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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00245
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 27, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00245

Full Text






--The Star-Florida's fattest grow-
ing little newspaper--dedicated to
the betterment and upbullding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
S--- DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
Sest growing little city. In
_ AR the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


rI


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1941


NUMBER 38


A


Property Will

Be Assessed

-At Full'Value


Gulf County Officials Receive In-
structions from Governor
And Comptroller

Along with 400 other county of-
ficials meeting in Tallahassee last
Tuesday to receive definite instruc-
tions' on tax collections, Tax As-
sessor Sammy Patrick, Tax Collec-
tor Edd Pridgeon, County Commis-
aioner George Tapper, County At-
torney T. Clay Lewis Jr., and Su-
perintendent of Public Instruction
Tomn Owns returned home to put
into high gear the machinery di-
rected by the new tax enforcement
statutes requiring full cash value
assessments for property and strin-
gent collection fteatiiies, among
which are mandatory publication
of the names of those who fail to
pay .thbir taxes promptly and' final
sale of tax delinquent property-
both real and personal.
Governor Spessard L. Holland
and Comptroller Jim Lee,, in out-
lining the new laws at the Talla-
hassee conference, predicted the
result would be a wider spread of
the tax load, reduced millages and
conesquent reduction in the bills
of those who consistently have
paid their taxes.
The governor pointedly declared
that the little property owners-
including those with homes and
farms covered by mortgages-have
consistently paid thrir i[e'-. while
other owners have not paid and
have waited for opportunities to
compromise their tax bills at re-
duced figures.
Tax dodging, he said, "became a
stench in the nostrils of those who
paid" so that revision of the tax
structure became a state-wide de-
mand and "a very clear mandate
form the people."
Lee said there could be no fur-
ther quibbling with tax laws that
always have required full cash
value assessments, although taxing
officials have by custom assessed
on an average of 25 per cent.
One of the pertinent points
raised by Comptrolelr Lee in his
remarks was that compliance with
statutes requiring full cash value
assessments should not increase
the tax burden inasmuch as the
law directs the commissioners and
school boards to reduce the mill-
age in proportion to increase in
assessment, "which will reduce
the 'take' from the fellow who has
been supporting government these
many years and distribute the bur-
den to property that has been
evading some part of its just tax
Toad."
Governor Holland declared the
1941 legislature "performed well"
in passing the tax laws and that
it is entitledi to the greatest credit
of any legislature within my me-
mory. The pulilc reaction shows
that the public welcomes gladly
this opportunity to make a sounder
tax structure."


Registration of 21-Year-Old Hyacinths Found

Men Ordered Next Tuesday Growing In Dead
SLakes By Editor


WINS POSTER CONTEST All Young Men In Gulf County Who Have Reached Voting
Age Since October 16, 1940, or Who Will Be 21
On July 1, 1941, Required to Sign Up


Proclaiming a second registration of men available for mili-
tary training in the interest of national defense, President
Roosevelt has designated next Tuesday, July 1, as the date
\vhen all eligible men who have become 21 years old since
October 16, 1940, or whose birthday falls on July 1, must
register for selective service training.
According to members of the local selective service board
this will affect between 75 and 100 young men in Gulf county.
The following places of registration have been designated i
R:n Port St. Joe at the local selec-


Competing in a field of high
school students from 41 states
and the District of Columbia,
Tony Provenzano. student at the
Hillsborough high school, Tampa,
won highest honors for the state
of Florida in the 1941 national
meat poster contest.


President Asks

U. S. to Observe

Fourth of July


Roosnvelt Says This Nation Should
Rededicate Itself On This
Independence Day

,President Roosevelt this week
urged the American people to re-
dedicate themselves on the coming
Fourth of July to "defend and
perpetuate those'inalienable rights
which found true expression in the
Declaration of Independence."
The approach of Independence
Day this year will kindle in all
American's hearts an appreciation
of the dark days that followed
July 4, 1776. Those were the times
that tried men's souls even as are
these times in another crisis in
American life.
"These days are also days of
hope," said the president. "and as
the birthday of American indepen-
dence draws near it is altogether
fitting that we should rededicate
ourselves to defend and perpetuate
those inalienable rights which
found true expression in the im-
mortal declaration. Those words
never had a deeper or more. solemti
meaning for America than they
have in this hour of anxiety ana
peril.
"The Fourth of July hIs always
been a. happy festival, a d!ay of
joy and exaltation in which all
Americans have caught something
of the spirit of liberty which the
fathers of the republic proclaimed
to all the world on that midsum-
mer day in Philadelphia in 1778.
it has been essentially a home
elo.brationr


-"I urge Americans everywhere
Return From Wedding to rededicate themselves to the
Mr. and Mrs. Massey Ward have end that we may find renewed
returned from New Orleans where faith in the blessings which are
they attended the wedding of Dr. ours because of the struggle andc
Mildred Ward to Dr. Paul Bar- sacrifice, the courage and fortt-
ranco. Itude and vision of those who made
----- this nation a reality."
Jacksonville Visitors --
Mr. and Mrs. Marc L. Fleischel Visiting Mother
)f Jacksonville were the guests Mrs. Frank Lanier and small
Wednesday through Saturday last, daughter Sally, of Savannah, Ga.,
week of Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Ken- are the guests of her mother,
ney. i. Mrs. R. A. Costin.


Dollar Fishing

Licenses Go On

Sale Next Week

Gbod for Entire State, Rod and
Reel or Cane Polo Fishing;
No License Inside County

Florida's new dollar fishing 11-
cense, enacted by the recent ses-
sion of the state legislature will
be on sale in Gulf county next
Tuesday, July 1.
All residents fishing in the fresh
waters of the state of Florida with
rod and reel or artificial lures are
required to-l-ave a license"under
the new law, which, however, ex-
empts those persons fishing with
a single pole and line in the county
of their legal residence. This pro-
vision allows the "barefoot boy,"
who fishes for recreation, and
those who depend on cane pole
fishing for part of their food sup-
ply, to fish without a license as
long as they fish in their home
county. Children under 15 and res-
idents 65 yeas old or more, as be-
fore, are exempt from licenses.
Holders of a resident license,
which until June 30, 1941, sells
for $2, are not required to pur-
chase a new resident state fishing
license until the current license
expires. Thus a resident who pur-
chased a $2 license since June,
1340, will not need a new license
until the old license expires, 12
months from the date it was is-
sued.
In addition to the license fee,
which goes to the state commis-
sion of game and fresh water fish,
there is a 25-cent charge for is-
suing the license, which is the
county judge's fee as established
by law.
The new license law, which was
designed to equalize the responsi-
bility among the sportsmen of the
state for paying fo fish conserva-
tion work, was co-sponsored by
the Florida Wildlife Federation.
its affiliated conservation and
sportsmen's groups, and the state
commission of game and fresh wa-
ter fish.
__---4(------
Return From Arkansas
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Boyer and
children returned Saturday from a
two weeks' vacation spent in Bee-
be. Ark.

To Visit In Connecticutt
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Locks expect
to leave this week-end for a two
week's visit with their parents in
New London, Conn.
----
It Is illegal in Kansas to drive
a horse without holding the reins.


tive service office at the city hall,
in charge of Miss Martha Belin;,
at the office of E. Clay Lewis Jr.,
in the Costin building; with B. B.
Conklin at the Gulf Hardware
store, or with Miss Kathleen Saun-
ders.,
In Wewahitchka places of regis-
tration will be in the courthouse
at the office of F. M. Campbell, ap-
peal agent, or at the office of
Sammy Patrick, tax assessor.
Time of registration will be
from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m.
In specifying who should regis-
ter, President Roosevelt's message
said: "Every male citizen of the
United 'States, and every male
alien residing in the continental
United States or in the Territory
of Hawaii, Puerto 'Rico, or the
Territory of Alaska, must present
himself for and, submit to regis-
tration before a duly designated
registration official or selective
service local board having jurisdic-
tion in the area in which he has
his permanent home or in which
he may happen to be on that day
If-
"Such person on or before July
1. 1941, and subsequent to October
16, 1940, has attained the 21st an-
niversary of the day of his birth
and has not heretofore been regis-
tered under the Selective Training
and Service Act of 1940."
4'-------


CARS DAMAGED IN all the talk about the "hyacinth
OLLISION FRIDAY nuisance" is silly. The plants let
COLLISION FRIDAYl your boat in, but. they close around


Miss Vivian Patterson and Miss
Edna Davis escaped with but mi-
nor bruises last Friday afternoon
when the cars they were driving
collided at the intersection of
long Avenue and Third street.
The Patterson car. which was
traveling west on Third street.
was turned completely around and
thrown across the avenue into the
palmettos by. the force of the col-
lision. Both cars were badly dam-
aged.

LOCAL KIWANIS CLUB
NAMES DIRECTORS
At the regular meeting of the
Kiwanis club held at the Port Inn
Thursday evening of last week,
Roy Williams. L. L. Zimmerman,
Ltndsey Temple, Bo Brown, Bert
Hull, C. W. Horton and John
Blount were elected as members
of the board of directors of the
newly-formed c'ic organization.
Thos. R. L. Carter was elected as
secretary.,
Pending the appointment of
regualr committees after charter
night, the membership indulged in


it and you can't get in or out.
Rowing is impossible because they
clog the oars. When ytou try to
pole the boat, you find, the whole
raft moving, with you and the
boat stuck in the middle. Eventu-
ally you fight your way out, but
it's with the determination never
to geO. caught again.
Motor boats don't have much
better luck, for a few minutes ar-
ter bucking a hyacinth raft their
propellers are so tightly wrapped
in plants that they are useless.
Many streams and lakes in East
and South Florida are clogged with
these plants and for years the U.
S. army engineers have been en-
deavoring to kill them off, using
traps, poison, brute strength and
mechanized, cutters, but about all
that has been done so far is to
keep a channel open in navigable
streams.
The engineers at first used pos-
son on the hyacinths and it was
doing ,the business until angry
cattlemen sued for the loss of
cows that had died from eating
the poisoned plants. This method
was abandoned and an effort made


informal discussion as to needs of to cut them loose in the rivers so
improved citizenship, that they would float down into
The name of Sheriff Byrd salt water, which kills them. Then
Parker was added to the roll of citizens of seaport cities began to
charter mefnbers at this time. (Continued on page 2)


VOLUME IV


Are Future Menace to Navigation,
Not Only In Lakes, But In
Streams and Canals

SWhile'fishing in .the Dead Lakes
at Midway !-ark last week, the ed-
itor of The Star noticed a beauti-
ful purple blossom floating in the
shallow water near shore. Upon
closer examination the flower re-
solved itself' into a water hya-
cinth, one of the most pestiferous
and rapidly spreading water plants
known to Florida.
Where the plant came from or
whether there are more in the
lakes and streams of Gulf county
we do not know, but if there are,
work should, be started Immedi-
ately to destroy them, for from
but one or two plants in the course
of a few years the entire Dead
Lake area would: be covered with
them, impeding navigation and
making it practically impossible
for fishermen in skiffs to get about
and-fish.
Not only that,, biut if the plants
are allowed to multiply without
hindrance, in a short time. they
would spread to all the lakes and
streams in this section.
Water hyacinths are beautiful
to look upon when in bloom and
are so tender they can be pulled
apart with the fingers. *But nature
has made it so that it Is hard to
beat in its native element. Each
leaf talk forms a float to keep
the plant on the surface. Long
fibrous roots reach far down into
the water to keep the plant sup-
plied with food. Runners bud out
all around a leaf-stalk, forming
dozens of new plants. The plants
Intertwine, making great rafts that
sometimes cover a hundred acres
or more of water. A single young
plant a few inches across will
grow in a few months to a mass
five or six feet in diameter.
.Running a hyacinth blockade
looks easy, until you try it. Your
rowboat cuts right into the plant
raft and you begin to think that









lc- r~


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-4r Telephone 51 )6-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

LET'S GO, U. S. A.!
Let's face the plain truth with old-fashioned
American honesty. And let's think of our-
selves for a change; let's think of the free-
dom we've fought for since 1776.
We have a fight on our hands; a fight for
freedom. There can be no honest denial of
it. The truth is that this freedom is in real,
immediate danger of disappearing. In an-
other decade our American freedom, our cher-
ished American ideals of independence, may
be as outdated as last year's almanac.
Let's go! We Americans cannot sit back
and, with our heads in the sand, pray that
the triumphant, blood-spilling Nazis will get
no closer to our shores. We must act now
with sudden violence or face the most dread-
ful choice in the memory of man-the choice
between economic, moral and political subju-
gation of our people by strangling blockade,
or a full generation of continuous warfare.
We cannot say to others: "Go to it! We'll
hold your coat!" We can't do that, because
unless we lend the strength of our arm to de,
eating the sworn enemy of what Americans
hold to be the rights of man, there's every
likelihood the United States will forfeit those
rights. Much as we hate to do it, we'll have
to send our young men to Europe again to
fight for democracy. The editor of The Star
knows exactly what that means-they'll g
through hell, many of them will not return
and many who do return will be incapacitatedL
for life, and many will be confined to veter-
an's hospitals for years.
That is the unvarnished truth. It isn't
pleasant to contemplate. But we must and we
can face it with courage and without flinch-
ing.
The subjugation of the Americas was
from the start the ultimate aim and objective
of the Hitler crusade. Only from the western
hemisphere could he hope to find the excess
of raw materials which he needs, to uphold
his otherwise unbalanced economy. His pres-
ent raid on Russia is merely to obtain the
rich Ukraien district which contains oil and
coal and is a vast granary, in order that he
may use these materials and foodstuffs to
continue his war to subjugate the Americas,
for only here can he find empty land witn
congenial climate for his artificially stimu-
lated excess popualtion.
Today is not one year ago-though many
of us think so. In twelve months, the war has
come almost to our front door. The sinking
of the American ship Robin Moore is only
one incident. Unless we "get tough," as Sen-
ator Claude Pepper urges, and act with ut-
most speed and decision, supported by our
strong convictions of right and wrong, that
war may surge up not only to our porches,
but overnight swirl around to our backyards.
To avoid the horrors of a ten years' war,
a twenty years' war, or another Hundred
Years' War, let's roll up our sleeves and ex-
terminate the creeping, filthy menace that
threatens the freedom of ourselves, our chil-
dren and their children. To safeguard our de-
mocracy and our freedom,, we have done it
every generation; since we must, Americans
of courage and faith can do it again.
LET'S GO, U. S. A.I

Keep smiling! '"'


With the closing of German consulates in
the United States, we lose a regular visitor
to The Star office-"Facts In Review," sent
out by the Nazi propaganda bureau in New
York. The editor always got a laugh out of
it, for it usually presented beautiful pictures
of Nazi soldiers assisting in harvesting crops
in conquered lands; of girls presenting flow-
ers to the invaders; scenes in "happy" Poland
where, in reality, the Polish people are being
slowly exterminated; photostatic copies of al-
leged documents showing how all the coun-
tries now under Nazi domination had secretly
conspired with England, and gobs of other
trash in a similar vein. We looked in vain
for any mention of the flight of Hess to Scot-
land. Such material long ago should have
been barred from the U. S. mails.

Fritz Kuhn, Nazi agent and American Bund
leader, sentenced to prison for five years on
a charge of stealing Bund money, has been
refused a parole. He ought to consider him-
self lucky to be alive and in prison. In Ger-
many, persons even suspected of counter po-
litical action are thrown into concentration
camps or taken before a wall and shot. It
might be a good idea to use those methods
in this country under the present national
emergency.

A Jackson county farmer posted this no-
tice on his pasture gate: "No more baptizing
in the creek running through my pasture. My
gate has been left open twice in the last
month. I can't afford to chase cattle all over
the country just to save a few sinners."

A report says that the Boulder Dam recre-
ational area drew a total of 665 visitors last
year. If it isn't a misprint, darn few people
in the country are curious about where their
money is spent.-Cincinnati Enquirer.

'It may be true that a person is taller in
the morning than at night, but we're usually
shorter at the end of the month than at any
other time.-Titusville Star-Advocate.

SThe world has found a way to avoid that
long hill climb. The alternate route is over
the warpath to the poorhouse.-Atlanta Con-
stitution.

A hundred years ago congress used to get
the jitters when the deficit ran over ten mil-
lion dollars. Nowadays-well, write your
own comment.

Port St. Joe would boom if the people here
would put as much money into homes as they
do into automobiles.

Looking at the bright side: Suppose you
lived at the North Pole and hubby stayed out
all night?-Palm Beach Post.

Don't envy the man with an income of
$25,000 a year. It generally produces a mil-
lion dollar case of indigestion.

After signing a 10-year non-aggression
pact with Russia, Hitler does the expected
and proceeds to break it.

StAdvice to the lovelorn: Don't keep telling
her that you are unworthy of her. Let it be
a surprise.-Winter Haven Herald.

When a woman says "and that ain't all"
her husband grabs his hat, for he knows she
means just that.

Our engineers perform miracles, but are
still building highways that don't curve when
the nut driver does.-Atlanta Constitution.

We saw two drunks the other days. Re-
minded us of something connected with a cir-
cus-a pair of tights.

Some of the soap they plug over the radio
will wash away everything but your sins, ac-
cording to the announcer.


BAD NEWS FOR HIM !


HYACINTHS FOUND Sheriff Willir-n R. Browne or
GROWING IN DEAD Closter, N. J., discovered after his
LAKES BY EDITOR birthday party, attended byp police
chiefs and detectives, that some-
(Continued. from Page 1) one had stolen his birthday gift, a.


co:nTinin that they couldn't stand
the stench of the dead hyacinths
that piled up along the shores, so
rois method, too, had to be aban-
doned.
Turning to the latest means of
warfare, the army now uses mec'
anized fighters. Small shallow-
draft !barlges are armed with a
battery of mnotor-driven buzz saws
which chop the plants so fine that
there is nothing left to star: new
ones growing, but all they can,
1i.e to do by this method is to
.k:'p th e hyacinths in check
e-lolr-h so h!at, boats can navigate
the rivers.
The best way to kill hyacinths
is to pull them out of the water
a',I let tlhnm 1dry on shore, but
this method is impractical where
t., re are thousands of acres of
the plants.
However, in the Dead Lakes,
Where i j ,, .r there may be
but a few of the plants, they prob-
ably can be eliminated and a men-
ace removed if fishermen, when
they find a hyacinth will pull it
out of the water, place it in their
beat and throw it high and dry on
shore when they lan< '. Such co-
cperation on file part of everyone
should in a short time remove all
the plants from one of the most
important attractions for sports-
men in Gulf county.

The latest thing out is a line of
rubber lures for fishermen. Now
sportsmen needn't stop at stretch-
ing the catch-they can stretch
the lures too!


IF IT'S FISH

YOU WANT!
Go To

"Uncle" Bud Brockette's

Bnllem & Pullem

Fishing Camp
----on the
DEAD LAKES
3 Miles Above Wewahitchka
Fine Clean Cabins In Beautiful
Surroundings. Good Dry
Boats. .. Shower. ... Ice
Cold Well Water.. And Above
All-
Plenty of Bass, Bream,
Shellcrackers, Perch and
Channel Cats


pair of silver candlesticks.
---- ----
When "Skipper," a parrot be-
longing to David Bothwell of Fort
Worth, Texas, wandered away. from
home and became lost, it called
"Hello, hello" until it was rescued
and taken home.
I
PLUMBING HEATING


ST. JOE

I PLUMBING

F. J. CORBIN, Manager

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.














rFe//,I
IisludllgI i
Developlet l v

fmHiess werk. ldiv dua at-
St.so. 24 heer **'rvk. A
tr ial ator wI make yr
s\ d

ii


S S


MIDWAY PARK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf 1
County Line


Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES
Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cabins
Good Beds
Good Meals
Good Guides
COME IN AND REST!
I Am YOUR Servant- Let
Me Serve YOU[


JOHN


HENRY JONES


'-C-'-"~+t----~ -~~


FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1941


.


rHE STAR, PO)RT ST. lbe, GULF OOUNTIY, FLOR-IDA


S AA rllA










FRIAY JNE 7,191 T-r SAR ?OT T.JOE GLFGONTV FORDA AG TRE


BRIDGE SHOWER FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT
MARY LEE HAYLES AUXILIARY FORMED
Honoring Miss Mary Lee Hayles, A call meeting was held last Fri-
who left Sunday io make her home day afternoon at the home of Mrs.
in St. Cloud, Fla., Mrs. Robert Troy Jones for the purpose of or-
Tapper, Mrs. Massey Ward and ganizing a Woman's Auxiliary of
Mrs. A. L. Ward, entertained with the Volunteer Fire Department.
three tables of bridge at the home Six ladies were present and Mrs.
of Mrs. A. L. Ward on Sixteenth Jones presided. The following were
street last Friday afternoon, nominated for the various offices
G'adiola and pc-onies decorated of the organization: Mrs. Jones,
the living room where two pro- president; Mrs. M. K. Hurlbut,
gressions w ere enjoyed., after vice-president; Mrs. Joe Morrow,
which pri;,es were presented to secretary; Mrs. Daniels, corre-
Mrs. Marc Fleischel, high, and spondling secretary; Mrs. W. C.
Mrs. Robert Tapper, cut. Little Roche, financial committee chair-
Bobby Ward and Annette Ward man; Mrs. Sammse Davis, 'pub-
then brought in an attractively licity; Mrs. Roy Williams, pro.
decorated wagon filled with gifts gram; Mrs. Joe Grim.sley, welfare.
and presented them to the hon. Following the meeting a social
oree. hour was enjoyed,
The hostess served refreshments These officers will be installed
of ice cream moulded in the form at a meeting to be held this after-
of a diamond ring, and iced angel noon at the home of Mrs. Morrow.
food caRes to Mesadmes Fleischel, .' *
J. B. Gloeckler, W. D. Dare, E. C. ENGAGEMENT OF NOBBIE
Lewis, J. L. Miller; R. Porter, H. STONE IS ANNOUNCED
Soule, and Richard Miller and Announcement is being made of
Miss Hayles. the engagement and approaching
*t t marriage of Miss Mazie Edith
IRTH ANNOUNCEMENT Bryan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Robert Burns Bryan of Wrights-
Mr. and Mrs. William Snellgrove ville, Ga., to Nobbie Higdon Stone,
announce the arrival of an 8-pound n of Mr.'-and Mrs. T. H. Stone
son on Sunday,. June 22, at their of this city.
home on Monument avenue. The wedding will take .place
next Sunday, June 29, in the
Mrs. Tom Gibson Jr., and son Wrightsville Methodist church.
Tommy III, of Atlanta, Ga., are A *
the guests of Mrs. R. A. Costin Sammie Davis was a busines-F
and M.r and Mrs. Tom Gibson of visitor in Marvyn, Ala., Tuesday
Beacon Hill. and Wednesday of this week.
66 *


Wallace Biteman of Attapulgus, Mrs. P. D. Prows has returned
Ga., has accepted a position with from Baskin, La., where she vis-
the LeHardy Pharmacy. ited her parents.


PORT THEATRE
Theatre Opens Sundays at 1:45 P. M. and 8:30 P. M.
Saturday 1:15 Daily 2:45 Admission 10c-16c-30c

SGO TO THE MOVIES FOR ENTERTAINMENT 3"

SATURDAY ONLY SAT. NITE 10:30 P. M.
Gene is Here With Ac- You'll feel your flesh
tion and Singing CREEP! .It's a spine-
tingling sensation with
IOC.t plenty of HORROR!
'in-ta


------- ---LLN PAUL
Final Chapter of Serial DREW LUKAS
"JUNIOR G-MEN" Tickets On Sale at 10 p. m.


SUNDAY MONDAY TUES. ONLY-JULY 1
June 29 and 30 .
SWORD'S CHAMPiOW BRORCO-BUSTER
I 1- "itn ih a aifd a man \ h1 at deht lard oed
Ccmedy Such as Only AMES HOLLYWOOD SCREEN
Chaplin Can Give You! IUEN'



n his new comedy
The Great
DIoTATOR 1
with JACK OAKIE and 'ry Bell
PAULETTE GODDARD George
MONIGOMERY

News "Infatnry"


SPECIAL 4th OF JULY OWL SHOW

THURSDAY NITE, TULY 3-11 P. M.

FREDRIC MARCH BETTY FIELD


"VICTORY"
TICKETS ON SALE AT 10:00 P. M.


WILLIAM HURLBUT AND
MARGARET PRITCHETT WED
Announcement was made this
week of the marriage of Miss Mar-
garet Pritchett, daughter of Mrs,
Lule Inez Pritchett of Alberta, Va.,
to William E. Hurlbut of this city,
son of Dr. and Mrs. J. C. Hurlbut
of Orlando, on June 19 at the Chris-
tian church parsonage, Orlando,
the Rev. W. H. Book of Alberta,
Va., officiating. The ceremony was
performed in the presence of .the
immediate families and a few
friends.
Mr. Hurlbut is employed by the
Apalachicola Northern Railroad
company. The young couple are at
home for the present at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Miles Hurlbut.

CONSECREATION SERVICES
HELD AT ST. JAMES CHURCH


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


EPWORTH LEAGUE TO HOLD
'LEMON SQUEEZE' TONIGHT
The Epworth League of .the
Methodist church is sponsoring a
"Lemon Squeeze" social this eve-
ning in the Black Cat cafe build-
ing, opposite the postoffice. Each
person must bring a lemon, and at
the door the lemon will be
squeezed and that person will pay
one cent per seed. No admission
will be over 25 cents. Let's all
be there.
As entertainment, "Cootie" will
be played. Instructions will be
given at the party, and no skill is
required for this novel game,
which will be fun for young and
old alike.
Proceeds from the social will be
used to send one of the League
members as a representative to
Huntington College at Montgom-
ery, Ala.

MARRIAGE OF MRS. VERA
LAWLESS IS ANNOUNCED
Announcement was made this
week of the marriage of Mrs. Vera
Lawless of this city to John Group


Final payments were made last of Harrisburg, Pa., on Saturday, ...... V ...Ure a b
week and consecration services June 21. pense, the picture can be brack-
were held at the:St. James Epis- The bride, a sister of Mrs. C. W. eted with many of the best terror
copal church Sinday evening, with Johnson and Mrs. Kelly Carver, films produced in recent years.
Bishop Frank Juhan, bishop of the is well known here, where she has The ingenuity of the story easily
Diocese of Florida, assisted by many friends who wish her ah outclasses most other films of this
Rev. T. Chalmers of Jacksonville happiness. type.
-------
and Rev. Frank Dearing of Pan- *
ama City, officiating. Onnie ,Lou LeHardy has re- Bishop Juhan Is Visitor
Immediately following the sery- turned home after spending a Bishop Frank Juhan of Jackson-
ices a reception was held at the week in Tallahassee visiting with ville was a visitor in Port St. Joe
Port Inn, during which time a his- Eilzabeth McLean. last Sunday.
tory of the church was read by B. 4* *( _
B. Conklin and congratulatory Mrs. 0. O. Miller of Blountstown The common eel is the only fish-
messages from friends afar were spent Monday in this city, the that spends most of its life in
read by Rev. Dearing. guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. fresh water and then goes into'
f E. B. Dendy. the depths of the ocean to spawn,
MRS. PRIDGEON ENTERTAINS *r after which it dies.
J. A. M. CLUB MONDAY Robert Buckles of Kissimmee
The members of the J. A. M. and M. L. Strickland of Vero One may, develop his own char-
club wee entertained Monday eve- Beach arrived Tuesday to spend acter, but his reputation is at the
ing at the home of Mrs. S. C. several days here as guests of Mr. mercy of the gossips.
Pridgeon on Third: street. The and Mrs. Thos. R. L. Carter. Mrs. ,
living and dining rooms were Buckles and Mrs. Strickland ar- DR C
opened ensuite and attractively rived last week to visit their par- y D t sv
decorated with vases of lillies and ts. DE N T IST --
zinnias.
Sewing and, chatting were en- Advertising doesn't cost-it pays Office Hours 9 to 121to 5
1 Sundays By AppointrrLent
joyed until a late hour, when the Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe
hostess served a salad plate, cake. AVOID TROUBLE! -
':e crinnm and punch to Mesdames .. If your car gets out of con-
E. C. Pridgeon, A. D. Lawson, C. trol you know what happens
N. Boyer, W. C. Pridgeon, J. M. -TROUBLE.
Smith, J. A. Connell, Sammie Da It's the same way with
i. 1- A D dWH,,i,, W_ TT I-Tnr- i e


V V s. .. A. r e ani Ct w. t. riowe1
and Miss Myrtice Coody.
*h 1
MARTHA CIRCLE PRESENTS
ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM
The regular monthly Royal Serv-
ice program was presented by the
Martha Circle of the Baptist Mis-
sionary society at the church Mon-
day afternoon. Mrs. Nick Kelly
"--is in charge and opened with
the watchword.
Topic for the program was "Ur-
,en!- Need In Europe," and was
preceded by the song and prayer
service. Members taking part
were Mrs. John Kelly, Mrs. A. G.
Montgomery, Mrs. J. F. Miller,
Mrs. Daisy Staten, Mrs. E. C. Ca.
son, and Mrs. M. B. Larkin.

SUMMER BAND CLASSES
ARE ANNOUNCED
BaRndmasie- Howell Halmpton an-
nounces that band classes for the
summer are getting underway and
all students, both old and new, are
"reed to make every effort pos-
sible to attend the classes, as well
as the weekly practice held every
Monday night.
The band is badly crippled by
the graduation, of about one-third
of i.s members, and beginners are
needed in order to maintain the
Standard of members. Now is a
mood time for parents 'to start
their children on a musical career.
Mr. Hampton points out.

Dan Harris has returned to his
home in Dotahan, Ala., after spendl
ing several days here as the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shaw.

Grady Herring of Beacon Hill
has as his guests his brother and
wife, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Her-
ring and children of Madison.


your system, so it's wiser to
rely on your doctor and our
accurately compounded pre-
sciptions. There can be no
trouble then.

LeHARDY
PHARMACY

-- -- --- -- -- -- -- -- -- -
ROOM AND
BOARD
BY THE T 7.00
WEEK

Dining Room

i; Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........:35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c
'I
MRS. M. O. FREEMAN ,
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building
-- .- - -
54
.


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

HERMAN ROWAN
Local Representative


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100 *

DAY OR NIGHT
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT -
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION
--- g^-maM. -- .- -- ---__-__---.__- ----- .. ,.


"Monster" Film

Is Chiller-Diller

Picture Showing at Port Theatre
Midnight Show Saturday Is
Ingenious Shocker

Bringing with it a bumper crop
of goosebumps, "The Monster and
the Girl," playing at.the Owl Show
Satudray night at the Port theatre
is an ingenious -shocker, featuring
Ellen Drew, Robert Paige, Joseph
Calleia, Paul Lukas and Onslow
Stevens.
Piling eerie thrill upon thrill in
staccato fashion, it tells the story
of a man unjustly executed for a
murder, whose brain, kept alive by
a brilliant scientist, is transplanted
to the skull of a gorilla. The dead
man's brain, flaring with hate
against six false accusers, five of
whom were responsible for the
evil betrayal of his sister, directs
the gorilla in wreaking horrible
vengeance against the six.
Swift-.naced nd mS acke with als-


.~FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1941


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, CUILF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


C








PAGEFOU TH STR, PRT T. OEGUL COUTYFLOIDAFRIDY, UNE27,194


Everybody Is

Cheering 'The

Great Dictator'

Chaplin Speaks In His Greatest
And Funniest Picture Coming to
Port Theatre Sunday-Monday

Charlie Chaplin is back. After
two years of now-you-see-him-now-
you-dont and an incredible confu-
sion of rumors as to whether he
would publicly show "The Great
Dictator," the first Chaplin comedy
since "Modern Times' will play at
the Port theatre Sunday and Mon-
day at regular prices.
In "The Great Dictator," Chap-
lin is seen not only as the little
tramp with the derby, cane and
awkwardly; fitting shoes, but in an-
other role as well-that of a
mighty dictator of a war-mad
country. There are two stories that
converge-the story of the barber
from the ghetto, and the story of
the palace. I "
Supporting Chaplin in his dual
role are Paulette Goddard, again
his leading lady; Jaik Oakie as
the rival dictator, and Reginald
Gardiner as Schultz. aide to the
'dictator.
And Chaplin talks! His first
speech in the picture has been
given a dramatic frame; it is an
event, and is exactly what you
would expect as the little clown
of screen history. But as the mad
dictator. he thunders aid roars.
rants and screams into a dozen
withering microphones in an un-
decipherable guttural.
(Chaplin, breaking the silence
that habitually enshrouds the pro-
duction of his pictures, points out
that notwithstanding any burlesque
of history and world events that
;might he found in the picture, no
change in the story was necessi-
tated by those events. The story
on the screen Is as Ie comedian
first conceived it.

Softball League

Games Next Week
June 30-Kenney vs. Pulp Mill.
DMerchants vs. Bank.
July 1-Laboratory vs. Mainten-
ance. Kenney vs. Champs.
_____- ---
A man who is clever enough to
be boss in his own home is gen-
erally too wise to brag about it
much.


OUR DEMOCRACY byMat


PEEPING TOM
He saw her swimming in the brook
A moment- swift and fleeting,
And from the shock of that brief
look
His heart almost stopped beating.
He worked his way around the
trees
To where the view was clear,
And then on trembling hands and
knees
He edged a little nearer.
He'd, never seen such perfect lines
As she was there displaying
Beneath the spreading towering
pines
In languid splendor playing.
Her twists and turns were full of
grace.
Her body smoothly moulded,
And, O! What joy was on his face
A7 each new charm unfolded.
And when she Joated with the
stream
The sight was so entrancing-
Her wondrous body seemed to
gleam
From sunbeams softly glancing.
He yearned for her with heart and
soul


And then ha fell to wishing,
For he had neither hook nor pole--
And bass are caught by fishing!
-Southern Wildlife.

If Sherman could see what war
is like today he could hardly de-
scribe it in one word.


GP.,


rrk. .


. A. -- -S '"I / 0'7/
LAYGROUNDS, PARKS
AND RECREATION CENTERS INCREASING.


AND, MOST IMPORTANT FOR.
PARENTS OF BABIES BORN IN
THE NEW YEAR. OF 1941 -
| OUR DOCTORS HAVE, SINCE
1915, car
/INFANT MORTALITY
I iN HALF.


My-y-y-y, But They Are Good!

They Say About These Cookies


NEW HUSE PAINT



MADE BY U POINT


IF HAVE Q,/
YOU EVER HAD
A DAY when you felt tense,
jumpy, irritable?
A NIGHT when you were
wakeful and restless?
Over-taxed nerves are likely to
,cause loss of friends, loss of sleep,
loss of pleasure, time missed from
work, family quarrels, physical
and mental suffering.
The next time you feel nervous,
try the soothing effect of one or
two Dr. Miles Effervescent Ner-
vine Tablets.
Try Dr. Miles Effervescent Ner-
vine Tablets for Sleeplessness due
to Nervousness, Nervous Irrita-
lIility, Nervous Headache, Excit-
ability and Restlessness. Your
money back if you are not en-
Slrely satisfied.
At your Drug Store
Small Package S50
Large Package 756
Read full directions in package.
0R. OR.MILES 4,.s--

I lNEDRVINETABLETS


COOKIES you can serve with fruit
for dessert, or for in-between
snacks are a summer "must."
And cookie recipes that can be
stirred up in a twinkle are a find.
To aid your knack for making cook-
ies fast, use the new self-rising flour
which cuts sifting and measuring
time in half. All you do is combine
this new self-rising flour with fat,
sugar, eggs, milk, and flavoring and
your cookies are ready for the oven.
They're more economical, too, for
a high grade slow acting baking
powder is already mixed into the
flour.
For a good combination, try lemon
cookies and walnut rocks, as fol-
lows:
Lemon Cookies.
Cream 'A cup butter and % cup
sugar together. Add 1 egg, and stir
until thoroughly blended. 'Add 2
cups self-rising flour (sifted before


FLORIDA PORTS MAKE
STARTLING COMEBACK
Florida ports, hard ]W, a year
ago because of curtailed trade
with Euripe, have made a start-
ling comeback, and figures re-
leased, by the U. S. customs of,
fice reveal that customs collec-
tions for the federal government
for May totaled $587,533 as com-
pared with $377,376 the corres-


measured) and % cup milk alter-
nately. Add the juice and grated
rind of lemon and 1 teaspoon
lemon extract. Drop by teaspoon-
fuls on a greased baking sheet and
bake in moderate oven (330 degrees
F.) about 20 minutes.
Walnut Rocks.
Cream % cup fat and 1% cups
light brown sugar. Add 2 eggs .one
at a time and beat vigorously. Add
1/3 cup milk alternately with 3 cups
self-rising flour, 1 teaspoon allspice,
1 teaspoon cinnamon, % teaspoon
cloves, 14 teaspoon nutmeg, Y4 tea-
spoon ginger. When blended, add
1 cups black walnuts and 1 cup
raisins or dates. Form into little
balls about V inch in diameter or
drop from tip of a spoon on a
greased baking sheet. Bake in mod-
erate oven (350 degrees F.) about
15 minutes.

ponding fonth last year.
The gain is credited to in-
creased business at home as well
as an improved business with our
neighboring Latin-American na-
tions. Shere are good indications
that the improvement will con-
tinue under government plans
which call for the increased use
of railroads while shivs are used
for shorter hauls between ports.


BRILLIANTLY white at the
start, Du Pont House Paint
keeps houses whiter because it
stays cleaner. Here's why:-
Du Pont Prepared Paint forms
a tough, durable film which pro-
tects the surface from rust, rot
or decay. Like all paints, it col-
lects dirt on exposure to the ele-
ments. As time goes on, however,
a fine white powder forms on the
surface of this new paint. This
powder is washed away by heavy
rainsrscarrying the dirt with it,
and exposing a fresh white sur-
face. This "self-cleaning" process


starts after a few months of ex-
posure under normal conditions
of weather, but may be delayed
under unusual climatic or dirt-
collecting conditions. Because the
"self-cleaning" process is gradual,
the wearing qualities of the paint
film are not abnormally affected.
Its economy lies in the fact
that it stretches the time between
paintings. Remember: Du Pont
House Paint costs no
more than other good
paints. Ask your
painting contractor
to use it!


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.


PHONE 2


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


rs ILillF) *


FRIIDAY, JUNE 27, 1941


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR