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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00253
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 22, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00253

Full Text





rT___T__I-------_T ------
Port St. Joe, site of the $10,000,000
duPont Kraft Paper Mill and the
St. Joe Lumber & Export Co., one
of the South's largest Saw Mills.


THE


STAR


The Star is dedicated to setting
forth the Advantages, Resources,
Attractions and Progress of Port
St. Joe and Gulf County.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1941 NUMBER 46
-a


Business Concerns

With Trade Names

Now Must Register

Many Unincorporated Firms
Will Be Subject to Un-
noticed Law

Under the provisions of a bill
which slipped unnoticed through
the 1941 legislature, every unin-
corporated business operating un-
der a trade name must register
with the clerk of the circuit court.
It has been named the "fictitious
name law."
This new law will hit a consider-
able number of large and small
firms in Port St. Joe and Guli
county. Any firms failing -to com-
ply with the requirements of the
law are prohibited from maintain-
ing a suit in any state court, and
its operators are subject to a
maximum penalty of 60 days in
jail. !
The registration fee is one dol-
lar, but the law provides further
that each firm must publish a no-
tice of intention to register for
four consecutive weeks.
The law defines a "fictitious
name" as "any trade name, whe-
ther a single or group of names
other than the proper names or
known called names of those per-
sons engaged in such business or
profession."
According to available informa-
tion, the bill was introduced by
Representative LeaIrd of Broward
county. It was passed by both
houses of the legislature and
signed by Governor Holland' June
13. It became effective 30 days
later.
The law applies only to unin-
corporated firms and operates as
follows: If John Doe is operating
a business under the name of the
St. Joe Trading Company, he Is
subjct t theprovsion ortn


L~~=rr~~-ur~~~sr~--nr u"---- ---a---~c-~\rr

SD.. -Le:tive Editorializing


Under the heading WAfRNING," the Port St. Joe Sentinel
yesterday carried an editorial which, if taken literally by resi-
dents of this city, would cause them to dispose of their holdings
and move elsewhere for fuar of being drowned.
The editorial states that "du ing the last 100 years Port St.
Joe has been destroyed by h gh water, and several other times
high water has been high enough to do considerable damage
and cause evacuation of the inhabitants. In case of high water
now there would be little opportunity of evacuation because the
tide might be a sudden thing (as of old)." The editorial
then goes on to point out the necessity for a modern bridge to
replace the floating bridge over the canal at White City in or-
der that the people of this city might escape drowning should
this theoretical high water come.
We do not believe the editor of The Sentinel delved very
deeply into the past history of this section, for if he had, he
would have discoveerd that old St. Joseph was not destroyed by
a tidal wave and that during the past 1'00 years there nas never
been need for evacuation of the inhabitants due to high water.
One of our oldest inhabitants, whose father lived here at the
time old St. Joseph was at the height of her glory, states that
his father told him there was nothing to the story of the sup-
posed tidal wave that was alleged to have rushed far inland-
that it was pure fiction concocted by interests which did not
want St. Joseph to be rebuilt on one of the finest natural har-
bors on the Gulf coast. And during the lifetime of this old-time
resident, who is'nearing the 80-year mark, there has never been
a time when evacuation of the citizens was necessary. It Is
true that several times there have been exceptionally high tides,
due to storms out on the Gulf, but never high enough to cause
any great deal of worry.
Such stories, entirely fictitious, are detrimental to our town
and while the editor of The Star carried in an early issue the
account of the yellow fever epidemic in old St. Joseph and the
supposed tidal wave, it was with the notation that it was merely
an interesting story without basis of fact in regard to the high
water.
Editorials of the type carried by The Sentinel this week
while ostensibly written in a constructive vein, tend to tear down
and destroy that which has been laboriously built up by the
people and the newspapers, and anyone reading such an editorial
would be fearful of coming to Port St. Joe to take up residence
or establish a place of business.
The prime purpose of any newpsaper, anywhere, is to build
up the community in which it is published; to boost without re-
serve or thought of personal gain any enterprise that will be
of benefit to the community as a whole, and above all. to con-
tinually extol the virtues of the community in which it has its
being-in other words, to work for the common good of all.


DuPONTS TO ESTABLISH
BANK AT BELLE GLADE

Belle Glade has been chosen by
the duPont interests as the sito for
a new national bank, which will
be known as the Florida National
Bank of Belle Glade, and will be
associated with the 12 other banks
operated by the estate of the late
Alfred I. duPont.
A new building will be con-
.tiucted to house the bank, which
will be opened this fall. L. A.
Usina, head of the Florida National
Bank & Trust Company of Miami,
will be president of the Belle
Glade institution.
---------( --

Drivers' Licenses


Go On Sale Sept. 2

Judge Pridgeon Warns of Firm
Enforcement of Law
Next Year

Gulf county, motorists had better
add an extra dollar to their bud-
get for the purchase of their 1942
drivers' licenses, as County Judge
E. C. Pridgeon says he expects to
start selling them on Tuesday,
September 2.
The judge said that due to ac-


Night Fire Guts

Chavers-Fowhand

Furniture Store

Stock Damaged to Amount of
$4000; Building Being
Remodeled

Fire, which is believed to have
started from spontaneous combus-
tion in a pile of mattresses stored
on a balcony, Thursday night of
last week caused damage in ex-
cess of $4000 to stock and fixtures
of the Chavers-Fowhand Furniture
company store on Reid avenue and
for a time endangered the adjoin-
ing buildings of the Gulf Hardware
& Supply company and Miller's
drug store.
The blaze was discovered about
10:30 by Tom Mosley and Miss Es-
telle Dickens, who noticed thick
clouds of smoke pouring out of the
ventilating windows above the
show windows. They hurried into
Miller's drug store, where Richard
Miller turned in the alarm.
..The volunteer fire department
worked, valiantly in an attempt to
extinguish the fire, but due to con-
struction of the building, which


tion of the 1941 session of the made It almost impossible to get


legislature, the license will cost
$1.00 instead of 50 cents. Sales
procedure will differ slightly from
that in the past also, and Judge
Pridgeon warns drivers that they
must bring in their 1941 ~'t.l'icnate
when applying for a 1942 license.
Motorists who cannot produce
their 1941 certificates will be is-
sued temporary licenses and then
must undergo an examination be-
fore they can receive a permanent
license. Judge Pridgeon said the
examinations would be conducted
by a member of the state highway
patrol. In case motorists fail to
pass the necessary qualifications.
their temporary license will be re-


subject to the provisions of the O 1 IGAME BOARD WILL voked and they will not .be per-
law. But if he operates under the Holland O pIe mitted to operate a vehicle on the
name of John Doe Tradling Corn- BUY HUNTING LANDstate highways. However, one fail-
pany, he is not subject. Gasoline Study ure will not be considered as
SA $34,099 allotment of federal permanent evidence that a motor-
MILO TWINS TO PRESENT Wil funds under the Pittman-Robinson ist cannot qualify.
SHOW AT PORT TUESDAYwiAsk That Rationing Be On act may be used by the Florida Due to the greatly enlarged
SHOW AT PORT TUESDAY Seasonal Basis, Due to Game and Fresh Water Fish Com- state patrol system which, inci-
Tourist Influx mission to acquire and develop dentally, gives Gulf county a pa-
Manager Roy Williams o the I public hunting grounds. trolman, Judge Pridgeon believes
Port theatre announces that he If and when federal gasoline Part of it may be used in co- traffic laws will receive greater
has secured the Milo Twins of rationing is applied, Governor Hol- operative programs with land own- enforcement. He feels confident
station XEAW, Renosa, Mexico, to land plans to ask that it be based ers for producing bird feed crops, eno during the coming year each
present their "Radio Varieties" on on seasonal periods to provide for I with the co-operative areas to be motorist will be called upon at
the stage next Tuesday. Florida's Increased winter con- opened to public hunting at later least once to produce his drivers'
The show will feature "Miss gumption. dates. license for inspection.
Reta," radio's own sweet singer Holland declared, he would "ex- I. N. Kennedy, executive secre- Children 14 to 16 years old will
of songs; Fiddlin' Chief Worley plore every possibility and make tary, of the commission, said the be issued a limited drivers' license.
with his cornstalk fiddle, and 'Lil every effort to insure an adequate fund could be used for various Application for these must be
Abner, everybody's pal. There is supply of gasoline in Florida dur- projects of wildlife restoration. It signed by the parents. When driv-
plenty of music, singing, fiddling ing the vital months of the tourist is apportioned to the states on the ing they must be accompanied by a
and comedy in this presentation. season ahead." basis of area and hunting licenses person who has an operator's li-
The picture for Tuesday will be Largely because of the influx of sold.
"Devildogs of the Air," starring hundreds of thousands of tourists, Governor Holland has advocated ceunioroperators' licenses are for
Pat O'Brien, Jimmy Cagney and Florida's monthly! gasoline con- the development of public hunting persons 18 years old and younger
Frank McHugh. sumption during the winter season grounds because so much of the and applications must be signed by
-- is about 10,000,000 gallons greater state's game-producing area is pri- the parents and can be purchased
HOLLAND TO INSPECT than in summer. vately owned and posted against for 50 cents.
TROOPS IN LOUISIANA "We will bring every possible outsiders. Regular operators' licenses will
argument to see that our people --be sold to those persons 19 years
Governor Spessari L. Holland get fairly treated In view. of our TO SELL GAS FOR CASH old and over, and can be purchased
and Brig. Gen. Vivian Collins will peculiar seasonal problem," the .or l 1 Chauffeurs' licenses will
inspect Florida troops in army governor said. Filling station operators of Stu- be sold to persons 19 years old and
maneuvers in Louisiana next week. Gasoline sales, in Florida this art, Fla., believe they have a word be sold to psons 19 y s od
They will go from Louisiana to year generally are running 10 per of wisdom to whisper in Secretary ad w c $..
Galveston, Texas, to visit a Flor- cent higher than in 1940. Ickes' ear-also a tip to the opera- PAPER MILL CHANGES
ida artillery regiment stationed --- tors of hundreds of thousands ofST. JOE PAPER MILL CHANGES
there. Fishers Leave for Mobile gasoline distributing points thru- WORK-DAY TO THREE SHIFTS
------- Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Fisher and out the nation. The St. Joe Paper company is
Chalkers Are Visitors daughter Janie left last Friday for In line with the national defense now working its 600 employees in
Mr. and Mrs. Selwyn Chalker of Mobile to make their future home. ;request to reduce gasoline sales eight-hour shifts, instead of six
Hinesville, Ga., spent the week-end -*- one-third, Stuart operators have hours as heretofore. The men will
here as guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. Guest of Parents informed' all their customers that continue, to work the same number
Lamar Miller. Selwyn said he had Billy Tapper of Washington, D. credit sales will end September 1, of hours weekly, but under the
to come back to St. Joe for some C., is the guest of his parents, Mr. "after which it will take the cash new setup will be given two days
;of our good fresh water fishing, and Mrs. Robert Tapper. to get the gas." off each week.


water on the smouldering mat-
tresses, and also due to the stifl-
ing clouds of smoke, it was past
midnight before the blaze was
brought under control.
Ronald Outlaw, manager of t:-
store, stated that loss fo the com-
pany was around $4000, which was
partially covered by insurance. Es-
timatedi damage to the building,
which is owned by Robert Nedley
of Apalachicola is about $2500.
Work was started Monday on re-
modeling the store by the Albrit-
ton and. Williams Construction
company of Quincy, who originally
built the block of four buildings.
Meantime the Chavers-Fowhand
company Is continuing business in
the Costin store building on Mon-
ument avenue, adjoining Kelly's
cafe, and Mr. Outlaw states that
when they return to their previous
place of business they, will have
one of the most modern stores in
Port St. Joe. It is estimated the
repairs will require about three
weeks.
During the height of the fire,
when it was believed it would get
out of control and spread to ad-
'oining buildings, a call was put
in to the Panama City fire depart-
ment, which rushed a pumper here,
but upon its arrival the blaze had
been extinguished.
---- ....C(--- ----
No More White Sidewall
Tires, Says Government

Following rumors which have
been afloat for several weeks, the
Office of Production Management
in Washington h'as ordered manu-
facturers to cease the production
of white sidewall automobile tires.
This latest move to conserve
rubber for national defense work
becomes effective tomorrow, and
officials estimate it will save more
than 6000 tons annually.
A white sidewall tire requires
approximately two pounds more
rubber than an ordinary black tire.
This new restriction will also save
some zinc, which, in its oxide
form, is used in the two-tone tires.

Visiting In North Carolina
Mrs. G. A. Patton left Saturday
for a several weeks' visit with rel-
atives in North Carolina.


_ __







TOA


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMI-TH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year....... ..$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months...........65c

-4 Telephone 51 }-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spolkn word
is lost; the printed word remains.

HOW ABOUT THAT OLD ALUMINUM?
The pile of scrap aluminum in the bin in
front of the Port theater is not piling up as
fast as it should. There is no way to know-
just how much scrap aluminum there is kick-
ing around in Port St. Joe, but the pile in
the bin looks pitiably small to us for a city
of our size,
There are undoubtedly a lot of people who
have set aside some old pots and pans with
the intention of bringing them down town,
but have not yet got around to it. Let's quit
talking about bringing in this scrap aluminum
and bring it in! Throw it into your car right
now and toss it into the bin when you come
up town. This is your duty, not the duty of
some committee or some public spirited citi-
zen. Let's boost the pile of aluminum in that
bin until it overflows the top-and let's do
it right now.

BEGINNING TO- PAY
We are just beginning to get a taste of the
higher taxation that has finally become in-
evitable. Some time back congress raised in-
c.ome tax rates in all brackets, and lowered
exemptions, in order to bring into the fold
thousands of low-bracket citizens who had
never paid direct federal taxes before, and
now they are talking of still another cut.
Our taxes are now the highest in our his-
tory. Even so, the revenue resulting will be
far from adequate to pay for what we are
spending. The answer to that is more deficit-
financing-which simply amounts to charging
today's bills against tomorrow's income. The
tax boosts so far approved by congress are
but a modest beginning. In coming sessions
further increases, more severe than anything
we have ever known, will in all probability
be passed. Only a miracle, which would raise
the national income far beyond any reason-
able expectation, could change the outlook.
Higher taxes mean sacrifices for all the
people. We will be able to afford fewer lux-
uries-and we shall have to make the most
out of the necessities. And if the people must
sacrifice, the government should also by pat-
ing down on all governmental departments
and eliminating the dead wood. It is the duty
of our government to see that our sacrifice
will not be in vain-that, in short, we get 100
per cent value in return for our tax dollars.

At the end of the last war, a leading Brit-
ish statesman made this significant observa-
tion: "The Allies sailed to victory on a sea
of oil." In World War II, thinks many an ex-
pert, the decision will again be largely deter-
mined by the petroleum assets of the antago-
nists. And that is where Germany is weak--
and Britain and the United States are strong.

Save a dime a day and one dollar on your
birthday. At the end of a year for your $37.50
you can purcahse one $50 (maturity value)
Defense Savings Bond.

-< Every man is willing to patch up a quarrel
-provided he is allowed to select the patch.
-Columbia State.

:b Lots of self-made men forget that their
wives bossed the job.-Columbus Ledger.


A GREAT GIFT
Life is a great gift. We cherish it, cling
to it desperately, long after its joys seem to
have been exhausted.
Yet it is cheap, so cheap that men pour it
out lavishly when they turn to war.
How many men have died since the storm
broke in September of 1939? How many per-
ished in the snows of Finland, in Norway,
Holland, Belgium, France, Greece, Crete,
northern Africa and Syria? How many are
dying today on the far-flung battle line in
Russia ? Iuthl Germans and Russians are say-
ing "millions." Will we ever know how
many are yielding up life on these battle-
fields which literally run rivers of blood ?
Throughout all Europe are countless fam-
ilies whose sons never return. The hosts of
men who yielded up their lives when their
country called, for causes just or unjust, lie
for the most part in unmarked graves on vast
battlefields. Sorrow lives in every home In
Europe today. And still the fever spreads.
When will it all end. ?-St. Augustine RecorcL

LONG SHOT UPSETS THE DOPE
In wars, as in horse races, the long shot
occasionally upsets the dope and comes thru
for a win. Some of the experts are now can-
tiously hazarding the guess that this may
porve true of the Russians.
When the German-Russian war began, the
bulk of the military authorities reluctantly
agreed that -litler was probably right when
he said that it would be over in six weeks.
Those six weeks and more have now passed
and the Russians, instead of retreating in con-
fusion, are apparently counter-attacking to
great advantage. The Germans have not
taken any areas of major importance.
The Red air force, which, according to Ger-
man claims was almost totally destroyed in
the early days of the fighting, is still very
much in evidence and is giving excellent sup-
port to the Soviet land forces. The Red mech-
anized equipment, which was supposed to be
second-rate, has, according to some reporters,
who have seen it in action, actually proven
equal and even superior to the German. Most
important of all, the morale of the Russian
people-military and civilian alike-seems to
have proven far more staunch than anyone
expected

With this hot weather on us, the danger
of fire in our timber lands is again with us.
Fire in the forest is worse than almost any
other kind of fire. A house can be rebuilt. A
tree cannot. In a few years, roaring flames
can destroy timber that nature must spend
fifty .or more years replacing. One of our
greatest resources is. our timber. It is the
basis of two great employing industries right
here in Port St. Joe. Help to preserve it.

Tentative figures reveal that Dade county
will have a half-billion dollar real estate tax
roll this year, compared to $110,000,000 a year
ago, and personal property is expected to go
over the $70,000,000 mark, as against $55,-
000,000 last year. This is more assessed value
on the tax rolls than the entire state had a
year ago. Looks like the new tax setup will
divide the tax burden far more evenly than
has been the case heretofore.

1A local June bride told her husband yester-
day that she would leave him and go home
to mother if it wasn't for the fact that her
mother had left her father and was coming,
here tomorrow.

Looks like the strategy of the Russians is
beginning to have results. They let the Ger-
mans chase them until they are all wAorn out
and then turn and clean up on the Nazis.

In this time of national emergency your
country needs your help. Buy Defense Sav-
ings Bonds and Stamps regularly.

We've finally discovered how the Nazi sa
lute originated. It is the position taken by a
paperhanger when he wields his paste brush.


0 ~E TRAFFIC COP WOULD BE BETTER!


STOP

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PRO'DCjlYTh L _7 hi l

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--36~ --~- 1
rIi;
~i~i ~B~R~B~-c J.S


s' 7c

z;P'' qll


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp
-
I like old stories. Pretty often
the oldest one is the best. Some of
the old ones on the radio ain't so
good because they're not really
old enough. They're sorta half-way
-somethin' like half-aged cabbage
which ain't yet sauerkraut.
And while we're still on sauer-
kraut versus old stories, you're in
tor an awakenin' if you still think
sauerkraut is common. Sauerkraut
is now steppin' out-it's served in


High places. And when more peo-
Sple eat more sauerkraut the doc-
tors are gonna have tough sleddin'.
But to git back to old stories.
The old timer I had. in mind was
the one about the souse who was
braggin' he'could lick anybody in
the house. Nobody took him seri-
ous, so he kept broadenin' his


scope until he finally reckoned he
could pulverize anybody-no limit.
Whereupon a quiet kinda person
popped the gent on the chin. And
when the gent woke up and was
able to talk, he kinda allowed he
had mebbe taken in too much ter-
ritory in his last remark.
This Mr. Hitler, there in Russia,
he savvies what I'm talking' about.
JO SERRA.


-- -& won Ka- --M u m Aftum


PHONE 3 Port St. Joe, Fa.

il .-


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100

-- DAY OR NIGHT
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT -
S OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION
O W WV t -


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1941


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO








FRIDY, UGUS'22 191 TH STR, PRT T. OE, ULFCOUNY, LORDA PGE HRE


Society


all B. T. U. officers in the Porr -
St. Joe Baptist church next Mon-
day, begiiling at 10 a. m. The
, cr.;:. officers' and leaders' --- --
meeting of the Northwest Coast dAPTIST MISSIONARY
B a.o !:,o i ,ill be held CIRCLES MEET
Monday night. All B. T. U. officers The Louise Bancroft Circle of
are urged to attend, the Baptist Missionary society, met
,,"; Monday afternoon at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Ward ar- : rs. W. H. Howell on Eighth
riv-:,: :., ;"i city last Priday from street, with Mrs. Kate Harrell as
Pen-acola, where Dt. Ward is un- ,oa;:ess and Mrs. Charles McClel-
d "go gi- treatment. HIe returned to lan in the chair. The devotional
Pc. :-"-o.t Fr:iday night, and iMrs. was given by the chairman, fol.
\\'i;:; ;: Dr. Mildred Baranco, jowed by the regular business. Re-
who has been attending to the freshments were served to mem-
doctor's practice since his accident, iers present by the hostess.
returned to Pensacola Sunday. The Martha Circle met at the
S* It home of Mrs. Asa Montgomery
Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Miner of Monday afternoon with Mrs. W. J.
Blountstown spent Sunday here as I.-'ughtry presiding during the
s-tj,: if Ir. and Mrs, J. F. Miller business hour. Mrs. Daisy Staten,
and'-'r.' and Mrs E B. Dendy. chairman of the Hundred Thou-
-sand club. gave a report, and Mrs.
SADS M. Hammock, chairman of the
LB'SI-OO .WT DS 'j White Cross, also gave a report.

CLA i:critIrure for the afternoon was
SALESMEN WANTED given by Mrs. Ed Guilford, fol-
WN pleasant otdr wrk a lowed with prayer by Mrs. E. C
WANT pleasant outdoor work Ai a at a aroce t t
business of your own? Good Cason. It was announced that the
profits selling over 200 widely ad- circle would be in charge of flow
ver ised Rawleigh home/farm ne- ers. for the church next month and
cessities. Pays better than mosthe Royal Service program fo
occupations. Hundreds in business the Royal Service program o
5 to 20 years or more! Products, next Monday was announced. De.
equipment on credit. No experi- lectable refreshments were served
ence needed to sart; we teach you to nine members and one visitor
how. 7Wri'e today for full particu- rs. L. E. o nttainei th
lars. Rawleigh's, 'Dept. FAH-199-145 Mrs. L. E. o entertained
Memphis, Tenn. 221 members of the Ruth Circle at he,'
.... home on Woodward avenue Mon
SELL OR TRADE 1 y afternoon, with Mrs. Curth

SWAPT-- -foot boat and 4 h. p. Palmer, co-chairman, presiding. A
masri:= engine (in need of re- lesson from the year book was
pair). Will 'ra-I! for chickens, or conducted by, the leader, after
what have ytu? Carl T -mmell. which refreshments were served.
Box 724. Port St. Joe. S-22tf a f
MR. AND MRS. CARTER AND
FOR SALE-Corner lot, Beacon RICHARD TALLEY HONORED
Hill. with one-room shack; $150. and Mrs
See Carl Trammell, Box 724, Port The hoe of Mr. and M
St. Joe, Fla. 8-29* a -Huson was the sceneof
St chicken dinner VWednesday eve
EQUITY IN TWO LOTS on Long ning of last week when Mr. and
Ave. on 14th St. Cheap. See Mtrs. Hudson, Mr. and Mrs-. H. (
Carl Trammell. Box 724. Port St. Spence, Mr. and Mrs. P. D. i'rows
Joe. 8-290" Mr. and Mrs. Rush Chism and Mr


ROOMS rPOR RENT


' d iMrs. V'oodro'- Talley were co
hosts and hostesses honoring, 'i,


IF YOU have a room for rent. ad Mrs. Ralph Carter and
whv not lace a classified adver- Talley. who left last Friday fo:
tise-enet in The Star. The cost is St. Mary's, Ga, to make tihei
!ow an:.l returns are gratifying. homne. Following the d inner, at
..ry i .Ltoy. "tfm motored to Beacon Hill where
MISCELLANEOUS dancing was enjoyed until .t Ih'
hour.
LEGAL FORMIS-The Star has on and Mrs. Carter and
hand a few Warranty Deeds andTalley have made this city the'
)Mor;r-ge Notes. Call at The
home for the past four yutars aI,
a_ -office._have many friends who regret t,
LEGAL ADVERTISING see them leave,

IN CIRCUIT COURT, GULF METHODIST M. S. IN
COUNTY, FLORIDA
1I,. C. complaint, PROGRAM MEETING
I. C. :;edle, Complainant,
y C. The Women's Society for Chri--
Evelyn Thames-Ne:lley, Defendant. tian Servicc of the Methodi:.
Tq Evelyn Thanmes Nedley: Church held its regular month i
Notice is hereby given that suit program meeting at the church
has been filed against you in thl MIonday afternoon. A short bhus
aojovtv srtylel c.tzuse for a divo-cce.
Youare hereby r.ti'-ed to appea ness session was held, after which.
in sa'id. suit oi the Is- day of S:ep- the meeting was turned over i.'
tembe., 1941, at t CCourt I-House, iii Mrs. Roy, Gib-lon. who presented
Wewahitcilka. IT'lorida, and plead, the program for the afternoon.
answer or' ohe' eise defc:'tl the
same and, in de:ault thereof, a de-
cree will be entered against you MAURICE FAIN HO-NOH-ED
upon the matters and things set The Misses Doorthy Costin and
fortl, in the P.ill of Comunlaint.
T'his order to be publiShed once Gewel Lewis wert co-iostesses at
eaca week for four consecutive ?. f~r?well party Thursday evcn:ni
weekl in The Star, a weekly news- of last week honoring Maurici
paper published! in C-ilf Cony Fai, who left this week with hi:'
Fl1'ia.arents to malke 's
Vwi:ness my hand and official Parents to make his home i.
seT this 21st day of July. 194-1. HTome-teRa'. The ;fa''ir wa's held
(Official J. R. HTrlNT' R, at the Costin behlqe home. and a
Se-!) Clerk of Circuit Court lage number of young people et
7-25 8-22 laige inmber of young peop-e et
-2 S-22 joyed the evening with Mauric-.

N O T I C E his parents and the hostesses.
Notice is hereby given that the :' <'
Board of County Commissioners of SMr. and Mrs. B. B. Conklin
Gulf County, Florida, will receive ent Wednesday in Panama Citv.
scl -i bids until l0:00 A. M.I. on
Fir ,y. August 22nd, 19-1i. f or re- Mr. Conklin returnied home Wed-
ro -i.'g the Court House and Jail nesday afternoon while Mrs, Conk:
of Cr,:lf County. The bidder will lin remained in the nteali'horin"
fu- :-' -h a-ll necessary materials to r-,i So a several days' visit with
il-al, Bur ap sp-eci.ica!ioi n uil- b il'-
upi r?'ofi additions to North an'd relatives.
Soutt en'i~ of Court House, roof of r
stairway to Jail and roof -f toilets Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Mee!ks of
of Jt-.I also to wire brush, caullk itzgerald. Ga., and Ray Moore of
an!. -aint the roof to the Jail two
gco'l coats of metal paint. t. Lauderdale were week-end
-he Board'reserves the right to guests of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wil-
rei any or all bids. liams.
Poard of County Commissioners, -, <*
-G:lf Co'tit". 'tr';a.
ry J., 1. UNTER. o P EvrTns visited friends last
8115-22 Clerk. Friday in Panama City.


Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


F you never have had any
of these pains, be thank-
ful. They can take a lot of
the joy out of life.
If you have ever suffered,
as most of us have, from
a headache, the next time
try DR. MILES ANTI-PAIN
PILLS. You will find them
pleasant to take and unusu-
ally prompt and effective in
action. Dr. Miles Anti-Pain
Pills are also recommended
for Neuralgia, Muscular
Pains, Functional Menstrual
Pains and pain following
tooth extraction.
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills do
not upset the stomach or leave
you with a dopey, drugged
feeling.
At Your Drug Store:
125 Tablets $1.00
S25 Tablets 250
Read full dl-
rections In
package.


Mr. and Mrs. Nobbie Stone of
Naples are guests this week of
the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs,
T. H. Stone.

The Misses Barbara and Teresa
Edwards left Tuesdayi for Apalach-


MRS. CONNELL IS licola to, visit their grandmother,
HOSTESS TO CLUB Mrs. Charles Doyle.
Mrs. J. A. Connell entertained
the members of the J. A. M. club Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!
Monday evening at her home on
Third street. The members sewed D C
for a time, after wnlch a contest DR. I C. COE
was enjoyed, with Mrs. Leroy
':;ainous as winner of high prize D E N T I S T
and Mrs. A. D. Lawson winner of Office Hours: 9 to 12, 1 to 5
low prize. Sunday By Appointment
A delicious salad plate, cake and Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe
soft drinks were served to Mes-
dames Gainous, Lawson, Sammie
Davis, C. E. Boyer, C. G. Costin, i LET US FILL THAT
S. C. Pridgeon and Louis Perritt, PRESCRIPTION
Miss Myrtice Coodiy and invited Bring us your next prescrip-
guest, Mrs. Joe Ferrell. I r i us your next presrip-
tion nOnlv fresh full nuality


YOUTH WEEK PROGRAM
TO EE HELD HERE
Ee. inning next Sunday. August
:1. and continuing until August
.:, the Methodist Youth Fellow-
:iDip of the Port Et. Joe Methodist
;hurch will hold a Youth Weekl
programm each night at the church,
beginning at S o'clock. This is a
hree-fold program featuring wor-
iiip, study and recreation. Each
assembly y will begin with a wor-
ship program conducted by Pauline
.)w is,. chairman of the worship
committee, assisted by Don Mari-
etta Jr., chairman of the missions
committee
Sstt.dy course divided into two
south h divisions and one adult di
.*i:otn will follow. In the first di-
vision will be all young people bE
*wEii n the ages of 10 and 15. who
\vil lie taught by Mrs. D. E. Malin
etta. Those over 15 will be under
Mrs. D. L. Hunt. The adult'class
w'Ill be conducted by Rev. Mari-
etta.
Following the study course, all
will go to the Centennial building.
transportation being arranged b
the citizenship chairman. Amelia
Gibson where all types of enter
tainment will be provided by tihe
recreation leader. Billy; Wallace.
There will be fun for all, and ali
ages and denominations ara In
vited to take part.

TENNESSEE MINISTER TO
PREACH AT CHURCH
It was announced this week that
the Rev. Homer Starr of Chris'
Church. NTashville, Tenn., will hold
services on the fourth and fifth
Sunday in August at the St. James
Episcopal church.
Rev. and Mrs. Starr will occupy
the Episcopal rectory in Pnanamn
City whiile Rev. Iranik DeIring ann
family are away on vacation.

BF3TH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Howell Hampton
are announcing the arrival of a
daughter, born August 14. The
young lady has been named Janie.

Mr1. and Mrs. C. L. Fain left yes
terday for Homenstead to mailk
their home.

C. J. Sullivan and E. Gibosr
were business visitors We:dinesday
in Wewahitchka.









.-- i:1? L ,'
3o' ,'
..^*': ;** '~~~ }lyi'J* i^''.r


materials are used. Only qual-
ified pharmacists do the
compounding

LeHARDY

PHARMACY


PORT THEATRE
Tehatre Opens Sundays at 1:00 Last Show at 8:30
Saturday 1:15 Daily 2:45 Admission 10c-16c-30c

Sa-- GO TO THEl MlOVIES FOR ENTERTAIN T
t <^ GO TO THE MOVIES FOR ENTERTAINMENT (,


- OWL SHOW -

TONIGHT 11 P. M.
Admission 16c

DANGER STRUCK AT
ALL THE INNOCENT!


This Picture Will Also
Be Shown at 9:30
SATURDAY MORNING


SUNDAY MONDAY
August 24 and 23

Theater Opens Sunday 1
P. M., Continuously
A MUST SEE !
TYRONE POWER
LINDA DARNELL
RITA HAYWORTH

IN TECHNICOLOR


C"FUREIGN SNP.'.CE"
CURRENT NEWS


SATURDAY ONLY
August 23

2 ,~B I G
SMASH HITS
HIT NO. 1

...w. i, KPUBLIC PICTUaS pres*nf



IT OBRaT LIVINGS -
BOB EE RUFE D'!

-- HIT NO. 2 --


- "- = '' T "t-t't'. f-'-
.- J -


"ADVEANTURES VOF
CAPTAIN MARVEL"
"-"----""'-~-'~"~


TUESDAY, AUGUST 26

ON THE STAGE

THE MILO TWINS
of Radio Fame, with

'LIL ABNER and 'RITA'


On the Screen

PAT O'BRIEN
JAMES CAGNEY
FRANK McHUGH

-- in

,__,I.L DOGS

0- AIR"


WEDNESDAY ONLY ^.1t/ *I AT
.'UNCERTAIN
AUGUST FE LI NG
'27 OB-RON DO Lsi
27 ^ .1- -


B. T. U. STUDY COURSE
NEXT MONDAY
There will be a study course for


FRIDAY, AUGUST22, 1941


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


I


Miss Sarah Kelly of Dawson,
Ga., arrived Sunday and is the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith.

Miss Thelma Johnstone spent
last Friday shopping in Panama
City.








i 1


Spending Week In New Orleans
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wellington
are vacationing this week in New
Orleans.

Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!


FASHION MODELS WANTED
The fall season brings many demands
from fashion illustrators, and photogra-
phers for new faces and figures. Prepare
now for this specialized and highly paid
profession.
The Illinois Photo Sound Studios have
perfected a new idea whereby you, in
the privacy "of your own home, may
acquire the poise and posture neces-
sary to be rated among America's top
flight models. No expensive trips from,
home are necessary you qualify,
under the expert guidance of models!
who are at the peak of their chosen'
profession.
Write immediately for details on The
Art of Fashion Modeling.
FASHION MODELS INSTITUTE
159 E. Chicago Avenue, Dept. M
Chicago, Illinois



ROOM AND ,

BOARD
BY THE 00
WEEK 7.

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25C
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
SCorner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building
f ^ ^ A ^ ---. 4_*^^*^A A A ..A_ A


MIDWAY PARK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf I
County Line

Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES
Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cabins
Good Beds
Good Meals


Gooda uiles
COME IN AND REST!


I Am YOUR Servant-
Me Serve YOU!


JOHN HENRY JON


Let



ES


4 - -. -h. .


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protectior



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

WARREN PINSON
Local Representative


Cesar Romero In

Cisco Kid Picture

Co:nedy-Thriller Slated for Show-
ing Saturday Only At
Port Theatre

Palpitating hearts and pounding
lioirs mean one thing-the Cisco
Kid, gun in hand and a senoriia
in his arms, is back again in "Ride
On Vaquero." playing tomorrow at
tlh Port theatre.
The handsome Cesar Romero
once more is seen in the role of
thla romantic richer of the sage.
the carefree caballero who rights
wrong with the business end of a
.45 and who wins the ladies by
just being the Cisco Kid." The
genial rolyr-poly Chris-Pin Martin
again portrays the part of the Kid's
bloodthirsty but faithful partner.
For all his accomplishments, the
Kid would still be in jail or hang-
ing from a tree if it were not for
tle conniving of beautiful Mary
Beth Hughes, who portrays a
dancer in the bullet-scarred Crys-
tal Palace cafe.
The Kid and Gordito, jailed by
the U. S. cavalry, are released to
track down a gang of kidnappers
who have been terrorizing the Ari-
zona territory. One of their vic
tims is the Kid's personal friend
For a while things looked bad for
the Kid. He has been arrested by
the sheriff, who is working with
the kidnapers, the town's banker.
and the saloon keeper.
Mary Beth helps Cisco escape.
He then tracks down the kid-
napers, rescues his friend, re-
covers the ransom money and
rides away before the cavalry can
catch up with him again.
Lynne Roberts lends her beauty
and talent to this roistering Cisco
Kid comedy-thriller. Robert Low
,ry is also one of the cast of fee
tured players, as is Ben "Shad-
rach" Carter.

MAYO ASKS FARMERS
TO CONSERVE ON GAS

Calling on all farmers to co-
operate in the conservation of gas-
oline and oil and get more mileage
jut of these products, Commis-
sioner of Agriculture Nathan Mayo
issued the following announce-
ment:
"You can get more mileage per
gallon traveling at speeds of 30 to
10 miles than at greaser speeds.
Also, you lose a lot of gas on
quick pick-ups and quick starts.
"Going up hills you do not have
to choke and give your vehicle a
lot of gas. Shove it in second if
too steep, save gas and get over
the hill.
"At 55 miles an hour you use
about six times the oil that 30
miles an hour requires.
"Don't make hasty, stops. This
wears out the brake linings and
brakes refuse to work when an
emergency arises.
"Going at 30 to 40 miles an hour
also saves wear and tear on tires.'
Incidentally, Mr. Mayo's advice
should be followed by all motor-
ists, not just the farmers.
_-------K
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin were
week-endl visitors in Bristol.


,111111111111111111111II111111111111111111111 11 111llll 1l 1111l1lIF
IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR
Phone 51-The Star
IllllIIIIHlIIllHllll l ll llll lllUil lllHlll HIIIIIIlllllill


Low-Cost Home Answers Private Or Defense Need


RECOMMENDED by the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture for
either city or country residence,
this "House of the Month" is
planned to appeal not only to the
prospective owner of a low-cost pri-
vate home but also to the devel-
oper planning to build in quantity
to fill defense housing needs.
It was designed by Ernest Lang-
ford, architect and head of the
Texas State School of Architecture,
and was one of the plans selected
at President Roosevelt's Confer-
ence on Home Ownership.
Both for beauty and to insure
long life, the use of pure white lead
paint is recommended, not only for
the original coats but also for re-
painting in future years. This old
reliable paint, approved by Govern-
ment experts, is outstanding in its
durability, and kee an en oer-


--- ~J1*r~ f~~j7~.


FrN,'"" '^of
Wa .
|WNINC moM m. |

*rnw***- 11*
OI O



face throughout its long lifetime at
a minimum maintenance cost.
The bedrooms, living room and
dining room have cross ventilation.
An insulated stove in the kitchen,
together with mechanical ventila-
tion, will keep this room comfort-
able in hot weather. And insulation
under the roof or in the first floor
ceiling wtl keep the whole house
comfortable, and will save fuel cost
in winter.


The floor plan layout is about
ideal. A hall gives access to every
room in the house except the din-
ing room. The living room, dining
room and kitchen are well related
to one another, and the same rela-
tion holds for the bedrooms and
bathroom. Large windows provide
plenty of light and air. The screened'
porch suggests many convenient'
uses.
Complete building plans and
specifications are available for this
house for $1.00. Included with the
plans is a cardboard cut-out model
of the house, architecturally drawn
to scale. The model can be colored.
and will enable you to visualize
exactly what the completed house
will look like. Address your request
for plans and model to the edttoL:
of this newspaper or Ladies' IHome
Journal, pattern 35969


Visiting Relatives In Vernon O :e automobile company which Spanish moss can gro;v on a
Mrs. V'. C. Roche and small son, is making army trucks and others telephone pole because it is a true
Michael, left Tuesday for a week's defense equipment, purchases its epiphyte, meaning a plant which
visit with relatives in Vernon. parts andi materials from some 200 derives its moisture from the air.
---- ------ communities located in 21 states. --- ----
E. Pitts of Panama City, visited Trade at home-your local mer-
in this city Saturday. It pays to advertise-try it! chants have just what you want.


I ]4 *


Invest In America... Buy


DEFENSE SAVING



Bonds and Stamps

Many Americans are asking themselves these
days: "What can I do to help in the Notional De.
fense?" Thousands ore now serving in the armed
forces of the United States, others are at work' in
vital defense industries, a still greater number can
and are supplying money by buying Defense Say


ing Bonds and Stomps.


*


As a convenience. ..
A supply of Defense Saving Stomps will
be on sale at all offices of Florida Power
Corporation for the convenience of those
customers wishing to purchase them when
they pay their regular service bills.

*


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
I


I


I


,.'
-J


I I..


Support the


U. S. 0.

The United Service
Organizations needs
and desetes your sup-
port in organization
and administration of
Sthe recreation facill-


ties near army comps '
throughout the noti. I
Give generously to
your local U.S. fund ,
1 i~l ^ l|<


v


THE STAR, PORiT 57. JDE. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1941


PAGE FOUR