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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00246
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 4, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00246

Full Text





SThe Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper--dadicated to
the betterment and upbulding of
the Cty of Port St Joe.
-Jy


THE


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
Set growing little city. In
A VR the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORtDA, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1941


Retailers Being

Urged to Make

Sworn Returns

Comptroller Jim Lee Asks That
Remittances Be Sent to
Hi i Immediately


With the new retail license and
inventory tax falling due last Tues-
day, July 1, State Comptroller J.
M. Lee, charged with its collec-
tion, is urging retailers in Port St.
Joe and Gulf county to make their
sworn returns and send remit-
ances to'him in Tallahassee im-
mediately to avoid penalties and
help reduce the state's cost of col-
lection.
Oomptrpller Jim's appeal appears
in this imsue of The Star, the ad-
vertisement also calling attention
to the .-fact that gross receipts
taxes fop May receipts and pre-
vious months must be paid immedi-
ately if not already paid. In a
prepared statement, he points out:
"Chapter 20689, Laws of Florida,
Acts of 1941, repealed Subdivision.
B, Sec. 4 of Chap. 16848, Acts of
1935, relating to gross receipts
taxes. However, the act provides:
'Nothing contained In this repeal
act shall be interpreted to affect
or to excuse or relieve any person
from the payment o(! gross receipts
taxes which shall have accrued
prior to July 1. 1941.'
"It is necessary that a return
reporting gross receipts up to and


9q


-si --- 11

This is the latest picture of Har-
lan Fiske Stone who has been
named chief justice of the U. S.
Supreme Court by President
Roosevelt. Stone is 68 years
old, a "liberal" Republican who
has been an associate justice
since 1925.


Pipe Line Foes

'Blind,' Says Cole

Maryland Solon Asks Senate Sup-
port for Bill to Speed
Southeast Project


including the month of May, 1941. Foes of pending legislation to
be filed and payment made at authorize acquisition through emi-
once. nent domain proceedings of rights-
"Chapter 20977, Acts f IlN41, re- of-wdyrifor petroleum pTi-* lines
pealed all remaining sections of were accused In Washington last
Chap. 16848, Acts of 1935, relating Friday before a senate subcommit-
to permits and' annual graduated tee of "blind opposition'" to a
license taxes, and in lieu thereof sorely needed national defense
imposed an annual graduated li- step.
cense fax and a separate addl- The charge was made by Repre-
tional annual inventory tax upon senative Cole of Maryland, chair-
independent and chain stores." man of the house petroleum com-
Reports and returns under the mittee, who said he had little "pa-
new inventory tax law are to be tience about gasless Sundays and
"filled out in detail," Comptroller heatless days on the eastern sea-
Lee reminds taxpayers, board when we have abundant pro-
--- duction."
NEW FISH LIMITS Pointing out that the problem
NOW EFFECTIVE of fuel shortages in the East arose
through lack of transportation, he
p r s in dy b asked a senate interstate corn-
Sharp reductions in daily bag inerce subcommittee to approve a
limits on fresh water fish in Flor- h e-approved measure which
ida became effective Tuesday, and houlse-app ed completion of the
would expedite completion of the
Gulf county, Izaak Waltons are Souteastern Pipeline company's
warned to remember this, tube from Port St. Joe to Tennes-
The 1941 legislature passed laws proposed line from
reducing, the day's legal catch of ee and the proposed' line frot
reducing the day's legal catch of Louisiana to the eastern seaboard.
black bass from 12 to 8; bream both of which have encountered
from 30 to 20, and shellcracker, difficulties in obtaining right-of-
rwarmouth perch and other species ways.
from 30 to 20. Representatives of major rail-
ossession is limited to one roads and railroad labor organiza-
day's bag, and this is particularly tionsrecently opposed the measure
important to fishermen from Ala- before the senate committee, con-
jiama and Georgia who come into tending that they did not believe
Florida for trips of several days. proposed pipeline in the southeast
-- were essential to defense.
CITY OFFICE CLOSED TODAY iCole declared that 260 tankers
The city clerk's office will be normally made up the petroleum
colsed all day today--July 4th-in fleet in this country, and that re-
order that City Clerk M. P. Tom- cent transfer of 50 tankers to the
linson can catch up on his back British had reduced this carrying
fishing. capacity by 20 per cent. He fur-
-- other declared that the pipe lines
Attends Lakeland Meeting were sorely needed in national de-
fense.
E. Clay Lewis Jr., spent several ense
days in Lakeland this week meet- Attends Wedding In Apalachicola
ing with four other members of ahcl
the 1941 legislature appointed by Mrs. Victor Anderson attended
Speaker Dan McCarty to study the the wedding of Miss Vivian Mar-
bond situation, shall, daughter of Dwight Marshall.
S ______ __and Lieut. John Sherlock of Fort
SSill, Okla., last Friday in Apaalchi-
S Guests From Arkansas cola
l.Mrs A. H. Temple and daugh-, --- ---
ters, Martha and Audrey Jean, of "Cars Washed, $1; Midget Cars
Little Rock, Ark., are the guests Dunked, I0c," advertises a garage
of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Temple. 'in St. Louis, Mo.


I


SPEAKS TO ROTARIANS


ing Clubs at Presentation; Ed
Bentley Is Main Speaker

With Rotarians present froI
clubs in Panama City, Marianna
iilanassee, Pelnsacola, Chattahoc
chee and Quincy, the Port St. Jo
IRoary club received its charter
last Friday night in a ceremony:
held at the Port Inn and took it
place with thousands of othe
clubs in Rotary International.
E. C!ay Lewis Jr., acted aE
toastmaster for the evening ant
introduced B. S. Gordon of Pan
am'a City, who in turn introduce<
'Ed. R. Bentley, Lakeland. attorney
who delivered the main address o
the evening.
Other Rotarians' introduced by
Mr. Lewis, and who spoke as rep
resentatives of their respective
clubs, were Dave Turner of Mari
:;na, Richard Gardner of Quincy
'George Armes of Chattahoochee
D):-vis Young of Pensacola, Dave
Kuhe of Panama City, and Henry
Moelberger of Tallahassee.
The charter was presented by
Millard Davidson of Marianna and
was received on behalf of the lo-
cal club by T. V. Morris in the
absence of President A. L. Ward.
Preparatory to presenting the
charter, Mr. Davidson, a past dis-
trict Rotary governor, spoke on
the meaning and the aims of Ro
tary.
The Port St. Joe club was also
the recipient of a large American
flag presented by Dave Turner and
Buddy Sewell on behalf of the
Marianna club, and a silver bell
and gavel from the hands of Dave
Kuhe on behalf of the Panama City
Rotarians.

FOREHAND PURCHASES
TRACT TO EXPAND HIGH-
LAND VIEW HOLDINGS
W. C. Forehand this week pur-
chased the Anderson waterfront
tract of four and one-half acres
in Highland View, thus adding 40
more lots to the 60 he already has
in Forehand's Addition to High-
land View. This property, adjoin-
ing the Forehand garage, includes
the Anderson fish house property.
Mr. Forehand, who came to this
section in December of 1936, be-
lieves that Port St. Joe is the
most rapidly developing section in
Florida and is backing up his
judgment in his development at
Highland View.
------- c--- '
SEVENTEEN COLORED TOTS
EXAMINED IN "ROUNDUP"
The summer roundup for the
colored 6-year-old children, spon-
sored by the P.-T. A. and the
county health unit, was held on
June 26 at the church in the col-
ored quarters with Dr. A. L. Ward
and Dr. R. J. Lamb in charge, as-
sisted by Miss Elmer andi Miss Mc-
Cloud, health department nurses.
P.-T. A. workers were Mrs. W. 1H.
Wellington, Mrs. B. E. Kenney Jr.,
Mrs. T. V. Morris and Mrs. Law-
rence Nichols.
Seventeen children were ex-
aminedl, given smallpox vaccina-
tion and immunized against diph-
theria.

SIGNAL LIGHTS INSTALLED


Two automatic electric warning -----
lights were installed this week. To Visit In Orlando
near the M. G. Lewis garage for )Mr. and Mrs. Jack Samford and
the railroad spur crossing to the baby will leave Sunday for a
paper mill. week's visit in Orlando.


NEW CHIEF JUSTICE St. Joe Rotary

Club Receives

I Charter Friday

a ,,. I Rotarians Present From Neighbor.


VOLUME IV
VOLUME IV.,


7- r


Fifty-One New

Draftees Sign Up

In Gulf County

Deferment Ordered for Men Who
Have Reached the Age
Of Twenty-eight

According to figures announced
by U. W. Eells, chairman of the
Gulf county selective service board,
51 young men who had reached
he age of 21 years between Octo-
ber 16, 1940, andi July 1, 1941,
-egistered Tuesday in the county
ind became eligible for the next
;elective service draft.
Registered in Port St. Joe were
Chester Adams, General L. Burk-
itt, Harris A. Braxton, Ernest C.
"owart. John B. Cato, Sanders
Chitty, Coy R. Oastleberry, Ernest
J. Goff, Frank W. Graves, Roy F.
Gaskin, Claude J. Gautreaux, Ervin
F. Gunn, James C. Horton, James
O. Holt, William H. Hurlbbut, James
L. Hardy, Alpheus D. Jernigan,
James E. Morton, Marvin P. Mark-
ham, James Plair, Francis Porter,
,-,merv W. Stevens, Charles R.
Tompkins, James H.. Thomas, Wil-
liam C. Williams, Brooks Wynn.
Colred: Timothy Cooper, Olen C,
Grant, Hubert Humphrey, Robert
C. Lowery, George Owens, Willie
Williams, Fred Lee Williams.
Registered in Wewahitchka were
John R. Anderson, Edward Chum-
ney. Benjamin F. Evans, Thomas
C. Holmes, Arthur C. Lanier, R.
D. Mosley, Mack Rhames, James
F. Rish Jr. Colored: Clarence
Baggett, Joe Cromaitie, Henry
East, Samuel H. Hayes, Albert
Hall, Emanuel W. Dawson, James
Riggs, Jimme L. Simmons, Wil-
iam Me. Slade, Joe L. Wynn.
Brigadier General Lewis B. Her-
shey, deputy selective service di-
rector in Washington, D. C., Tues-
day formally, ordered deferment of
all men now subject to induction
nto the army who have reached
he age of 28. It is estimated that
1.000,000 men between the ages of
28 and 36 are affected.
-------S---
EXAM FOR CLERK IN
P. O. HERE POSTPONED

The United. States Civil Service
Commission announces that as a
efficient number of applications
or the position of substitute clerk
n the Port St. Joe postoffice have
not been received, the receipt of
applicationss will remain open untli
he close of business next Tues-
ay, July 8.
Qualified persons are urged to
ile- their applications with the
Manage-r, Fifth I. S. Civil Service
district New Postoffice Building,
tinnta. Ga.. on or before that
ate.

BUILDING PERMIT ISSUED
A building permit was issued
his yeek by the city clerk to C.
Rambo, owner of the Woco-Pep
service station on Monument ave-
ue, for construction of a 29 by
5-foot addition to the back of the
:ation; cost $2000.
---4 -
Return From Virginia
dMrs. Pat Lovett and daughter,
Tarthla T,Loisc. iretrnP(l to Port
t. Joe Tuesday after spending
wo yeeks in Huntington, Va., vis-
ing relatives.
----K
Mrs. Hurlbut Returns Home
M. K. Hurlbut spent last Wed-
esday and Thursday in Orlando.
:rs. Hurlbut, who has been a pa-
ent in an Orlando hospital, re-
mred home with him.


IA


NUMBER 39


I-


_


UNA


^**~


-3


Ed. R. Bentley, Lakeland attor-
f ney and former district Rotary
official, who delivered the ad-
S dress of the evening at the
.charter presentation ceremony
Sof the Port St. Joe Rotary club.
i-

Cost of Public

Schools Shown


Operating Expenses Per Pupil In
Gulf County Comes to
$37.30 In 1940

The current operating cost of
the public schools of Florida in-
creased 45.5%. from 1935 to 1940.
During the same period the total
number of pupils enrolled in-
creased 3.5%, according to figures
released yesterday by the Florida
Tax Revision League.
Current operating expenses of
the public schools for the school

year 1934-35 totaled $13,004,344,
and the 1939-40 total was $18,929,-
345-an increase of $5,925,001. Fig-
ures are for current operating ex-
-tenses only. For 1934-35 there were
disbursements of $478,485 for cap-
ital outlays and $5.416,402 for debt
service, making total disburse-
ments for the year $18,899,232. In
1939-40 disbursements for capital
outlays amounted to $1,597,871 and
Jebt service $4,6,39,848, making to-
tal disbursements $25.167,310.
The average current operating
cost per pupil enrolled in Gulf
county was $32.39 for the school
year 1934-35, with 700 pupils en-
rolled, and $37.30 for the school
year 1.39-40, with 1,378 pupils en-
rolled. Average current operating
cost per pupil enrolled over the
state was $33.82 for 1934-35 and
$47.57 for 1939-40.
Current operating cost per pu
pil by counties shows a wide vari-
ation. In 1934-35 Collier county's
school operating cost amounted to
$64.92 per pupil, the highest of any
county in the state, while Bay
county's was $19.01 per pupil.
In 1939-40 current operating cost
per pupil was $70.57 in Glades
county against $32.37 In Bay. Col-
lier county reduced their cost to
$60.92 in 1939-40, being the only
county in the state which operated
at a lower cost per pupil than in
the school year 1934-35.
---- -4--
Engineer Retires
Baker Smith. engineer, has serv-
ed his number of years for retire- t
ment from the A. N. railroad and
left last week for his home in Tal-
lahassee.


i --









W


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Secand-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Pos'otfice, Iort St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1S79.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months......... 65c

-~ 'Telephone 51 s-

The spoken word is given scant attention:
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly corvinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


DEATH TAKES NO HOLIDAY
Between six and seven hundred persons in
the United States will meet violent death in
auto accidents over this three-day Fourth of
July week-end, according to statistics com-
piled over a period of years. Let's see to it
that none of these deaths occur in Port St.
Joe or Gulf county. We cain do it by driving
safely and observing all traffic rules.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Among the millions of birthdays occurring
each year here and there on the earth's face,
thare is one which is absolutely unique.
It is the Fourth of July, which we are ob-
serving today.
Unlike the proverbial actress, the United
States is proud to give its right age. The
165 years of existence it can boast have all
becer passed as a democracy, under one type
of government and one Constitution. Only
the government of England can boast of a
longer existence. France, Germany, Russia,
Japan and the rest have changed their po-
litical structures so often that they seem like
youngsters compared to us.
But the United States has enjoyed the lib-
erty and justice that come only under de-
mocracy for over a century and a half
now. Every additional birthday becomes a
cause for greater rejoicing, for it helps to
prove that freedom is the only enduring ideal
in a changing world.
It is hard to realize that America has had
so many birthdays. Democracy does not show
its age. Today, when reactionary systems ot
all kinds are running wild over half the globe
and most of Europe is under the iron heed
of the Hun, this country of ours seems by
contrast younger than ever, for it has the
vitality and strength that goes with.youth.
And the Fourth of July-the most import-
ant birthday in the world-should be our re-
minder that democracy is the only way ot
life that ensures happy birthdays for all or
us who live and enjoy our freedom under it.

We've noticed that since President Roose-
velt clamped down on the circulation of Ger-
man propaganda material and froze German
assets in the United States that Linbergh and
Wheeler have cut down their activities. It
seems rather strange that these appeasers
have been struck by poverty at this particu-
lar time.


WHAT ARE WE WAITING FOR?
In his recent broadcast to the nation, Presi-
dent Roosevelt said:
"We shall actively resist wherever neces-
sary, and with all our resources, every at-
tempt by Hitler to extend his Nazi domina-
tion in the Western Hemisphere."
With the Vichy government now fully
aligned with Hitler and with Spain and Por-
tugal helpless to resist, doesn't Hitler to all
intents and purposes now hold the northwest
coast of Africa? Doesn't he to all intents and
purposes now hold Dakar?
kWhat about the Azores? What about the
Cape Verde Islands and the Canary Islands?
Must we wait until Hitler or his stooges grab
them, too?
Hasn't the time come to act?
Mr. Roosevelt said further:
"Nobody can foretell tonight just when the
acts of the dictators will ripen into attack on
this hemisphere and us. But we know enough
by now to realize that it would be suicide to
wait until they are in our front yard."
If Britain falls, won't the Nazis be in our
front yard? We all know by now that the
will of the British to continue their heroes
resistance is based on the belief that we are
in this fight with them.
Isn't it time to show by deeds, not words,
that we are in this fight with them ro the
finish?
Are we going to let Hitler get the jump on
us the way he has on all the other countries?
What are we waiting for? Let's be the
ones to get the jump on Hitler!

ANOTHER PLEDGE BROKEN
As one news commentator put it, Stalin is
the last and most impressive example of the
folly of trying to appease the one-time Vien-
nese house painter who has become master
of a continent. The Russians, obviously afraid,
did everything in their power to mollify the
Nazis. They signed a -...:- -'i.. and col-
laboration pact. They agreed to deliver to
Germi-anv considerable quantities of vital raw
materials. According to reliable writers, they
permitted German technicians to come into
Russian industry in an attempt to speed up
production and transport. They did nothing to
prevent any of Hitler's territorial acquisi-
tions. But all this was not enough. And the
oft-given warnings of Winston Churchill at
last came true-when Hitler was ready he
struck at Russia, despite the pact, despite all
pledges of frienship.
Hitler's spoken reasons for war against the
Soviet are his usual ones-he claimed that
Russia had not lived up to her agreements,
that Russian agents were seeking the down-
fall of the reich, and that he was simply act-
ing to save Europe from the blight of Com-
munism. No one believes that these reasons
amount to more than an easy alibi for the
breakage of another treaty. Russia has in
abundance what Hitler most sorely lacks-
grain, to feed the German people; oil, to pro-
pel the German war machine. And, on top of
that, if Russia could be destroyed as a mili-
tary power, Hitler would no longer have to
fear attack front the east. He could then con-
centrate all of his weapons for the final as.
sault on the British Isles.
It is clear that Hitler has taken a gigantic
gamble. Russia, as Napoleon found out, has
been the graveyard of empire before. It is
a vast land, and much of it is geographically
and climatically unfriendly. In the Little Cor-
plrtl' plirase," Empires die of indigestion."
And Russia is the biggest bite that any con-
queror could attempt.
Hitler certainly must have felt there was
no other solution to his problems before de-
ciding to give the marching order to his le-
gions along the 1500-mile front that extends
from Narvik to the Carpathians.
If Hitler subdues Russia, he will have all
he needs-the blockade will no longer be im-
portant, and he will have taken a long step
tro'vrd mastery of Asia as well as Europe.
If he loses in Russia, he will be finished. The
fate of much of the world may be decided
in the wheat fields of the Ukraine, and the
oil lands of the Carpathians.


I STRIKE NOW, UNCLE SAM!


--- 1'-V


You just can't miss the outstand-
ing value in this Florence Oil
Range! It's a Florence throughout
-with the famous, dependable
Florence oven; with a wealth of
features that make cooking better,
more convenient!
See it here now! We'll show you
how easily you can own this range
or any other of the great new mod-
els we're featuring now. You'll find
a Florence that just fits your needs
and your budget.

HWE.R..E N,O W !


Big Features Make
This a Great Buy
* Roomy oven fully porce-
lalned heavily Insulated.
* Beautiful modern stream-
lined design.
* Handy utensil storage
cabinets.
* Florence Wickless Kerosene
Burners for clean, Intense,
economical "Focused Heat."


PB lEy FURNITURE COMPANY
"Gulf County's Oldest and Largest Home Furnishers"


PHONE 56


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


FRIDAY, JULY -4, 1941,


THE ST-AR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO














Society Personals Churches -
LANETA DAVIS, EditorPR 1.
. .


ROYAL AMBASSADORS
IN MEETING TUESDAY
The boys' organization, the Royal
Ambassadors of the Baptist church,
met Tuesday afternoon at the
home of Emory Cason, with Mrs.
J. 0. Baggett as leader and P. B.
Fairley in charge of the program.
The meeting opened with sen
tence prayers for China. Following
an examination for classification
in the organization, a social hour
was! enjoyed after dismissal t~'
Mrs. Baggett.

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Horton and
daughters, Sara and Kathryn, of
Jacksonville, spent from Saturday
through Wednesday in this city,
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. H,
Wellington.


DR. J C. COE
DENT I S T -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bfdg. Port St. Joe







-S egg
IkSioi0-U$


YOU'LL join the chorus of ap-
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work. And with no effort at all!
DUCO flows smoothly and easily
off your brush... leaves no brush
marks... and it dries to a sparkling,
flawless surface! And DUCO is as
durable as it is beautiful!


: A little goes such a
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"ONE COAT MAGIC"
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NowOll)

75c
Pint Can


Gulf Hardware &

Supply Company

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.





8.' s. 8( W7


EPWORTH LEAGUE HOLDS
INSTALLATION SERVICE
Sunday evening the Epworth
League of the Methodist church
held installation service for the
newly-elected officers. Preceding
the service, Julian Reburn told of
attending a young peoples' assem-
bly similar to the one to be at-
tended at Huntington College by
one of the local league members
later this month.
A short business session was
held, presided over by Paul John-
son, after which Rev. D. E. Mari-
etta installed the following offi-
cers: Paul Johnson, president:
Tames Traweek, vice -president:
Mary Johnson, secretary-treasurer.
and Mrs. Marietta, sponsor.
Following are the committees in
charge of various activities:
Worship Dorothy Trawick,
chairman; Bobby Bellows, Julaine
Hinson, Paul Johnson, Joe Sharit.
Bill Traweek, Onnie Lou LeHardy.
Citizenship Amelia G i b so n.
chairman; Wilbur Darcey., Walter
Kirby, James Traweek, Edwin Mc-
Gill, Jimmy Taylor, J. W. Nichols.
Missions Don Marietta, chair-
man; Thomas Farris, Opal Luns-
ford, Evelyn Taunton, Betty Jo
Temple, Sally Lee Traweek, Harry
Lee Trawick.
Recreation William Wallace,
chairman : Lenora Johnson, Nolan
Ross. Robert Wilson, J. C. Evans,
Mary Lee Helms.
Publicity John Moaffett, chair-
man; Mary Johnson, Billy Mont-
gomery.
't i'fr i'r
MRS. MILLER AND MRS.
GAILLARD CO-HOSTESSES
Mrs. J. L. Miller and Mrs. B. C.
Gaillard were co-hostesses at a
bricige party Thursday afternoon
of last week at the home of Mrs.
., :!~1. Five tables were placed foa
play in the living room of the
iome, which was decorated with
seasonal flowers. At the conclusion
of several progressions prizes were
presented to Mrs. B.. 1. Kenney
Jr., Mrs. E. Clay Lewis Jr., Mrs.
H. W. Soule and Mrs. Richard Mil-
ler. Guest prizes were presented
to Mrs. N. A. Brown and Mrs. A.
C. Nelson, both of Pensacola.
Refreshments were served to
Mesdames Floyd Hunt, W. D
Dare, J. B. Gloeckler, Richard Por-
Ler, N. Comforter. Robert Bellows,
Fred Curtis, A. L. Ward, Massey
d*a'. Marc lieischel. B. BW. Eells.
B. J. Hull, Tom Owens and the
prize winners.
*it -- .'
MISSIONARY SOCIETY IN
STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM
The Baptist Missionary society
held its Stewardship program at
the church Monday afternoon with
Mrs. Victor Johnson in charge.
The meeting was opened with an
interesting talk on "Tithing" by
the leader, followed by the song
service. The devotional was given
by, Mrs. Curtis Palmer. Mrs. J. O.
Baggett and Mrs. W. H. Howell
fnurlher developed the program. Af
ter a song and prayer a short busi-
ness meeting was held with Mrs.
-Iow e.'l presiding.
A social hour was enjoyed at
the close of the business session.
A contest was held, with Mrs. C.
G. Costin in charge. The Louise
Bancroft circle was hostess fo:
the afternoon.

RED CROSS FIRST AID
CLASS IN PROGRESS
Another Red Cross first aid
class was organized this week
with an enrollment of ten mem-
bers. Mrs. Floyd Hunt of Ken-
ney's Mill is instructor. This is
the sixth class, to be held in the
city.

Mrs. B. B. Conklin spent yes-
terday in St. Andrews, the guest
of her mother, Mrs. M. J. Thomp-
son.


FIRE DEPARTMENT
AUXILIARY INSTALLS
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Volunteer Fire Department met at
the home of Mrs. Joe Morrow
I'hursday afternoon of last week
for installation of the following of-
ficers for the enu'sing year: Mrs.
Troy Jones, president; Mrs. M. K.
Hurlbut, vice-president; Mrs. Joe
ilor-row, secretary; Mrs. Daniels,
corresponding secretary,; Mrs. W.
C.Roche. financial chairman; Mrs.
Sammie Davis, publicity chairman;
Mrs. Roy Williams, program chair-
man; Mrs. Joe Grimsley, welfare
chairman.
After the installation of officers
a social hour was enjoyed.

VISITOR COMPLIMENTED
WITH BEACH PARTY
The Misess Alice Ruth Gibson
and Anita Tillman were co-host-
esses last Saturday evening at a
beach party at Beacon Hill com-
plimenting Miss Lois Harrison of
31ountstown.
Following a delightful swim in
he surf and a picnic supper, danc-
ing was enjoyed at Beacon Inn by
the Misses Helen Hart, Dorothy
'rawick. Marigene Smith. Thelma
Johnstone, and Royce Goforth, Mr.
and Mrs. Roy Gaskin, Horace Ma-
his, Williiam Trawick, Frank Han-
ion. Howard Taunton, David Mad-
lox, Willie Tharn)e. Elmore God-
frey and James Brasington.

MISS MARY LEE HAYLES AND
ROBERT McLEAN MARRIED
Announcement is being made
this week of the marriage of Miss
\Iary Lee Hayles of Port St. Joe
and Pensacola to Robert McLean
if Pensacola and St. Cloud. The
ceremony took place in Tallahas-
:ce on .lune 2, at the Methodist
*wrsona'e.
The bride came to this citi
about two years ago and made
nany friends while here. Mr. Mec
Lean acted as relief pharmacist
for a local drug store for several

The Star joins with their many
friends in wishing them much hau-
piness.

The Methodist Women's Society
for Christian Service met at the
church M1onday afternoon, andi in
stead' of holding the regular meet-
ing the members visited absent
members and invited them to re-
turn to the society regularly.


Miles Hurlbut spent Sunday in
Birmingham, Ala., returning home
Monday. His mother-in-law, Mrs.
E. D. Mouchette, accompanied him
to Port St. Joe for a visit.

Mrs,. Harvey Childs and daugh-
ters, Mona and Margie, of Panama
City, are the guests this week of
Mrs. Sally Montgomery and family.


IF IT'S FISH

YOU WANT!
Go To --

"Uncle" Bud Brockette's

Bullem & Pullem

Fishing Camp
on the
DEAD LAKES
3 Miles Above Wewahitchka
Fine Clean Cabins In Beautiful
Surroundings. Good Dry
Boats Shower. .... Ice
Cold Well Water... And Above
All-
Plenty of Bass, Bream,
Shellcrackers, Perch and
Channel Cats


PRICES START AT
$595
All pric,-s "Delivredc at Fac-
tory," Toledo, Ohio. Federal,
state and local taxes (if any) ex-
tra. Prices and specifications
subject to change without notice.


Get Our Daring
Trade-in Allowance FIRST

WILLW$
i -al",H-o
Wa~rB Iafa*


M. G. Lewis & Sons

Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, Fla.


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100 *

--DAY OR NIGHT


TAXIS
1-f OF ST.


PORT THEATRE
Theatre Opens Sundays at 1:45 P. M. and 8:30 P. M.
Saturday 1:15 Daily 2:45 Admission 10c-16c-30c

<< GO TO THE MOVIES FOR ENTERTAINMENT ,


SATURDAY ONLY -JULY 5


I kw; II M1 ho


Hit No. 3-NEW SERIAL THRILL!


CREAM TO ALL
COME EARLY!


1F E E SOLOMON'S ICE
S .IL THE KIDDIES!


SUNDAY MONDAY
July 6 and 7
IT'S GLORIOUS!
IT'S GLAMOROUS!!
YOU MUST SEE IT!!!

AMECHE FAYE MIRANDA


"NT I rate]CIarl: Iiq

News "Air Corps"
Popeye Cartoon


WEDNESDAY ONLY 'ERROL FLYN
JULY 9

__ A lso

"FLY FISHING"
PORKY CARTOON Brenda MarShall


ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT :
JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION C


TUESDAY, JULY 8
VICTOR McLAGLEN
PATSY KELLY
ZASU PITTS
GEORGE STONE

"BROADWAY

LIMITED"
Musical Comedy
"Huting the Hard Way"


PAGE THREE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF eOUlNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1941


I


-01


a








PAGE FOUR THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1941


CANDIDATES BUDDING OUT
NOW FOR STATE OFFICES

Candidates are already begin-
ning to bud out for state offices.
Those mentioned prominently for
Jerry, Carter's railroad commission
job are Senator Lon Folks, Ocala;
W. C. King, Zolfo; Rep, Carl Gray,
Panama City; Paul Raridan, Canal
Point; ex-Senator R. L. Sweger,
Clearwater, and Sheriff W. T.
Coleman of Sumter county.
After Railroad Commissioner Eu-
gene Matthews' scalp are Buck
Hancock. Madison; Sen. J. Slater
Smith, Green Cove Springs, and
Ed Martin, Okeechobee.
Representative Ernest Overstreet
of Miami is the only avowed can-
didate for congressman-at-large.


AVOID TROUBLE!
If your car gets out of con-
trol you know what happens
-TROUBLE.
It's the same way with
your system, so it's wiser to
rely on your doctor and our
accurately compounded pre-
sciptions .There can be no
trouble then.

LeHARDY
PHARMACY


'That Night In HEAVIER PUNISHMENT FOR
.WOODS BURNERS PROVIDED
Rio' Is Romantic heavier punishment for ma-
licious woods burners is author-
And Glamorous ized by the 1941 legislature. One
of the acts passed was to amend
The Sd to the the penalty section of the 1935 fire
The Samba Is Introduced to the distinguish between
law so as to distinguish between
Public for First- Time By forest fires resulting from care-
Carmen Miranda lessness and those willfully or ma
liciously set.
The torrid tempo of the Samba, The early law set up a penalty
the enchantisg melodies of Alice of $200 or three months' imprison-
Faye, the suave love-making of ment or both in connection with
Don Ameche, and the dancing of any fire. As amendi.d, the same
Carmen Miranda are all filmed in penalty will hold if a person is
Technicolor in "That Night In convicted of having caused a fire
Rio," playing Sunday and Monday through carelessness or negligence
at the Port theatre, but a person who deliberately or
As the American-born wife of a maliciously sets fire faces a fine
wealthy Brazilian baron, Alice of $500 to $1000 or imprisonment of
from one to three years.

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin spent
Sunday in Bristol visiting rela-
tives.


ALICE FAYE


MIDWAY PARK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf I'
County Line

Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES
Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cabins
Good Beds
Good Meals
Good Guides
COME IN AND REST!
I Am YOUR Servant- Let
Me Serve YOU!


JOHN HENRY JONES


Faye has an opportunity to wear
many sophisticated gowns, which'
provide a spectacular background
for her delightful singing..
Don's role is the first dual Tech-
nicolor part-that of a Brazilian
Ibaron and an American night club
:performer. The problem confront-
ling the cameramen was that of
making the densities and color
qualities of each of Ameche's two
characterizations match exactly
when they appear together.
The Samba, Brazil's national
dance, is introduced to the Ameri-
can motion picture public for the
first time by Miss Miranda and a
troupe of trained Samba dancers.
According to the leading dance
masters, this wild yet graceful
dance will become the ballroom
rage of the United States during
thP. next .rear


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

HERMAN ROWAN
Local Representative


e y Ix .





















up3r .SaPi in


* AMERICA


^ ~ Now, as Americans, we have an opportunity
to buy a share in this wonderful country of ours.
Since that momentous day when the first settlers
dropped their plowshares and fired the shot heard
'round the world, Americans have been defending
their birthright of freedom. Now we have the
same opportunity of continuing the efforts of
those Minute Men by investing in United States
Savings Bonds and Stamps. You can purchase
your Bonds and Stamps from your favorite bank
-r at your local post office.


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION

I ,-, -- I "PIP


Mrs. Blondie Gainous has re-
turned to her home in Memphis,
Tenn., after spending several days
here as the guest of her mother
and sister, Mrs. Annie Balkcom
and Mrs. Foster Talley.
t* A U
Mrs. J. E. Rollins is expected to
arrive today to spend the week-
end in this city. She will return
to Troy, Ala., Sunday, where she
will continue her studies at the


Do the members of YOUR family say this?
If not, perhaps it is because you have never given Alka-Seltzer
a thorough trial
All over the world people who have used Alka-Seltzer are
enthusiastic in its praise.
If Alka-Seltzer is as good as we say it is, you want it in-your med-
icine cabinet; if it is not, it won't cost you a penny. We will refund
the purchase price to any new user who is not entirely satisfied.
Your family may need Alka-Seltzer sooner and more often than
you think. Our guarantee of satisfaction or money refunded
... covers its use in all conditions listed be-
S.low.
Gas on Stomach, Add Indigestion, ewt-
S. burn, "Morning After", Muscular Pains, N1-
ralgla, Headache, Distress of Colds, as a Ge-




















The new annual Retailers' License and Inventory
Tax Law (Chapter 20977), passed by the recent
Session of the State Legislature, became effec-
tive July 1, 1941.

Report forms must be sworn to and filed with
your remittance for your license to do business


This tax must be paid immediately.

Penalty for delinquency amounts to 2 per cent
per month and can not be waived if you delay.

Do not delay. Save yourself from penalty and
save the State from further costs by remitting
promptly.




No GROSS RECEIPTS TAX is due on your June
business-BUT all Gross Receipts Tax due on
receipts for May and previous months must be
paid. Interest and penalties are piling up already
if you have neglected this matter. Save yourself
and the State further costs by remitting promptly..




SJ.HM.LEE
p Coroptrollter
TALLAHASSEE-, FLORIDA


summer session.

Mr. and Mrs. Camp Kilbourn and
small daughter spent Tuesday in
Dothan, Ala.

Mr. and Mrs. Troy Jones spent
Sunday in Lynn Haven on busi-
ness.

Buck Alexander was a business
visitor Saturday in Panama City.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1941


PAGE FOUR