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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00244
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00244

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and uptullding of
the City of Port St Joe.
elk


THE


STAR


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


Pnrt St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florlda's fast.
eat growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1941 NUMBER 37


Voters to Pass Welcome Rain

On Eight New Beats Down To

Amendments End Drought

One Measure, If Adopted, Will Six Weeks' Dry Spell Is Ended
Make Gulf and Calhoun Coun- As Four Inches of Rain Falls
ties One Senatorial District During the Week-End

Eight constitutional amendments Coming as a welcome relief to
will be submitted, to the electorate the drought that- has prevailed inI
of Florida at the general election this section since May 7, more
in November, 1942, for adoption or than four inches of rain fell in
rejection, as the result of legisla. Port St. Joe and over all Gulf
tive action just ended. Briefly, the county between Friday and Mon-
amendments provide as follows: day.
Amend Article IV, by adding The downpour was indeed, wel-
%:Sec. 30, creating a game and fresh come to farmers, for so little had'
wvatr fish commission to consist fallen in .the past six weeks that
of five members, one from each many had given up hope of saving
congressional district, to be ap- their crops, which had begun to
pointed by the governor. wilt from the lack of moisture and
SAlend Article XVII, Sec. 3, to excessive heat.
provide for .submitting constitu-i Local flower lovers saved their
tional amenciment in special elec- blooms through the use of city wa-
tion,' not less than 90 nor more ter, a speciaT rate having been
than 180 days after the legislature made recently by the city commis-
adijourns; providing three-fourths sioners in an effort to encouarge
of the members of each branch beautification of the city by the
of the legislature vote to submit planting of flowers and shrubs.
constitutional amendments at spe- Reports indicate that the rains
cial election, were general throughout the South
Amend Article IX, by adding and gave relief to the drought-
Sec. 16, creating a state board of stricken area.
administration; providing for di- It is hoped that the rains will
vision of gasoline taxes on a basis continue, not only as a relief for
of two cents for county road and agriculturists, but to swell the
bridge debt :service and four cents lakes and rivers which have been
to the road department for a pe- falling at an alarming pace. R
riod of 50 years. The governor, ----
comptroller and treasurer to cor- 33 CHIDREN EXAMINED
pose the board of administration, IN SUMMER ROUND-UP


and snail nave power to retire all
road, bridge and debt service, and
supervise refundings.
Amend Article V, by adding Sec.
46, providing for the election of cir-
cult judges in 1948; and all incum-
bent judges to remain in office un-
til January, 1949, it amendment is
adopted.
Amend Article XVI, Sec. 16, pro-
viding for the taxing of all corpor-
ations except religious, scientific,
municipal, literary, fraternal or
charitable, but not affecting Sec-
tions 12 and 14 of Article IX.
Amend Article X, Sec. 1, to pro-
vide garnishment of wages, salary
or incomes up to 25 per cent; but
not applying to salaries or in-
comes of $25 or less per week.,
(Continued on page 4)
----------
Police Pension Bill
Signed By Governor

Governor Holland last Friday
signed into law a bill which set
up a voluntary state retirement and
insurance fund -for city police of-
ficers.
Revenue for the fund may be
raised by adding an extra dollar
to every fine assessed in munici-
pal court and by officers' contri-
butions.

To Attend Aquatic School
Buck Walters of Kenney's Mill
was selected as delegate of the
Red Cross to attend the aquatic
school in Brevard, N. C. He will
take a two weeks' course after
which he will be stationed at the
Gulf Beach for the summer.

Undergoes Appendectomy
Miss Malzie Waters was taken


to a Panama City hospital Tues-
day, where she underwent an ap-
pendectomy.
-K
Attend G. A. Camp
Geraldine Parker, Carolyn Bag-i
gett, Gwendolyn Howell and Caro-
lyn Gangneiux attended the G. A,
camp held at Beacon Beach Inn
from June 11 to 14.


The annual summer round-up of
pre-school age children sponsored
Wednesday by, the Parent-Teachers
association in conjunction"with the
county health unit, resulted in 33
young children being examined.
The work was carried out by
Mesdames T. H. Kirkland, Curtis
Palmer, W. D. Dare, B. E. Kenney
Jr., Brooks Kennington, J. D. Lane,
W. H. Wellington, Dave Smith, E.
C. Cason, E4 Smith and T. V. Mor-
irs and Miss Fay Morris. Doctors
assisting were A. L. Ward, J. R.
Norton, L. H. Bartee and J. C. Coe.
Dr. R. J. Lamb, director of the
health unit, took charge of the im-
munizations. Nurses assisting were
the Misses McCloud,. Warren and
Elmer, the latter being the new
health nurse for Gulf county.
The P.-T. A. expresses its grati-
fication to those who assisted, all
of whom have volunteered to aid
in the colored clinic to be held
next Thursday, and wishes to
thank especially Mr. Palmer for
his valuable assistance.

G. P. WOOD TO ACT AS
PEPPER'S SECRETARY


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TO PRESIDE IN 1943 Colored 'Healer' Local Kiwanians

SHe.. old aon Ch.r,- A O


I



.4
.,,


State Senator Philip D. Beall,
Pensacola lawyer, who will pre-
side over the 1943 Florida ten-
ate. He was elected by caucus
of holdover senators and will
succeed John R. Beacham of
West Palm Beach. Beall has
served two terms in the senate.


rapper Named

Harbor Master

places A. M. Jones; Appoint-
ment By Governor Is Con-
firmed By Senate

Captain Robert Tapper of this
ty was named as harbor master
r the local port June 6 by Gov-
nor Spessard L. Holland, the ap-
ointmnent being confirmed' by the
ate senate during its closing
iurs. Captain Tapper succeeds
captain A. M. Jones, who has held
e position of harbor master for
e past three years.
Captain Tapper will hold the po-
ion until the November 1942
neral election, when the people
Gulf county will vote on the of-
e under a local bill passed at
e recent legislative session.

AF Cadets Surprised
At Florida Fruit Supply

Young British aviation students, I
ing taught U. S. flying methods
Lakeland, say they are amazed
the amount of citrus fruit to be
ind in Florida.
Oranges, if obtainable at all,
it 75 cents each in London since
war, the students said.
The 100 British students were
pertained at a picnic Monday at
ich 10 boxes of oranges were
de into juice. One RAF cadet


n was rei iIUy ireipoietu rn was amazed when told the cost of
Washington last week that Oscar the fruit was about $15. In Lon-
Johnson, secretary to Senatordon, said, the cost would be
Claude Pepper, is to be appointed about $1600.
director of the office of govern- ____
ment reports in Jacksonville, and WEATHER STATIONS PREPARE
that former Representative G. P. TO ISSUE HURRICANE DATA
Woodi will succeed him as the sen- A protective guard against trop-
ator's secretary. ical hurricanes thrown up along
---- --- the Atlantic and Gulf coasts from
Nurse Leaves for St. Cloud Florida to Texas by the federal
Miss Mary Lee Hayels, R.N., ex- government, began its seventh
pects to leave Sunday for St. year of operation last week. There
Cloud. "Hayles," as she is better are 12 major weather bureau sta-
known, has made many friends in tions in the area, linked by tele-
the past two years who will regret type, which will issue hurricane
her leaving. Miss Thelma Johnston warnings and- announce formation
of Charity Hospital, New Orleans. of dangerous storms.
arrived this week to take her place iV-
in Dr. A. L. Ward's office. NO ERROR
---- ---- -- That cut upside down on the
Visiting In Virginia society page of The Star last
Mrs. Patty Lovett and small week was not an error. It was
daughter, Martha Louise, left yes- one of those "Friday the 13th"
terday for a two weeks' visit with gags, and brought considerable
relatives in Covington, Va. comment from our readers.


A VJUL I .llCjr ees

Of Four Women

Being Held In County Jail Await-
ing Hearing; Claims to Have
"Divine Power"

Joe Lyons, coal-black negro from
the West Indies, self-styled "divine
healer" and apparently well edu-
cated, is being held in the county
jail at Wewahitchka on complaints
filed by four white women that
he used obscene and suggestive
language in their presence.
Lyons was arrested at Kenney's
Mill by Chief of Police Troy Jones
and carried to the county seat. It
is reported that as the car stopped
-at the court house several Port St.
Joe cars pulled up behind, and the
negro jumped out, almost knock-
ing down Chief Jones, dashed into
the court house and hid in the
men's toilet, -evidently fearful that
a mob was on his trail. He was
dragged out by Sheriff Byrd Parker
and lodged in a cell.
Lyons had an office in the col-
ored quarters where he worked on
the superstitious beliefs of the ne-
groes, claiming that he could cure
all diseases through his divine
powers.

BUD BROCKETTE HAS
LAKES' BEAUTY SPOT

The editor and his wife, accom,
panied by Mr. and Mrs. G. M.
Sheppard of Tallahassee, Mrs.
Miriam Fisher andl two daughters
of Fort Myers and Charlie Shep-
pard, our printer's devil, spent the
week-end at Bud Brovkette's, fish-
ing camp on the Dead Lakes.
A more beautiful spot cannot be '
imagined and "Uncle Bud'" cabins t
are clean and comfortable, with t
complete furnishings. His boats are t
roomy, dry and clean. But the (
thing that took our fancy was the h
ice-cold well water that is avail- F
able-we never could get enough g
of it.
The fishing was excellen.f'anE"d
when Ye Ed went out casting for f
bass they were jumping so fast r
and furious that he could hardly V
decide wTiere to cast. We only
brought in five, but the boat would I
have been loaded had we hooked
all that struck.
Anyone desiring to spend an en-
joyable week-end in what might be o
termed "the garden spot of the a
Dead Lakes," should! make ar- o
rangements to visit "Uncle Bud" w
Brockette.s Bullem and Pullem
fishing camp. W ere going back. e
-------- Ji
TWO SELECTEES LEAVE b
FOR CAMP BLENDING m
Roy Redd and William H. Cook
.eft Monday for Camp Blanding as
part of the Gulf county selective


service quota.
Three white youths will leave on
July 7 and three colored men on
July 14 asis county's quota on
the new call.


Return to Home In Georgia
Mrs. W. K. Norton and daugh-
ter, Miss Adelia, Miss Laurine
Kelly and Bill Jennings have re-
turned to their homes in Dawson,
Ga., after spending several days
here as guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.
M. Smith.


r.e ue"trvnlg

All-Kiwanis Week


tain exercises at St. Marys, Notre
Visiting If Arkansas Dame, Holy Cross, Ind., of which
Mr. and, Mrs. J. L. Temple left school she is an alumnus. Her
last Friday for a week's visit in dauglfter. Barbara, accompanied
Little Rock, Ark. Miss Betty Jo her to Montgomery, Ala., where
Temple, who has spent threeweeks she will visit relatives for a short
in that city, will return with them. time.


Session of Port St. Joe Club Is
Attended By Members.
From Panama City

Together with 2000-odd other Kl-
wanis club in the United .States
and Canada, Port St. Joe Kiwan-
ians are observing "All-Kiwanis
Week," June 15 to 21.
"Service and concentration are
the keynote of today," writes Mark
A. Smith of Macon, Ga.; president
of Kiwanis International. "Our
times call for self-denial, determi-
nation, thrift and' the faith that
right will'win."
Thursday, evening of last week
the loocal Kiwanis club, meeting
at the Port Inn, was honored by the
presence of several Panama City
Kiwanians headed by W. S. "Bill"
Weaver, principal of the Bay high
school and president of the Pan-
ama City club. Others were Sam
Morgan, Forest Holland and Capt.
H. L. Ulyat, in charge of the Sal-
vation Army.
Following the invocation by Cap-
tain Ulyat, Mr. Weaver presided at
the insistence of J. E. Bounds,
president of the Port St. Joe club.
He outlined briefly, but with tell-
ing clarity, the Klwanis goal for
ideal citizenship, especially with
reference to existing emergencies,
the tribute to the flag and all. that
the flag meant to tA.merica and
Americans. Mr. Weaver's talk was
followed by the singing of "Amer-
lea," led by Captain Ulyat with
Miss Clarice Chafin..at the piano.
With reference, to the roll of
charter 'members published last
week, Tegret was expressed that
.he name of George Tapper was
inadvertently oiiltted. Added to
the roll were the names of IaYve
Gaskin and Roy Connell of Wewa-
itchka. Rev. W. A. Daniels of the
Presbyterian church was an invited
suest at the meeting.
Due to lack of time and .the wish
of many members to attend the
iremen's ball, the election of di-
ectors andi a secretary was post-
*oned 'until the next meeting.
______-K
Receipt Tax Payments
Ended On June 15th

When they made their payments
n June 15, Florida retailers were
ble to close their books on the
ne-half per cent gross receipts tax
hvich they have paid for six years.
The 1941 legislature repealed it,
effective July, 1, and Comptroller
im Lee said payments would not
e required on business during the
onth of June.
------4-
NEW SANITARY OFFICER
Dr. R. J. Lamb, head of the lo-
al health unit, announces that L.
Buzzett will take over the po-
tion of sanitary officer for Gulf
unty made vacant by. the recent
-signation of Selwyn Chalker. Mr.
uzzett, who has been coAsiected
ith the Apalachicola health unit,
ill arrive about July 15.
-----..-----
Visiting In North
Mrs. J. R. Cawthon left Sunday
morning for a fortnight's visit in
ort Wayne and Chicago. While
ray ahe expects to attend cer-


.^ _


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"w'.. v---- --- -----









T


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W.. SMI-TH*, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
it~der Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........ $2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-{ Telephone 51 j s-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is, thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

MR. WALDROP IS ALL WET
Frank C. Waldrop, columnist, writing in
the Washington, D. C., Times-Herald, puts
forward the theory that construction of the
Florida ship canal would eliminate the neces-
sity of pipelines from the Gulf to carry gaso-
line and other petroleum products to the
eastern seaboard.
Says Mr. Waldrop, in part
"The Florida ship canal-or rather the lack
of it-has a direct bearing on the looming
shortage in oil. and gasoline. Our
railroad system today has less carrying ca-
pacity than it did in the war of 1917-18, and
the war project is infinitely greater. .
You may assume with perfect, gloomy assur-
ance that our railroad system, less able to
move goods than it was in 1917-18 and with
more goods to move, is headed for an un-
pleasant era. It just won't be able to deliver.
"To relieve just one tiny element of the
total pressure, Mr. Roosevelt has ordered an
oil pipeline from the Texas and Oklahoma
fields to the Atlantic coast' The oil must be
got there. But is that a sound solution?
'"To movea- barrel of oil by pipeline costs
six or eight times as much as to move it by
tanker. If this proposed national defense pipe-
line were justified in the ordinary terms of
trade, it would already have been in opera-
tion.
"It will be only an expensive stand-by for
military purposes, doomed to idleness as soon
as we stop fighting.
"What this pipeline would cost has not yet
been announced. But we do know why it is
needed. We are desperately short not only
in our railroad capacity but also in our ships.
There are not enough tankers to move the
oil where it is needed, though we have in the
ground more than we can use.
"Short on trains. Short on ships. So we're
laying an economically unjustified pipeline."
There is one thing Mr. Waldrop does not
mention, and that is that a corporation had
been formed to build the Texas-Atlantic coast
pipeline and that it was necessary for the
government to step in because the railroads
have held up the laying of such lines through
the state of Georgia. One line already com-
leted by private capital from Port St. Joe to
Chattanooga, Tenn., with the exception or
about 21 miles under highways and railroads
in Georgia, has been carrying gasoline as far
as the Geoogia line for a number of months.
He further states that such a line will be
"doomed to idleness as soon as we stop fight-
ing." He is decidedly wrong there, for such
a line will continue to function as long as
there is gasoline to be transported to the
eastern seaboard. If such were the case, there
would be no justification for the thousands
of miles of pipelines already in operation in
the United States and which have been in
use for years.
Mr. Waldrop admits that there is a short-
age of tankers to carry petroleum products
and that the railroads are unable to cope with
the situation, and yet in the next breath
avers that the pipeline is "unjustified."
We don't know what Mr. Waldrop is get-
ting out of the fact that he is boosting for
the Florida ship canal, which would take sev-
eral years to build at a cost of unestimated


millions of dollars and which would not be
used by shipowners, who so stated when the
matter of building the ditch was brought up
some years back and into which $5,00,000 ol
the taxpayers' money was sunk, but he is
all wet when he says that pipelines are "un-
justified."

HOW NOT TO PAY

There has been much discussion of how to
finance the defense program. Equally im-
portant is the subject of how NOT to finance
defense.
There is a small, uninformed group which
still feels that the easy way out is simply for
the government to issue more money-to turn
the printing presses loose, and to pay as we
go with crisp new currency. That would be
the most ruinous course this country could
take. That would be direct inflation. The dol-
lar would buy less and less. Prices .would go
upward with ever-gathering momentum. And
the result would be a collapse similar to that
occurring in Germany after World War 1,
when literally billions of marks were needed
to buy a loaf of bread.
There are others who.still believe the gov-
ernment can follow its old policy of forcing
more and more federal securities on the
banks. But this, long enough continued, will
breed still another kind of inflation-credit
inflation--which in the long run can be
disastrous to a country.
What it all comes down to is that that part
of the defense program which cannot be fi-
nanced out of current government revenue,
must be financed by borrowing it directly
from the people. That is why the treasury
is issuing special defense bonds now and why
we of Port St. Joe, as well as the rest of the
nation should buy them. We've reached the
point where all of us are going to have to
finance defense-and no one else can do it
for us.

WHAT OF JAPAN?
For many years the American people have
been accustomed to swift changes in the
status of U. S.-Japanese relations. Both sides
have done considerable diplomatic bluffing.
Many time alarmists have said that the two
nations were standing at the brink of war.
But, so far, nothing has happened, outside of
a few minor incidents which were swiftly
settled.
Now, according to those who know the
Japanese character and Japanese conditions,
there is a chance that matters will move from
the talking to the shooting point.
It is significant that recent pronouncements
of Japanese statesmen have become very
blunt. Premier Matsuoka scarcely bothers any
more to conceal his dislike for the U. S. and
his admiration for the Axis. Germany's suc-
cesses in Europe have stiffened Japanese
spines and encouraged Japanese saber rattlers.
The result is that the Pacific can accurately
be described as a tinder box today.
The stand of the United States with Ger-
many on the sinking of the Robin Moore in
the South Atlantic may well decide how the
Japanese will act in the next month or so. A
firm stand, with threat of reprisal, may hold
off the Japanese menace, but if we back
down before the Nazis on the matter of the
Robin Moore, the Japs may figure that this
nation is afraid and proceed with their con-
templated grab of islands in the Pacific.

A medical journal warns that whiskey
cade:ns the brain. And sometimes it deadens
the body when an auto driver becomes too
reckless after imbibing.

Summer officially begins tomorrow. Won-
der what these past two months of hot
weather can be called?

Civilization has indeed progressed to the
point where it insists that war be placed upon
a higher plane production.-Greensboro News.

Some men are afraid they'll have to go to
war, and their wives are afraid they won't.


F.RIDA.Yp 'JUNE,'*0


I BEFORE THIS HAPPENS LETS GET TOUGH I


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
In our U. S. A. we manage to
keep in a lather-winter and sum-
mer. A few years ago they stirred
us up by sayin' the country was
bogged down on account every-
thing was overbuilit-too many fac-
tories, too many everything. Now
their's too little of everything, and
everybody's sayin' the government
has gotta git busy and build
everything.
But if you stop now to inquire


about why we were lulled into a
state where we figgered we were
o.'er-equipped, instead or unpre-
pared, you're a traitor or most any
name they can think up as a slo-
gan to shame you. But we gotta
play ball now with the ones who
lulled us-or we'll all wake up as
dead pigeons.
But we can do one thing from


BEA VUTFUL










(/ evloplag
21 e yrsr Sussieoful ommp
lin4|a* *I yo irBte* of
faultleS. wer. lSd hlde at-
tee.io 24 Iur *evice. A
ia order win mlo y*u o
sh\ rteady cudemer.


iVt


. .1


now on-we can keep one ey4
pCLied and one ear to the. ground
while we're bending our back to
the oar. .. And speaking' of
oars, the fishing' is mighty good
down here in the Swamp right
now, and I'm gonna be' looking' for
you right soon,
Yours with the lowdown,
JO SERRA. .
r-.
Get out and fish or hunt more,
Juniping. at conclusions is the only
exercise some sportsmen,take.


PLUMBING

ST

PLU


HEATING


'JOE

MBING


F. J. CORBIN, Manager

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


MIDWAY PARK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf I.
County Line
Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES
Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cabins
Good Beds
Good Meals
Good Guides
COME IN AND REST!
I Am YOUR Servant- Let
Me Serve YOU!


JOHN HENRY JONES
-


THE STAR, PORT AT. JOE GULF COUNTY, FiORMA~


PAGE TWO









FRIDAV4UN~2O, TH~ STAR, POWFST. 10K, GULP C~UNTY, PLORI~A


PAGE THREE


Society Personals

SLANETA DAVIS, Editor


Mrs. Lottie Mandeville of Tal-
lahassee and Mr. and Mrs. C. C.
Stewart and children of Pensacola
spent last week in Port St. Joe as
guests"otf Mr. and- Mrs. Ned Alisp.


cIliillTWli!^^.l^








A MARTIN THEATRE
Opens Dally 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1.35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager


OUR THIRD

BIRTHDAY
FRIDAY, JUNE 20

Unar!,


V I 'EN LEIGH .
LAURENCE OLIVIER


\,, *



SATURDAY ONLY


FEATURES

CHARLES STARRETT
"Sons of the Pioneers"

"West of Abilene"

-HIT NO. 2-


"JUNIOR G-MEN"


SUN. MON. JUNE 22-23
More Hit Songs by
CROSBY-LAMOUR
More Laughs Than Ever
Before


-. ~ Bing C OSBY
-'.^ HqBob Hope. Dorothy Lamour '




"POWER FOR DEFENSE"
LATEST NEWS EVENTS


TUESDAY ONLY, JUNE 24


"FLORIDA" In Color
MUSICAL COMEDY
p Uliliflulllrllllh llildll[Cif4 5S


GARDEN CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. WELLINGTON
The Garden Circle of the Port
St. Joe Woman's club met Wedi
nesday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. W. H. Wellington with Mrs.
G. A. Patton, the chairman, pre-
siding. Four new members were
present at this time, Mrs. D. E.
Marietta, Mrs. Fred Maddox, Mrs.
W. Hudgins and, Mrs. Moffett.
The circle desires'to call the at-
tention of the public to the flowers
planted in the Fifth street parkway
and at the school house, which
were set out under its. supervision.
in order to show what a little ef-
fort put forth in the right direc-
tion can do toward' beautifying our
city. Flower-lovers are urged to
plant shrubs and flowers to fur-
ther aid in making Port St. Joe
"The City Beautiful."
**r *
BAND BOOSTERS CLUB
PLANNING FOR DANCE
A call meeting of the Band
Boosters club was held Tuesday
evening at the home of Mrs. W.
H. Wellington, with B. B. Conklin
presiding and Mrs. T. V. Morris
acting as secretary. A splendid re-
port: was given by Mrs. Wellington
on collection of dues, and a motion
was made and approved, that all
music orders fw- thte band should
be approved by the club.
The possibility of sponsoring a
dance, with music furnished by
the local orchestra recently or-
ganized, was discussed and a com-
mittee was appointed headed by
Mrs. Wellington to consult with
Bandmaster Howell Hampton and
set the date.


After a short discussion of mi-
nor items the meeting was ad-
journed.

SISTER OF DR. WARD MARRIES
Of interest to many people in
Port St. Joe is the marriage of
Dr. Mildred Ward of New Orleans,
sister of Dr. A. L. Ward and Mas-
sey Ward of this city, to Dr. Paul
Barranco of New Orleans. Dr.
Mildred relieved Dr. Ward last
spring while he was out of the
city taking a special course of
studies, and made many friends
here.

Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Sheppard
and son Emmet of Tallahassee
and Mrs. Meriam Fisher and two
daughters of Fort Myers were the
week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs.
WV. S. Smith. Mrs. Fisher and
daughters elft for poitns in North
Carolina and Tennessee before re-
daughters left for points in Nlorth
Myers.

Miss Martha Belin spent the
week-end in Panama City as the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Mor-
mon.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Thompson re-
turned Sunday from a two weeks'
vacation spent in Little Rock, Ark.

Miss Louise Yeoman of Dothan,
Ala., is the guest' this week of
Miss Alice, Ruth Gibson.


Churches



BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY IN MEETING
"Centennial Debt-Paying 'Week"
was observed Monday afternoon by
the Baptist Missionary society with
a program presented at the church.
Topic was "A Debtless Denomina-
tion By 1945."
The program was 'opened with
song, followed by prayer. The de-
votional was in charge rof Mrs. W.
C. Pridgeon and the pastor led in
prayer. An historical sketch of the
1940 W. M. U. was given by Mrs.
J. 0. Baggett, and Mrs. Curtis
Palmer gave an interesting talk on
"The Trail of Seed." Mrs.. C. L.
Fain gave a talk on the 100,00
club and Its work, and a talk on
"Budgeting for God'" and a report
on the convention by Mrs. Charles
McClelTan, followed by a' period of
consecration. The meeting was dis-
missed by repeating the Mispah.

MRS. SMITH ENTERTAINS
AT BRIDGE TUESDAY
Mrs. W. S. Smith entertained
with two tables of bridge Tuesday
afternoon at her home. Gladoli
and roses decorated the room
where several progressions were
enjoyed. At the conclusion of play
prizes were presented to Mrs. W.
M. Howell, high, and Mrs. J. A.
Christmas, cut
The hostess served delicious re
freshmeuts to Mesdames Howell,
Christmas, D. C. Smith, Joe Hau.
ser, M. B. Larkin, I. Lilienfeld and
H. C. Spence. 7

NORTHWEST COAST B. T. U.
TO MEET IN PANAMA CITY
The quarterly mass meeting of
the Northwest Coast B. T. U. will
neet at the First Baptist church,
Panama City, next Sunday, June
22, at 2:30 p. m. Guest speaker
will be O. K. Radford of Jackson-
ville, state secretary.

Mrs. Hoke Larkin of Bristol vis-
ited her husband here Saturday.

Mrs. Abby MIartin, who is at-
ending the summer session at F.
S. C. W., spent tha week-end in
Port St. Joe.

Fred Perry was a week-endi visi-
or in Donaldsonville, Ga.

J. E. Rollins spent the week-end
n Troy, Ala., Visiting his wifb,
who is attending summer school at.
he teachers' college in Troy.

Julian Raburn of Waverly Hall.
3a., is the guest this week of his
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and
Mrs. Morgan Jones Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Boyer and
family are visiting relatives in
3eebe, Ark., this week.

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Thompson
if Dothan, Ala., are guests of Mr.
.nd Mrs. R. W. Smith.

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Hunt spent
Saturady in Caryville attending
he "Home-Coming" celebration.

Mr. and' Mrs. R. F. Miller have
s their guests this week Mr. and
Mrs. Winston Stewart of Rockford,


Howell Hampton returned to the Ga.
city last week from Ocala, where r Q
he visited his parents. Miss Peggy Lay of Birmingham,
SAla., is visiting with her uncle and
Mrs. Charles Doyle andi Miss aunt, Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Lay.
Eva Doyle of Apalachicola were ^ *
guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. M. Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Rhef-'of
C. Edwards. Augusta, Kan., are the guests this
week of Mr. and Mrss Edwin Ram-
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett re- se
sey.
turned Saturday from a week oft f *
fishing on the Dead Lakes. They Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Taylor are
report a nice catch, spending a week's vacation in New
? Orleans.
Mrs. M. B. Smith has returned ot f
to the city after a visit of several Mrs. Anna Balkcom has as her
weeks in Orlando, Cornelia, Ga., guest this week her daughter, Mrs.
and Newville, Ala. B. Gainous of Memphis, Tenn.


PORT NEWS
S.S. Dorothy of the Bull Line A missing traffic stop signal was
S.S. Dorothy of the Bull Line
sailed last Friday with a cargo of returned to Philadelphia police
paper .for eastern ports. with this unsigned note: "Here's
_____ your nasty old sign. I woke up
v;;.,. .,1 ., ... .r Sunday morning with this thing
.itiV .-in N York kA ai MU ,,ny.


Si ii r 11r- N l iu nld arylandcn
T. M. 'Schneider and daughter,
Miss Mimi, left Sunday to visit
points in New York and Maryland.

Miss Clara Farley of Marianna
is visiting this week with Mrs. L.
N. Smith at Beacon Hill.

Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!

AVOID TROUBLE!
S. If your car gets out of con-
trol you know what happens
--TROUBLE.
S.. It's the same way with
your system, so it's' wiser to
'rely on your doctor and our
accurately compounded pre-
sciptions. There can be no
trouble then.

HARDYY
PHARMACY



ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE
WEEK $7 .0

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....26 c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


in my bed."


Save mouey by reading the ads.


DR. J.C. COE
- DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12,; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bllg. Port St. Joe


FOR BETrtR

HEALTH
SH 'E A L T H
Milk is an energy food. It- Ia
iarily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

HERMAN ROWAN
Local Representative


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

0 PHONE 100 *

-- DAY OR NIGHT-
STAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION
cp ^ ^^ ^^B^^it ^^^^^ 1^^^Cl


O ONE likes to lie awake; yet every night thousands
toss and tumble, count sheep, worry and fret, be-
cause they can't get to sleep. Next day many feel
dull, logy, headache and irritable.
Has this ever happened to you? When it does, why
don't you do as many other people do when Nerves
threaten to spoil their rest, work, enjoyment, and good
temper try

Dr. Miles Effervescent Nervine Tablets
Dr. Miles Effervescent Nervine Tablets are a combina-
tion of mild sedatives proven useful for generations as an
aid in quieting jumpy, over-strained nerves.
Read full direction Your druggist will be glad to sell you Dr. Mies
in package. Effervescent Nervine Tablets in convenient small or
-' economical large packages. Why not get a package
and be prepared when over-taxed nerves threaten to
interfere with your work or spoil your pleasure.
Large Package 75* Small Package 354


FRla#.Y,13U NE -nt,~ rs41-'


THE $TAP, POIR--T.4oldr, GULF MUtNTY, .1 FLVRDA







PAGE FOUR THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1941


Gag Globe-Trotters

Crosby and Hope

Due In "Zanzibar"

Two Comedians Battle for Dorothy
Lamour and Laughs In Film at
Port Sunday and Monday

Laden with sparkling comedy,
gags and brand new song hits,
"Road to Zanzibar," starring Bing
Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy
Lamour, plays Sunday and Monday
at the Port theatre.
Bing and Bob are a couple of
carnival men barnstorming their
way through Africa trying to raise
money to get back to the States.
Bob ahs the job of carrying out
the hare-brained ideas Bing gets
for sideshow stunts. And how Bing
can. invent them! He has Bob soar
through the air as a "Bat Man,"
has him frozen alive in a cake of
ice, electrocuted, wrestling a bear
and shot out of a cannon!
Dorthy Lamour and Una Merkel,
as stranded vaudevillians, manage
to pull a couple of fast ones on
the boys. Bing and Bob fall for
Una's. story that Dotty has been
captured by slave traders and that
she's on the auction block. The
boys buy her without knowing the
girls are working a racket of their
own. Then they persuade Bob-and
Bing to use, the last of their hard-
earned money on safari to take
them through the jungle to Zanzi-
bar, where Dotty's "father" is ill.
"Father" turns out to be a rich
lad Dotty intended to marry.
All this is too disillusioning to
the boys, who decide to brave the
Jungle alone after leaving the girls
with the safari equipment and the
guides~
-_--.---,
VOTERS TO PASS ON
NEW AMENDMENTS

(Cotitnued from Page 1)
unless for necessities of life,
Amendi Article XVI, by adding
Sec. 32, creating and vesting au-
thority in a-board to make rules
and regulations relating to conser-
vation of salt water fish and salt
water products.
Amend Article VIII, by providing
for election of Dade county com-


TAXES, INCREASED
COSTS MAKING U. S.
'4-CYLINDER' WISE

Rising fuel costs, shortages of
vital materials, proposed direct
and indirect taxes-these are but
a few of the "defense time" fac-
tors which are making American
drivers "four-cylinder minded," ac-
cording to Hilton Lewis, local
dealer for Willys-Overland Motors,
Inc.
"Never before in our history
have drivers been faced with such
sharp increases in the cost of own-
ing and operating their cars," Mr.
Lewis said. "We consider the un-
precedented increase in sales, of
the Willys-Americar, this coun-
try's only full-sized four-cylinder
automobile, as strong evidence
that motorists are turning to low-
upkeep automobiles as a means of
counteracting rising costs.
"Reports from Americar owners
show .that the Willys product is
delivering up to 35 miles per gal-
lon of gas.
"This," concluded Mr. Lewis, "is
the 'proof of the pudding' for lit-
erally millions of drivers who must
reconcile transportation needs with
the rising cost of automobile own-
ership and operation."

An inventor has equipped an in-
nerspring mattress with a motor-
driven blower and an electric heat-
ing unit to enable a user to sleep
at any temperature desired.


missioners for four-year terms.
Amend Article VIII, Sec. 3, by
increasing the number of state sen-
itors from 38 to 40; creating two
new senatorial districts, the 39th
out of Broward county, and the
40th district out of Calhoun and
Gulf counties.
At present this senatorial dis-
trict is made up of Gulf, Calhoun,
Washington and Bay counties and
there has been a "gentlemen's
agreement" that: each county would
take turns in electing a senator. If
this measure passes, which it un-
doubtedly will, and the gentlemen's
agreement is still held effective,
Gulf county will elect- a senator
every other term instead of once
in four terms, as at present.


MANAGER OF PORT THEATRE


Roy Williams, manager of the
Port theatre, which this week is
observing its third anniversary
with an exceptionally good bill.
of pictures

Billy Hights of Montreal, Can-
ada, had a narrow escape from
death when his wooden leg caught
fire and burned as the result of a
collision with a motor truck.


IF ITS FISH

YOU WANT!
Go To --

"Uncle" Bud Brockette's

Bullem & Pullem

Fishing Camp
--- on the -
DEAD LAKES
3 Miles Above Wewahitchka
Fine Clean Cabins In Beautiful
Surroundings. Good Dry
Boats. .... Shower. Ice
Cold Well Water... And Above
All-
Plenty of Bass, Bream,
Shellcrackers, Perch and
Channel Cats


Softball League

Team Standings
Team- W L P


Subscribe to The Star-$2 year.


Laboratory .......... 8 1 .888
Champs' ... ......... 7 2 .777
Kenney Mill ......... 6 4 .600
Bank Building ....... 5 .5 .500
Merchants ........... 4 5 .444
Pulp Mill. ......... 3 6 .33'
Maintenance .......... 3 7. .300
Warehouse .......... 2 7 .222
Games, Next Week
June 23-Laboratory vs. Bank.
Champs vs. Warehouse.
June 24-Pulp Mill vs. Mainton-
ance. Merchants vs. Kenney.
June 26-Laboratory vs. Ware-
house. Champs vs. Maintenance.
A ditch-digging crew in Maini,
recently turned over a rock and
found 66 snakes of different varie-
ties and sizes.


NEW DUPONT



HOUSE PAINT


keeps white houses BWjN

'Apr C

000-0,-


Defense is for Them


.* *


o defend America's children, this country has
entered on the greatest production task in his-
tory. The life blood of production, in this war of
machines, is electric power, and this country has power
in abundance. Electricity was ready when the rearma-
ment race began, and is ready for present and future pro-
duction. Defense demands will be met without curtail-
ment of power necessary for carrying on the normal needs
of life, in homes, factories, schools and public buildings.
We are proud of the accomplishments of America's pri-
vately owned power companies. '




Florida Power Corporation


IT'S brilliantly white... tough...
durable! Du Pont House Paint
keeps houses beautiful because it
stays cleaner! Here's why:-
Du Pont Prepared Paint forms
a tough, durable film which pro-
tects the surface from rust, rot
or decay. Like all paints, it col-
lects dirt on exposure to the ele-
ments. As time goes on, however,
a fine white powder forms on the
surface of this new paint. This
powder is washed away by heavy
rains, carrying the dirt with it,
and exposing a fresh white sur-
face. This "self-cleaning" process
starts after a few months of ex-
posure under normal conditions
of weather, but may be delayed
under unusual climatic or dirt-
collecting conditions. Because the
"self-cleaning" process is gradual,


Looks better longer...
needs fewer repaintings!

New "Self-Cleaning"
formula now available
in light colors, too.


the wearing qualities of the paint
film are not abnormally affected.
Its economy lies in the fact
that it stretches the time between
paintings. Remember: Du Pont
House Paint costs no
more than other good
paints. Ask your
painting contractor
to use itl


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.


PHONE 2


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


4 -M
i'! :.wm


hflj~


I


CUT RATE PHOTOS ml
DEPT. SO. JANESVILLE. WIS.


- --~m+r~


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORI.DA


FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1941


~niE~