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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00485
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 1, 1946
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00485

Full Text








THE


STAR


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IX PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1946 NUMBER 18


Seven Qualify In City



Commission Election


Last Rites Held

For C. E. Stebel

Passed Away Last Week at White
City; Interment In West
Palm Beach

Funeral services were held Mon
day afternoon at 2 o'clock at West
Palm Beach for Charles E. Stebel,
59, who passed away Thutrsday
morning of last week at his home
in White City as the result of a
heart attack. Interment was in the*
Wood-lawn cemetery at West Palm
Beach.
, Mr. Stebel was born In Liverpool,
Ohio, coming to Florida in 1926
and' settling at Fort Lauderdale.
Later he moved to Pahokee and in
1937 came to Gulf county. He'had
been employed, at Tyndall Field In
the electrical maintenance depart-
ment for the five years prior ,to
his, death.
.Surviving besides his widow,
Mrs. LouellaStebel, are two daugh--
ters, Mrs. Jane Smith of White
City and Mrs. Marie Nelson of
West Palm Beach; one son, Rob-
ert Stebel of White City; three sis-
ters, Mrs. Grover Hagg of Stony
Ridge. Ohio, Mrs. Mella Lehman
of 'Luckey, Ohio, and' Mrs. Jesse
Bright of Assinihoia, Sask., Can-'
ada,; two .'"', 'i-:a. Harry of Bowl-
ing Green, 'w.o, and' Joe Stebel Of
White City,. andtwo granddaugh-
ters, Delmar Jean Smith and San-
dra Nelson.

Democratic Executive
Committee Sets Fees,

At a meeting of the county Dem-
ocratic executive committee held at
the city -,hall Wednesday candi-
dates' fees for the forthcoming
May primary were set as follows:
Candidates for representative in
the legislature, $6; candidates for
county commissioner, $12.
Present at the meeting were
Floyd Hunt, chairman; Mrs. B. E.
Kenney, Jr., Mrs. Claude Whaley,
L. W. Owens and(Mrs. A. D. Law-
son, Port Sit. Joe; Mrs. Annie Cook.
Over.street; Jim Sealy, White City,
and Mrs. Kate Lanier and Sammy
Patrick, Wewahitchka.
K
A & P STORE ENTERED
The A & P store was entered
some time Monday night, the bur-
glars gaining entry 'through the
side door. Manager Jimmy White
states that as far as he knows
nothing was taken except possibly
some cigarets. The cash register
4s always, le-ft open at night, and
21 cents in pennies in it were not
touched.

VISITING PASTOR TO PREACH
Rev. E. H. Garrot of Quincy will
speak at the Baptist Church Sun-
d.ay morning and evening in the
absence of 'Rev. R. F. Hallford, who
is on vacation.

Visitors From Illinois
Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Croxton had
as their guests over 'the week-end
Mr. and, Mrs. William Gallion of
Champaign, Ill., and Mrs. W. T.
Clanton of Cairo, Ill., the two ladies
being aunts, of Mrs. Croxton's. The
party was en route to St. Peters-
burg where they will spend the re-
mainider of the winter season.


Next Monday Is Deadline For
Qualification; Registra-
tion Books Open

Seven candidates have qualified
to date with the city clerk as can-
didates for members of the board
of city commissioners at the elec-
tion to be held Tuesday, Felbruary
19, at which time an entire board'
of five commissioners will be se-
lected by the voters. It is antici-
pated that one or two more will
qualify before the deadline Febru-
ary 4-next Monday. 'l"
First to qualify was: Roy Evans,
an employee of the St. Joe Paper
Company, and J. R. Chestnut, local
groceryman.
Qualifying this week were B. B.
Conklin of the Gulf Haiyd.ware Com-
pany, a former member of the city
commission; Horace Soule of the
St. Joe Hardware Company, one of
the present board members; J. L.
Shari't, long-time member of the
board and. mayor; I. C. Nedley, op-
erator of Nedley'st Cafe, and James
W. Duncan, an employee of the St.
Jo-e Paper Company.
It is expected that one of the
largest votes in a local election
(Turn to Seven Candidates page 6)

Clothing Campaign
'To Close This Week

If you, haven't already contribut-
ed your discarded clothing and
shoes to the United National
Clothing Collection Campaign., do
,s'o before Sunday, as the drive Is
to endt on that date. The space pro-
vided at the Florida Power Cor-
poration office is filled, so take
clothing to the old' ration board
office next the telegraph office,
which B. W. Eells has -granted, use
of for this purpose.
Through the efforts of churches,
civic clubs, the American Legion,
labor organizations and individuals
a fine, collection of clothing and
shoe, has been secured. These are
to be shipped off next week for
distribution to, the needy in 'the
war-torn countries of the world.
Outstanding ind-ividual contribu-
tion to date was made by T. M.
Schneider in the form of 394 pair
of brand new shoes.


Voters ofCon Tapper Tosses Topper
PRillwH'^-ILn ^ f ?-/<4^M P AH i


mUSt e-reglSter

Required By Local Bill Passed 0
At Last Session of
Legislature Enters Legislative Race

- All voters of Gulf county must
re-rcgister if they desire to vote
in the forthcoming May prima ry
and future elections, according to
an editt contained in a local bill
passed at the last session of the
legislature and which was intr q-w .
ducedi by Rep. C. C. Wilson.
The bill requires re-registration e
of voters in counties having a pop-
ulation of noot more tgan 6,975 nor '
less than 6,925 accqd dn'g to the .
last federal census -,and that is
strictly Gulf ccun'ty
To take care of men in the armed
service who were qualified voters
at *the time they entered the serv-
ice, the measure providess that
their names shall automatically be
transfererd to the n'ew books pro-
vided they are still In service. It
does not include those who have
received their discharge so, you GEORGE G. TAPPER
Joes who are again back in civvies
need to re-register if you want to March of Dinmes
cast a ballot.
In due course C.. G. Rish, super- Drive Continues
visor of registration, will open the
new books and, as i~ the past, will
have a deputy registrar in each Extended To February 9 Due To
precinct. Fact That Cards Mailed Out
Are,Coming In Slowly
Attending Ministe" Conference
Rev. Alton McKeitheu left Sat- Joe Mira. chairman in charge. of
ardeay for indi t~rcJis nd. to the March.f l imes -rive er %
attend a ministers' conference. announced yesterday that the cam-
IIIllll1lllllIIllllI'llll1iIlllI! fllIllllllllIIllll IIIIIl Ipaign to raise funds for the Na,
tional Foundation for Infantile Par-
Classified Advertising Pays alysis and for local use, would be


. J. F. Miller of Oak Grove last
week advertised' an automatic
gas water heater for $90 in the
classified' ad column of The Star.
Peck Boyer was needing' such a
contraption and snapped it up as
soon as he saw 'the ad. Cost of
.the ad to Mr. Miller was 30c.
Then Mr. Miller gave us an ad
last Saturday for a cow he de-
sired to sell, tl'oe ad to be run in
today's Star. Hle came in Mon-
day and' said ,e had mentioned
to a fellow that he was going to
advertise his (ow in' The Star
and this individual took it off his
hands.
"Yep," said Mr. Miller, "those
classified ads sure get result's-
even before ,they're printed."
>IllIlllIIIIllllil IlliIll illill I tl' illll I IIIII! IIII lill llII l lllllI


continued' until February 9.
He said this is necessary due to
the fact that of 500 coin cards sent
out. but 83 had been returned up
to yesterday. "If the card has 'been
lost or mislaid,." said Mira. "just
send your donation to 'March ot
Dimes, Port St. Joe,' or mail it to
me as, March of Dimes chairman."
He reported that the President's
Birthday Ball held last Friday eve-
ning at the Centennial Auditorium,
netted $158.33.

SERIOUSLY BURNED
Carl Guilfordi received serious
bunins about the face and neck
!Thursday of last week when a gas
Stove at the Guilford home in
Overstreet exploded as he was
lighting it. H.e is receiving treat-
ment at the municipal hospital


From Private To Major the Hard Way


We have other majors in OGli
county, but we believe there is bui
one who made. it the hard way-
from private to major-and th i i
Richard 'C. Mahon, 26, the son of
Charles R. and the late Aunt Mit-
mie-Mahon of 'this city and Ap'
alachicola.
Promotion of Richard from *:i ,'
tain to major on December -'
1945, was announced: while he w.,
home on terminal leave.
Major Mabon was assigned l I')
the New Castle Army Air 'B.'i-
headquarters of the famous Cre -
cent Caravan 522 AAF Base Uni"
in Wilmington, Del., oft Septemrnil
27, 1942, as the squadron ad'jut.uni
of the Fourth Fer-rying Squadron
until he was given an assignment
which he was envied liy his, 'assist-
ants-recruiting officer for WAC


liticai Ring


IL


S Transport Comand. filled with young men's clot hing
ssig .ent kept Majo- Ma- taken from Schneider's store were
i. hon in 'the field from March tc recovered, at that time.
iJuly 1. 194i4, and upon completion Holley's car was taken from In
of this drive he was credited with front of the Port theater, and it is
recruiting 18 pef cent of the wo surmised that the youths, afterr
meni assigned 'to, this' command, for failing to. extricate the Tapper car
which he received a personal comn- from 'the sand, looked around for
mendation from Generals Smith other mean-s of transportation to
rand Turner of the ATC. He was get out of town and came upon
then assigned as civilian personnel Holley's car with the keys tempt-
officer. and this position he kept ingly in the ignition switch.
until his request for release from --k-
i Rcive. duty. FRUIT MARKET OPENS
Richard's" 'irst assignment in the S. J. CucchiariV yesterday opened
army as a private 'was at Camp his new fruit and vegetable mar-
BlIandinit. lTe iis taifisferred to ket in the small concrete block
"Craig Field. Selma, Ala., then to building he has erected. In addition
Tyndall Field. Iii June of 1942 hie to carrying fruits and vegetables
was sent to Officer Candidate he will offer a full line of meats,
School 'at :Miami Beach, graduat- having installed a 12-foot refriger-
MAJOR RICHARD C. MAHON 2) (Continued on"Pge 2) ated meat display case.


L


Announces Candidacy For Seat
In Legislature Now Held
By C. C. Wilson

George Tapper this week tossed
Iis, hat into the ring as a candl-
ldate for representative in the legiA-
lature from Gulf county, the seat
now held' by C. C. Wilson of 'We-
wahitchka.
This is not George's first entry
nto the. realm of politics', having
been elected, to -the board of county
commissioners in 1940. He. served
adlmira'bly in, that capacity from
January 1941, to January 1942,
Oluring which time he' acted as
chairman of the board. He re-
signed at that time to enter the"
air force.
During his four. years:. with theq..
AAF, George saw action in. North.
Africa, Sicily and, Italy, spending
14 months in that theater and fly-
ing 55 missions as operations of-
ficer and being advanced 'to the
rank of captain.
He returned to the states' in '44
and was stationed at the Marianna'
Air Base as chief test pilot up to
the time 'of his discharge.
In the way of decorations, Cap-
tain Tapper holds the Silver Star,
Distinguished Flying Cross, Air.
(Turn to 'Tapper Tosses' page 2)

T'wo Local Youths Are Held
In Burglary and Car Theft

James C. Lee and George Mur-
phy, of Oak Grove, both '16 years
of age, were returned here from
Tampa yesterday by Sheriff Byrd
Park'er on charges of burglary and
car theft.
It is believed the boys are re-
sponsible for breaking into Schnei-
der's Department Store and the
theft of cars belonging to George
Tapper and Gene Holley. At the
time they were arrested by Tampa
police they were driving Mr. Hol-,
ey's car.
The Schneider store was entered'
Saturday night and about $300
worth of clothing, shoes and suit-
cases taken, as well as. two. foun-
ain pens, $7 in cash from the
registerr and small change in .the
March of Dimes container.
The keys to Tapper's' 2ar were
aken Saturday night and the car
aken Sundlay night. It was found
abandoned Monday morning at the
city dump, where it had ,bogged
lown in the sand. Wired over the
icenise tag was a 'tag stolen from
Tom Parker's car. Two suitcases


PorsOlillel to bo assigned to the. Air T,









tG w


POST-WAR FLYING IN YOUR HOME TOWN
By CAMPBELL, Member, Aviation Writers
By C. C. CAMPBELL, 4.omcition, Washington, D. C. --


National Groups Aid in
Airpark Planning
The day is not fax off when a town
that does not possess community
landing facilities will be as much
out of the American scene as would
be a town without roads leading to
other sections.
As personal flying and feeder air-
line transportation become a definite
and important feature of our every-
day lives, much of the community
activity will be centered around the
airpark. For this reason, progres-
sive town officials look forward to
building an air service installation
that will be attractive, convenient,


At Washington, the Civil Aero-
nautics Administration has an air-
port division which will supply dia-
grams and working plans for air
landing facilities of every descrip-
tion. Regional offices of the Civil
Aeronautics Administration work
closely with State aviation execu-
tives.
Various privately operated avia-
tion organizations can provide much
salient information. For instance,
the National Aeronautic Association
is helping communities to plan their
air future and aiding them to gain
their position on the "Main Line."
More than ,40 years of accumulated


( .



The Joint Airport Users Conference, designed by the National Aero-
nautic Association as a discussion and study group, meets in Washington.
Conference membership includes such organizations as the American Road
5ullders Association, the American Public Works Association, the Asso-
'elation of Land Grant Colleges and Universities, the American Association
of Nurserymen, and many other technical and' professional groups with
Wx interest in airport planning, construction, and use.


and economic, as well as being
capable of future expansion.
i Naturally few citizens know much
about the construction of an airpark,
'go seek expert advice. Fortunately,
this is easily available. Both the
Government and several non-profit
!aviation organizations are ready
with information and advice from
the early decision to lave an air-
-park through all the stages of select-
'Ing a suitable site and arranging
'for runways and buildings.
The usual community will find that
its State Capitol offers a wealth of
information. Most states have avi-
ation commissions and boards func-
tioning for this very reason. State
officials know the local conditions
and geography, are aware of what
the neighboring towns are planning,
and usually have data on the num-
ber of feeder or area airlines con-
templated and lists of prospective
owners of personal planes.


Tapper Tosses Topper

(Continued From Page 1)
Medal with nine Oak Leaf "Clus-
ters, American Defense Ribbon
with one star, North Africa-Euro-
pean-Middle East Ribbon with five
stars, Victory Medal and presiden-
tial unit citation. Quite a salad
bowl.
Before entering the service Cap-
tain Tapper operated the St. Joe
etevedoring Company, was, chair-
man of the original Gulf County
Defense Council and president or
the Gulf Copast Electric Co-opera-
tive (RIEA). At present he is a
member of the congressional Dem-
ocratic executive committee and
county commander of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
George is a lifelong resident of
port St. Joe and has always had
the best interests of Gulf county
at heart. He is well known and
well liked and from his past r'.-
cordi, if elected as representative,
we can all feel assured that the
.county will be well and ably rep-
resented at Tallahassee.

HAVE HORRIBLE TIME
WITH CLASSIFIED AD
It's been a problem as to which
Would go insane first, Dr. L. H.
3artee or Editor Bill Smith and
pil over a'small classified ad.
Doc came in to put an ad' in the
paper stating he wanted to buy
gome houses. The ad came out
this: "Wanted' To Buy-Three o01'
four-be1'room house."
Doc didn't care for it, and tdil
1ur wife what he really Wanited.


knowledge on aviation, and particu-
larly on the construction of air fa-
cilities, is available. Many commu-
nities which have decided to estab-
lish airparks or other types of land-
ing facilities, have formed their own
community chapters of the National
Aeronautic Association.
Two other groups ready and will-
ing to plan and work with town avi-
ation' planning organizations in this
effort are the National Aviation
Trades Association, located at Kan-
sas City, Missouri, and the Personal
Aircraft Council of the Aircraft In-
dustries Association. of America at
Washington, D. C.
These organizations have endorsed
the model airpark at Eldon, Mis-
souri, and are doing pioneer work
among other communities in all
parts of the country.
This is the eighth of a series of arti-
cles on post-war flying and its effect
on community life. The final article,
"Local Flying to Aid American Air
Power" will appear In as early issue.


The ad came out last week like,
this: "Wantedi To Buy-Three or
four 3 or 4-bedroom houses."
Doc was frantic and Ye Ed was
yanking at the few remaining hairs
on his cranium.,
Today we hope we have Doc's ad
right. If not we're, closing up
shop and making reservations at
Chattahoochee.


* A VALUABLE

DOCUMENT
Your doctor's prescription is a valuable
document. More than a piece of paper
bearing queer words and odd characters,
it represents his years of training, expe-
rience and skill applied directly to your
individual case. As such, the prescription
deserves the care and accuracy exercised
by our registered pharmacists and the
purity and uniformity of the prescription
chemicals and drugs we dispense. .
W we Merck Prescriphi's Chmicals

Smith's Pharmacy

Phone 5 Port St. Joe
We Fill Any Dootor's Prescription


BAPTIST GA'S PACK CLOTHES
FOR DISTRESSED PEOPLES
Members of the Junior and In-
termediate Girls' Auxiliaries' of the
Baptist church gathered at the
church Monday and had a big .time
packing boxes of clothing for the
distressed peoples of liberated
countries. Supervising the packing
were Mrs. W. I. Carden and Mrs.
L. E. Voss.
Four boxes were packed by the
young peo-ple, one going to Yugo-
slavia, one to China, .one .to Europe
and one to the local clothing
drive. A note was placed in each
box bearing the name of the or-
ganization and a picture of the
church and the Bible school as a
group.

REBEKAH CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. T. MITCHEsL
The R'ebekah Circle of the Bap-
i-t, W. M. U. met last week with
M.i s. Tom Mitchell at her home on
M.:Clellan Avenue with nine mem-
rers present.
The devotional was taken from
tii- 122nd Pslam. The minutes
.'. -re read and approved, reports
r.- eived from all committees, and
a collection of $3.65 taken up.
Mrs. Milton Chafin asked the
mothers to get up clothing for re-
lief of people in liberated countries
and' to let the children give them
through the Sunbeams. The meet-
ing was then. closed with prayer,
after which the hostess served a
delicious salad, plate and coca-
colas.


MAKES HONOR ROLL
Miss Caroyln Bagget, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. J. 0. Baggett of
this city, was on the honor roll
fo" the fall term at Stetson Uni-
versity, Deland, and was selected
as one of 16 alternates for the
glee club, travel squad, and was
posted for an engagement this
week.


FROM PRIVATE TO MAJOR Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Morton ot


(Continued from page 1)
ing and winning hi's commission' as
a second lieutenant in September.
He was promoted to first lieuten-
ant in January 1943, and' to cap-
tain in October 1943. Major Mahon
was also graduated' from the ad-
jutant general school a,t Ft. Wash-
ington, Md., and the civilian, per-
sonnel school at San Antonio,
Texas.
Prior to entrance into the army
on August 6, 1941, Richard was
employed in 'the accounting office
of the St. Joe Paper Company. He
was graduated in 1938 from Chap-
man high school, Apalachicola.


Carrabelle visited here Tuesday
with Mr. and Mr. P. J. Lovett.



SFor Those Who Think
of Appearance
Run down shoes make you
look sloppy and unattractive.
Better keep yours in repair
and well polished. Let us be
your footwear valets.


THE LEADER SHOE
SHOP


All FUR COATS

and JACKETS



PRICE!

Muskrat, Squirrel, Chifna Mink,
Kidskin, Mandel


ALL DRESSES GREATLY

REDUCED!
WOOLS and RAYONS


ONE LOT OF

BLOUSES


$1.00 $2.00!


OTHERS REDUCED
Sheers, Crepes, Batiste and Cottons
PASTEL SHADES


ALL WOOL SKIRTS
In Pastels and Plaids

ONE-THIRD OFF!


Fur Trimmed

SPRING COATS



PRICE!

PASTEL SHADES



All RAINCOATS and

All WOOL DRESSES

Reduced One-Third!


ONE LOT

ALL WOOL SWEATERS

HALF PRICE!


ALL WOOL COATS
Chesterfields, Princess, 3/4 Lengths

Reduced One-Third!
New Styles Spring Colors


ONE LOT HATS

HALF PRICE!


HOTEL MARIE BUILDING

THE FASHION SHOP PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


NOTICE!


Effective February 1, persons wishing to, buy lumber
for home building will be required to file Form CPA
4368, Application for Preference Rating under Priori-
ties Regulation 33, as amended., We have a supply
of these forms on hand.
The regulation is designed to assist private builders,
educational institutions and others to build moderate
cost housing accommodations to which veterans of
World War II will be given preference, by giving an
HH preference rating for certain building materials
for the construction.
Persons who wish to buy lumber for other purposes
should consult with this office before preparing to
buy.





St. Joe Lumber & Export Co.

'^s^^l^m^^I^S^ISS^^S~~iSSS~iS^SBSmsSESUBSSSSs|


THEY MUST GO!


TH1E STAR; POhT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1., 1946i


PAGE TWO







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1,1946 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE THREE


GI Is Finally Defined
By General Stilwell
General Joseph W. Stilwell in a
recent news story defined a GI as
follows:
"A GI (pronounced 'gee-eye') is
a special breed of American who
inhabited North Africa, Italy,
France, Germany, Guadalcanal, Sal-
pan, Okinawa. Luzon, Iceland,


years 1941 through 1945.
"Very few of them were to be
found within the continental lim-
its of the United States during
that time. The term 'GI' is usually
applied to enlisted men and, has a
negative effect when applied to of-
ficers. The GI\ was' superbly
equipped, but happiest when in
dirty fatigues with a baseball cap.
"He cooked meals in his helmet.
in which he also shaved and


Burma, China, India, Korea, Japan washed. He swore in "good style,
and' other places during the war liked pretty girls, milk, steak, beer,


cheesecake, swing music, and was
a sucker for a place called the
U. S. A.
"He hated Japs, Germans, C ra-
tions, draft dodgers,, and a thing
called 'chicken' (not to be confused
with the fowl of the same name).
"Race? All races. Just go visit
the cemeteries for proof. Names?
Murphy, Jones, Galliopolis, Cohen,
Damibroyski, Smith-the works.
"Ways 'to recognize the GI: No
matter where you find him he
gri)pes when things are going well;


he keeps. his mouth shut when the
going is tough.
"Accomplishment of the GI: He
beat the hell out o the Japs and
Germans."
QUICK THINKING
Sergeant (very irate): "Not a
man in this company will be given
leave this afternoon."
Rookie: "Give me liberty or give
me death!"
Sergeant: "Who said that "
Rookie: "Patrick Henry."


DRAFT CARDS STILL NEEDED
All male citizens of the United
States between the ages of 18 and
68 were reminded, again this week
that they must carry their selec-
tive service re prtration cards. Mid-
May was set as the earliest pos-
sible date for discontinuance of
this regulation. The FBI currently
is seeking 13,697 draft evaders, ac-
cording -to Washington reports.
Great men never feel great, and
small men never feel small.


IS THIS A 1C KP i)F PAPER ?




The CIO--United Steel Workers Union said that its strike


does not violate its contracts with steel companies. Here


is the "no strike" clause taken from a typical contract.


LET THE WORDS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES!


"During the term of this Agreement, neither

the Union nor any Employee, individually or

collectively, shall cause or take part in any

strike, or other interruption or any impeding

of production at any plant of the Company

covered by this Agreement. Any Employee or

Employees who violate the provisions of this

Section may be discharged from the employ

of the Company in accordance with the

procedure of Section 8 of this Agreement."


This provision, or one similar to it, is contained

in each contract between the Union and the

various steel companies. These contracts

continue by their terms until the

autumn of this year.



American Iron and Steel Institute

350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, N. Y.
95 PER CENT OF THE WORKERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY ARE EMPLOYED BY OUR COMPANY MEMBERS
C' GET THE FACTS FREE Send postcard for copies of recent interviews with steel industry leaders.
I l I. I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1946


PAGE THREE









PAGE~~ ~ ~ ~ FORTESA.PR T OGL ONY LRD RDY EBUR ,14


THE STAR
Published Eve-y Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMv-TH, Editor

Entered as second-class matter, December 10, 1937, at the
I'ostoffice, Port St. Joe, Fla., under Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
One Year ....... $2.00 Six Months....... .1.00
-. Telephone 51 1'-

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in adver-
tisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for
damages further than amount received for such advertisement.

The spoken urord is given scant attention; the printed word
is thoughtfull'y weighed. The spoken word barely asserts;
the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

Our Country "-q Right or Wrong


MEBBE SO MEBBE NOT
President Truman tells congress that dur-
ing the past'three years the cost of living has
risen by only three per cent and that "the
fight against inflation has been waged suc-
cessfully."
We can't understand how Mr. Truman has
reached that conclusion, but it is- probably due
to the fact that he is living in a world of his
own up there ini the White House where
e'verything'is bought for him and hee has no
personal contact with the outside world irn
making purchases that Mt. AAverage Citizen,
has.
All we had to do to disprove this statement
was to,"look in the-b.k files. of The Star for
1942, hunt out a .few groceryand clothing ad-
vertisenwents and check them with today's
prices. We find that they show an increase
on everyday items of from 20 to 85 per cent.
And any housewife here -in Port St. J.e canl
testify that she is paying a doggone sight
more than a three per cent increase for most
things than ,she did in 1942 and 1943.
True, prices did-'not spiral like they: did in
World War I, and we can thank the price'
control regulations for that, but indirectly
we are paying a higher price than we realize,.
for government subsidys on items like sugar,
butter, bread, meat, milk and cheese are run-
ning to over a billion dollars a year.- In short,
cash from the government treasury is being
paid ,producers for not increasing prices, and
that money must go back into the treasury
in the form of increased taxes.
Naturally if the subsidy payments are ddne
away with the price of the subsidized prod-
ucts will rise slightly'-about one cent a.pound
on sugar, three cents on meat and one cent a
loaf on bread-but as far as we are concerned
we will be merely be paying the price increase
when we buy the items instead of paying it in
taxes through the treasury. And we'd prob-
ably save money, for the administrative cost
of handling, the subsidies in many cases runs
higher. than the subsidy itself, and this addi-
Stional cost will be wiped out if the subsidies
are stopped.

We don't know of a better man we could
elect as representative in the legislature from
Gulf county than George Tapper-unless it
were E. Clay Lewis. Jr. George is a home-
county boy and has always taken the keenest'
interest in county affairs, he's well-liked and
has a pleasing personality and can talk well
on his feet.


BEYOND THE ATOM
How quaint Hollywood is, and how naive! STARDUST and
Four movie companies are in a headlong race MOON
to be first with a film play on the atomic MOONSHINE
bomb. Now the bomb itself, as Hollywood -
"figures." is not enough to sell the show. The I remember a' gentle admonition
problem, says 'one of the producers in this I used to see in a restaurant down
n in Fort Myers: "Patience is a godly
5X'tjS di~~S S 1Wh I bUIiJI C.I ith thu


sweepstakes. is 1-iow to com Ine Sexw 1vii tiU
atomic bomlrb.
lie thinks he has solved it. The secrecy
surrounding work on the bomb breaks up an
affair of the heart; marriage goes on the,
rocks, or something like that; bomb secret is
revealed; reconciliation scene with realistic
closet)ps: positively happy family until fur-
ther notice.
The paths here is what a lot of unneces-
sary trouble Hollywood makes for itself. A
simple- solution was all the while staring
them in the face. It isn't as if they hadn't had
experience with it; the thing has exploded din
their hands time and again, singed their eye-
brows, cost them millions, and dimmed the
lustre of more than one of their brightest
stars. Hollywood, Hollywood, must you be
told the facts of life by the likes of us?. Well,
if you will have it so, so be it: Sex is the
atomic bomb! -Boston Globe.


MOST COSTLY BATTLE
The most savage and costly battle of the
recent World War, for the American forces,
was not fought in- Africa or Europe, but in
the Pacific on Okinawa. That is the story
conveyed in the release of official' figfires by
the government, in its report on the final
battle of the war.
More than 79.500 Amierican soldiers,' sailOrs.
and marines piled up the casualty totals for
that epic fight, both during the actual combat
and immediately 'thereafter whin.battle' ta-
tigue exacted its grim toll. The American
losses in the Battle of the Bulge stood at
.around 67000. .
Some 21,342 army inen fell at Okinawa as
battle casualties. The marines, proportion-
ately fewer in the battle muster, suffered a
slightly higher percentage of' casualties al-
though the actual figure was smaller--16,313.
To this ensanguined total the navy added its
9,700, mostly as a. result of the terrible fight
it waged against the Japanese suicide planes.
This record is something the public may
well keep in mind as it studies postwar de-
mobilization problems. -Boston Globe.


Fred Maddox named' one of his pigs "Ink"
because it was always running out of the-pen,.
Port St. Joe Star editor W. S. Smith informs
us. It's logical to assume, we suppose that the
pig's name .is pronounced "Oinck."-Miami
Post.


A local mnan is advocating that the govern-
ment make a copper three-cent piece so it
will make as much'noise as a quarter when
dropped in the collection plate.

Legisaltors run in groups before an elec-
tion and run in groups when they get to
Tallahassee.

Market report says "hogs move up." .They
are not doing that on the buses.

Keep smiling-and Buy Bonds!


JUST CALL US 'SAINTS' port St Joe-ite, a Port st. Joe-sian
or just a Joe?"
---- Wal, now pardiner, that is, quite
The Panama City News-Herald, a perplexing problem and we have
in its "Town Topics" column the never given it much thought. Of
other day. seemed to ibe worried course, we have a lot of Joes here
over what to call residents of Port who have' recently returned., from
St. Joe. We quote: the armed forcess' but then that
"A bit of a problem has arisen, doesn't take in all the population,
How does one refer to a person so we might as we'll discard the
from Port St. Joe, ,other than to -term "Joe." And we thiink your
say 'He is from Port St. Joe'? A "Jo(ite" and "Josian" smells to
person from P. C. is.;a Panama1 high heaven, even as a council-
Citian or Panama Citizen; a per- man's dirty socks.,
son from the county seat of Duval 'Way, back during the depression
is a Jacksonvillian or Jaxon. But days' When practically anyone who
is a person fromdown the coast a had two d times to. rub together was


looked upon as a, plutocrat and a
member of the idle rich, persons
from this city were sometimes' re-
ferred' to as 'being' from "Poor St.
Joe," but that' became a thing of
the past with the coming of the
paper mill and other industries-
and we didn't think much of that
one either.
But we can offer the Panama pa-
per this: Just call us "Saints" and
let it go at tha-t. even If we aren't
all saints.

A genius is one who. shots, at
something'no one else can see and
hits t.


virtue. Don't hurry the waiter."
It was printed, there for the guid-
ance of short-tempered patrons.
Now, what I have in mind may
be a virtue, and it may be a fault,
but the fact remains that it is an
inescapable truth. If you know
anything about the ladies you'll
agree with me-out of hearing of
the ladies. So here goes'.
For some reason the gentler sex
possesses a certain hesitancy at
questioning one another as to
what a dress', or a hat, or an egg-
beater, or anything else, may have
cost the owner. It's most peculiar.
All the time they're burning up to
know what May or Lavina paid
for that pair of shoes that may
have been created on the Rue de
la Paix, or imitated in wholesale
lots in Jersey City, but do you
.think they would come right out
:arid ask the question direct? Not
on- your life!
'Perhaps it isn't necessary, after
all, when you consider 'the ingeni-
ousness that the: fair ones have de-
Yeloped through *thi ags'6s of fol-
lowing their own subtle planii. 'fli
technique is, to call to mind: the
type of h'pme the Objeot of their
curiosity liVes' ih, neighborhood
rumors as' to- whether or not there
is a mortgage: on their car, how
imnny Yewaiatr' .i tte l iaba At'sa slit
looks, gossip in -the beauty shop as'
to, whether she does .her own wash-
rag or has a: colored woman do it,.
and for good measure they throw
din' a, chunk otr what 'hag beea called
"Woman'n irntilitft. '
That usually gives them the. an-
sw-er, in' anywhere Tyom two: days
to a week after talking 'to May (or
Lavina) and seeing her wear the
shoes.' Of course, if' the: answer'r
doesn't seem to fit with the kfiow*i'f
facts they take a day off, scout
around town inh a search for d'upl1-
cates (with price tag attached) of'
the suspected' item., and get the
lowdown that way.
All of which is very fine, and a
tribute to feminine 'strategy, but,


In Dimes Drive





S "'"


Eddie Cantor, national chairman
of the March of Dimes of the Air,
stresses the magic figure 10. Ten
cents to a dime, ten dimes to a
dollar are what count in the appeal
of the National Foundation' for
Infantile Paralysis.
just the same it's an awful waste
of 'time. Take two men. John
Blount meets' GWA Crelcf on' the
sitireet. Gus is. weAtng 'a new sult.'
John 'thinks the suit looks like it
was made in the dark by a- blind
tailor. with the palsy, -aind he tells'
GGum so, winding ulp with the qud y,`
"And' how much did yoiu get stuck
for that piece of burlap?"
Gus, tells' him, adding ruefully,
--Bui I got the cloth from Cecil
Costin, alid lhe'said' it was the very
best, and my brother Ken made it
ut 'for me',' anaf 'yW16iW 1ii. 1iW w
darn good tailor."
"Yeah," responds John, "a boxer
.Ilid.A wad' on while I was up In
Chicago a couple of weeks a-go
was supposed to be good, too. If 1
we're you I'd sue Cecil and Ken
for, defamation of character, ob-
itaitinig money under false. pre-
'teniegs' and misrepresentation of
Assets." ,
Andt so on. They part
friends. Men are like that.
Oh, well, it women should work
along those lines they'd lose half
the fun of buying things. They like
guessing contests. Of course they
don't always guess right some-
times the shoes really do come
from the Rue.de La Paix!


i --- --' - ,,


$300.00


$300.00


MONEY TO LOAN

-- NO RED TAPE -
IT ONLY TAKES ABOUT FIVE MINUTES
TO GET UP TO $300.00!
At

Confidential Loan Co.


PORT ST. JOE

$300.00


FLORIDA

$300.00


Martin's Beach Club

Now Under New Management
W. V. (BILL) PEEKE

jOn the Gulf Between
Port St. Joe and
r Tyndall Field


$ 0 DINE AND DANCE EVERY NIGHT
SSpecializing in
FRIED CHICKEN AND STEAK
,. / DINNERS.
Also Sandwiches and Refreshments


We Take Pleasure In Serving You On Birthdays, I

Anniversaries and Al Occasions
. .*.. .... .. -. -. ...- 4Z,


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 19466


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA









FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1946 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE FIVE


MISS HULEAN STAFFORD
AND ALBERT THAMES WED
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Stafford of
this. city announce, the recent mar-
riage.of their daughter, Hulean,
to Albert Thames, son of Mrs. W.
T. Thames of Chipley, Fla..
The wedding was an event of
January 5 in Thomasville, Ga., the
Rev. W. P. Webb officiating. After
the. ceremony the young couple
spent a brief honeymoon in Thonm-
asville before returning to Port St.
Joe, where both are employed by
the St. Joe Paper Company.
Mrs. Thames is a graduate, of St.
Jo'e high school, class of '45, and
Mr. Thames has recently received
his. discharge from the army, hav-
ing spent 44 months in the service,
32 of which were' overseas duty.



71A1"A:El.A


The stock at the LILIUS JEWEL.
RY COMPANY is always new... .
WHY? Because a large group of
regular, satisfied customers keep
our merchandise moving. They buy
here because, they know they are
buying the BEST. We're proud
of our stock of DIAMONDS,

4 il L t:l T


Rotarians Briefed BAPTIST W. M. S. ENJOYS
otaans ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM
On Use of New DDT I Twenty-five members of the Bap-
Through the facilities of the U. tist Woman's Missionary Society
S. Public Health Service Ro-tarians enjoyed the Royal Service program
were briefed on the use and ad- at the church Monday afternoon,
vantages of DDT, the new all- with Circle. Two in charge.
powerful insecticide, at their ses- Mrs.. Nick'Kelly, program chair-
sion Thursday of last week. Rep- man, opened' 'the meeting promptly
resentatives of the health service at 3 o'clock with the assembly
showing films on. the effects of singing the year seng, "We've a
the deadly insecticide in connec- Story to Tell to the Nations." The


tion with malaria control, stressed
the use of at 'least a 5 per cent
D'DT solution. A strong toxic 7
per cent solution is even more
efficient, they said.
It was pointed out that once the
insecticide is properly applied anid
allowed to crystalize, it loses all
harmful effects to human beings.
All insects, with the possible ex-
ception of roaches, that come in
contact with the paralyzing crystals
die within a relatively short time.
With the help and co-operation
of citizens in approximately 300
communities of the state, Rotar-
ians were told, the health service
plans to assist homemakers spray
DDT in homes in localities thru-
out. Florida. Gulf county homes
are, included in the project.

MEMBERS OF WOMAN'S CLUB
TO HEAR CAMP G-J SPEAKER
The, regular meeting of the Port
St. Joe Woman's Club will be held
next Wednesday afternoon at 3:45
o'clock in the club room. The pro-
gram will be under the direction
of Mrs. J. L. Sharit.
Guest speaker will be an officer
from Camp Gordon Johnston who
will take as his subject "The Es-
tablishment of a Single Military
Department."
- 42A ,& .f
Tom Fleming Smith, Y 2/c, from-
the Canal Zone, and, his mother,
Mrs. Tom Fleming Smith of Ap-
alachicola, were guests here Mon-
day night of Mrs. Verna Smith.
Mrs. T, M. Schneider ,left Sun-
day for Tampa for a visit with her
mother, Mrs. E. Shorstein. She ex-
pects to return home Sunday.


Kenney Mercantile



Company

THE STORE WHERE YOUR DOLLAR HAS-THE MOST, CENTS



A Complete Line of


Groceries Meats Dry Goods


PHONE 136-W -:- WE DELIVER




EVERYBODY WELCOME !

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


"HOLDING FORTH THE WORD OF LIFE"
R. F. HALLFORD, Pastor Telephone 156
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1946
9:45-Bible School for all.
10:55-Morning Worship. Sermon Topic:
"LESSONS FROM THE PRODIGAL."
6:251--Baptist Training Union.
7:30-Evening'"Worship. Sermon topic:
"'. "ONE FOR MANY."
--------------- ---------------- I ------


!Bible study, taken from 1 Peter,
2:1-10 and other passages, was de-
veloped by Mrs. Fred Madduox.
rising the subject "As We Prepare
to Build We Take a Look At Our
Assets for Building." This was fol-
lowed with prayer by Mrs. E. C.
C'son. After singing "The Church's
One Foundation," the theme for
the year was announced and the
watchword, taken from Isa. 45,22,
was given by Mrs. Kelly.
The following program was then
presented: Mrs. Wesley Ramsey
talked on "A New Year Dawns"
and: 'A New World to Build." Mrs.
T. V. Morris talked on "A Peace
to Preserve and a Democracy to
Live." "A Prosperity to Share"
was given by Mrs. W. S. Smith;
"A Power to Use Aright" and "A
Gospel to Proclaim" by Mrs. Ca-
son, and Mrs. W. J. Daughtry gave
the concluding talk, "Unchanging
Foundations." followed: in prayer
by Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon.
During the business period it
was announced that ten. or more
would attend the quarterly meet-
ing in Apalachicola January 31.
A new mem-ber, Mrs. Emmett
Daniels, was welcomed.
The schedule for next Monday Is
the business meeting, at 3 p. m.,
with the Sunbeams' meeting at
the same hour with Mrs. Milton
Chafin. as leader.

MRS. ADKINS HOSTESS TO
RUTH LAWRENCE CIRCLE
Mrs. G. C. Adkins was hostess
to the Ruth Lawrence Circle of
the' Methodist W. S,. C. S. Monday
afternoon, with 'twelve members
present.
The meeting opened with prayer
by Mrs. G. A. Patton, and Mrs.
Frank Manning was& in charge of
the Bible study book, "The Divine
Fatherhood." The' lesson was given
by Mrs. Watson Smith and Mrs.
D. B. -Lay and' was followed by a
discussion in which all took part.
Mrs. M. P. Tomlinson presided
over the business session. Excel-
'ent repoi'ts were made .on atten-
dance, social relations work and
pledges paid. Mrs. S. D. Spears
was welcomed as a new member.
A social hour followed the meet-
Ing, during which Mrs.-. Adkins
served delicious refreshments of
sandwiches,, cookies and hot choco-
late.
Members are urged to attend the
program meeting at the church
next Monday.


MRS. DRAKE IS HQ.STESS TO
J. A. M. CLUB MONDAY NIGHT
The J. A. M. Club met Monday
4 night with Mrs. H. A. Drake, at her
home on Reid Avenue. Entertain-
ment feature of the evening was
a contest, "Pen Pushers," prizes
going to Mrs. Eula Pridgeon and'
.Mrs. Florrie Connell.
The hostess served delicious.
tuna salad, open-face sandwiches,
cake and: coffee, to the following
members: Mrs. Callie Howell, Mrs.
Eula Pridgeon, Mrs,. Florrie Con-
nell, Mrs. Ifola Costin, Mrs. Ned
Gaino.us, Mrs. Ruby Pridigeon and
Mrs. Myrtice Smith.
Next meeting of the club will be
February 11 with Mrs. Ned Gain-
'.isf at her home on Eighth Sttee.t

Lt. Barney Shorstdin of Jackson-
ville, who is home on terminal
leave after two years overseas,
spent, several days' here visiting
"with Mr. and Mrs. T, M. Schneider.
Mrs,. J. J. Perritt and Miss
Gladys Jean Redd of Panama City
I spent the week-end there as the
guests. of 'Mr. and Mrs. Leroy
Gainous.


Kiwanis Officials At

Local Club Meeting
Celebrating the 29th annive
of Kiwanis International, the
St. Joe club had as its guests T
day evening of last week
Parkins of DeFuniak Springs,
tenant ,governor of the north
ern division, and Forace Ho
of Panama City, past lieute
governor.
Holland gave a very intere
address, charging Kiwanians
the responsibility which h
them in 'the post-war world,
calling upon the entire men
ship to support the peace as f
fully and diligently *as they
the war.
Vice President Franklin J
presided at the meeting in
absence of President Tom 0'
who was attending a meeting
'ainesville.
C. E. McCollum, new manag
the Port theater, was a guess
the club.

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Horton
transacting business in Tall
see last Tuesday.





Port

A Martin Theatre

THEATRE OPENS SATU
CONTINUOUS PERFC


SATURDAY, FEBRUAR




HIT NO..1

BUSTER CRABBE
-- in.-


"His Brother'



Ghost"

HIT NO. 2





RICHARD DIX


rsary
Port
hirs-
C. E.
lieu-
west-
illand
enan-t

sting
with
faces
and
mber-
faith-
Sdid

Jones
the
wens,
g at

er of
st of


we're
ahas-


MARY VIC MAUK CIRCLE
MEETS WITH MRS. BROWN
The Mary Vic Mauk Circle of
the Meth.odist W. S. C. S. met Mon-
day afterno-ono at the home of Mrs.
H. C. Brown. The devotional was
conducted by Mrs. J. L. Sharit,
Who used as her subject Acts 2:47,
after which she led, 'the group in-
prayer.
'During the business session it
was agreed to send flowers to Rev.
0. D. Langston, who is in a Mo-
bile hospital and, according to a
letter received and read by Mrs.
George Suber, is fearful of losing
an infected toe. Suitable cards
were ordered sent 'to shut-ins and
the bereaved of our community.
During the study period Mrs.
Ralph Swatts presented part ot
chapter one of "The Divine Father-
hood.'" by Henry M. Bullock. Mrs
Sh-arit closed the meeting with the
Lord's prayer.
Tasty refreshments of sana-
wiches, cake, tea and coca-colas
were served by the hostess to the
twelve members andi one guest
present.
The next meeting of the circle
will be at the home of Mrs. B. H.
Dickens.


Tt



URDAYS-
IRMANCE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3


YOU'LL HOWL
WITH GLEE AT *
THE COLONEL!


T ^ T--- - - -



ieatre

Port St. Joe, Fla.

SUNDAYS AT 1:00 P. M.
.DAILY AT 2:45 P. M.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6


Also -
Chapter 12 of Serial
"JUNGLE RAIDERS"
and
"SCREEN SNAPSHOTS"


THURSDAY FRIDAY
February 7 and 8

BARBARA STANWYCK

GEORGE BRENT
in -


CHARLES JOAN WILLIAM 1
COBURN.BENNETT. EYTHE e ltatiof


-- Also--

Latest 'MARCH OF TIME'
"JUSTICE COMES TO
GERMANY"


MONDAY AND TUESDAY
February 4 and 5












LATEST NEWS EVENTS
and
PETE SMITH. SPECIALTY


Also
NEWS and CARTOON
OEM


* COMING *

Wednesday, February 13

ON OUR STAGE!
THE GREAT MAGICIAN



LPPINCOTT

AND HIS

CONGRESS OF SPOOKS

A Spook Show different
from any you have ever
seen DON'T MISS IT!


Tvv


I


TtHE- STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1946


P









PAGE,~~ SI TH STR POR ST OGL ONY LRDAFIAFBUR ,14


'Enjoy Oyster Dinner At Beach
Visiting Mr. and Mrs. E. C.
Pridgeon, Jr., and enjoying an
S,-ster dinner at Lagoon Beach
I tst Saturday wc.:e bt. Col. and
I 'rs. Royce Coln of California, Mrs.
... hl Jon's and, .two daughters of
-Fens.acola, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
McDar.iel and son. Mrs. Skeet
Jones and Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon, all
of Wewahitchka.


CLASSIFIED ADS
RATES-I- 1 cents per word for one inser-
tion (count initials and figures as single
"iordis); miriimunm charge 3 ) cents. Addi-
tionsi insertions of same ad take lower
rate. To eli inmate bookkeeping, all ads
must be paid for at time of first insertion

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Two large store coun-
aters, wood or coal cooking stove
and water heater, large double kit-
chen sink. Apply Mrs. R. A. Cos-
tin, Monument Ave. 1-8*
BABY BED, practically new, with
waterproof mattress; $20. Call
174-J. 2-8"
RADIO-New 1946 Philco battery
radio; $45.95 ceiling price. See
Dan J. Brooks at the Creech andti
Brooks Laundry. 1
SEWING MACHINE-Singer port-
able eler.tlic. See Mrs. Gus
Creech, phone 152-J. 2-122
FRYERS--50 New Hampshire Red
fryers between 2 and 3 pounds
each; 50c pound on foot. See Mrs.
Aubrey R. Tomlinson, Oak Grove.
COAL HEATER-In excellent con-
dition; ne.w grates. See W. 'Red:'
Ramsey. 1-25tf
FENCE POSTS-Can furnish cy-
press or pine posts, any length,
at nominal cost. See I. C. Lupton,
corner of Eighth Street and Long
Avenue. 3-8-46*
OUTBOARD MOTOR 51/2 h. P.
Johnson. See Gus Creech at the
Creech '& Brooks Laundry. 12-14
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
NICE HMES FOR SALE Lo-
c.al-d in Ray View Heights and
Highland View. 'See J. S. Shirey.
Phone 233-J. 1-lltf
REAL ESTATE WANTED
WANTED TO BUY-Three or four
2 or l-bedrootni houses. What
have .you, got? Dr. ,L. H. Bar-
tee, Port St. Joe. 1-lltt
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED TO RENT Two-bed-
room house; unfurnished. See E.
H. Vittum. 2-1"
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
FOR RENT-3 unfurnished apart-
ments at Highland View; $15 a
month. See W. H. Weeks, High-
land, View. 1*
FOR APARTMENTS See The
\S1irey .Apartments. 8-3
INCOME TAX EXPERTS
DONWT WAIT till the last few days
about yDofr 1945 income tax. Se,
Conklin and Carter, Costin Build-
ing. 1-11 2-1
MISCELLANEOUS

Carpentering & Plumbing
FOR BUILDING OR REPAIR,
-See
R. C. 'Bob' Collier or P. G. 'Parker'
Hart iBeacon Hill 15*

Panama Sheet Metal Works
ANYTHING IN SHE-IFT METAI


CHANGE OF HOURS
'H. C. Anderson, contact repre-
sentative for the Veterans. Admin-
istration, who has been coming to
Port St. .1o9 on Wednesdays, .an-
nounces that hereafter he will be
at the selective service office every
Tuesday from 2 to 4:30 p. m.

Return To Georgia After Visit
*Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Morton left
yesterday for St. Marys. Ga., after
a visit here of several days with
the former's, mother, Mrs. P. J.
Lovett.



POLITICAL

ANNOUNCEMENTS


FOR CITY COMMISSION
To The Citizens of Port St. Joe:
I hereby announce my candidacy
for City Commissioner in the forth-
coming February election. Re&liz-
ing the fact that Port S. Joe faces
a future brilliant with possibilities,
I pledge myself for a city admin-
istration that will be conservative
.with respect to the taxpayers'
money and liberal toward meas-
ures for future growth. I especially
pledge myself to do the will of the
majority of the people and ask
that they express themselves to
me at all times.
B. B. CONKLIN

FOR REPRESENTATIVE
Believing myself to be in post-
tion to be of service to my fellow
citizens, I would-like to take this
opportunity of announcing my can-
didacy for the Democratic nomina-
tion as Representative in the State
Legislature from Gulf County, sub-
ject to the primary in May. I shall
sincerely appreciate the vote and
support of all the people.
Respectfully,
GEORGE G. TAPPER

LEGAL ADVERTISING

NOTICE OF REGISTRATION
Notice is hereby given that the
registration hooks of the City or
Port St. Joe, Florida, will be open
for the purpose of registration of
all qualified electors who are qual-
ified under Ordinance No. 35X and
Chapter 18816 Laws of Florida,
Acts of 1937.
Said books will be opened on
January 30. 1946, and will remain
open for registration purposes un-
til February 8, 1946, between the
hours of 9 o'clock A. M. and 12 A.
M., and, 2 o'clock P. M. until 5
o'clock 'P. M. each day except Sun-
days and holidays. All persons de-
siring to register shall call at the
City Hall for such purpose.
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk,
1-18, Registration Officer,
2-1 City of Port St. Joe, Fla.
NOTICE TO APPEAR
In the Circuit Court, Gulf Coun-
ty, Florida, IN CHANCERY.
Opal Lunsford Perez, Plaintiff,
vs.
Angelo D. Perez, Plaintiff.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
To: Angelo D. Perez.
You are hereby notified and or-
dered to appear on the 11th day
of February A. D. 1946, before the
above styled court to the bill of
complaint for divorce filed against
you in the above entitled cause.
WITNESS my hand and official
seal at Wewahitchka, Gulf Cofinty,
Florida, this 11th day of January,
1946.


,K 1 I' IA 1- -1J. R. HUNTER,
L. T. Thompson E. W. Wood Clerk of Circuit Court,
635-37 E. Coastal Highway (Court Seal) Gulf County, Fla.
Phone 1589 P. 0. Box 647 E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr. 1-18
PANAMA CITY, FLA. 2-S* Attorney for Plaintiff. 2-8

For Dependable NOTICE OF REGULAR
TAXI SERVICE MUNICIPAL ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the
CALL 234 regular municipal election for thei
J. P. BASS, Owner 9 14tf election of five City Commissioners
--- -- for tlh.e full termn of two years for
SCRATCH PADS 4 x 7 inches, the City of Port St. Joe will be
100 sheets, to pad. Blue' or white held in the City Hall in the City
bond paper; 3 x 5-inch, about 40 of Port St. Joe on Tuesday, Feb-
sheets to pad, white only; 15c per ruary 19. 1946.
pound. The Star. 10-12 tf The polls will open at 7 o'clock
FISH BAIT Fresh, clean worms asMer ain lose at 7 o'clock P. M.
that a;re guaranteed to get the 1-18 tM. P. TEML NSrT
fish: for you. See Eddie Beverly 2-15 City Auditor and Clerk.
in the Sheffield colored quarters.

LODGE NOTICES NOTICE OF FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
MASONIC TEMPLE F & A M- Chapter 20953, Laws of Florida, Acts of
ll- l. t, th u ler.,igned persons intend to
Port St. Joe Lodge 111. Regular register with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
meetings 2nd and 4th Fri- of Gulf County, Florida. four weeks after
days each month, 8:00 p. M. the first publication of this notice, the
Members urged to attend; fictitious name or trade name under which
embers rged a the will be engaged in business and in which
visiting brothers welcome. ,G. W said liusin-ss is to be carried on, to-wit:
Cooper, W. 'M.; G. C. Adkins, Sec. BOYLES DEPARTiENT STORE. Port St.
Special :meeting February 1 wornK .oe. Florida.
in.F. C. degree.-. .' -. i : 2 J.. A OI2AN.


Seven Candidates

(Continued from Page 1)
will be chalked up during this bal-
loting, as considerable interest is
being manifested by the city's
voters.
Those who have not yet qualified
as voters are reminded that the
city registration books are now
open at the city hall between the
hours of 9 and 12 a. m. and 2 and
5 p. m. daily except Sunday, and
that they will be closed next Fri-
day, February 8.
There is some question as to
th:l legality of the special law
pas-seed a.t the last session of the
legislature increasing the number
of board members from three to
five, and it wouldn't surprise us
at all if the forthcoming election is
contested, either by one of the
candidates, or a resident of the
city.

Return Here To Make Home
Mrs. T. V. Wes'tbrook and daugh-
ter Norma, Mrs. W. P. Gilbert and
daughter Diane, and Mrs. G. T.
Boswell have returned here from
Mobile, Ala., to make this city
their future home and are residing
on Fourth Street.

To Return To Duty
Major Richard' Mahon expects to
leave today for Wilmington, Del.,
after a five-day leave spent here
with his father, Charlie Mahon. He
expects to be discharged from the


RULE 26
The Pullman conductor one night
found a red lantern hanging on a
berth, so he looked up the porter
and asked: "George, why is that
red lantern hanging there?"
"Well, boss," George replied,
"Rule 26 in the rule book says you
should always hang up a red lan-
tern when the rear end of the
sleeper is exposed."

Attend Stebel Funeral Services
Harry Stebel of Bowling Green,
Ohio, Mrs. Grover Hagg of Stony
Ridge, Ohio, Mrs. Etta Emch and
Bruno' Stebel of Toledo, Ohio, ar-
rived here Wednesdiay night from
West Palm Beach, where they at-
tended funeral services for Charles
E. Stebel. They, are staying with
Mrs. Stebel at White City and ex-
pect to leave Sunday for their
homes in Ohio.


METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. 0. D. Langston, Pastor
_-9:45 a. m.-Church school.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
6:30 p. m.-Youth Fellowship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening Worslhp.
Woman's Society meets Mon-
days at 3 p. m. Prayer meeting,
Bible study and choir Diractic
Wednesday ,at 7:30 p. m.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. W. A. Daniel, Pastor
10:00 a. m.-Sunday -.:hi.'-i eaeh
Sunday; Jimmy Greer, supt.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
First and third Sundays.
Services at Beacon Hill every
first and third Sunday night.

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Perritt of
Pan'ama City were guests Sunday
of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Gainous.


Once there were things people Approximately 44 per
couldn't talk about. Now they talk the inhabitants of South
about nothing else. are in Brazil.


cent or
America


service February 20. |


America's Sixth Largest Industry

Offers Jobs in the Woods and at Mills

APPLY U. S. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE


VICTORY PULFP'V L


J. B. WHITE

CUBIE R. LAIRD

DON'T WASTE PRECIOUS. TIME *


SCOM M ITT E E


W. S. SMITH
'1
C. N. JOHNSON

CUT TOP QUALITY WOOD


RON HAUTEY CUBAN RUM
$9 PROOF Was $4.66 $3.25
NOW

HAVANA CLUB Puerto Rican Rum $3 25
86 Proof Was $4.21.. NOW..........
RQN CHIKOTO Puerto Rican Rum$325
86 Proof Was $4.21. NOW.........

ST. JOE BAR


L~bli~il~J~m


I I r


THE STAR, PORT ST.- JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1946


PAGE, SIX