<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00261
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 17, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00261

Full Text












The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME V PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941 NUMBER 2



Men 17 to 50 Are Plans Completed A Timely Pointer on Honey Week School Trustees

Wanted for U. S. For P.-T.A. Fiesta To Be Elected and
To Be Held Nov.1 -- -- --
Naval Reserve OCTOBER Millage Set Nov. 4
____ Big Time Promised All Who At- '- THU

Those Joining Will Be Kept Fndsl for P.-T o A.iWo Voters Will Also Consider the
On Active Duty Only for -Consolidation of Districts
Duration of Emergency The Port St. Joe Parent-Teach- -- In Gulf County
ers association has compIleted its -- i
According to an announcement plans for the annual carnival, g i I Freeholders of Gulf county who


made this week in Washington by which this year will be held! on
order of Secretary of the Navy Saturday, November 1, beginning
Knox, "All men now enlisting in at 5 o'clock in the afternoon, ac-
the naval reserve will be retained cording to Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler,
on active duty throughout the pe- chairman of the planning and dec-
riod of the national emergency, orating committee.
but they will be released to inac- As usual, the big feature of the
tive duty as soon after the emer- affair will be the crowning of the
agency as their services can be king and queen. This part of the
spared, regardless of the length of i fiesta is in charge of Miss Erline
time remaining in their enlist' McClellan.
ment." rThe various booths, together
Enlistment in the U. S. Naval 'with those in charge, are as fol-
Reserve is for four years, but if a lows:
man enlists today and the emer- Seniors-Basketball throwing or
agency ends within a period, of sev- tossing (McClellan).
eral months, he will lie returned Eleventh Gaade Shooting gal-
to his civilian job as soon as pos, lery (Dendy).
sible after the emergency is over, (Continued on Page 2)
and will not be required to cor- -----
plete his four-year term in active Tax Roll Sent To
service.
Four classes of service in the Lee for Approval
naval reserve need men urgently
todayL They are Class V-3, which
includes radio and communica- County-Wide Millage Set at 19/2;
tions.; V-5, aviation; V-6, for trade St. Joe School District Mill-
specialists or men desiring traded age Fixed at 63/4
or vocational training, and V-7,
fleet officers. County Clerk J. R. Hunter this
Men with no previous special- week submitted the county budget,
ized triThing will be enlisted in together with the millage neces-
Class V-6 as apprentice seamen. sary to be levied, to State Comp-
Directly following enlistment the troller J. M. Lee for his approval.
new recruit will be sent to one of The county-wide levy was fixed
the four naval training stations for at 191/2 mills with the school mill-
a short period. At. the training age set at 4%. Broken down, the
station he will be given an apti- village is as follows:
tude test, and if he passes thisI Fundd- Mills
test successfully he will be sent General Revenue .............5
to a navy trade school. Approxi- Fine and Forfeiture ........ 11/2
mately 5500 men are admitted to Road and Bridge ........... 1/2
these trade schools each month. Mothers' Pension ..........
This schooling, valued at hun- C. H. & J. I. & S............. /
dreds of dollars, is free and the $15,000 T. W. I. & S........ 3J
seamen receive their regular navy Outstanding Indebtedness ... 2%/
pay while receiving instruction. $6000 T. W. I. & S.......... /2
Those applicants who do not $200.000 Canal Bond ........ 11/
pass their tests ror admission to ,Health Unit ................. 11/
a trade school will be sent to duty Judgment (W. C. Whaley) .. %
aboard ship, where an opportunity Agriculture & Livestock ... 1/2
will be given them to train in a General School ............. 41/2
trade. Men with previous special-
ized training of any kind will be County-wide village ......191/,
enlisted in the naval reserve Class icts- i
V-6 with petty officer ratings and School Districts- Mills
will be sent immediately to the No. 1, Maintenance ......... 4%
No. 11, Maintenance ........ 4% r
ship or shore station where they No. 11, Maintenance ........ 4%
are needed.No. 1 Maintenance ........ 4
College graduates who desire en- No. 16. Maintenance.........
gineering or deck duty as officers No. 1, Old Bonds ...........2
(Continued on page 3) No 16 (St. Joe) Ol Bonds.. 14
No. 16, New Bonds .......... 13
SThis makes a total millage for
OFFICES MOVED Port St. Joe, including the school

B3. W. Eells, chairman of the levy, of 261.
selectiveanThe estimated revenue for the
selective service board,'announecI
S1 1941 to


period from Octo er 1, IV41, LO
that the offices of the board have per, 1
been moved from the city hall to September 30, 1942, was placed at
the second floor of the Masonic $133,893.77.
building, above the postoffice. Estimate of expenditures for the
building, above the postoffice ^^ ^
The move was made on instruc- same period, by funds, was as
tions from state headquarters. follows:
tios frGeneral Revenue ........$31,925.00
Race Track Money Trans-
BU LDING PERMIT I fers ................. 48,676.03
A building permit was issued Fine and Forfeiture .... 10,972.00
this week by City Clerk M. P. Road and Bridge ....... 19,575.00
Tomlinson to Richard Porter for Mothers' Pension ........ 1,200.00
the construction of a dwelling on C. H. & J. I. & S. ..... 6,570.00
Twelfth street; cost $3000. Arthur $15,000 T. W. I. & S..... 1,950.00
Lupton is the contractor. $6,000 T. W. I. & S..... 1,120.00
------ -- Health Unit ............ 2,700.00
Rhodes To South Carolina $200,000 Canal Bond .... 13,100.00
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Rhodes left Judgment (Whaley) .... 625.00
last week-end for Georgetown, S. Agriculture & Livestock 1,419.31
C., where Mr. Rhodes will work in Outstand. Indebtedness 16,686.43
a paper mill. Canal Toll Fund ......... 9,300.00


The calendar whets little Lucy Martin's sweet tooth in anticipation
of "Honey Week," proclaimed by the American Honey Fnstitute for
the last week in October. Honey producers of Gulf county, home
of the famous Tupeol honey, report a banner year in honey produc-
tion. Tupelo honey, which will not granulate, has achieved an im-
portant place in the medical world.


:re qualified to vote will select
school trustees, fix the school tax
levy and express their approval
or disapproval of a plan to con-
solidate county school districts in
the regular biennial trustee elec-
tion to be held Tuesday, Novem-
ber 4.
Under a plan worked out as a
result of recent legislative acts,
the school board proposes to con.
solidate the county's four school
districts into two large districts,
each of which will contain one of
the county's two major school
plants, Wewahitchka andi Port St.
Joe.
Superintendent Tom Owens said
that the present four districts are
inadequate as the Buckhorn school
has but 13 pupils and there is no
school at present in the Over-
street drfstrict. The consolidation
will also simplify records in the
superintendent's office
The voters will also determine,
whether 4% mills shall be levied
for school purposes in the districts


Food Prices Are 'Must Have Driver's during the next two years. Such
a millage, it is estimated, will

On the Upgralde License By "'"la raise approximately, $12,500.
O n"te Up d-Licnse yt If the proposition of red!Narict-
-ing the county is turned down, an-
Milk. Bread, Butter, Meats and Those Not Holding Permits Will other election will be called with-
Groceries Show Considerable Be Required to Take Examl- in six weeks for the purpose of
voting in the old districts foi- trus-
Rise Over Last Year nation After Oct. 20 t n ih old disi .
tees and millage.
Candidates for school trustee
A comparison of 'ood prices at Gulf county motorists who have must be freeholders. That is, they
not yet secured their drivers' li- must own real or personal prop-
present with prices at the same ceses have only today and tomor- erty on which taxes were paid for
time last year shows that the cost row in which to secure them, for 1940. They must reside in the dis-
of living in Port St. Joe is on the starting Monday, according to J. strict they seek to represent and
upgrade. J. Uil'iam, direct-or of the state must be otherwise qualified as
Starting last week, bread selling 'ihighwa:y, patrol, examinations will electors.
Starting last week, bread selling e required for all persons notelectors.
in local stores took an extra pennye le vied for a11 persoss not In order for a candidate for
from the housewife's budget as the hold vald d eld drier licenses. school trustee to get his name on
usual 10-cent loaf advanced to 11 nhe deadline for obtaining the the ballot, he must obtain an en-
cents. e .w pmits without examination l trance blank from the school su-
D1,irvymen serving, this erritor igi nally as October 1, hut Gil perintendent's office and have it
raised the mrice of mnk last Wed- im cstend it as there ee endorsed by five qualified electors.
esay two ct a quart decr- housnds ho had not been i- The application, or petition, must
censed.
ing that it was necessary to make be filed in the office of the super-
the raise or stop giving the grade intendent not less than 15 days
of milk they are delivering. They Several Are Seeking prior to the day of the election.
report that Lottle tops have al- Supreme Court Seat Counting today, that leaves but 19
most doubled in price, and that ---- days for candidates to file.


feed is up around 20 to 25 per
cent, and that to show a fair
profit they had to raise prices.
The price of butter has also been
boosted.
Taking a few grocery items
from circulars of a year ago, we
find that canned milk which sold
six small cans for 19 cents is now


25 cents. A quart jar of peanut
butter last year sold for 19 cents,


Interest in the elections in May
probaH'lyi willcenter on the race for
the supreme court seat of retiring
Justice J. B. Whitfield, who has
held the post for the past 37 years.
Theo. Turnbull of Monticello,
and William P. Allen of Tallahas-
see, have already announced their
intention to run, while others be-
ing mentioned as probable candi-
cates are Judge George C. Gibbs


The election notice, together
with the names or election offi-
cials and the districts to be con-
solidated, will he found on page
six of this issue of The Star.
r-
KNITTING CLASSES TO
REOPEN NEXT TUESDAY

Mrs. A. T. Gagneiux. chairman
of the Red Cross knitting commit-


now it is 23 cents. Five pounds of of Jacksonville, former attorney tee, announces that the classes in
sugar in 1940 could be purchased general, Stanley Milledge and Daj knitting will be resumed next
for 22 cents, today the same five H. Redfern, attorneys of Miamt. week beginning at 2:30 p. m. They
pounds costs 29 cents. A 10-pound ---will be held in the health depart-
sack of flour at this time last year Child Undergoes Appendectomy silent on Sixth street each Tues-
brought 47 cents, while today it Mabel Iris, 4-year-old daughter day and Wednesday.
brings 57 cents, of Mr. and Mrs. Erbin Bowen of
Meats are also taking a big up- Highland View, was taken to a Wallace n Veteran's Hospital
swing. In October last year loin Panama City hospital Thursday
steak was 30 cents per pound', night of last week, where she un. Bob Wallace of St. narys. Cn.. a
compared with 35 cents today, derwent an operation for appendi- former resident of this city, is in
Chuck steak sold for 20 cents, cities. She is reported as being well the veterans' hospital at Lake
while it is 24 cents now. Lamb is on the road to complete recovery. Cityv. He is suffering with a heart
up about four cents per pound -- ---- ailment, according to reports.
and cured ham is out of sight. To Hospital For Treatment
Restaurants and boarding houses Mrs. Joe Mira and daughter. Do- Visiting In South Part of State
in this city have also been com- lores, left last week for Pensa- Capt. John Maddox left Monday
polled to raise their prices due to i cola where Dolores will undergo to visi: relatives in the southern
the jump in foodstuffs. treatment. part of the state.


Port St. Joe, site of the $10,000,000
duPont Kraft Paper Mill and the
St. Joe Lumber & Export Co., one
of the South's largest Saw Mills. H


Th. Star is dedicated to setting
Forth the Advantages, Resources,
Attractions and Progress of Port
' R St. Joe and Gulf County ..


. . . . . . .


r _____


i


__ ~_~ __ ___









-A T I


POPEYE, THE ~ZE OFFICER, GETS AIR-CONDI


I'M AIi AVIATION WELL, BLOW ME DOWN I
MECHa C- ,:MOW: *A ERTINLN O GETTl'\



II 4'~
S' i .----

,,, *-' ,-- ...."-


VK*, I'L FE




'I:: F L!I= E~









%__
~ q \1i \I


TONED!


You're flying high in the Navy
fcu Ive like a king! Free meals. Free
medical and dental care. No rent to
cay. And you get regular raises in pay.
V, hal a life for a man who's young and
amblious! You get travel and adven-
ture and you learn a skilled trade that
pulse you in line for big pay jobs when
you gel out of the Navy.
If yc.u are 17 or over, get a free copy
of the illustrated booklet, "LIFE IN THE
U. S. NAVY," from the Ndvy Editor of I
ihis paper.

So -SERVE -OUR COUNTrR. !
5 BUILD VOUR FUTURE! /I
6(ET IN THE NAVY NOW!


THE TATTLER

Buck Walters ........ Editor
Marigene Smith ... Reporter
Fay Scheffer ...... Reporter


Sees All, Knows All, Tells
L All About Port St. Joe
1 High School


NEW TEACHER THIS AND THAT
Name-Miss Martha Belle Dun- We wouldn't actually SAY so,
can but we THINK .
From-Frostproof, Fla.
School--Florida State College -That the Sharks will be state
for Women, champions for six-man football
Teaches-History and science, this year.
Hobbies Archery, life saving. -That there's a bit more study-
swimming, Girl Scouts. "I particu- ing going on this week. Wonder
larly like to go camping in the why?
suminer time," said Missi Duncan, -That G. F. is not so far-minded
"This is my first yJear teaching as was once supposed. Get it?
school." -That Foy will grow up to fit
his mouth soon.
SIX WEEKS EXAMS -That M. J. is having (blonde)
It doesn't seem possible that trouble about J. T.
school has, been underway for six -That figures of speech are
weeks, but according to Principal quite expressive.
Biggart and the teachers, It Is in -That Thomas C. and Ruth are
full swing, and time for us to take sure thick. What romance!
the'check-ups. All the students are -l'iat M. S. is still that. way
studying hard in order to make about H. T.
good. -That M. C. and F. S. say they
went- straight home Friday night
NEW BAND INSTRUCTOR -but seeing's believing, and we l
R. B. Woods of Panama City, didn't see it.
who has been assistant to Band-
master Whitney at Bay High, in THE PERFECT TEACHER!
charge of the elementary and ju- Hair--Miss Gunn.
nior high bands, has taken over Clothes--Mrs. Dendy.
the position of band director here Eyes-Miss Milton.
made vacant when Howell Hamp- Disposition-Mrs. Kennington.
ton was drafted by the Dothan Figure-Miss McClellan.
high school. Face-Miss Solomon.


PLANS COMPLETED
FOR P.-T. A. FIESTA

(Continued from Page 1)
Tenth Gradie-Baseball throwing.
(Hannon).
Ninth Grade-Hot dogs and soft
drinks (Creech).
Eighth Grade-Bingo (Pridigeon
and Smith).
Seventh Grade--Candied apples,
popcorn and ice balls (Jones and
Marietta).
Sixth Grade--Candy and pea-
nuts (Goforth and Milton).
Fifth Grade-Home-made cakes,
cookies and pies (Gainous, Higs-
ton and' McLawhon).
Fourth Grade-Fish pond (Fer-
rell and Smith).
Third Grade-Coffee and ham-
bergers (Rollins and Perritt).
Second Grade-Horseshoes (Mar-
tin and Gunn).
First Grade-Apple ducking, ice
cream cones (McPhaul, Solomon
and Howell).


spiritual education.
The plans and decorating for
the carnival will be in charge of
Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler and her com-
mittee, Neal Smith, C. H. Bram-
mer and Mrs. B. Owens.
All purchases, for the carnival
will be taken care of by Neal
Smith and his committee, Mrs. W.
H. Wellington and Mrs. Hazel Fer-
rell.
---- ---- ---
MATTHEWS IS SEEKING
RE-ELECTION TO STATE
RAILROAD COMMISSION

Eugene Matthews, senior mem-
ber of the Florida railroad commis-
sion, has announced that he will
he a candidate for re-election, run-
ning in Group One on the May
primary ballot.
He was appointed to member-
ship on the commission by Gover-
nor Cary A. Hardee in 1924 to fill
the vacancy caused by the death
of Douglass Campbell of Chipley.


Band-Coca-cola (Wood and as- and has been successively elected
sistants). since that time.
The co-operation and help of the During his service on the comn-
citizens of Port St. Joe Is earn- mission many millions of dlollars-
estly desired. The purpose of the have been saved to the citizens of
P.-T. A. is to bring Into closer re- the state through adjustments and
nation the home and the school so reductions in transportation, tele-
that parents and teachers may co- phone and toll bridge rates.
operate in the training of the chil- ----- ---
dren, and to develop between edt- Duke Lost Two Titles
captors and the general public such By his abdication the present
united efforts as will secure for Duke of Windsor automaticallyre-
every child the highest advantages nounced title of Duke of Lancaster
in physical, mental, social and and Duke of Cornwall.


Sharks Defeat

Florida Hi 33-6

Go To Frink Today for Game;
Meet Blountstown Next Fri-
day At Centennial Field

The St. Joe Sharks continued on
the victory trail last Friday night
by defeating the strong Florida
High Demons of Tallahassee on
the local field 33 to 6.
The Sharks showed their power
by taking the ball on the opening
kickoff and marching straight to
a touchdown. A few minutes, later
the Demons scored their only
touchdown when Johnny Lane
fumbled a Demon punt in his own
end zone and the ball was re-
covered by Kinney of Florida High.
The Demons failed to make the
extra point, and the score was tied
at 6-all.
In the second quarter the local
boys came back to score again,
and this time ran the extra point
over to lead 13-7 at half time.
The second half of the tilt was
played almost entirely in Florida
High territory, the Demons mak-
ing but three first downs during
the remainder of the game.
Although the visiting team was
beaten, they never let up. They al-
most smothered the Sharks' pass-
ing attack, but could not stop the
hard running attack shown by the
St. .oe gridmen. After the final
whistle, the boys of both teams
complimented each other on a
-4-

MIDWAY PARK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf I
County Line

Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES
Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cabins
Good Beds
Good Meals
Good Guides
COME IN AND REST!
I Am YOUR Servant- Let
Me Serve YOU!


JOHN HENRY JONES



ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE &P ^0%
WEEK aW4Au

Dining Roomn

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
Lunch, 12 to 2...........40c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ...........40c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Coiner Reid Ave. and 3rd St. 4
Griffin Grocery Building
4....^^. ^\... .


clean, hard-fought game.
The Sharks will trek to


Frink


to play this afternoon, and will
face a strong Blountstown lineup
on Centennial Field next Friday
night.


Leaves For Trinidad
Manning Smith of Andalusia,
Ala., spent Wedinesday in the city
as the guest of his mother, Mrs.
M. B. Smith. He left Wednesday
night for Trinidad, South America,
where he will be employed by the
British governments
S-
Hospitality is Japan's long suit,
but prisoners, pay for their own
meals.


Mr. and Mrs. Orin McCranie of
Valilosta. Ga., spent the week-end
here as guests of Mrs. Sally Mont-
gomery.
.4j


LET US FILL THAT
PRESCRIPTION
Bring us your next prescrip-
tion. Only fresh, full quality
materials are used. Only qual-
ified pharmacists do the
compounding

LeHARDY

PHARMACY


U -~sFr rr --' -


DON'T WRITE TP



THE EDITOR!


if you have trouble seeing to read this paper
Tonight, don't blame the editor! Probably you
had better check up on your lamps. Chances
are you'll find misfit bulbs, pee-wee sizes,
midgets where big bulbs ought
to be. (4 out of 5 bulbs in
homes are wrong size for see-
ing without eyestrain.) So
X prowl around. Compare your
bulbs with the ones recom-
mended below. And get a car-
ton of the right sizes to-
morrow!

I.E.S. Table lamps-100-watt bulb .... 15c
I.E.S. Floor lamps-150-watt bulb ..... 20c
I.E.S. 3-lite-100-200-300-wott bulb .55c
Kitchen ceiling fixture-150-wtrt bulb .20c

see
your I L P EALE



FLORiDA POWER

CORPORATION




.-'. -'iP h.. .. ..

,- _,- .,

^ a-Pfrei [ 'ght -, -. r
- -- --- ------- -r..04..oflfl -a2 a~-.ms aU m-a


" ` i '"


-1 1


i' `- '"''r'~':~ `-'''''-"-`-' I-ij ~u r* In


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941


THE STAiR, PORT S7- JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO








pRIAY OCOE 7 91Th .R TS.d UFCW1Y FOIAPG HE


FOR NAVAL RESERVE
,MEN 17 TO 50 WANTED

(Continued from Page 1)
'.n the reserve will be enlisted as
inidshipmen, Class V-7. 3pon com-
rpletion of a four months' training
course these men will be commis-
sioned ensigns in the naval re-
serve.


A man with at least two years
of college education who desires
to enter naval aviation will be en-
listed as a seaman second class in
Class V-5. After a month's pre-
ilminary training he will become
a naval aviation cadet and will be
sent for advanced training to one
of the three principal flight train-
ing centers. On completion of this


advanced course, which requires
approximately seven months, he
will be designated as a naval avia-
tor and commissioned as an en-
sign in the naval reserve.
All applicants for the U. S. Na-
val Reserve must be between 17
and 50 years of age and native-
born citizens of the United States,
with the exception of candidates


for Class V-5, who must have been
U. S. citizens for a period of at
least 10 years.
For further details call on the
editor of The Star.
"------- -----""
There are moer than 16,400 tour-
ist camps operating in the United
States with a total of 166,000 cot-
tages.


LINDBERGH LOSES OUT

fthe sponge diving boat "Colonel
Lindbergh," plying Gulf waters
since 1928 out of Tarpon Springs,
has been re-named the "Greece" by
its owners. The change was of-
ficially. authorized-by the marine
Inspection service of the depart.
ment of commerce.


25,000 young men wanted and a complete outfit of clothing free! If, at the
end of your term of service, you wish to get a
immediately to get best job in civil life, your Navy training will be a tre-
aviation training in the world mendous asset to you. Employers the country
over are eager to employ Navy-trained men.


Right now the world's fastest planes are rolling
out of America's factories by the thousands.
That's why the United States Navy needs
25,000 new men to fly and service these planes.
That's why your Navy is offering qualified
young men the finest training course offered
anywhere. Now you can get paid to lead the
greatest life in the world. Aviation Cadets in the
United States Navy get $75.00 a month dur-
ing seven months of flight training. Then they
become Naval Aviators receiving as much as
$245.00 a month.

Earn while you learn
Uncle Sam's Navy offers you tremendous op-
portunities for advancement in a wide variety
of fascinating jobs. There are 45 skilled trades
and vocations which the Navy may teach you
if you are qualified. If you're interested in radio
work, engineering, aerial photography, carpen-
try, pharmacy, welding, the Navy may spend
$1,500 in one year training you to become an
expert in your chosen field.

OpporunSties for advancement
If you apply yourself, advancement and in-
creases in pay will follow regularly. Before the
end of your first enlistment you may be earning
up to $126 a month-with your board, keep,


Good fun, good food, good friends
The Navy is noted for its popular sports pro-
gram. Every ldnd of sport from baseball to



LOOK WHAT THE U. S. NAVY AND
NAVAL RESERVE OFFER YOU
FREE TRAINING worth $1500. 45 trades and
vocations to choose from.
GOOD PAY with regular increases. You may
earn up to $126 a month.
EACH YEAR you are entitled to a generous
vacation period with full pay.
GOOD FOOD and plenty of it.
FREE CLOTHING. A complete outfit of cloth-
ing when you first enlist. (Over $100 worth.)
FREE MEDICAL CARE, including regular dental
attention.
FINEST SPORTS and entertainment any man
could ask for.
TRAVEL, ADVENTURE, THRILLS--You can't
beat the Navy for them!
BECOME AN OFFICER. Many can work for an
appointment to the Naval Academy or the
Annapolis of the Air at Pensacola.
FUTURE SUCCESS. It's easy for Navy-trained
men to get good-paying jobs in civil life.
LIBERAL RETIREMENT PAY for regular Navy
men.
ft


boxing and swimming is offered the man who
enlists. On board ship, the latest moving pic-
tures are shown free. Organized recreation, such
as dramatics, singing and musical entertain-
ment, goes to make the life of a Navy man
the best fun in the world.
The food served in the Navy would do justice
to your own mother's cooking. It's well pre-
pared-and there's plenty of it.
Any man who wears the trim uniform of
Uncle Sam's Navy is bound to be looked up to
-for you've got to be good to get in the Navy!


Get this FREE Booklet
Mail coupon for your free
copy of "Life in the U. S.
Navy." 24 pages, fully illus-
trated. It answers all your /'*
questions. Tells what your a
pay willbe...promotions and ..
vacations you can expect ...
how you can retire on a life
income. Describes how you
can learn anyone of 45 big-
pay trades from aviation to
radio ... how many may be-
come officers. 27 scenes from Navy life showing sports
and games you may play, ships you may be assigned to,
exciting ports you may visit. Tells enlistment require-
ments and where to apply. If you are between 17 and
31 (no high school required), get thisfree book now.
No obligation. Ask the Navy Editor of this paper for
a copy. Or telephone him. Or mail him the coupon.
You can paste it on a penny postal card.
WEAR THIS BADGE OF HONOR If after
reading the free booklet you decide to
apply for a place in the Navy, you will
NAVY receive this smart lapel-emblem. It is a
badge of honor you will be proud to wear.


Are you cG iz. r-. joi: a military service?
1' C. "iT Co 2-sSE THE NAVAL RESERVE!
Don'L wait. Choose the Naval Reserve regardless of the length of time remaining
zlh. The Secretary of the Navy has an- in their enlistment."
irounced: "All men now enlisting in the Remember-the regular Navy and Naval
Naval R1eserve will be retained on active Reserve offer you the same travel, train-
Navy duty throughout the period of the ing, promotions, pay increases. Physical
national emergency, but they will be requirements in the Naval Reserve are more
re..a,-d to inactive duty as noon after the liberal. Find out all about the Naval Re-
emergency as their services can be spared, serve. Send in the coupon now!
* SERVE YOUR COUNTRY BUILD YOUR FUTURE


I Tear out and take or send this coupon I
Sto the Navy Editor of this newspaper Da 3
_ Without any obligation on my part whatsoever, please send
:= me free booklet, "Life in the Navy," giving full details about
Sthe opportunities for men in the Navy or Naval Reserve.

Name Age

9I Address

STown State
fm m


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941


THA OT*Rt MRT ST. k% J~cE, GULF couOTY, FLL)MDA


PAGE THREE







A FRE A P SO F Y .


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Enered as Second-class matter, December 10,
193.7, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year.......$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-*{ Telephone 51 0-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

TB NOT HEREDITARY
A very informative article on the causes
of tuberculosis, written by Dr. Kendall
Emerson in a late issue of Life and Health
magazine, is patricularly appropriate at this
time, -since Dr. R. J. Lamb, director of the
Gulf-Franklin-Wakulla health unit has sched-
uled X-ray clinics in Port St. Joe and Wewa-
hitchka on November 7 and 8 where every
person interested in having their chest ex-
amined will be given the opportunity. In his
article, Dr. Emerson endeavors to answer
some of the leading questions which often re-
main a mystery to the average person.
"No matter how poor, run down, malnour-
ished, overworked or badly housed you may
be, you will not have tuberculosis unless the
germ gains entrance to your body," he says.
"It is the tubercle bacillus alone that causes
tuberculosis, and the only way to prevent the
disease from developing is to eradicate these
germs from the world.
"Tuberculosis is eminently a family dis-
ease. Obviously the reason for this is that tu-
berculosis, being an infectitious disease, is
most likely to pass from one member of the
family to others with whom he is in intimate
contact.
"The old belief that tuberculosis 'runs in
families' and is hereditary has long since been
exploded. If we look on the germ of tubercu-
losis as the seed and the human lungs as the
soil, we may say that the soil varies in its
fertility for the growth of the germ from
person to person. Thus there may be some
family lack of ability to inhibit this growth
or to kill off even a small number of invaders.
The lesson from this is that those in whose
families tuberculosis has been prevalent for
some generations are under special obligation
to watch their health and to avoid contact
with known cases of the disease."
Dr. Emerson points out that keeping
physically fit is important in combating tu-
berculosis, and that being run down opens
channels for the entrance of disease, pre-
cisely as the holes in worn-out shoes allo\,
moisture to enter.
If you suffer from "that tired feeling"--
and we don't mean the urge to take a day off
to go fishing on the Dead Lakes-or have
other symptoms indicating a physical malad-
justment, see your doctor at once. It is to
the credit of the medical profession that it
is as much interested in preventing diseases
as it is in effecting cures when diesase has
been contracted.

Soldiers in current U. S. army maneuvers
are being allowed only three quarts of water
daily for bathing purposes. Little Johnny is
more eager than ever to join the army. He
says he can drink that much.-Montgomery
Advertiser.

America is in a state of emergency. Every
citizen is urged to do his part by buying De-
fense Savings Bonds and Stamps. r

Speaking of synthetics, Italy goes in most
heavily for substitute generals. Greensboro
News.

Trade with your home-town merchants.


DEFENSE IS COSTLY
Next March 1 a good many residents of
Gulf county will have a rude awakening.
They will learn, for the first time, that war
and defense are an incredibly costly business
and that the construction of defense projects
like unto Tyndall Field west of this city have
to be paid for by somebody. For, on that
date, the highest income taxes ever levied
in this country will be due and payable.
Everyone knows that the new tax bill is se-
vere-the editor of The Star has been point-
ing out all through the past year that we're
all due for a severe jolt-but it is probable
that relatively few know just how much ot
their income it will take.
A comparison of the old tax bill with the
new tells the story. Under the old law, a
single person with $3000 net income paid the
federal government $84 in direct taxes-un-
der the new law he must pay $197. Under the
old law a married person with no dependents
and a $10,000 income, paid $528-under the
new law he must pay $1,305. And the new
tax bill reaches down into income levels which
were never touched before, probably hitting
a goodly number of workers at the paper
mill and maybe, even, the editor of this vN-e
sheet. For instance, under the old law a
married person earning $2000 a year was not
taxed at all. Under the new law he must pay
$37. In the upper income brackets very sub-
stantial increases have also gone into effect.
A married man, for example, without depen-
dents and earning $25,000 a year, paid $3,843
under the old law. Next year he must pay
$6,,64-an increase of nearly 50 per cent. (Or
course, this does not include a great number
of local people.)
Heavy as this tax bill is, the treasury esti-
mates that it will mean an increase in fed-
eral revenue of only $3,550,000,000 a year. So
far, we have appropriated $60,000,000,000 for
military purpopses-of which $50,000,000,000
is for our own defense and $10,000,000,000 is
"for aid to Britain. In short, the revenue pro-
duced by the record-breaking new taxes will
be only a drop in the bucket in relation to
the cost of our arms policy program. A fai
tougher tax bill will have to be enacted be-
fore very long-possibly next year. Current
English income taxes, which are three or four
times as heavy as ours, indicate what happens
when a nation goes to war in the mechanized
modern manner.
You people of Port St. Joe and Gulf county
will not have met your share of the new taxes
when you sign your check for your income
tax and send it in to the collector of internal
revenue. In addition, the new bill levies a
large number of commodity taxes, which we
are already paying. Liquor, automobiles, the-
ater admissions, household machinery, etc.,
all are bearing their burden. And the con-
sumer-you and me-will have to pay.
As we have pointed out before, there are
two facets to heavy taxation. One-the obvi-
ous one-is the production of more revenue.
The other is to reduce the public's purchas-
ing power and so help prevent, or slow price
inflation. But some believe that the new tax
bill does not go far enough so far as the last
goal is concerned. They believe that a system
of compulsory savings will have to be put
into effect during this period of rising in-
comes and declining supply of commodities
Whatever happens, it is clear that we are
just beginning to learn, at first hand, the fi-
nancial sacrifices that the defense of our
hemisphere makes unavoidable.
Sherman was right-war is hell-particut. r
larlv for those with a small income in this
modern day.
s

The government is so considerate of the v
taxpayer these days that it is going to give r
him an opportunity of paying his taxes in
advance by selling him tax anticipation bonds.
-Sanford Herald.


THE SPIRIT OF OLD ABE


@,I2llf- -



'-"- -- I
It .. ,-






NZN



American Gardi

Brings,

Yard into. 7

Home ... ''
""i .... *" .'
t h. '1 .























.,_?. ....
"
























Typical ECample of01
Accepted Garden Style.

An accepted style of small home door living room." This private
garden design has been developed garden should always be s,*recied
in America during the last decade, with fence, hedge or shrub..ry or-
ful and practical, as well as sound ily, and background for the garden
from the artistic point of view. picture. It may be improved in
It might be described as a meth- any fashion, formal or informal.
od of equipping for family use and depending on size, surroundings and
enjoyment the whole area of the the taste of the owner.
enjoyment the. whole, area. of the the taste of the owner.


home grounds. It creates an out-
door department of the home.
When the house is planned, its
layout is considered with refer-
ence to the yard, especially the
back yard, where the private gar-
den naturally must be made. A
terrace is often provided overlook-
ing this garden, communicating
directly with the living room. This
garden entrance to the home is
quite in contrast to the old-fash-
ion :d kitchen door, from which one
ent-red the back yard to hang up
clothes; so the private garden be-
cr.ecs a center for the family's out-
door life.
The layout shown in the illustra-
tion is a good example of the ac-
cepted American style. Infinite
variations of it are possible, but
all should provide the direct rela-
tionship between the living apart-
ments of the house, and the "out-


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

editor The Star:
Everything you pick up, you
'i into something about A-1 or
B-1, etc. Or if you twist your dial
ryin' to get away from some per-
son tellin' you how to become more
llurin' by rubhin' something on
versus getting' out in the sun, you
un into vitamins TJust as o time


The manner in which a vegetable
plot may be worked into ihe gen-
eral design is illustrated. H-ere
leaf vegetables for the bowl sala:;,
greens and carrots fcr the ci':Jire,
and other table varieties ot a cual-
ity impossible to obtain in t11 -;ar-
kets may be grown, in surprising
quantity. Decorative paintings of
flowers are made in the borOmers
surrounding the lawn.
While the perfect relatic. -ip be-
tween indoor and outd:.:', 'iv-.'
rooms is not always possi': ,- ..
houses, the new ideas may .-
ried out with some a:j;::
They have demonstlrald ,.
ue in making home life r
joyab!e for two-thirds of c
even in the cold wcath, -;
and they put to use co: -
which formerly contribute I
to the pleasi7res of hb.Wne


government, we're headin' into
poor sleddin'.
Fifty years ago they found out
how to make white flour, so the
millers made it white. Now, to-
day, science is showing' that white
flour is good flour that was ruint
by takin' out the iron and vita-
mihs of the original wheat kernel.
Before messin' around' with A, B
and C in a can or pill, your doc-
tor is the guy to see.
Grampaw and Grammaw ate
dark bread, loaded with vitamins,
iron, etc. No wonder they could
fight Injuns.


I.a m I In
when the Alley Bands are be- Yours with the low (lown,
omin' a trifle more scarce on the JO SERRA.
adio, along comes vitamins. -- --
I ain't not. nothing r ,,,,-. l q itn,,nflkn'


t tril g t I1LIIi sI)n eciail aginlll" DONUIT WORRY
A-1 and B-I, etc., we are just over- Don't worry about our boys in
Orientals are popularly supposed to have doing' it. Like in the government, Iceland. Returned travelers from
no sense of humor, but the other day a high we been over-doin it there, too. that tle island say that whiskey
o s e We got alphabetitis-a badt case. is $1.50 a drink there.
ranking Japanese official congratulated Mus- If the ABCXYZ in vitamins should --
solini on all his victories.-WVashington Star. happen to turn out like with the Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941








IRA C R 1'SR SO ri iv
7n~ y~


MISCELLANEOUS SHOWER
COMPLIMENTS BRIDE
Mrs. Clyde Gentry and Mrs. G.
L. Kennington were co-hostesses
last Friday complimenting Mrs.
Lamar Hardy, a recent bride, with
a miscellaneous shower. A color
scheme of orange and, black was
carried out, depicting the forth-
coming Hallowe':en season.
Games and contests were en-
joyed, after which the honoree was
presented with many lovely gifts.
Delectable refreshments w ere
served by the hostesses.

PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
MEETS WITH MRS. KENNEY
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney was hos-
tess to the Presbyterian Auxiliary
at her home Monday afternoon.
After a short business session the
program for the afternoon was
presented by Mrs. P. D. Prows.
The hostess served refreshments
to members present during the
social hour which followed.


BUSY .



A&M6,M&


Attractive but easy to manr,
age hairstyles were create
for people like you who
have to push curls in place
and be ready to go in five
minutes flat. Ask for our
Simplicity Wave. It involves
all the waves and curls you
want, but leaves out the
fussiness.
RINGLETS $2.00 up
MARCELL $2.50 up
CREAM OIL $5.00




CARR'S BEAUTY

SHOP
Coastal Highway In East
Millville Near Panama City
MR. CARR and EUNICE.



Be Sure It's
GULF COUNTY DAIRY
MILK!


LOCAL POET PRAISED BY
ESTATE POET LAUREATE
Vivian Yeiser Laramore, poet
laureate oZ Florida, in a weekly
column conducted in the Miami
Daily News, devoted the greater
part of her column to Ruth Alien
Smith of this city, and, reprinted a
number of her poems. Said Mrs.
Laromore:
"On a lecture tour of the state
last fall we got to know better
and like immensely the northwest
section of Florida. It was, then that
we first learned of the poetry of
Ruth Allen Smith, who lives at
Port St. Joe and is a native Flor-
idian, having first counted palm
fronds at Kissimmee. She Is pres-
ident of the Port St. Joe Woman's
club and active in the Methodist
church there, where she conducts
a Sunday school class.
"Her masterful essay, "Why We
Should Prohibit Immigration for
Five Years," won her thie medal
of merit offered by the national
American Legion, and her verses
are appearing regularly in state
dailies and journals devoted to the
arts


"Her first impression of poetry
in relation to time came when she
was, visiting her maternal grand-
mother in whose beautiful old gar-
den grew a magnolia tree on which
-vas carved "1886," the year of her
mother's birth. Standing there, the
transient quality of life dawned on
the child. Before she was, time
had been; and after her, time
would continue. The wonder of this
moved her to write her first poem.
"Don McLeod, writing in the Ap-
alachicola Times. compares her
free verse with that: of Carl Sand-
burg.
"In the little town of Port St
Joe the sea is an overwhelming
magnet that shapes the lives an(
thoughtss of its inhabitants, and it
is about this supreme power thai
Ruth likes best to write. If her
songs accent the minor key, they
escape the pitfall of morbidity."

KENNEY'S ENTERTAIN
SUPPER CLUB
Mr. and Mrs. Basil E. Kenney
entertained the members of the
Saturday Night Supper club with
a chicken dinner at their home
'lst week. After the supper, games
vere enjoyed.
Present were Mr. and Mrs%. E.
Clay Lewis, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. S.
L. Barke,, Mr. and Mrs. Maxe
Felischel, Mr. and Mrs. H. H.
Saunders, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd
Hunt, Walter Cooner, Mr. and
Mrs. Elgin Bayless of Tallahassee,
Stanley Sheip of Apalachicola and
Richard Mahon of Craig Field, Sel-
ma, Ala.
r* 5ft -fr


CHURCH TO HOLD
TURKEY SHOOT
Members of the Episcopal church
-re developing plans for a turkey
shoot: to be held November 15 at
the ball park from 10 a. m. to 6
p. m.
This church held a similar shoot


OLIVIA WOODEN
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Olivia Woodenu celebrated her
in.'h birthday Tuesday afternoon
with a party at the home of her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. I. Wooden
on Hunter's Circle. Games of vari.
ous kinds were played on the lawn
iafte'r whicll cake and ice cream
,vere served to the guests.
Enjoyingi t!'e affair with the
lonoreo. who was the recipient of
many lovely gifts, were Carolyn
Allpress, Barbara Ann Norris, Pat
,Vard, Bo.bbie Ward, June Alle-
more, Sonny Goul, John Barrier,
Mary Fay Lowery, Lenohr Brown,
May C. Gettie, Jimmie Willis, Dot
.Minus, Ruth Ramsey, Oscar Wil-
ians, Lyndon Gangneiux, Carolyn
Gangneiux, Jack Frost, Joan Snell-.
grove. Virginia Gloeckler, George
Atkinson, Norman Allemore, Bar-
bara Sue Boyles, Charles Roberts.
Sonny McLahon, Sally Frambough,
Merita Sutton, Elbert Sutton, Wil-
na Wooden, Mary Louise Wooden,
Howard Wooden Jr. and Sadie
Wooden.
Assisting Mrs. Wooden in enter.
training the guests were Mrs. J.
E. Rollins, Juliette Darcey, Mrs.
Lowery and Frenchie Wooden.

REV. DEARING IS HONOR
GUEST AT MUSICAL
Rev. Frank Dearing of the Port
St. Joe Episcopal church was the
guest speaker at the JacKsonville
Friday Musicale Interpretative last
week. He was accompanied by
Mrs. Dearing to Jackso'nville.
Rev. Dearing has been rector of
the St. Andrews church of Pan-
ama City and the St. James church
of this city for the past two years.
N beautiful article. entitled "The
Rct-or. from Life." based on the
life of Rev. and Mrs. Dearing. ap-
ne"red1 in the September. 1936. At-
Innti: Monthly. The article was
written by the sister of a former
professor of Mr. Dearing's, giving
a vivid description not only of the
Dpice he and his wife have made
in the communities where they
have resided, but also of his beau-
tiful character, gentle manner and
his deep understanding.
Mr. Dearing was requested to
read some of his poems in his
talk last week, some of which
have been set to music.
fr *
P.-T. A. OBSERVERS FATHERS'
NIGHT AT MEETING
The regular meeting of the Par-
n.t-Teachers association was held
n the high school auditorium
Thursday evening of last week.
Fathers' Night was observed, and
he topic was "The Home and
Community Foundation for To-
norrow's Citizens." Guest speaker
of the evening was Rev. Frank
hearingg of Panama City. Neal
Smith also gave an interesting
alk on the subject. A large num-
ber of parents and teachers en-
oyed this interesting program.

BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


--- Also

NEW SERIAL
"JUNGLE GIRL"
"Treachery!"


WEDNESDAY ONLY HALLOWE'EN

Land of lawlessness! Midnite Show

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31

^/T)^?^,^^^ I _


Pure! Fresh! Ricih!
Wholesome!
Drink plenty of 7 ilk and
be sure of getting that
precious sunshine vitamin
-Vitamin D. Our milk
is sunshine in a bottle!



Sulf County Dairy


last year just previous to inanis The Baptist Missionary society
qgving, which was very successful. met Monday afternoon at the
So don't order yor turkey before lburch with Rev. H. F. Hallford
this affair comes off, for you might as leader. The life of St. John was
he a lucky winner! presented by the minister.
Plins were completed for the
METHODIST W.S.C.S MEETS Northwest Coast Method Clinic to
Mrs. A. M. Jones was hostess be held here next Tuesday. Com-
-o the Methodist Woman's Society mitt.es were appointed, after
hr Christ'an Service at her home which Mrs. A. I. Gangneiux asked
Monday afternoon. After a brief all members to join in preparing"
irlvotional by the hostess a con- kits for the boys from this city
test was held, with Mrs. J. L. who are in training. The meeting
Temple as leader. Refreshments of was dismissed with prayer.
a salad plate, sandwiches and iced.. .
drinks were served by the hostess. Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Conklin. Mr.
and Mrs. Sammie Davis and A. E.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Owens and Conklin spent Sunady in St. An-
son, Tommy, were week-end visi- drews and Fort TWalton. I
Stores in Pensacola. ..- .- ,
S* I Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler and daugb-
Horace Kelly visited friends in i ter Virginip and Mrs. W. D. Dare
Panama City Sunday. spent Monday in Tallahassee. .


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY


lqp R OMPT SEIRVICE


* PH0NE 1EI

-- DAY OR~ '


G TAXIS
OF ST.


ALWAYS AVATLA.L''. I' FRONT _
JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION


WOMAN'S CLUB BRIDGE i APPRECIATION
PARTY THIS EVENING I
PWe wish to extend our heartfelt
The Port St. Joe Woman's club thanks to our many friends for
extends a cordial invitation to the sympathy shown us during
everyone to take part in the bridge our recent sadness; also for the
party they are giving at the Port beautiful flowers and the kindness
Inn this evening, beginning at 8 and interest during my illness.
o'clock. Other games, such as par- Mr. and Mrs. G. D. He-witt.
chesi, rhummy and Chinese check- .---
ers, can be played as well as Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!
bridge.
Refreshments will be served by
Mrs. A. M. Jones Jr., and her com-
mittee D C. C E
--D E N T I S T--
O. E. S. INITIATES Otfice Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Initiation services were held at Sundays By Appointment
the regular meeting of the Order Bdg rt t Je
of Eastern Star Tuesday evening '
at tihe Masonic hall. Mrs. Sarah
Morgan; worthy matron, presided.
Mrs. Nola Orwig was initiated into
the order at this time.
After the chapter was closed,
refreshments were served to 25 DR. C. L. REICHERTER
members and two visitors, Mrs. T. REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
Ritz and Mrs. G. L. Croxtomn; EYES EXAMINED LASSES FITTED
EYES EXAMINED-GLASSES FITTED
Ritz Theatre Building First Floor
Mrs. Tom Owens spent yest-er- PANAMA CITY, FLA.
day in Apalachicola on business.




Ie P T


A A Mxrtin Theatre 7 Port St. Joe, Fla.

THEATRE OPENS SATURDAYS SUNDAYS AT
1:00 P. M., CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE
DAILY AT 2:45 P. M.

SATURDAY ONLY



9 BB En Us-IT


i
ap~p~ss~


r94~r~e39~a~B~dll~fInar~~-~m_~c .=I -- ~


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1941


THE- STAR; PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


/Zh


t


DPAGE clVF








'PAGE S1X

Richard Mahon Visits
Richard Mahon of Craig Field,
Selma, Ala., .spent the week-end
in this city.

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Reicherter
and son, Dr. C. L. Relcnerter of
Panama City were visitors in this



CLASSIFIED ADS

'ROOMS fOR RENT

FURNISHED BEDROOM for rent,
hot running water. Reasonable.
Mrs. James Marea. Fourth St. *
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
.tisenrent in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
'-ry it today. tf
FOR SALE

120 HOUSES FOR SALE
Priced at $20.00 and up
Located at Harbeson City, Fla., 4
miles west of Carrabelle, Florida.
Address inquiries or call at the
David J. Joseph Company, P. O.
Box 1264, Carra.belra, Florida.
Also used galvanized roofing and
lumber. 10-17tf
MISCELLANEOUS

LEGAL FORMS-The Star has on
hand a few Warranty Deeds and
Mortgage Notes. Call at The
Star office.
LEGAL ADVERTISING

NOTICE
'No~ce is hereby given that the
Board of Public Instruction of
Gulf County, Florida, will receive
sealed bids until 10:00 A. M. Fri-
day, October 20, 1941, for installing
a Heating System in the Port St.
Joe Schools at Port St. Joe, Fla.
7The plans and specifications for
'the heatingg system can be obtained
reom the School Architect's Office
sof the State of Florida, Depart-
ment of Education, Tallahaase,
Florida, or the office of the Gulf
County Superintendent.
The Board reserves the night to
reject any or all bids.
BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,
Gulf County, Florida.
THOMAS A. OWENS THOSE. MERIWETIIER
Superintendent. Chairman.
.NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, pursuant to the "Fic-
titious Name Statute," House Bill
No. 1175, Chapter No. 20953, Laws
of Florida, 1941, will register with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, in
and for Gulf County, Florida, upon
receipt of proof of the publication
of this notice, the fictitious name,
to-wit: WHITE TOP TAXI CO.,
under which we are engaged in
business at Port St. Joe, Florida.
That the party interested in said
business enterprise is as follows:
B. W. Eells.
Dated at Port St. Joe, Gulf
County, Florida, October 3, 1941.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, pursuant to the "Fic-
titioun Name S.itnte." T-Touse Bill
No. 1175. Chapter No. 20951, Laws
of Florida. 1941, will register ,with
tli Clerk of the Circuit Court. in
and for Gulf County. Flori1a. upon
receipt of proof of the publication
of this no'icP, the fictitious name.
to-wit: PRINCESS BEAUTY SHOP
under which I am engaged in busi-
ness at Port St Joe, Florida.
That the narty interested in said
business enterprise is as follows:
Mrs. Onnie Lou LeH-ardv.
Dated at Port St. Joe. Gulf
County, Florida, October 7, 1941.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the
Board of Public Instruction of
Gulf County, Florida, will receive
sealed bids until 10:00 A. M. Fri-
day, October 20, 1941, for huildine
a boiler room and. stack to install
the '-oiler for the heating system
,nt tl'e Port St. Joe Schools at Port ,
St. Toe, Florida. The Bidder will (
furn'-h al-l necessary materials for
builrldini boiler room and staclk.
Tlbm nlans and specifications for r
the 'noilPr room and stack can be
obtained from the School Archi-
tect's Office of the State of Flor- i
ida. Denartmen-t of Education, Tal-
lahassee. Florida, or the office of I
the culf County Superintendent. t
The Board reserves the right to
.rejee* annv c.r all bids. A
BOARD OF PT'P.I.TO. ISTrI'CTION,
Gulf County, Florida. S
"THOMAS A. OWENS THOS Mf.ER.WETIIER o
Superintendent. Chairman. (


THE ST

city; Sunday. They viewed the ol(
cemetery and took pictures of the
tombstones and vaults.

The Misses Erline McCellan
Juanita Gunn and Marilyn Solo
mon spent Saturday in Tallahassee
shopping.

NOTICE OF ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that al
the same time and places within
tWe territory hereinatier described
when the regular Biennial School
District Election is held in Gull
County, Florida, which election
shall be held on the first Tuesday
after the first Monday in Novemn
bar, 1941, there shall be determined
a', such election the approval or
disapproval of the organization ol
proposed adequate School Districts
in Gulf County, Florida, such Dis-
tricts ito be known as District
Numbered 1 and District Numbered
2, the following territory shall em-
brace the following described
lands in Gulf County, Florida, in
District Numbered 1, to-wit:
Beginning at the NW Corner
of Section 30, Township 3 South,
of R. 11 West, thence run South
to the SW Corner of Section 18,
Township 5 South of Range 11
West, thence East to SE Corner
of Section 13, Township 5 South
of Range 11 W., thence South to
SE. Corner of Section 36, Town-
ship 6 S., R. 11 West, thence
East to Brothers River or Forbes
Line, thence following said
Brothers River or Forbes Line
in Northwesterly direction to
where said Forbes Line inter-
sects the Apalachicola River,
thence up said Apalachicola Riv-
er to the Northeast Corner of
Section 27, Townshin 3 South,
of R. 9 W.. thence West to the
point of beginning.
The following territory shall em-
brace the following described lands
in Gulf County, Florida, in District
Numbered 2, to-wit:
Beginning at the SW Corner
of Section 18, Township 5 South
of Range 11 West, thence South
along the Bay County line to the
Gulf of Mexico, thence South
and Easterly along the main
shore following the meandering
and embracing the opposite is-
lands to the point where the
Forbes Line shall reach the Gulf
of Mexico, thence following the
said Forbes Line to a point di-
rectly East of the NE Corner of
Section 5, Township 7 W. of
Range 8 West, thence W. to SE
Corner of Section .6, Township
6 S. of Range 11 W., thence N.
to NE Corner of Section 24.
Township 5 S. of Range 11 W,,
thence to the point of beginning.
Only persons residing and living
within the above described terri-
tory, whom are qualified to vote in
the regular Biennial School Dis-
trict Elections of the County, shall
be entitled to vote on the approval
i)r* disapproval of the organization
of the proposed Adequate School
Districts as above described.
The voting places within the
abovee described territory will be
Is follows:
Wewahitchka, Florida, at the
Court House. The Inspectors are:
Mrs. G. D. Campbell, Dave Gaskin,
Mr's. P. F. McDaniel. Clerk: E. V.
pollock .
Buckhorn School House. The In-
;pectors are: J. A. Barfield, Mrs.
T. T. Byrd, R. H. Glass. Clerk:
', F. Hanlon.
Overstreet School I-ouse. The
rnsi Ttors are: Mrs. W. G. Hardy,
T. J. Kinnard, J.F. Roberts. Clerk:
W. G. Hardy
Port St. Joe. Florida. at the
'ity Hall. The Inspectors are:
lrs. A. D. Lawson, L. W. Owens
'-Irs. Florazelle Connell. Celrk: W.
R. Belin.
That at such election there shall
I) elected three school trustees
o:r such Distriots in the territory
of proposed District Numbered 1
nl th( territory of proposed Dis-
trict Numbered 2 as aforesaid:
and a village of 43, mills has
leen determined to maintain a
miform system of free schools
within said Districts.
The followinvi named or desig-
lated school Districts now in ex-
-+te~ce are included in the pro-
-:sed District Numbered one as
Foresaid, to-wit: All of District
NTrimberel 1.9 and part of District
Numbered 11 of 'Gulf County, Flor-
'a. and the following named or
designated school Districts now in
x istence are included in the pro-
,cped Distr.i't- Numbered Two as
foresaid, to-wit: All of Distri t
N numbered 16, and part of District
lnumered 1c of Gulf County. Flor-

Bv order of the Board of Pubilc
instruction of Gulf County, Florida,
his 19th dray of Sentember, 1941.
THOSE. MERIWETHER,
ttest: Chairman
rHOMAS A. OWENS,
superintendentt Public Instruction
f Gulf County, Florida.
OFFICIAL SEAL) 10-3 31


AR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY. OCTOBER 17, 1941


Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!


Wayne Morris, recent star of "I struction from Navy pilots who intro-
Wanted Wings," became a member of duced dive bombing, aircraft carriers
Uncle Sam's Navy in May, 1941, and catapult take-offs to the rest of
when he was appointed to the rank the world. Also, there are opportuni-
of Ensign. ties in Naval Aviation for men who
When asked what he thought of don't want to fly. They can be trained
the United States Navy, Morris said, as aviation machinists, metalsmiths,
"I think every man who is consider- photographers, observers, or they can
ing joining a military service should receive instruction in many other
look into the 'chance of a lifetime' trades. It's a great life in the Navy."
which the Navy and Naval Reserve of- Ensign Wayne Morris is pictured
fer to get into the big-pay field of the here in his line of duty as a member
future-aviation. -In the Navy you of the Naval Aviation Cadet Selee-
can attend the finest flight training tion Board at the Long Beach Naval
schools in the world, and receive in- Reserve Air Base.


Tui:

P,


neful Comedy the South when she hears that a
Y Broadway stage director is on his
layig At Port way south to search for "the

S da -M da the lead in his new show. How she
Sunday- onday permits him to "discover" her, an
'i-nov.6 ot. ueuoni nh unud,1


"Kiss the Boys Goodbye" Stars
Don Ameche and Mary Mar-
tin; Plenty New Tunes

With five new tunes added to a
story that was already famed' for
its merriment, "Kiss the Boys
Goodbye" plays Sunday and Mon-
day at the Port theater. The film
stars Don Ameche and Mary Mar-
tin, and features Oscar Levant,
the musical genius and informa-
tion expert of radio's "Information
Please"; Connie Boswell, the sing-
ing star of the Bing Crosby hour,
and Rochester, temporarily forsalk-
ing his boss of radio and films,
Jack Benny.
The story is about a beautiful
Southern girl with stage aspira-
tions who unsuccessfully tries to
get a job on Broadway, returns to


NOTICE
Notice is hereby given thai the
Board of Public Instruction of
'lulf County, Florida, will receive
sealed bids until 10:00 A. M. Mon-
day, October 20, 1941. for asbestos
shingles for re-roofing the Wewa-
litchka High School and Auditor-
ium. approximately 110 squares.
Bids will be received for putting
shingles on with or without fur-
nishing shingles.
The Board reserves the right to
reject any or all bids.
BOARDn OF P BLIC INSTRUCTION.
oulf County. Floridn.
T'IIOMAS A. OW1EN TITOS. fMER'V.W1TIIER
Superintendent". Chiirnan.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCE!I:
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, pursuant to the "Fic-
titious Name Statute." House Bill
No. 1175, Chapter No. 20953, Laws
of Florida, 1941, will register with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, in
and for Gulf County, Florida, upon
receipt of proof of the publication
of this notice, the fictitious name,
to-wit: ST. JOE TEXACO SERV-
ICE STATION, under which I am
engaged in business at Port St.
Joe. Florida.
That the party interested in said
business enterprise is as follows:
B. W. Eells.
Dated at Port St. Joe, Gulf
County, Florida, October 3, 1941.


S "inn cent'U, sou uttllII glll, unsullied
'by Northern exposure, just brim-
ming over with natural singing.
dancing and acting talents, without
ever having taken a lesson in her
life, makes the rest of the hi-
larious story.
---------
Mrs. O. F. Freeman of Fountain
is the guest of her son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Mr. and' Mrs. M. 0.
Freeman.

It pays to advertise-try it!
It panys to advertiseo-tryp it!


PRICES GOinG


UP!




Due to rising costs in all
supplies and materials we
are compelled to charge
the following prices here-
after:


SUITS sClea d -


DRESSES 60,


Single Pants 30'

-ONE DAY SERVICE -




CREECH BROS.
TAILORS and CLEANERS


Phone 102


Port St. Joe


I'LL TUNE DVon.-THATS THE MOST
OUT THE IMPORTANT THING
ALKA- YOU'LL HEAR TONIGHT
SELTZER \. -
ANNOUNCEMENT t',"'-*,0f.a .


M ILLIONS suffer less from Headache, Acid Indigestion, Distress
of Colds "Morning After" and Muscular Fatigue because they
have heard-and believed-Alka-Seltzer radio announcements.
To these millions, the relief obtained by the use of Alka-Seltzer
is worth far more than the genuine enjoyment they get from the
broadcasts.
The most important parts of our radio program, both to you and
to us, are the commercial announcements. Once you have tried
Alka-Seltzer we believe you will agree with us.
But try Alka-Seltzer because it is an unusually effective medi-
cine not because you enjoy the radio programs.
WHY ALKA-SELTZER IS SO EFFECTIVE
The pain-relieving analgesic in Alka-Seltzer is in complete solu-
tion, ready to ease the distress as soon as you swallow it. The
painrelieving action is made more effective by alkaline buffers.
The alkalizing elements in Alka-Seltzcr reduce excess stomach
acidity.
Get Alka-Seltzer the next time you
pass a drug store.


r