least two months after
planting.
Francis Bacon
In 1624, Francis Bacon wrote,
"The Turks have a drink called
caffa, made of a berry of the same
name, as black as soot and of a
strong scent. This drink comfort-
eth the brain and heart and helpeth
digestion."
Alaskan Brown Bear
The Alaskan brown bear-a griz-
zly weighs from 1,800 to 2,000
pounds.


-


THE STAR, PORT ST. JQE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


Y MAY 12 1950










PG I TL RA Y1 9


THE STAR
Published Every Friday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St.
Joe, Florida, by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Man, Pressman, Floor Man,
Reporter, Columnist, Janitor and Printer's Devil.
Entered as second-class matter, December 10, 1937, at the
l'ostoffice, Port St. Joe, Fla., under Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
D.NE YEAR $2.00 SIX MONTHS $1.00
THREE MONTHS $127.15

"-{ TELEPHONE 51 }i*-
TO ADVERTISERS---In case of error or omissions in adver-
tisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for
damages further than amount received. for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word
is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts;
the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

Our Country Right or Wrong

WE JUST DON'T GIVE A HOOT!
The editor of The Star, as you probably have
already discovered, is neither saint nor sage, phil-
osopher or professor. There's no secret about the
matter. We manage to take in enough mazuma
to keep us in sowbelly and beans and sufficient
clothes to hide our nakedness. We express our
opinions freely, but put on no campaign to per-
suade anybody to agree to anything, or with
anybody and, least of all, with us.
Our opinions expressed in these editorial col-
umns, generally written in haste and sometimes
indecently ungrammatical, may baffle or be-
fuddle you, but someone has to do the job, for
a newspaper without an editorial page is liken
unto a church without a preacher.
We generally find it rather difficult to work
,up a rich lather of perspiration over political
(campaigns, issues that face the world or the na-
tion, but we do manage a sickly line or two at
times. There have been issues, local, national and
-world-wide, for many years, and there will be
issues long after we.have passed into the world
where the editorials will either be written on as-
bestos or golden tablets. Why should we worry
about what somebody else thinks about our
humble opinions, much less other matters?
The human race is an ancient institution, here
long before we were born, and it has been be-
deviled by wiser writers than we are. It has gone
its untroubled way. So be it. All that we ask is
the privilege of going our own way, with those
-who may choose to come along, and without
-those. who prefer to go some other way.
We appreciate it when somebody tells us we
:have written a fine editorial, but we never worry
whether our readers agree iith us or not. And,
above all, we refuse to turn these editorial col-
.umns over to selfish promotional schemes of in-
-dividuals or politicians. If we feel so inclined,
we may put in a word for a worthy cause or a
politician whom we consider is working for the
interests of the people, otherwise we tell them
'No dice!"

There is hardly any product that somebody
cannot make a little worse and sell a little
cheaper, and the buyer on price alone is that
man's prey.

We've.ben thinking what a fine thing it would
be if the termites would eat up the mortgage in-
stead of the building.

Jonah had a fine chance to tell a whale of a
fish story.


THAT GOVERNMENT MEDDLING
The publisher of The Star recently took on a
printing trainee under the G.I. bill and since that
time has been required to fill out innumerable
forms, generally in quadruplicate, and before the
trainee completes his course we probably will -be
required to fill out many "more. If we had known
of all the red tape involved, we wouldn't have
taken on the young man to begin with.
All of which is leading up to an article appear-
ing recently in the Saturday Evening Post en-
titled "The Federal Snoops Are After Me," writ-
ten by Robinson McIlvaine, publisher of the
Dowington, Pa., Archive.
Seems Mr. McIlvaine and his wife bought this
small weekly paper on the proverbial shoestring
and were getting along nicely until a represen-
tative of the wage and hour division of the fed-
.eral government appeared with a long bill of
particulars of unfair practices which the pub-
lisher had unwittingly committed. It amounts to
an interesting, first-hand account of how federal
laws whose intent is perfectly good can be car-
ried to extremes of interpretation which make
them almost incredibly onerous to business-and
especially small business like the Archive and
The Star.
Newspapers of less than 4000 circulation are
exempt from the wages and hours act, and Mr.
McIlvaine assumed that his Archive, with a cir-
culation of about 1600, naturally fell into this
category. However, it seemed that the printing
end of the paper had been set up as a separate
corporation, and this legal quirk brought it
within the scope of the law. Mr. Me. didn't think
he was engaged in interstate commerce either.
But he was wrong again-simply because he
printed letterheads for firms which mail letters
out of the state!
That was only the beginning of the troubles.
It had been a common practice for years for
groups of people, young and old, to drop in at
the plant each Wednesday evening and fold the
papers for mailing next day. They earned a little
money and had a lot of fun. But, according to
the wages and hours agent, each one would
henceforth have to have a time card, a social se-
curity card, and all kinds of records would have
to be kept. Result: Mr. Me., who was already
heavily in debt, borrowed more money on his
remaining assets and bought a press which me-
chanically folds the papers as they are printed.
Some time later the wage and hour people
moved again. Mr. Me. was ordered to pay $744.25
in back wages-which he didn't have. Of this,
$156 was to go to the foreman, who, incidentally,
had been paid a straight $80 a week, with paid
vacation;, and had been off two more weeks be-
cause of' sickness. So he had already received
$320 for time he had been absent. But he got the
additional $156.
Most amazing of all, $582 of the back wages,
according to the wage and hour division, had to
be paid to.himself! Apparently he'd been taking:
out less than the proper salary-and that just
wasn't legal.
Mr. Me.. cites more instances of this sort, and
observes that the Archives' dosier at the wage
and hour office "is now about 15 inches thick,
and it would be hard-to estimate how many of
our tax dollars were spent on this investigation."
In all probability, thousands of little busi-
nesses have found themselves involved in similar
predicaments. The big business, with its legal
and accounting departments, can take the huge
mass of laws and rulings and bureaucratic prac-
tices pretty much in s ride. The small operation,
on the other hand, takes the beating.


exercises last Friday night, Prof. 1949 AutoF
D. G. McPherson presented medals The 53 automo
to the following students: Margie ers in the United
Kirkland and Al Schenider citizen- production record
ing out 6,250,000
ship; Susan Saunders and Carolyn busses. This tops
Baggett, honor points; David Mad- ord, set in 1929,
dox and Madeline Soderberg, best lion vehicles.
all-around students; John Lane and
Billy Hammock, school activities. YU
Martin-Hunt LOSE A
Rev. J. H. Hunt of Dothan, Ala.,
announces the marriage of his 5
daughter, Bertha, to Coy Martin of BILL?
this city. The marriage took place Maybe i's on the fo
on Monday, April 29, in Panama For every pair of wor
City. back in service will re
-- --- lars in wear at today's
Margarine Restrictions Pickup that money. t
Federal and state laws impose -at little cost.
such restrictions on margarine
that "the poor man's butter" is The Leader
not stocked by about 40 per cent
of the nation's grocers. Our New
(- 203 Third Street
T1 +_ _A- -- + ,+


Production
bile manufactur-
States set a new
in 1049 by turn-
ears, trucks, and
the previous rec-
by almost a mfl-


'r-in your closet.,.
rn shoes you can put
pay you several dol-
shoe prices.
Bring in your wom
.ke them like new


Shoe Shop
Location
Phone 363


it pays to advertise try it!


.*0**..* 0 000 0-
* TRY OUR .

" FREE DELIVERY SERVICE :
* ANYWHERE IN THE CITY! *


S ST. JOE BAR
* PHONE 114 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
0e 6 $ :* 6 *******0** *





&-Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


4b O -
4a-& wm.
GNP


- .- --
- ~-
* -
-~ ~



- -
*


dm


*


a dm. oms -F
410M 4- u -

p. of bf -p



a*



-Odo


SV
iian a e s more


than an oil change-


TEN YEARS AGO
From the Files of The Star

Results of First Primary
Spessard Holland and Francis P.
Whitehair will enter the second pri-
mary in the gubernatorial race. B.
F. Paty ran in third place. Gulf
county gave Holland 321 votes and
Whitehair 177 and Paty 144. There
were eight other contenders in the
race for the governorship. In other
contests Clay Lewis was returned
as representative in the legislature


when W. S. McLin, second high,
withdrew; B. W. Eells ran third.
C. G. Rish was returned as super-
visor of registration, polling a ma-
jority over Mrs. Belle Bateman, A.
Z. Culbreth and Miss-Adele. Lister.
George Tapper was named county
commissioner over Nick Comforter,
and Tom Owens was elected school
superintendent over C. L. Costin.
In the contest for county judge, T.
R. L. Carter and J. E. Pridgeon will
enter the second primary; Sam P..
Husband ran third and Hamp By-
num was fourth.
Prospects of River Bill Good


ing yesterday for final congres-
sional authorization of $6,500,000 to
begin a $66,000,000 development of
the Chattahoochee, Flint and Ap-
alachicola rivers. The initial $6,-
500,000 would be used to build two
dams and locks, one at Fort Ben-
ning and one at the junction of the
Chattahoochee and Flint rivers.
Exporters Take St. Joe
The Port St. Joe town team and
the Kenney Exporters met Sunday
at th* local ball park, with the Ex-
porters coming out on the long end
of a 12-8 score.
School Students Receive Medals


The prospects appeared promis- Immediately following graduation


When you bring your truck in for "Summer-izing," we do
more than just change to a summer grade oil. We check
the entire cooling and electrical systems of your truck,
check-up and tune-up the engine, and lubricate the en-
tire chassis. Put your truck in top condition for hot-
weather hauling. Stop in now!.


M. G. LEWIS & SNS GARAGE


MONUMENT AVENUE


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


A)AA


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


qqb W
4b
dm ,
-wmdimo-a









FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE FIVE


WEDNESDAY, MAY 10
Wewahitchka at Port St. Joe.
Apalachicola at Blountstown.
Tallahassee at Panama City.
SUNDAY, MAY 14
Port St. Joe at Blountstown.
Panama City at Apalachicola.
Tallahassee at Wewahitchka.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 17
Port St. Joe at Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Blountstown.
SUNDAY, MAY 21
Tallahassee at Port St. Joe.
Apalachicola at Wewahitchka.
Panama City at Blountstown.
WEDNESDAY MAY 24
Port St. Joe at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka at Blountstown.
SUNDAY MAY 28
Port St. Joe at Wewahitchka.
Blountstown at Apalachicola.
Tallahassee at Panama City.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 31
Blountstown at Port St. Joe.
Apalachicola at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Wewahitchka.
SUNDAY, JUNE 4
Port St. Joe at Apalachicola.
Panama City at Wewahitchka.
Tallahassee at Blountstown.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7
Tallahassee at Port St. Joe.
Wewahitchka at Apalachicola.
Blountstown at Panama City.
SUNDAY, JUNE 11
Panama City at Port St. Joe.
Tallahassee at Apalachicola.
Blountstown at Wewahitchka.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14
Wewahitchka at Port St. Joe.
Blountstown at Apalachicola.
Tallahassee at Panama City.
SUNDAY, JUNE 18
Blountstown at Port St. Joe.
Panama City at Apalachicola.
Tallahassee at Wewahitchka.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21
Apalachicola at Port St. Joe.
Wewahitchka at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Blountstown.
SUNDAY, JUNE 25
Tallahassee at Port St.-.Joe.
Apalachicola at Wewahitchka.
Panama City at Blountstown.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28
Port St. Joe at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka at Blountstown.
SUNDAY, JULY 2
Port St. Joe at Wewahitchka.
Apalachicola at Blountstown.
Tallahassee at Panama City.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 5
Port St. Joe at Blountstown.
Apalachicola at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Wewalhitchka.
SUNDAY, JULY 9
Apalachicola at Port St. Joe.
Panama City at Wewahitchka.
Tallahassee at Blountstown.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 12
Tallahassee at Port St. Joe.
Wewahitchka at Apalachicola.
Blountstown at Panama City.
SUNDAY, JULY 16
Panama City at Port St. Joe.
Tallahassee at Apalachicola.
Blountstown at Wewahitchka.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 19
Wewahitchka at Port St. Joe.
Blountstown at Apalachicola.
Tallahassee at Panama City.
SUNDAY JULY 23
Blountstown at Port St. Joe.
Panama City at Apalachicola.
Tallahassee at Wewahitchka.
WEDNESDAY JULY 26
Port St. Joe at Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Blountstown.
SUNDAY, JULY 30
Tallahassee at Port St. Joe.
Apalachicola at Wewahitchka.
Panama City at Blountstown.

Mill Worker Breaks Arm
Luke Taunton, an employee of the
St. Joe Paper Company, last Friday
about noon received a broken left
arm when he fell off a scaffolding
at the lime kiln. His arm was frac-
tured at the wrist and also broken
about midway between the shoul-
der and elbow.

Fire and insects are two of the
worst enemies of Florida's forests.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2
Port St. Joe at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka at Blountstown.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 6
Port St. Joe at Wewahitchka.
Apalachicola at Blountstown.
Tallahassee at Panama City.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9
Port St. Joe at Blountstown.
Apalachicola at Panama City.
Tallahassee at Wewahitchka.
Scheduled games with Tallahas-
see for Wednesdays at Port St. Joe
will not be played until lights are
provided at the new ball park. The
games will be played at night later
in the season, since the Tallahas-
see team can not get away Wed-
nesday afternoons. Panama City,
Apalachicola and Blountstown all
have lighted parks.



THE LOW DOWN
----- from-----

WILLIS SWAMP

Editor The STARR:
You no, folkses, when this here
country wuz free, yung and fancy,
kongruss wud meet, pass a law or
2, say how much the army and navy
cud have, make a guess on how
much the P. 0. deficit mite be-
then go on home. Folks then cud
breathe easier but now lookit.
Knogruss never goes home. Prob-
lums git bigger and gloomier-also
mor wispy-and kongruss falls for
'em, and makes a new law.
To cook up a problem where they
wuzn't no problem before, is child's
play. Them hed men of ourn up
there on the Potomak keep tellin'
us we gotta do this or that or we
ain't gonna survive, and we better
pull back into our shells and jist
let the guvamint do everything fer
us.
Kongruss is a sucker for will-o-;
the-wispy and whipporwill prob-
lums, and we're a nashun of suck-


ers. We bin actin' like the guy who the hat and wrapt it up. 6'U. All men who let their wife buy
lets his wife buy his hats fer him. But the lady was non-plussed, or his hat wear a 614."
The good lady went into Costin's sumthin' like that, and she sez Yours with the low down,
Dept. Store and sez "I want new "Whut size is the hat-you didn't JO SERRA.
hat fer my husband." and G. F. Law- ask me whut size I wanted." ----
rence sez "Yes, ma'am," and he got And Lawrence up and sez "It's a It pays to advertise try it!


1 Treat Mother To


One Of BARBIZON'S,

"Jaunty" Slips




$300




The magical Barbizon Slip that won't
ride up, pull or twist because the skirt
is straight cut. The smooth soft bodice
molds to Mother's bust, the bias mid-
riff tapers her waist. Trimmed with
dainty embroidered nylon sheer.

"Jaunty Fit" in rayon crepe. White only.









Miss Lady Little Miss Little Lady
Jaunty Fit 10-20 38-44 9-15 14V2-26V2




SIHNEIDER'T S


DEPARTMENT STORE


WILLYS-top maker of station wagons-leads'
again with this distinctive new model...
strikingly styled.. stepped up in power and
economy... a greater value than ever at its
NEW LOW PRICE!
The sensational F-head HURRICANE
Engine gives the New Willys surging per-
formance and squeezes out more miles per


gallon! Compression is 7.4 but premium fuel
is not required.
Come in and see the many features of this
doubly-useful car-extra roominess and visi-
bility-washable seats-quick conversion from
passenger car to cargo carrier. Road-test the
New Willys-feel its smooth, comfortable
ride, its ease of handling. It's a great car and
a great buy!


SM. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE
MONUMENT AVENUE --:-- PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


GULF COAST LEAGUE SCHEDULE


ITS THE NWF f LEAIE

SIN USEFULNESS IN VALUE IN ECONOMY


HURRICANI-POWERE WI LLYS STATION WAGON


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


PAGE FIVE





O F C F ID


This Time The Anti-Trust



Lawyers Won A Case



Against A&P


As almost everyone now knows, the anti-trust lawyers in Washington have brought a
civil suit to destroy A&P.
They ask the courts to order the dissolution of this company.
They say that this suit is based on the fact that they won a suit against us at Danville,
Illinois, in 1946.
They did. In that case, Federal Judge Walter C. Lindley made a decision against A&P.
Immediately thereafter, in a letter explaining his decision, Judge
Lindley wrote:

"I have not condemned the A&P system.
I have not made a finding which could
be the basis for a suit of dissolution."


So, now we have the anti-trust lawyers saying that their suit to dissolve A&P is based
on Judge Lindley's decision; while Judge Lindley himself says his decision could not be
the basis for a suit of dissolution.
In previous ads we told you about the cases against A&P which the anti-trust lawyers
lost. We promised to tell you about this case they won.
On the next page is the story of the Danville case.


PAGE 81X


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950










FRDAMA 1,190 H STR OTS.JE UFCONY LRD AESvt


What Judge Lindley Objected To

At Danville, the anti-trust lawyers made all of the charges which
they are again making against A&P today. They were substantially
the same charges they had made and dropped at Dallas, Texas,
after four federal judges had objected to some of them as
"inflammatory."
In his decision Judge Lindley was critical of some of our
activities. He threw some of the charges out of court. He did
not make any decision on others.
He even took occasion to praise A&P for the efficient job of
food distribution it had done.
Judge Lindley said:
"To- buy, sell and distribute to a substantir portion of
130,000,000 people, one and three-quarter billion dollars
worth of food annually at a profit of 1 / cents on each
dollar, is an achievement one may well be proud of.
"No place in the world I take it are people so well fed as
in the United States. Nowhere else, I suppose, do food
distributors accomplish -efficient distribution at so low a
margin of profit. In contrast, we are told in other nations
the problem is not one of an adequate diet but one of
no diet at all."
But Judge Lindley did find us in violation of the Sherman Act.
He based his ruling on the dual role played by our fresh fruit
and vegetable buying subsidiary, the Atlantic Commission
Company, whereby that organization acted both as buying
agent for A&P and as selling agent for growers.
Judge Lindley said:-
"If I assume for the purpose of disposition of this case that
in general the policy of A&P was to operate within the
law and attribute to defendants a desire to comply with
the law, there still remains the conscious, knowing adop-
tion by all defendants of a plan of action by the Atlantic
Commission Company affecting every department of A&P
and every retail store which cannot be squared with the
intent and purpose of the act."
In his letter explaining the decision, Judge Lindley wrote: "I have
condemned their, practices through the,Atlantic Commission
Company."
Judge Lindley imposed fines totaling $175,000. When his decision
-was upheld by the Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, we paid
the fines. This ended the case but we did not stop there.


What We Did To Correct This

In the light of the decision, we immediately set about reviewing our
activities to be sure that there could never again be any critic--m
of our operations.
First, the Atlantic Commission Company abandoned the dual
role to which Judge Lindley objected and which he said was
the basis of his decision against us.
We did this even though the Atlantic Commission Company
had been licensed for many years by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture to act as both a buyer and seller of fresh
fruits and vegetables.
The Atlantic Commission Company now only buys for A&P. In
other words, we stopped doing the thing which Judge Lindley
said put us in violation of the Sherman Act.

We made additional changes in other methods of operation
which Judge Lindley had questioned at Danville, even though
he did not base his decision on them.
We did even more than this!
We went down to Washington and asked the anti-trust lawyers
what else they thought wd should do to conform to their new
interpretation of the vague anti-trust laws.
The only answer we ever got was that we should break up
this company!
Despite their claim that they were not opposed to A&P's size,
they insisted that we destroy this size.
Despite their claim that they were not opposed to our manu-
facturing operations, they insisted that we get rid of our
factories which produce many of the fine foods you buy
at A&P.

Despite their claim that they were not opposed to our low
prices, they insisted that we destroy many of the efficien-
cies that make these low prices possible.
In other words, they insisted upon the' dissolution of A&P.
We were still trying to find out from the anti-trust lawyers
what else they thought we should do to conform to the law
when they filed the current suit to destroy A&P.


Why, Then, Do They Want To Put A&P Out of Business?


Ever since this suit was filed, the anti-trust lawyers have been
making damaging statements that could seriously hurt our
business if they were believed by the public.
They say that we were found guilty at Danville of all the
charges they are making today.
This is not true. Judge Lindley did not sustain all of the
charges of the anti-trust lawyers.
They say this suit is designed to enforce the law.
But A&P has clearly demonstrated its sincere desire to
abide by the spirit, as well as the letter of the law.


They say they are seeking to "enjoin" A&P from engaging
in certain "alleged' practices.
Actually, the whole purpose of this wmit is not to "enjoioa'
us, but to put us out of business.
They say that this suit for dissolution is based on the decision
handed down by Judge Lindley in Danville.
But Judge Lindley has said of his decision: "I have not
made a finding which could be the basis for a suit of dim-
solution."


What, then, is the real reason why the anti-trust lawyers want
to destroy this company, which for 90 years has pioneered the
methods of distribution which have given the American people
more good food for their money?


THE GREAT ATLANTIC &


PACIFIC TEA COMPANY


T14E STAR, PORT SIT. JOEo GULF, COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


PAGE SEVEN







PAGE GHO O


Grady Albritton Is Laying
Plans for Strong Campaign
Grady N. Albritton of Tampa,
whose 134 471 votes put him in the
May 23 runoff with Wilbur King
for membership on the state rail-
road and public utilities commis-
sion, is laying plans for an inten-
sive campaign.
His campaign manager announces
that Albritton will tell audiences
he will work toward improvements
in bus, rail and street car transpor-
tation, with "a watchful eye on
rates"; lower freight rates in inter-
state and intra-state traffic; exten-
sion of rural telephone service and
"careful guarding of the public's in-
terest in the event of rate boosts";
better regulation of Florida's fast-
growing trucking industry and cer-
tain water carriers, and early abo-
lition of toll bridges and/or lower-
ing of toll charges.
Steamboat Race
In early steamboat days, his-
tory was made in the race between
the ornate, palatial Natchez and
the Robert E. Lee. The rivals
started puffing up the Mississippi
from New Orleans on June 30, 1870.
The Robert E. Lee was the ffrst to
make the goal, at St. Louis, on the
4th of July.
Pullman Carpets
Carpets on the floor of Pullman
cars have to be replaced about
every two to six years, depending
upon carpet type and color used.

TO THE PEOPLE OF
FLORIDA


L -- -r


The one
you keep
on a
pedestal
. Honor
HER on


OTHER'S D


The Red
Letter
Day
i May 14


PAY TRIBUTE TO YOUR MOTHER WITH AN APPROPRIATE GIFT!!

New Spring Colors to Wear With Anything! GIVE HER A BEAUTIFUL


HUMMING BIRD BEDASPEAD


HOSIERY IDE

51 Gauge ------$1.35 Only $.9
60 Gauge ------ 1.65 CHENILLE SPREADS ..--$5.9
GIVE THE DEAREST FRIEND YOU EVER HAD A AT M T2
BOX OF HOSIERY ON HER DAY! BATHROOM SETS------

REMEMBER MOTHER WITH Maybe she still likes to swim!
SEVERAL NICE if so, give her a ...
SEVE "JANTZEN'

Handkerchiefs I thb h.!
an ; I~ I~i~LLI3


39c


49c


and $1.00


Also Boxed.


The result of last Tuesday's
election impresses me very
deeply and reverently as a
triumph of democratic prin-
ciples over personalities. I
regard your nomination of
me as a solemn mandate to
be guided by those prin-
ciples in representing you as
your U. S. Senator in Wash-
ington. When I assume
those duties I shall always
have in mind and heart the
whole people' of Florida,
their determination to re-
main a free, liberty loving
people who have retained
in their own hands the di-
rection of their individual
destinies.
To you who worked in my
behalf so tirelessly during
the campaign in the belief
that I would be faithful to
every trust imposed, I ex-
press my lasting gratitude
and my assurance that I will
not fail you.
Gratefully yours,
George Smathers.
Thank you again, and may
God bless you all.
(Paid Political Advertising)


WE GIFT WRAP!


GIVE HER A DRESS!

NELLY-DONS
12 to 20

S8.95 To S14.95

MINX MODES
9 to 17

S8.95 TO $12.95
AN IDEAL GIFT!

BEAUTIFUL SOFT WHITE
FIELDCREST SHEETS
FOR DOUBLE BEDS
Packed 2 in a cellophane package
$2.69 each


The

FRIENDLY

Store PO


,
.stays
discreetly
hidden -

concealed by the
3-way cuE of an



SLIP
Every Arrcmis dIrp hjs a jpe:ul .
k.no, ng %ay' ar, e>xdl-jc
ind pa:en-ed cur thl l I.eer, ,,:,u "
propt ereI under drcse. of
V'lov. ;',h.n :h.r,:fr tjbriA ira. t,:.' r
f ahi,:.o rnew be .,jre. t, A- erd
tr.; ,i1 t i : h -rTi iIh [h:
Fin",Jurc.Pe a Ac i .A n.T r lip.
i:r the S rji .hr Cursc B:-, cLt
th-l h"I-._ rhe boun.:' r ,, ol you- l'H ,
nelei ijdc. up a"J n .m tIr ,v v .;'


Lace-Trimmed
Nylon Slips ...-- --
Plain Tailored Slips.
Pink and White ..
Lace-Trimmed Slips.
Pink and White
Plain and Lace
Trim Slips ......---- -


$S5.95

S2.95

$2.95
'T 1Q5S


Artemis_ $3.95 o 9.95
Gowns OE, toI



1STINE1I


RT ST. JOE, FLORIDA PHONE 141


meal Tor, e /eac ies
One-piece and two-piece suits.


$8.95


$10.95


Nylon $12.95- $14.95


LADIES' PANTIES
Rayon -59c and 79c
Nylon --$1.59
Nylon------$1.89
WE GIFT WRAP!

JANTZEN

PLAY SHORTS


$2.95


$3.95


S4.95
Others $1.95 up

AN APPROPRIATE GIFT!
LADIES' BLOUSES
Sheers -- $1.98
ayons -- $2.95
Nylons ----$3.95

SWhere Your
Patronage Is
ALWAYS
8 Appreciated


5
5


I,


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


PAGE EIGHT









FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950



Thanks for


Everything!.

With all the gratitude of
my heart I want to sin-
cerely thank the good
people of Florida for the
wonderful vote they gave
me in the first primary in
my race for re-election as
a member of the Florida
Railroad and Public Utili-
ties Commission. You
gave me more than 225,-
000 votes nearly 100,-
000 more than my near-
est opponent and we
lead in all but four coun-
ties. I want to thank you
for that support and urge
you to go to the polls
again on May 23rd and
give me a second term in
the office that I have
worked so hard to fill in
the interest of all
the people.

THANKS FOR

EVERYTHING!


WILBUR C.


KING
(Paid Political Advertising)


FOR ANY
MAJOR SERVICE JOB

Come in today. Prompt,
expert service. "Renew"
your car and pay as
you drive!





St. Joe Motor Co.
Phone 37
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


GARDEN NOTES.
PORT ST. JOE GARDEN CLUB

Properly conditioned cut flowers
will last easily three times as long
as unconditioned ones. For best re-
sults the conditioning should be
done overnight, but ndver longer,
as the solutions will eventually
ruin the flowers.
Here are the rules: Cut flowers
early in the morning or after the
sun has gone down. Cut stems on a
slant to increase the water intake.
Strip the stems of foliage for at
least four inches from the base. Put
the flowers in their special solution
as soon as gathered. Use a clean
container, but never an aluminum
one. Keep flowers away from direct
sunlight and draughts while con-
ditioning. Afterwards place them in
fresh water.
Many flowers:.need to have cut
end singed. Wrap the whole flower
in a cloth or towel to protect blos-
soms and leaves from heat while
singeing.
Another type, such as the nar-
cissus, conditions best if the jelly-
like substance is squeezed from
ends of stems. If this is allowed to
remain it will thicken and prevent
the drawing in of water.
Flowers with woody stems may
have the stem ends pounded up
about two inches to increase water
absorption. Stocks and hydrangeas
belong to this type.
Solutions for various flowers are
as follows:
Allysum-1 tbsp. sugar, 2 quarts
water.
Amaryllis-2 teaspoons household
ammonia, 1 quart water.
Carnation-Cool water up to the
flower heads.
Coreopsis-1 tablespoon salt, 1
quart water.
Cosmos-1 tsp. sugar, 1 pt. water.
Dahlias-Burn stems, 5 tbsp. al-
cohol, 2 qts. ice water.
Daisies-All types; 8 drops pep-
permint, 1 qt. water. .
Delphinum-1 tbs. alcohol, 1 pt.
water.
Forgetmenots-8 drops alcohol, 1
pt. water. Plunge in hot, then cold
water.
Daylily-% cup cinegar, 2 cups
cold water.
Gailardia-2 tbs. salt, 1 pt. water.
Gladiolus-2 tbsp. vinegar, 1 qt.
water.
Baby's Breath-1 teaspoon alco-
hol, 1 pint water.
Hollyhocks-1 handful rock salt, 2
quarts water; burn ends.
Larkspur-1 tbsp. alcohol, 1 qt.
water." ":
Lilies-% cup vinegar, 2 quarts
water.
Marigolds-2 tbsp. sugar, 1 tbsp.
salt, 1 quart water.
Narcissi (and all members of this
family)-Arrange it no-.morg,thag.,
one ineh of..w.ater.
Petunias--I. tsp. sugar, pt. water.
Poinsettias-Bun ends' 1 1hadful'
rock salt, 2 quarts Watetr""' *.
Poppies-Burn ends; 1 handful
rock salt, 2 quarts water.
Roses (all types)-2 tbsp. powd-
ered alum, 1 qt. water. (If alum is
no available, use 2 tbsp. salt, 1
quart water.)
Salvia-1 tbsp. alcohol, pt. water.
Snapdragons-1 tbsp. salt, 2 qts.
water.
Statice-3 tbsp. sugar, qt. water.
Violets-Bunch, submerge for 2
ours after picking, then place in
container filled with ice water.
Violas-Same as violets.
Thirty-three garden club federa-
tion members saw flowers at the
Mobile clinic that had been condi-
tioned in these solutions over ten
days before they were used in ar-
rangements, and they appeared as
fresh as the day they were picked.
Return From Shoe Show
Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Boyles re-
turned Wednesday from Augusta,
Ga., where they attended the South-
eastern Shoe Travlers Show held
at the Sharaton-Bonair Hotel. New
summer and fall shoes were se-
lected'by Mr. and Mrs. Boyles for
their department store.


Merita Sutton Rates and music festival held over the vision ratings at the district festi-
week-end in Miami. val held March 31-April 1 in Quiney.
In State Music Festival Miss Sutton's selection, a piano -- ---
solo, was a required number, being Texarkana, astride the Texas-
Miss Merita Sutton, senior in the the first movement of Beethoven's Arkansas line, is the only city in
Port St. Joe high school, made first Sonata. the U.S. that is really two inde-
division honors in the state band She had previously won first di. pendent cities.








#/ERES THE ANSWER


FLORIDA POWER


CORPORATION


I I


THL STAR, PORT ST. JOE, G'ULF COUNTT*, FLORIDA


PAGE NINE








~AETE HESAR OR T.JEGL CUTY LOIA RDAMA 2,15


Rev. Lee Graham
Speaks At Meeting of
Panama Rotarians
Denounces Communism and Calls
for Return To Christian
Faith
Rev, Lee Graham, rector of St.


James' Episcopal Church of this
city, last Friday told Panama City
Rotarians that the United States
must regain the weapon of Chris-
tian faith to win its fight against
Communism. His subject was "The
Religious Aspect of Communism."
Rev. Graham, who addressed the
club's luncheon meeting at the Cove
hotel, was introduced by Rev. Tomn
Byrnes, former rector of the Port


St. Joe church and now rector of
the St. Andrew Episcopal Church.
Commifism, said Rev. Graham, is
geared to an economic system that
holds every subversive action right
so long as it furthers the system.
Instead of heaven, he said, the
Communist looks forward to world
domination by the leftists and la-
boring classes as the moment of
Utopia.


"Democracy has turned aside from
the life of Christian faith and it
must regain that faith to further
its fight against communism," he
declared.
100-Year.Old Cells Found
Cells, usually assumed to be
short-lived, have been found still
living in the heartwood of redwood
trees a century old.


Annual Junior-Senior
Prom Is Set for May 19
The annual juniior-senior prom is
to be held May 19 at 9:30 p. m. in
the Centennial Auditoorium and all
alumni of the Port St. Joe high '
school are cordially invited to at-
tend.
It Pays To Advertise Try It.


quick


A glance at Ford's sleek, race-lined styling and you'll know why
Ford walked off with the coveted New York Fashion Academy
Award-for the second staright year. And the '50 Ford's looks
are only a hint of the quality inside.


JUDGED
"FASHION CASR
OF 1950


Which low-priced car gets away fastest? Almost any driver
will say FORD ... for Ford alone among all low-priced cars
brings you a fine-car V-eight engine. It's priced way under
most "Sixes," and "hushed" to whisper while it works!


Ford's 35% easier-octng King-Size Brakes we port of yur
or's forward motion to take "*e work" out of stopping. And,.
trips are mor restful ii he quiet of Ford' s-"sound-codned,"
13-way-stronger "Lifeguard" Body more comf e,
because you get a lower level "Mid Ship" Ride.


"Test Drive" the 0 R D




AT YOUR FORD DEALER'S





ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


322 Monument Avenue


Port St. Joe, Florida


- ---.r., -


PAGE TEN


THE'STAR, PORT ST, JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


8


4~lok










FRIDY, AY 2, 150 HE TAR POR ST JO, GUF CUNT, FORID PAE EEVE


Spring Flower Show

Committees Named

Garden Club Members Working In-
dustriously for Event To Be
Staged May 27-28

Mrs. Massey Ward, flower show


_. -. chairman, has announced the fol-
The St. Joe Saints lost their sec-
-i < *i,^. i <~i* T lowing committees for the Spring
ond game of the Gulf Coast Leaguel
Flower Show to be eres tn d at the


to Panama City Sunday by a score
of 8 to 3 in a rather loosely played
tilt that was marred by rough de-
cisions against both teams by the
umpires. Eddie Meharg went the
route for the Saints on the mound,
but received poor support from his
team mates during the first four
innings, when seven of the visitors'
eight runs were chalked up.
The Saints scored one in the
third frame and two in the ninth.
Bert Cox led the hitting, getting
three for four trips to the plate.
Wednesday's game with the We-
wahiitchka 'Ga ors was a long-diawn
out affair, finally ending with an
18-6 score in favor of St. Joe.
The game was replete with er-
rors, and 15 walks were handed out
by five pitchers-Summley and T.
McDaniel for Wewa, and Mills,
Weisenback and Parker for St. Joe.
Clyde Parker, Saint hurler, had
a perfect day at the plate with three
for three; Bennie Burke, in his first
appearance on the field this season,
came up with four for five and ac-
counted for four runs, while Weis-
enbach got four for five and crossed
the plate three times. Houser and
Belin took three for five and ac-
counted for five runs, one of Belin's
hits going over the fence for a
homer.
The Saints play at Blountstown
next Sunday and in Apalachicola
the following Wednesday.

DEPUTY SHERIFF HILL

(Continued from page 1)
vious marriage, Johnny, Carlos and
Connie, all of this city; his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hill of Cypress;
one brother, Brady Hill of Cypress,
and two sisters, Mrs. Edell Petron-
ius of Tallahassee, and Mrs. Eldress
Young of Marianna.
Funeral services were held yes-
terday for Mr. Hill, the funeral cor-
tege leaving the Comforter Funeral
Home at 1 p. m. for the Sink Creek
cemetery, near Altha, where inter-
ment took place at 3 p. m. under
direction of the Port St. Joe Odd
Fellows Lodge, of which he was a
member, with Rev. L. J. Keels of
the Port St. Joe Baptist Church of-
ficiating. Pallbearers were Austin
Huggins, C. W. Long, Sam Hus-
band, H. W. Griffin, J. G. Hershey
and Coleman Tharpe. The Comfor-
ter Funeral Home was in charge of
arrangements.

U. S. battleships are named after
states, and cruisers after cities.




VISIT OUR BABY


DEPARTMENT!


*

BABY GIFTS:

Baby Strollers

Baby Pants

Baby Spoons

Baby Beds and Play
Pen Combinati6n




JOHN ROBERT SMITH
Pharmaceutical Chemist
We Fill Any Doctor's Presciription


Centennial Auditorium May 27 and
28 by the Port St. Joe Garden Club.
Mrs. Ward is being assisted by Mrs.
S. B. Shuford:
Staging-Mrs. Ward, Mrs. Shu-
ford, Mrs. G. F. Lawrence, Mrs. I.
C. Nedley, Mrs. George Cooper, Mrs.
J. L. Sharit, Mrs. Robert Bellows,
Mrs. Donald Birath, Mrs. Buck Grif-
fin, Mrs. H. R. Maige, Mrs. J. C. Be-
lin, Mrs. B. A. Alexander, Mrs. J.
C. Arbogast, Mrs. W. 0. Anderson.
Entry-Mrs. Ralph Nance, Mrs.
Milton Chafin.
7Classification-Mrs. J. C. Arbo-
gast, Mrs. George Patton.
Publicity-Mrs. Lee Graham, Mrs.
Harold Bell, Mrs. Thomas Mitchell.
Hospitality-Mrs. J. R. Smith.
Registration-Mrs. D. K. Brod-
nax, Mrs. Paul Blount, Mrs. Fennon
Talley.
Photography-Mrs. I. C. Nedley.
Finance-Mrs. Bert Munn, Mrs.
Gordon Thomas, Mrs. L. P. Sutton.
Judging-Mrs. Roy Hallman.
Awards-Mrs. D. K. Brodnax.
Southern Belles Mrs. George
Wimberly, Mrs. Charles Brown.
Music-Mrs. Donald Birath.
Section 1: Room Groups-Mrs. B.
W. Eells.
Section II: Arrangements-Mrs.
G. F. Lawrence.
Section III: Open Class for Chil-
dren and 'Teen-Agers-Mrs. Harold
Bell, Mrs. Donald Birath, Mrs. Paul
Blount.
Section IV: Open Class Mrs.
Franklin Jones.
Section V: Horticulture-Mrs. G.
A. Patton.

In Jacksonville for Treatment
Mrs. Janette Jones left Monday
night for Jacksonville where she is
undergoing medical treatment. Her
friends wish her a speedy return to
health.

In Tallahassee On Business
Mrs. Ellen Kirkland, Mrs. Fred
Maddox, Mrs. M. H. Elder, Mrs. G.
E. McGill and daughter Frances,
and Ray Kinsey were business visi-
tors in Tallahassee last Saturday.

Home Prom Visit In Georgia
Mrs. Denver Miller returned home
last week from a visit of several
week in Columbus, Ga.


Saints Drop Game

To Panama City and

Win From 'Gators

Play At Blountstown Next Sunday
and In Apalachicola Fol-
lowing Wednesday


pie from the northern parts of Ala-
bama and Georgia were deciding to
cast their lot and come "down the
river."
A veteran of river traffic, who han
the,"Apalachicola" from 1907 until
late in 1923, was Roy Connell, now
of Wewahitchka. Being on duty at
various times in different capaci-
ties, he had a wide and varied ex-
perience during this 16-year span
when he was on the "John C. Calla-
han," which came to be one of the
most widely known boats. Until
she hit a snag in the Chipola River
cutoff, about two miles below Coch-
ran's Landing and went down to
her last resting place. this steamer
was a vital and almost necessary
part of the people's lives.
According to Mr. Connell- this
boat ran largely between the towns
of Bainbridge, Ga., and Apalachi-
cola, and in this approximately 100
miles the "Callahan" was busy with
her job of transporting passengers,
cargoes and the U. S. mail.
This famous boat was a 400-ton
outfit which carried large cargoes
of such things as naval stores, com-
mercial guano, and all types of gen-
eral merchandise which the people'
of the river towns ., rd the inland
communities needed.
Leaving Columbus on, a Saturday


MAI a SPECIAL
No. 2449--A big 48" long beautiful waterfall
design in matched American Waltnut.
Guaranteed Moth Prosection.
Mother will love the rich
beauty of a Lane and its cleaft
genuine red cedar aroma.
She'll love you for being so
practical too! Her finest


No. 2465-Popular Period
Design in Mahogany. Has $S9.95
Lane's patented automatic tray.

AS ADVERTISED IN LIFE


woolens and linens will be
safe from moths, backed by a
Moth Protection Guarantee.
Come in and choose her
Lane now from our com-
plete selection."


Panama Citians Saved
From Drowning In River

While camping on the Apalachi-
cola River during-the week-end, Bu-
ford Attaway and George Harper
Jr., of White City Sunday morning
saw a small boat upset and throw
its passengers into the swirling wa-
ters of the river. As quickly as Bu-
ford could reach his boat he raced
to the scene and threw the drown-
ing victims life preservers. They
were Mr. and Mrs. Birch of Pan-
ama City.
The boat which the Birch's were
using was some ten feet long and
very narrow. Mrs. Birch refused to
get back into the boat, so Buford
carried the couple back to Howard
Creek and helped them load their
boat on their trailer.
Mr. Birch presented Buford with
his 16-h.p. outboard motor, saying,
"We are through with fishing as
soon as we can deliver this boat to
its owner."
The'watbtrs'of the' river areaare_
very tricky, and to be safe, every-
one should be sure that the boat
they are using is safe for the area
in which they plan to travel. Quite
a number of people have reported
having their boats tip over recently.

DAYS OF RIVER BOATS

(Continued1 from npage 1


NOTICE TO0 THE PUBLIC



The Municipal Hospital of Port St. Joe an-

nounces the following new policy on the

payment of Hospital Bills:

All patients upon admission are required to make
a deposit in advance on the Hospital Bill according
to the following schedule:

1. For Major Operations- $75.00

2. For Maternity Cases $35.00

3. For Medical Treatment

and Minor Operations ---$25.00

Hospital rates have not been changed. Any unused
amount of the advance deposit will be refunded
promptly upon discharge of the patient.

Patients covered by Hospitalization Insurance in
force are not required to make an advance deposit.

THE CO-OPERATION OF THE PUBLIC IS REQUESTED.


morning, this boat would reach Ap- 720-mile trip down the river and
alachicola around noon on Monday. back. This fare included all meals
The return trip would require more and stateroom accommodations as
time, a good schedule being to leave (To be concluded next week)
Apalachicola Monday night and ar- -______ ______
rive in Columbus Thursday after- New Barber At Cooper's
noon. Passenger fare for the round J. L. Bracewell of Orlando began
trip on this and other of the better work this week as a tonsorial ar-
boats was an average of $9 for the tist in the Cooper Barber Shop.




NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC



Dr. LaRue Garrett, D.V.M., will be at the City Hall
on the following dates for the purpose of inoculat-
ing dogs for rabies:

MONDAY, MAY 15--9:00 A. M. TO 12 NOON
TUESDAY, MAY 16--3:00 P. M. TO 6:00 P. M.
A charge of $1.50 will be made for each inoculation. Dogs that
are inoculated will not be required to have a license.
On and after Juh.e 1 ;Q';logs foupd on the streets that have not
been inoculated will be impounded and disposed of according
to law.
Witness my hand and seal this 8th day of May A. D. 1950.

H. W. GRIFFIN, Chief of Police
City of Port St. Joe, Florida.


'O'L


s~


~ 4~~ r ~ ~ ~~~~f~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORMAA


PAGE ELEVEN


FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1950


PHONE 5


PORT ST. JOE


,,& AkA-A, A&A A-&,&,


.& Ak


4








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


NOTICE TO OUR READERS
All cards of thanks, with the ex-
ception of those after a death, must
be paid for at time of insertion. A
minimum charge of 50c is made for
30 words or less; 1/c per word for
all over 30.
Br.o--:ng
Neither a fat animal no a skinn%
one is a good hbrfc' in prospect.


CLASSIFIED ADS
FOR SALE


Home Demonstration
Agents Do Good Work

White City Club Pays Tribute To
Present Agent for Assistance
Given Members
By Mrs. G. S. CROXTON
The rural communities of Gulf
county are better places in which
to. live, partly because of the con-
tinuous efforts of the home demon-
stration agents who have served
the county.


HOUSEHOLD GOODS-Iron heater, The present White City Home
porch swing, dinette suite, kit- Demonstration Club was organized
chen cabinet, 5-burner oil stove, ice four years ago under the leadership
box. See Mrs. C. W. Enfinger or
S. J. Taylor. 519* of Mrs. Wilma Revell, to whom the
USED OUTBOARD MOTORSg' members-are very grateful for their
Good, bad, indifferent. All makes, knowledgee of food preparation and
models and prices. Brooks Sporting preservation, home sewing, interior
Goods Store. 1-27tf decorating, and. a variety of handi-
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE crafts, Each of these phases of
home demonstration work was-rep-
HOUSE FOR SALE Completely resented in a window display at
furnished; 2 bedrooms, bath, liv-
ing room, kitchen, and kitchenette, the Florida Power Corporation of-
2 screen porches, new Frigidaire; fice last week in Port, St. Joe in ob-
+ $3000 cash. See P. G. Hart, phone servance of Home Demonstra ,ion
2350, Beacon Hill. 5-5tf Week.
SALESMEN WANTED Through the home demonstration
* WANTED-Man with car for Raw agent and the state extension de-
leigh business in City of Port St., apartment in home economics, club
Joe. City Dealer Marsh in Polk members are kept currently in-
county has made average sales of formed in these fields of homemak-
$180 weekly since first of year. ing. As an illustration, though can-
Middle-aged man preferred. Write
at once, giving age and experience. ning has definitely not been elimi-
Rawleigh's, Dept. FAD-101-JAL, at- nated as a means of food preser-
tention Mr., Laws, P. 0. Box 2467, nation, it has to a great extent
Memphis, Tenn. 5-26* given way to home freezing, and as
FOR REN" an increasing number of home
freezers are being used throughout
FOR APARTMENTS See The the county, homemakers may secure
Shirey Apartments. tf
information as to the most eco-
SPECIAL SERVICES nomical and up-to-date methods of
ANYTHING MADE OF WOOD freezing through actual demonstra-
Cabinets, doors, all types moulding, tions in the homes.
screen doors, windows, etc. It is not only the practical and
Gulf Manufacturing Company economical knowledge which mem-
Phone 2350 Beacon Hill
bers gain from this club, but also
REXAIR AIR CLEANER the fellowship of working and striv-
Cleans by washing the air. Scrubs ing together which leads to better
floors, picks up scrub water; dusts, homes and better communities.
humidifies, deodorizes. Drowns dust
and dirt in a churning water bath. Though the White City Home
No bags to empty-just pour the Demonstration Club h a s fewer
dirt away. Helps all allergy cases members than any other club in
caused by dust. Where to call: Rex- the county, the accomplishments
air (John Ford Jr.) Phone 338- J c
Port St. Joe, Fla. 55* have been extensive and varied, in-
cluding the roofing and painting of
KEYS DUPLICATED! the community building, the pur-
WHILE YOU WAIT! chase of a piano for use of the com-
35c Each 2 for 50c munity, a speed zone for White
Brooks Hardware and City, and collections of unused
Sporting Goods Co. clothing for distribution by county
welfare workers. Present goals are
LODGE NOTICES the equipping of the community
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of building with kitchen facilities and
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A. recreational equipment on the sur-
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. An visit- rounding grounds for the children
ing companions welcome. James M. and young people.
Harris, High Priest; H. R. Maige, As a close to the week set aside
Small over the nation for special ob-
ARA M I A 1 r~-M K1 An I-


SAMARIT AN LUUODGE NO. 40, I.-U.
0. F.-Meets first and third Wed-
tiesdays, 7:30 p. m. in Masonic hall.
All members urged to attend; visit-
ing brethren invited. W. H. Weeks,
N. G.; Walter White, Secretary.
VIELODY REBEKAH LODGE NO.
22, 1. 0. 0. F.-Meets 2nd and 4th
Wednesday at 8 p. m. in Masonic
hall. Elwyn Blount, N. G.; Mary
Weeks, Secretary.
MASONIC TEMPLE F & A M-
?ort St. Joe Lodge 111. Regular
R meetings 2nd and 4th Fri-
days each month, 8:00 p. n.
/ \ Members urged to attend;
visiting brothers welcome. W. A.
Roberts, W. M.; G. C. Adkins, Sec.


servation of home demonstration
work, we of White City salute all
home demonstration agents, but es-
pecially do we salute and pay trib-
ute to our own leader who has
given so much of her time and ef-
'forts to making Home Demonstra-
tion Clubs in Gulf county what they
are today..
We salute you, Mrs. Wilma Rev-
ell!

Vitamin C. Vegetable
Fresh cabbage is one of the best
vegetables for vitamin C.


COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME
24-HOUR AMBULANCE SERVICE i
601 Long Avenue Phone 326 Day or Night
4c
MEET YOUR

AT-
LeHARDY'S BAR *q


COMPLETE SERVICE
WE HANDLE ALL TYPES OF INSURANCE
FIRE LIFE CASUALTY BONDS
We recommend fire Insurance because Its easy to start a fire
BUCK ALEXANDER


6.00-16
AND YOUR
OLD TIRE


Tir$estone
GUARANTEED
FACTORY METHOD NEW TREADS
Applied on Sound Tire Bodies or
on Your Own Tires


WHILE THEY LAST!

2-Cell Flashlight

I~ ~~ q7, V*1 fj9


IT'S A REG.
'1.00 VALUE


ea.


Batteries Extra
Buy one for the home and
one for the car at this sen-
sational price!


Big Savings Here
Fire $795
Extinguisher *


Horns
Horns --
Floor Mats-
Ford ---
Floor Mats-
Plymouth
Car
Fans


$5.95

$3.49

$3.95

$5.95


Other Sizes Also Low,
" oame High Quality
Tread Materials as
Used in New Tires.
* Same Tread Design as
in New Tires.
* Same Tread Depth as
in New Tires.
" Same Tread Width as
in New Tires.
* New Tire Guarantee.


/I//f LIMIT 2 TO A CUSTOMER
Hurry ... Hurry These
Won't Last Longi Only
Through a Special Purchase
Are We Able to Offer this
Special Valuel

Exhaust
Deflectors -- ------
Tailpipe $1.19
Extensions .- v


Steering Wheel
Covers -


Backup
Light
Visor
Mirror


PLASTIC WHISK BROOMS -- .39

CAR POLISHING CLOTHS .19

JOHNSON'S CAR NU --- .69

JOHNSON'S CAR PLATE 1.00

SPORT TOP DRESSING -----.65

SEAT COVERS ----- 7.95 up



SEPIA4TE IY..

3 O~U fM
.3~m Aty 11i

BSTT


Our Last Sale at
This Sensational

Sell-Out... New
Shipment Just PLUS TAX
Received... You 6.00-16
Demanded It! I AND
We're Repeating ; U R
This Big Sale. OLD TIRE
Other Sizes Also Low Priced


FIRESTONE HOME & AUTO SUPPLY STORE


B. W. EELLS, Owner


25% MORE MILEAGEl

MADE OF COLD RUBBER!

still on~ly


-45o


$2.69

49o


.: PORT ST JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TWELVE


FRI~DAY, MAY~ 12, 1950