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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00249
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 25, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00249

Full Text




~___ ___T------------I-
Port St. Joe, site of the $10,000,000
duPont Kraft Paper Mill and the
St. Joe Lumber & Export Co., one
of the South's largest Saw Mills. .

The Home Newspaper of N


The Star is dedicated to getting
forth the Advantages, Resources,
Attractions and Progress of Port
St. Joe and GulTf'ounty. .


northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY. JULY 25, 1941 NUMBER 42
VOLUME IV


iuoney Festival

Will Be Held In

7ewa Tomiorrow

Governor Holland Expected To Be
Present For Dedication of
New City Hall

Big things have been planned
for the Tupelo Honey Festival to
be held tomorrow in Wewahitchka,
and it is expected that a large
number of people from this city
will trek to the county seat :to
participate in the day's festivities.
Big event of the affair will be
dedication of the recently-com-
pleted city hall at which it is ex-
-c-te Governor Spessard Holland
will be the main speaker. Other
state officials expected to be pres-
ent are Secretary -of State R. A.
Gray, State Comptroller Jim Lee,
and State Treasurer Ed Larson. .
The festival, which is being
sponsored by the Wewahitchka
Business Men's club, the Woman's
club and the city of Wewahitchka,
will open at 10:30 in the morning
with a parade through the business
section headed by the Port St. Joe
and Wewahitchka school bands.
Other events include boat races
on Lake Alice, among the entries
being Joe Hunter, Claude Lister,
Dave Gaskin, Jack Connell, Floyd
Lister, Jack Pridgeon and others;
special event by the Port St. Joe
Boy Scouts, under the direction of
Scoutmaster Sammy McCall; the
crowning of the Honey Queen,
Miss Janie Redfearn; a large dis-
ulay of the famous tupelo honey,
and other minrl? events.
At the noon hour a free dinner
will be served visitors on the
shores of Lake Alice.


Special Car Tags

Available For $1

Funds Raised By Special Requests
Will Go To Fund For Aid
To Dependent Children

Port St. Joe automobile owners
who can't remember their tag
numbers will have an opportunity
when they buy their 1942 tags to
get any number they desTre, such
as one the same as their telephone
number, their age, their wife's age
(if she's, willing to tell), a dupli-
cate of their present car tag, or
any combination of numbers, pro-
vided the number has not already
been sold.
This "personalized" service may
be secured from Uncle Edd Pridr
geon or his agents- for an addi-
tional fee of $1, the extra simoleon
going to the fund for aid to de-
pendent children.
Under provisions of a bill en-
acted by the last legislature, "upon
application of any person, firm or
corporation, accompanied by the
fee of $1.00, in addition to all other
costs and charges for the issuance
of an automobile license plate, the
tax collector of any county and
the motor vehicle commissioner of
the state of Florida are hereby
authorized to issue an automobile
license plate with any particular
number selected by such applicant
when such number is available for
such issuance."
The act forbids the issuance of
a selected number except upon the
payment ;of $1, and specifically
states that all funds raised and
collected pursuant to its provisions
shall become a part of the state
welfare fund, :to be used- exclu-
(Continued on Page 4)


; ~j .61
u- i3ai t~.~:ry
;yj
at 1!14:71 IBUY.a


With Mayor J. L. Sharil' as chair- in charge o' solicitations in the
man, the drive of the United Ser- colored quarters.
vie Organization to raise $500 in `,Th!e USO is composed of the
Port St. Joe got underway Monday Y ug Men's Christian associa ion,
Salvation Army, National C: tholic
and it is expected that the quota Commnity Service, Jewish Wel-
-et will be raised within ten days, fare Boarn. Young Wonien's Chris-
or by next Wednesday. !tian association and the National
Ir. SIharit has named the follow- I Travelers Aid association and. the
ing cominittee members to assist national campaign is endeavoring
'im in the drive: Mrs. Basil E. to raise $10,765,000 tlo operate 360
Kenney, Jr., SIt. Joe Lumber & Ex- service clubs for .soldiers, sailors
port company employees; Miss Es- and defense workers. In addition
tell Dickens, St. Joe Paper corn- the USO will finance an all-star
i.lny employees; Mrs. Jake Belin, program of entertainment in the
bank building and telephone comn- camps.
pany employees; Misses Kathleen Residents of Port St. Joe are
Saunders and Martha Belin, busi- asked to be generous with their
ness houses and individuals; Miss contributions, for the need for the
Margaret Belin, steamship com- USO is obvious. Many army train-
pany employes and stevedores; B. ing camps are located in out-of-the-
H. Smith. mechanical force of A. way places, a long distance from
N. Railroad company; J. O. Bag- a big city. As a result, it is not
gett, station and transportation unusual for a camp of 40,000 merj
employes of A. N. railroad; S. L. to be situated, near a town of but
Barke, treasurer for drive. Damon a few thousand people. The recre-
Peters and Lemon Butts will be (Continued on Page 4)



Wheelei Charged With Treason


By 'Fight for Freedom' Leader

N EW YORK (Special)-Charges of treason have been laid
.it the door of Senator Burton K. Wheeler, isolationist
American First leader, by the Rgt. Rev. Henry W. IHobson,
Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Southern Ohio
and national chairman of the Fight for Freedom Committee.
In addition, the Fight for Free-
dow Committee is demanding a Last week the Great Falls
"News" revealed that Senator
Congressional investigation to de- Wheeler had used his official posi-
termine how the Montana Senator tion to cut off the Walter Winchell
was able to predict the expedition broadcasts from the Helena, Butte
of American forces to Iceland, at and Bozeman radio stations. Ac-
a time when that troop movement cording to Miles Romney, Jr., edi-
tor of the "Western News" of
was still secret. Hamilton, Mont., the Senator "is
"Senator Wheeler's revelations financially interested in three of
of this country's military and nav- Montana's radio stations, viz., He-
al activities could serve only one lena, Butte and Bozeman."
purpose, that of informing Nazi
Germany in advance of America's EVEN WHEELER'S STATE
defense preparations," Bishop S NOT ISOLATIONIST
Hobson said. "His statement was
nothing short of treason, and is a BILLINGS, Mont. (Special)-
violation of his oath of office as a Even in this State, the bailiwick
member of the Congress of the of Senator Burton K. Wheeler,
United States." leader of the America First Com-
mittee, the well-financed isolation-
British Also Worried ist movement is making no head-
London cables this week reveal- way.
ed that the Montana Senator's In a letter received recently from
strangely accurate predictions were John B. Tansil, United States At-
causing anxiety in British Govern- torney here, and addressed to the
ment circles. According to the Fight for Freedom Committee at
New York "Times," "now that New York, that official said that
the United States' occupation (of "if the talk I hear in this locality
Iceland) has been announced, it is and also over the entire State of
proper to record one fact that had Montana is indicative of sentiment,
official Britain worried and puz- I don't think (the America First
zled. That is the way in which Committee) are going to get very
Senator Wheeler, before the opera- far. I do not believe they echo
tion had been completed, came out the sentiments of more than 15 per
publicly with an announcement that cent., at most, of the people of
it would be done and even gave Montana. I am in hearty accord
the date when he expected it to be with your efforts."
carried out. The British are Senator Wheeler recently threat-
angry over the fact that (Senator ened to sue the Fight for Freedom
Wheeler) involved their own troops Committee for "vicious libel" after
in giving away what was obviously the Committee charged that anti-
a military secret." Semitic, pro-Nazi and pre-German
To judge by messages pouring organizations had sent out mail
into tleight for Freedom headquar- under his Congressional franking
ters here. the isolationist leader is privilege. The reply of the Coin-
facingo a widespread revolt in his mittee was a telegram to the Mon-
own State (where, incidentally, the tana Senator saying "we note your
opposition Fight for Freedom or- threat to take action and invite
organization is growing substantial- you to do so immediately without
ly).*According t.:. tie Great Falls hiding under the cloak of Con-
(Mont.) "News," which has made gressional immunity. We are pre-
a poll of Montana sentiment, the pared to back up our charges with
people of the State are about six documentary evidence. Are you
to one against Wheeler. ready for a showdown?"

Taking Treatment In Pensacola Postmastar H. A. Drake left
Mrs. Annie Balkcom is spending Tuesday, fos his vacation, to be
this week in Pensacola, where she spent visiting points in Georgia
is taking treatment, and Alabama.


Pipe Line Rights

Measure Clears

Way For Action

Bill Passed By Congress Gives
Companies Right of Con-
demnation


The way was cleared Tuesday
f o r construction of petroleum-
carrying pipe lines through Geor-
gia and the rest of the Southeast
when congressional leaders in
Wa'shington completed action on
the bill designed1 to give pipe
lines righits-of- vay.


A compromise, accepted Monday
AMERICA ON GUARD! by the senate, was agreed to by
Above is a reproduction of the; the house Tuesday morning'. a he
Treasury Department's Defense legislation provides that either
Savings.Poster, showing an exact' public or private companies can
duplication of the original "Minute secure rights-of-way by condem-
Man" statue by famed sculptorruct needed lines.
Daniel Chester French...Defense nation to construct needed lines,
Bonds and Stamps, on sale at your Sponsors of the legislation ad-
bank or post office,.are vital part vocated it in the light of a threat-
of America's defense'preparations. ended petroleum shortage on the
east coast caused by transfer of
tankers to Great Britain.
lims Allowed ,In immediate prospect is con-
Clams Allow e pletion of the Southeastern pipe
line from Port St. Joe through
The following claims against the Georgia to Chattanooga, Tenn.,
city were allowed and ordered paid which will mean a greater num-
during the month of July by the ber of tankers coming into our
board of city commissioners: :. port to diischarge cargoes for the
Water and Sewer Fund pipe line. The Southeastern line
City Treasury ............. $144.45 is almost completed and should be
l. H. Valvrdwae Co. .......29602 in full use within the next two
A. & H. Valve Co ......... 11.96
City Treasury ........... 65.74 months.
St. Joe Land & Dev. Co... 10.00 Construction is also proceeding
A. J. Navarre ............. 2.36 on the Plantation Pipe Line com-
W. D. Dare ...............2.00pany's tnbe from Louisana tO
viuller Co................ te from L ana to
M. G. Lew::s ..: .... 1.25 Greensboro, N. C.
St. Joe Hardware Co....... 9.26 -
Florida Power Corp. ....... 17 Epworth League
General Fund r Leag
A. N. Railroad Co. ....... $112.00
i ty Treasury ............ 117.5 Sponsoring Trio
City Treasury ............. 220.91
\V. S. Darley & Co.......... 11.74 __
Vice's Service 'Station ...... 11.70
Wayside Nurseries ......... 5.00 Famous Brown Trio Will Present
Motor Parts .............. 1.15 Popular Classical and Semi-
The Setninel .............. 2.00
M. G. Lewis Garage ...... 2.50 Classical Numbers Aug. 1
St. Joe Motor Co. ........ 65.27
The Star .................. 36.00 Next Friday evening, August 1,
Leii.ardy Pharmacy ....... 30.00
St. Joe Hardware Co. ..... 9.81 the Epworth League will present
Kelly's Cafe ............ 11.70 for the music lovers of Port St.
St. Joe Tel. & Tel. Co. .... 18.40 Joe and Gulf coulify a program fea-
Galf Oil Corp. .............36.60 taking the music of the masters as
City Pori St. Joe ......... 22.30
St ud:.rd Oil Co ............ 104.77 played by the renowned Brown
SCity Treasury ............. 57.35 Trio composed of Harry K. Brown,
S ity- Treasury ............. 192.49 cellist, his wife, violinist, and
Volunteer Fire Dept ....... 17.42their talented 15-year-old daugh-
ITroy Jones ............... 10.00
H & B W Drew Co. ...... 4.39 ter, Dorothy, who will accompany
Payroll to July 15 ........ 355.00 them at the piano.
J. E. Bounds .............. 34.00 Among his many notable per-
Florida Power Corp. ..... 51.27
Kielly's Cafe ............ .50 formances, Mr. Brown has played
Smith Printing Co. ........ 20.25 at royal command for Edward,
St. Joe Motor Co........... 45.25 Duke of Windsor, then king of
City Service Garage ....... 2.50 England. Mrs. Brown also has
Gult Oil Corp. ........... 1.45
S Joe Tel. & Tel. Co..... 22.68 played for many European celebri-
The Sentinel .............. 2.00 ties during her concert tours
W. S. Darley & Co. ....... 1.42 abroad.
C(ty Port St. Joe .......... 26.06 Their program will consist of
Dr. A. L. Ward ...........7.50
H & B W Drew Co. ...... 4.10 .the most popular classical and
St. Joe Lumber Co. ....... 38.12 semi-classical numbers and will
Gulf Hardware Co. ....... 100.67 present to the people of this sec-
Sunny State Service ...... 222.81 ition an opportunity to hear these
W D. Dare ................ 5.10I
Gulf Co. Defense Council .. 10.)00 numbers played as they should be
J. L. Sharit .............. 155.65 played.
S a The program will be held in the
Billy Coody Is Visitor high school auditorium, and tickets
Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon and chil- may be obtained in advance from
dren, Edward and Anthony, and ,Epworth League members at the
:ss Myrtice C'oody returned Sun- nominal price of 25 cents fop
day after spending two weeks in adults and 15 cents for children.
!.i tman and Hiawlinsville, Ga. Pri- -- -----
v:{te nilly Coody .o Chanute Field. Vacationing in City
Ill., returned, to the city with them Mr. and Mrs. Orin McCranie of
Lor a several days' visit with his Valdosta. Ga.. are spending their
sister, vacation in 'his city as guests of
I---Mrs Sally Montgomery.
Return From Vacation i


Mr. and Mrs. H. H.. Saunders and
daughter, Miss Susan, returned to
the city Sunday after a week
spent visiting relatives in North
Carolina and Tennessee.


Visitors From Virginia
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Childs and
daughter, Sally, of Huntington,
Va., are guests this wepk of heir
son, Bill Childs.


TlrrTT-rrrrlr---TTT-TITtTT


V


S A]R








THE STAR, POQRT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


k


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Campany
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
unde- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year....... .$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months.......... 65c

--4 Telephone 51 JE*-

The spoken word i.s given scnt attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully waigijd.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


NO PLACE FOR DUAL LOYALTY

The uncovering of Nazi, Fascist and Com-
munist agents in this country continues and
has revealed that there is a tremendous ele-
ment in the United States which seeks the
overthrow of our constitutional republic.
What is more important, literally thousands
upon thousands of these people are natural-
ized United States citizens, pledged to uphold
and defend with their lives if necessary, the
sovereignty and form of this government.
Naturalized citizens have the same rights
and privileges of native citizens, and restric-
tions on foreigners are so slight in compari-
son with those in other countries that the
United States has become the Mecca of im-
migrants. This is because the founders of our
republic wanted this country to be the haven
of the oppressed, the land of opportunity for
those held down by economic tyranny, the
home of all who cherished the ideal of indi-
vidual freedom.
This country offers its freedom and oppor-
tunity without reservation, and those taking
advantage of it are expected to become sin-
cere citizens. Loyalty to the United States
and to the United States alone is the one re-
quirement that brooks no evasion or reserva-
tion.
Unfortunately, this is not always the way
it work out. Foreign groups continue to re-
gard themselves as still partly citizens of
their homelands, and band together in organi-
zations ostensibly to preserve the culture of
their native countries. Too often these groups
continue to carry on the political battles or
the old country in their adopted home-even
those who have renounced their old ties and
pledged allegiance to the United States.
Foreigners can become full citizens of this
country in only five years. Once natuarlized,
they can vote, hold any public office but that
of president, and be assured of equal treat-
ment in the courts with native citizens. Yet
the native-born must serve a 21-year appren-
ticeship before they receive voting and office-
holding privileges.
It has been proposed that the Constitution
be amended to restrict the privilege of pub-
lic office-holding to native-born citizens if
these organizations of foreign-born persons
continue their divided allegiance. It is un-
arguable that it wou!d rid the country of ele-
ments in public office that are guided by for-
eign, not American, political ideals.
Regardless of what is done, the present
crisis has made the country aware that many
naturalized citizens are not keeping up their
end of the bargain they made with the gov-
ernment.
There is no place for dual loyalty.

Tip to Port St. Joe coal users: The govern-
ment is urging the buying of the winter coal
supply now, as the defense program may jam
the railroads to such an extent this winter
that you may not be able to get coal here.

Here's one way of looking at it: The or-
dinary person puts 2 and 2 together and gets
4, but the optimist gets 22.

The man who used to turn over a new
leaf now has a son who turns over a new car.


OIL APLENTY
This country is building a great mechanized
army. The very soul of that art y will be oil
-gasoline to propel it, and 1 bricants to
grease the intricate mechanisms. So one ot
the extremely important questions of the day
is this: Have we the motor fuel we need-
and will there be enough left over tor our
civilian demands after military requirements
are met?
Secretary of the Interiior Ickes said Satur-
day that curtailment of motor fuel in the At-
lantic seaboard states was essential to avoid
compulsory rationing and if consumption was
not cut by at least one-third that a ration
card system would have to be introduced.
'That applies only to the eastern states, in-
cluding Florida, and such a move probably
would not have been necessary had not the
Georgia legislature held up construction of
pipelines across that state.
The Texas Company says that there Is
plenty of oil for all uses. It is estimated that
gasoline for the army's 250,000 motor ve-
hicles-tanks, blitz buggies, trucks, etc.-may
total 1,000,000,000 gallons a year. That's a lot
of gas, yet, says the company, America's re-
fineries can turn out that billion gallons in
less than two weeks, leaving 50 weeks to
produce for the air force, the navy and the
civilian population.
There's plenty of gasoline for all of us-if
it can be transported where it is needed in
the shortest possible time. Pipelines are the
answer to that problem.

FLORIDA COUNTS ITS RICHES
\Within the next 60 days, Florida will begin
to realize how rich it really has grown. By
September 1, 1942, the preview of the coming
60 days should be enlarged into its true as-
sessable magnitude. The final figures \will be
staggering.
Instead of having real estate valuecdlat a
mere half billion dollars, its taxable worth
should approximate two billion dollars. Fronm
a mere fifty million dollars worth of taii personal property--merchandisc stocks, plant
equipment, house furnishings, pi ofcssional
equipment, antd other personalty hecrctofore
escaping taxation-will find placement upon,
the tax rolls and will probably show a tax-.
able valuation in the neighborhood of a bil-
lion dollars.
Palatial homes, apartment houses and ho.
tels heretofore enjoying homestead exemp.
tion in varying amounts up to $50,000 will re-
sume their place on the tax duplicates as tax-
yielding properties. Cattle and horses, sheep
and goats, pigs and chickens, will come out
of hiding and become tax contributors to sup-
port local government.
Railroads and allied corporations will show
a fourfold value increase to approximately
$100,000,000. Public utility companies will
show values comparable to Moody Manual
figures and large manufacturing concern,
will show value increases mounting into mil-
lions.-St. Petersburg Times.

We should not be surprised that the organ-
ized forces of Hitler in America are working
behind a highly patriotic name-"The Amer-
ice First Committee." The camouflage is
nearly perfect. There is the popular hero,
Lindbergh (in France it was Admiral Dar-
lan) ; the long-time active and resourceful
leader of noisy minorities, Wheeler (in France
this was Doriot) : the scion of respected fam-
ily high in best capitol circles, Taft (in France
this was Laval). These men say they are


RURAL AMERICA MUST UNITE !




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IF, WHEN you climb on the scales,
. the little dial tells you that you
have a slight credit in the way of
pounds rather than a debit, it is
time to start watching what you
eat. This doesn't mean you have
to starve yourself. In fact, that is
just the thing to be avoided for
your system needs ai adequate
amount of proper food to keep the
machinery going. Instead. eat foods
that keep the calorie count down
and yet satisfy appetite and energy
demands. Twelve to fifteen hun-
dred calories is the count for the
average woman's daily reducing
diet.
I-low to keep within that calorie
budget? Fruits, vegetables and lean
meats are part of the answer.
Jellied salads are another helpful
item. When they are made with
plain unflavored gelatine, which
has almost no calorie count in it-
self, they offer an excellent way
of varying foods that often would
become monotonous by themselves
from repetition. Too, plain gelatine
extends small quantities of foods,
giving more to eat and helping to
fill up some of those empty crevices
in the appetite.
Desserts are often thought to be
on the forbidden list but that isn't
true. The system needs a certain
amount of carbohydrate to carry on
its work and so some desserts
should be included in a low calorie
diet. Here, plain gelatine again
comes to the aid of the dieter for
there are a wide variety of desserts
made with it that are low in calo-
ries but delicious to eat.
Complexion Salad
(Serves 6-18 calories per serving)
1 envelope plain unflavored gelatire
VI cup cold water
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup hot water
3 tableslyons Inild vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon jrin
2 teaspoons onion juli
i cup carrIts, gra t- 1 or
-shreilds-


2 tablespoons chopped parsley or
raw spi-nach
:!:c cup cabbage, grated fine or
shredded
Soften gelatine in cold water. Add
salt, hot water. Stir until tlorog'ily
dissolved. Add vinegar, lemon juice
and onion juice (extracted by grating
onion). Cool and when mixture bg'ins
to thicken, fold in remaining ingredi-
ents. Turn into one large or indi-
vidual nolds which have been rinsed
out in cold water first, and chil. V'llen
firml-. 1nmold onto !ttu-e. Platter may
be l ,.c'-iail.' x, is ,-i.: of it\ ar-
rot straws tied with strips of green
pepper.
Grapefruit and Cucumber Salad
(Serves 6-4-0 calories per serving)
1 envelope plain unflavored gelatin
1 cu1p hot water
1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup fresh grapefruit, cut in cubes
or
1 small can broken grapefruit
/ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 cup diced cucumber
Bring sugar and water to a boil
Drain grapefruit. Soften gelatine in
one-half cup grapefruit juice (if not
enough juice, add water t5 make dif-
ference). Add to hot syrup and stir
until dissolved. Add salt and lemon-
juice. Cool and when mixture begins
to thicken, fold in grapefruit and cu-
cumber. Pour into one large or six
individual molds which have been
rinsed out in cold water first, and
chill. When firm, unmold onto lettuce
and serve with desired dressing. A
drop or two of green vegetable color-
ing may be added if desired.
Hawaiian Delight
(Serves 6-GJ calories per serving)
1 envelope plain unflavored gelatine
%A cup cold water
cup hot water
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
'a cup crushed pineapple (canned)
1 egg white
'! teaspoon salt
Soften gelatine in cold water. Add
sugar and hot water and stir until
dissolved. Add lemon juice, pineapple
and salt. Cool and when mixture bea
gins to thicken, beat until light and
frothy with a rotary beater. Fold In
stiftly beaten eg-g white and beat until
thick. Pile into sherbet glasses and
garnish with a cherry.


patriots, but their actions belie their words.
Thle growth of tiih :-i-craf! i.- The average consumption of
Britain and the United States can breathe (dustry in ll e United :tt:!:.s has steel in this country equals 600
easier for the moment at least. That's one been tenfold in the past tirty pounds a year for each American.
d e of nt hin a nohs, colmp o"l with a seven- The comparable average for tex-
advantae of not having a on-a ressi old increas in tie shipbuilding tiles is 30 pounds, and for oil pro-
pact with Germany. She seems to prefer to industry during the entire World ducts, 2500 pounds.
polish off first the ones she has agreed not War. ---
to attack.-Cincinnati Enquirer. ---- --- The power of steam to impart
Mrs. Walker .Stalling of Mobile motion was known to Hero of
Why is it the average person can distinctly is visiting in the city this week. Alexandria. He devised several
S--------- forms of steam apparatus, which
hear a clock tick clear across the room, but Poison ivy, can be distinguTshed he is said to have exhibited to
can't hear the radio unless it's turned up to from Virginia creeper by its glossy Ptolemy Philadelphus and his
hog-calling volume?-Winter Haven Herald. leaves and lead-gray berries, i court in 150 B. C.


FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1941


I-AGE TWO









FSO


RUTH CIRCLE ENTERTAINED
BY MRS. W. C. PRIDGEON
Members of the Ruth Circle of
the Baptist Missionary society
were entertained at the home of
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon Monday after-
noon. The devotional was given by
Mrs. Pridgeon, who is chairman
of the circle, followed by a short
business session at which plans
were made for studying the Year
Book. Plans were also made for
the Royal Service program to be
presented at 'the church next Mon-
day afternoon.
A social hour followed during
which the hostess served delec-
table refreshments.



DR. I C. COE
-DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bidg. Port St. Joe


Society


/


Personals


- Churches


LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MARTHA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. BARRIER
The Martha Circle of the Bap-
tist Missionary society met Mon-
day afternoon at the home of Mrs.
W. W. Barrier with Mrs. Daisy
Staten as hostess. The devotional
was given by the leader, Mrs. W.
J. Daughtry, and f'ollowedl with
prayer.
During the business session Mrs.
R. E. Warren was appointed per-
sonal service chairman, a after
which the meeting was dismissed
and a social hour enjoyed.

Stuart Stevens of Hattiesburg,
Miss., is the guest this week of
John Moffett.


PORT THEATRE
Theatre Opens Sundays at 1:45 P. M. and 8:30 P. M.
Saturday 1:15 Daily 2:45 Admission 10c-16c-30s


< GO TO THE MOVIES FOR ENTERTAINMENT ,


10:30 P. M. Admission 10c 16c

THE COMPLETE STORY OF JOE LOUIS--
-HIS RISE FROM A SMALL ALABAMA HOME
TO THE KING OF THE RING! ALL PIC-
TURES OF HIS FIGHTING CAREER!


FLYING FISTS! ACTION!











THIS WILL ALSO BE SHOWN

SATURDAY MORNING AT 9:30 O'CLOCK

!1 11 11i i l g q


KATHLEEN SAUNDERS
COMPLIMENTS VISITOR
Honoring Miss Sallee Childs of
Huntington, WV. Va., who is visit-
ing her brother, Miss Kathleen
Saunders entertained with three
tables of bridge Wednesday eve-
ning at the home of her parents
on Fifth street. Baskets and vases
of zinnias and roJes wore placed
at vantage points in the spacious
living room of the Saunders home.
During play, iced soft drinks
were served to the players and at
the conclusion of several rubbers
prizes were presented to Mrs. H.
Hampton, Mrs. Charles Hayden
and Miss Helen Hart, and a box
of bath salts was presented to the
honor guest.
Refreshments of ice cream and
cake were served to Mrs. Hamp-
ton, Mrs. Hayden, Mrs. Sammy Mc-
Call, Miss Hart, Miss Margaret Be-
lin, Mrs. George Core, Miss Es-
telle Dickens, Miss Martha Belin,
Miss Josephine Grimsley, Miss An-
ita Tillman and ,the honor guest.

MACK HIGDON ANd MISS
ANNE BARNETT MARRY
Announcement is being made
this week of 'the marriage of Miss
Anne Barnett of Charlotte, N. C.,
to Mack Allen Higdon of this city,
formerly of Sylvia, N. C., on July
12 at the Presbyterian manse in
Ilanville, Va., .the Rev. P. W.
Hodge officiating. The ceremony
vwas performed in 'ihe presence of
a few relatives and close friends
of the contracting parties.
Both the bride and groom at-
tended the Carolina Teachers' Col-
e? in Cullowhee. N. C., and Mrs.
Higdon has taught in the schools
of Clharloite for several year-s piasi.
iMr. Tiiionu is employed by ihe St.
;oe p;aipr colpiinlly, having comn
to this city. about three years ago.

WVESLVAN SERViCE GUILD
MEETS WITH MRS. DRAKE


Th'e Wes!eyani Service Guild
i: l1 its regila.r meeting g uily 11
1t the home of M'es. I-. A. Drake.
Mrs. J. L. Temple was guest o[
ile evening and gave an excellent
-dn..,0ing on two cai])tei's of the
Guild's current mission study.
The dishes for the Methodist
parsonage were oni display at this
time, the buying of the dislies be-
ing a recent project of the Guild.
After the business session and
reports from committee chairmen,


MRS. BOYER HOSTESS
TO J. A. M. CLUB
Mrs. C. E. Boyer was hostess to
members of the J. A. M. club
Monday evening at her home in
Oak Grove. Vases of roses decor-
ated the living and dining rooms
wbich were opened ensuite for the
occasion. Sewing was enjoyed and
two contests held, winners for
high score being Mrs. Louis Per-
ritt and Mrs. W. H. Howell; low
score winners were Mrs. J. M.
Smith and Mrs. J. A. Connell.
The hostess served delicious re-
freshments to. Mesdames Perritt,
Howell, Smith, Connell, Leroy
Gainous, E. C. Pridgeon, Sammie
Davis, W. C. Pridgeon, A. D. Law-
son and C. G. Costin, Miss Myrtice
Coody and invited; guest, Mrs. W.
M. Bragg.

FIREMEN'S AUXILIARY TO
NEXT THURSDAY
It is announced by ithe presi-
dent, Mrs. Troy Jones, that a
meeting of the Firemen's Auxili-
ary will be held at the home of
Mrs. W. C. Roche next Thursday,
July 31. All members are urged to
attend and pay 'jheir state dues of
50 cents, which are to be sent in
at once.
(r -f C&
B. T. U. EXECUTIVE MEETING
TO BE HELD AT ST. ANDREWS
.The executive meeting of the
Northwest Coast B. T. U. associa-
tion will be held Sunday, July 27,
at 2:30 p. m., c.s.t., at the St. An-
drews Baptist church. All associa-
tional officers are expected ito at-
tend.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Dodson are
annmouncing- the arrival of a 91/2-
;lound son at Dr. Norton's clinic
in Friday, July 18.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lilius and
laughter Anice returned to the
city Wednesday from Forest Hill,
\. C.. where they spent their va-
cation.

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
ind children, Bernice and Coleman,
ihave returned from St. Louis, Mo.,
and Birmingham, Ala., where they
attended the fall style shows.

Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!


- -


,llilllll||lll1l llllllll llllll!ll llll ll llllllllllln ll!ll
IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR
Phone 51-The Star
Jl ili lllllIIIII lllllllllllllllll lllllllII II Ill lll1 l


SATURDAY ONLY JULY 26


3 BI THRILL HITS


HIT NO. 1


Paramount Picture


SUNDAY MONDAY
July 27 and 28

Also

DISNEY CARTOON and
CURRENT NEWS


-- HIT NO. 2


and "Sons of the Pioneers"

- HIT NO. 3 ---

"Adventures

of Captain

Marvel"


A JoaCrawfor
I~ceJoan Cawford


the guests were served with a de- l i Iil
viciouss salad course by the hostess.
A* DORABLE '
The Misses Erline Brown, Clyde A
:rown and Louise Austin of Ap-
alachicola attended the benefit
rI'idge party sponsored Wednesday M-Su n U I
by the Woman's club a't: the Port
Inn.

Mrs. Roy Edmunds and Mrs. Cleared
San ford Barber returned Sunday
to their homes in Bainbridge, Ga., B G I N S
after spending a week here as the = l
guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. 9
Hurlbut.
-- in --
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Orr of Mobile,
Ala., visited in the city last week. P A N A i A C I T Y

Mrs. Tonm Yance' of Marianna
is the guest this week of Mrs. H,
A. Drake.
Ms. J ig BAeargains In Quality Ladies'
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Alle; e* n0I
ligon, C. and and Children's Ready-to-Wear
Co wthou and dt-ughter Julia of
D f'uniiak Siprinqgs, were tle itguest
T' .'sny of Mr. and Mrs. J. It. .
Cawthon. COME EARLY AND SAVE!

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Little and
small son of Montgomery, Ala.,
were guests of Mr s. Annie Balk- ADORABLE
comn over the week-end., gA

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brewton "Styles Inexpensively Expressed"
and baby were weekend visitors
in Mobile. PANAMA CITY FLORIDA

Save money by reading the ads.


10


WOMAN'S CLUB HOLDS
BENEFIT BRIDGE PARTY
Forty-four players enjoyed sev-
eral progressions of bridge at the
benefit bridge party held Wednes-
day afternoon by ;the Woman's
club on the porch of the Port Inn.
At the conclusion of play, high,
-cond high and cut prizes were
.:vardc', for bridge and hig prize
for rhummy, after which refresh-
ments of sandwiches, cookies and
icld tea were served by Mesdames
W. H._Wellington, R. W. Smith,
Charels Brown, Omar Branch, R.
R. Minus. D. B. Lay and Basil E.
Kenney Jr.
The door receipts of $12.25 and
a donafioh '- '"'from tihe Ap-
alachicola State Bank will be
added to the treasury of the cicb.

BIBLE SCHOOL TO
ISSUE DIPLOMAS
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, in charge
of the Baptist Vacation Bible
School, announces that diplomas
will be issued to approximately 200
students at graduation exereisee
to be held next Sunday.
The baccalaureate sermon will
be delivered at 11 o'clock Sunday
morning at the church,, and the
graduation exercises will be held
in the evening.
Concluding the school, all stu-
dents will enjoy an all-day picnic
Monday at Wakulla Springs.

O. E. S. INITIATES
At the regular meeting of the
Order of Eastern Star held Tues-
day night in the Masonic hall,
Mrs. Minnie Lupton was initiated
into the chapter.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bellows and
son Bobby arrived home last Fri-
day from a two weels' vacation
spent in Tennessee and Virginia.


mrrn,,,,... .....,........ .......... .... I I --H, "I ...11,i111H 'IM"4 1111 l i0ANIIUIII IIIIU


I


~~-lls~-`~l~~~y-"~"-~_l__l__ _~__~~__~_


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FMDKYY JULY 25, 1941


PAGE THREE


1
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04*947Y .;C*V 00= OF '/OI1Y Vl9A7/4jflOt/G


'A Woman's Face'

Packs Big Wallop

Joan Crawford and Melvyn Doug-
last Will Be Seen In Powerful
Roles Sunday and Monday

The love story of a lonely heart
finding a strange partnership that
leads to murder, furnishes Joan
Crawford with the most gripping
role of her career in "A Woman's
Face," playing Sunday and Monday
at the Port theatre. Miss Crawtord
runs the gamut from ugliness to
beauty, appearing first as a wo-
man horribly .scarred and shunned
by society, and later, through plas-
tic surgery, as a glamorous but
dangerous criminal until her love
for a child brings regeneration.
Melvyn Douglas shares stellar
honors as the plastic surgeon who
restores the mutilated girl to
beauty and effects her regenra-
tion. Also brilliantly cast is Con-
rad Veidt as the criminal madman
whose sinister power over the girl
drives her to murder in order to
save the child she has come to
love.
Excellent support is given the
principals by Osa. Massen, playing
the surgeon's, philandering wife;
Reginald Owen, Marjorie Main and
Donald Meek.

Visiting In North Carolina
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Rollins and.
daughter Peggy left last Friday
for a week's visit with relatives in
Rocky Mount, N. C.


IN CIRCUIT COURT, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA
I. C. Nedley, Complainant,
vs.
Evelyn Thames Nedley, Defendant.
To Evelyn Thames Nedley:
Notice is hereby given that suit
has been filed against you in the
above styled cause for a divorce.
You are hreby required to appear
in said suit on the 1st d'ay of Sep-
!ember. 1941, at Court House, in'
Wewahitchka, Florida, and plead,
answer or otherwise defend trhe
same and, in 'default thereof, a de-
cree will be entered against you
upon the matters and things set
forth in the Bill of Complaint.
This order to be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in The Star, a weekly news-
paper published in GCulf County,
Florida.
Witness my hand an- official
seal this 21st day of July, 1941.
(Official J. R. HUNTER,
Seal) Clerk of Circuit Court.
7-25 8-22


Chills, Thrills In

'The Mad Doctor'

Fast Action Looms at Port Theatre
Saturday As Homicide Squad
Jails Doctor

A more thrilling murder mystery,
has never before been told on the
screen than "The Mad Doctor,"
starring Basil Rathbone, Ellen
Drew and John Howard, which
plays at the Port theatre tomorrow.
Rathbone turns in an excellent
performance as a brilliant doctor
driven to murder by the actions of
an unfaithful wife. He inspires her
suicide by the power of sugges-
tion. After this act he goes thru
life. with but one aim, to marry
wealthy women mulct them of
their fortunes and then scientific-
ally bring about their deaths.
John Howard is seen as a re-
porter who becomes irked when
the .doctor captivates his fiancee.
Howard then proceeds to exliose
the psychiatrist as a charlatan.
The role of a wealthy young wo-
man with a suicide complex, who
falls under the spell of the doctor,
comess one of the best in the ex-
periences :of Ellen Drew. It is at
this point that a change comes
over the doctor. He really falls in
love with Ellen and wants to marry
her, to live again like a decent
man. He would like to forget the
three women he had married and
murdered..
But while the crazed physician
would like ,to forget his past, th'e
reporter back-tracks on the doc-:
tor's past and the fireworks begin
which lead to an exciting climax.

Some use a vacuum cleaner,
while others pick up their dirt
over the telephone.


CAMPAIGN UNDERWAY
TO RAISE USO FUNDS

(Continued, from Page 1)
national facilities of such small
communities are soon swamped.
Soldiers wander aimlessly about
the streets, vainly seeking amuse-
ment for their leisure hours. By
providing a wide range of recre-
ational and social events the USO
service clubs will go a long way
toward solving this problem.
We hope every citizen will look
upon this campaign as something
more than an opportunity 'to pro-
vide recreation for our soldiers and
sailors. We trust that everyone
will strive to put this drive "over
the top" as a demonstration that
Port St. Joe is united in standing
solidly, behind the nation's de-
fenders.


IF IT'S FISH

YOU WANT!
Go To -

"Uncle" Bud Brockette's

Bullem & Pullemn

Fishing Camp
-on the -
DEAD LAKES
3 Miles Above Wewahitchka
Fine Clean Cabins In Beautiful
Surroundings. Good Dry
Boats. Shower.,... Ice
Cold Well Water... And Above
All-
Plenty of Bass, Bream,
Shellcrackers, Perch and
Channel Cats
4 4


WgETE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR FPRCTPT SERVICE

PHONE 100

-- DAY ,OR NIGHT -
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION -.


1.
i
~


r


relief of Florida's needy and de-
pendent youngsters.

Jones' Return From Trip
Mr. and Mrs. Troy Jones and
small daughter returned to the
city Sunday after a two weeks' va-
cation spent in Malone and Mobile.



MIDWAY PARK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf I
County Line

Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES
Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cabins
Good Beds
Good Meals
Good Guides
COME IN AND REST!
I Am YOUR Servant- Let
Me Serve YOU!

-- -JOHN HENRY JONES
-4
,,.,,,,,,,.,,,,.,,


Charels Starrett, who plays to-
morrow at the Port theatre in
"Outlaws of the Panhandle."

SPECIAL CAR TAGS
AVAILABLE FOR $1

(Continued from Page 1)
sively in administering aid to de-
pendent children.
Since the federal government
matches state money for the pay-
ment of aid to dependent children
dollar for dollar, the car owner
who specifies a certain ;tag number
actually contributes $2 toward the

AVOID TROUBLE!
... If your car gets out of con-
trol you know what happens
-TROUBLE.
It's the same way with
your system, so it's wiser to
rely on your doctor and our
accurately compounded pre-
sciptions .. .There can be no
trouble then.

LeHARDY
PHARMACY



ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE
SWEEK $7.00%

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....250
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c
4

MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Coiner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


SPDR.MILES








Hundreds Of Thousands Of Times
Each Year Dr. Miles Nervine
Makes Good
When you are wakeful, jumpy,
restless, when you suffer from Nerv-
ous Irritability, Nervous Headache,
Sleeplessness, or Excitability, give
DR. MILES NERVINE
a chance to make good for YOU.

Don't wait until nerves have kept
you awake two or three nights,
until you are restless, jumpy and
cranky. Get a bottle of Dr. Miles
Nervine the next time you pass
drug store. Keep it handy. You
never know when you or some
member of your family will need if,

At Your Drug Store:
Small Bottle 25,
Large Bottle $10.
Bea fu ll dkitian a P. 4I4f.


IC--Y-YI----^~---I- I*C1


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY JULY 25 1941


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

WARREN PiNSON
Local Representative


-1