<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00242
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 6, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00242

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper--dedicated to
the betterment and upbuliding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


Port St. Joe--Ste of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1941 NUMBER 36


Port St. Joe Now

Has Rotary and

Kiwanis Clubs

Members of Panama City Organ
zations Aid In Formation
Of Units Here

Steps were taken last Friday by
a group of fifteen business and
professional men for the organize
tion of a Rotary club in Port St
Joe when they mat at the Por
Inn with B, S. Gordon, a membe,
of the Panama City Rotary club
which is sponsoring the culb here.
Those present at 'the meeting
when it was decided to form a Ro-
tary club in this city and seek ad-
mission to membership in Rotary
International were J. Lamar Mil-
ler, Dr. A. t. Ward, S. L. Barke,
T. V. Morris, eorge Tapper, W.
O. Anderson, Basil E. Kenney, B.
B. Conklin, Louis Emrich, Richard
Porto:, M. P. Tomlinson, Kenneth
Creech, Robert Bellows, C. G. Cos-
tin and W. H. Wellington. These
men, each representing a different
classification of business or pro.
session, were brought together to
be the nucleus of a complete cross-
section of the economic life of the
community. The new club will
have its regular weekly meetings
at the Port Inn.
As soon as the club has been
admitted to membership in the in-
ternational organization its char-
ter will be delivered by the Pan-
ama City club and J. Chalmers
Buchanan of Jacksonville, district
governor. Delegations from nearby
Rotary clubs are expected to at-
tend this event.
Adding another civic club to the
city was the organization of a Ki-
wanis club Thursday evening of
last week at the Port Inn, forma-
tion of which had been under way
for some time past.
Honor guest at this meeting was
Congressman Bob Sikes of Crest-
view. Other guests were Messrs.
Morgan, Daffin and Holland of the
Panama City Kiwanis club.
The new organization has 1S
paid up members and it was ex-
pected that the membership would
be increased at a meeting held last
evening at the Port Inn.

T. M. Bandy Is

Taken By Death

Long-Time Resident of Port St.
Joe Passes Away At
Age of 83

Funeral services were hold Sat-
urday for Thomas Marion Bandy,
83, who died early Friday morning
at his home on Long avenue after
an illness of several weeks' dura-
tion.
Pallbearers were Robert Tapper,
Nick Comforter, J. F. Miller, Tom
Parker, Bernard Pridgeon, Dr. J.
C. Coe, Tom Strickland andi Stet-
son Pridgeon.
Mr. Bandy, who was a native of
Savannah, Ga., and came to this
city from Carrabelle in 1919 to
work for the Florida Menhaden
company, is survived by his widow.
'one son, Jake Bandy of Baltimore,
Md., and four daughters, Mrs. C.
E. Campbell of St. Andrews, Mrs.
George Carburry of Meadows, Va.,
and Mrs. Elizabeth O'Day and Mrs.
Z. B. Adams of this city.
-------4------
Vacationing In Arkansas
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Thompson left
Saturday for a two weeks' vaca-
tion in Little Rock, Ark.


COMMISSIONING THE 35,000-TON U.S.S. WASHINGTON BALL I DESIGNATED A Roosevelt May
j PRESIDENT OF 1943 SENATE
Philip D. Beall, veteran Escam- Act n Indicated
bin county member of the state A
senate, Wednesday was designated Shortage of il
Sto be president of the 1943 senate.
He was the unanimous choice of
.r the men who last year were elected Both President n t of
i-n ooo oil p nt and Secretary ofb
i. to four-yuar senate terms. The des-
ignition has always been tanta- Interior Ickes Urge Comple-
mount to formal election. tion of Pipe Lines

Summer Roundup The controversy over construe.
S- u tion of gasoline pipe lines in this
STo Be Ht eld June 19 section took on a new aspect this
weeuk as a threatened oil shortage,
t-- reportedly caused by lack of trans.
-- a Parents Urged to Bring In Pre potration facilities, led to the be-
i School Age Children For lief that President Rooievelt may-
SExamination soon take action to remove this
Swmenace to the preparedness effort.
The annual "summer roundup" Whether the president will call
of preschool age children, spon- on the public voluntarily to curtail
scored by the Parant-Teachers as- the "luxury" use of gasoline is
The scene aboard the mighty ing the commissioning ceremonies sociation in conjunction with the not certain. He already has warned
battles Washington as Secre- at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. county health unit, will be held in that "restriction of oil consumption
tary of thue Navy Frank Knox ad- The battleship brings America's Port St. Joe at the school building to essential usea" is a distinctt
dressed officers, members of the dr.~adnaught strength up to 17. It Thursday, June 19, from 9 a. m. to possibility," and he has urged con-
crew and visitors under the 16- was completed six months ahead 4 p. m. for white children, and gross to facilitate construction of
inch guns of the dreadnaught dur- of schedule. Thursday, June 26, for the colored oil pipe lines in the Southeast by
children at the school in the col- authorizing acquisition of right-of.
Big Time Promised County to Aid With ored quarters. ways by eminent domain.
SEveryone realizes the great im- Secretary of Interior Ickes, cit-
Firemen at District Hospital When 80% portance in giving the children en- ing a serious national shortage of
tearing school for the first time a oil, declared in Washington that
MeetIn City June12 Of Pledges Are In complete physical checkup in order "gasles Sundays" might be insti
that minor physical defects 1oat tuted to meet the situation.
the parents never kuew of might He said the problem was strictly
Day of Gaiety and Sightseeing Is Unsigned Check for $2500 Given be brought to light and' corrected. one of transportation, and in this
Outlined By Local Organiza- To Chairman Bounds With by the family physician during the connection he advanced completion
tion for Visitore Strings Attshed summer months. .of the Port St. Joe-Chattaonoga,
In addition, parents should have Tenn., pipe line and construotloli
Visiting firemen, members of the J. E. Bounds, chairman of the their children get their final im- of a line from Louisiana refineries
North Florida Firemen's associa- municipal hospital committee, this munization against diphtheria, vac- to Greensboro, N. C. This new line
tion, who will gather here June 12 week showed the editor of The citation against smallpox and ty- is expected to cross at Atlanta the
.for their annual coinv tion will be Star a check for $2500 from the phoid Immuniza. ,en. All of these Southeast.in Pipe Line company's
royally entertained by members of Gulf county board of commission- services will be offered at the tube which has its te;iminus in this
the Port St. Joe Fire Department. ers. made payable to the hospital summer rouduup. city. The Southeastern line has
The local boys have made ar- fund. Assisting Dr. R. J. Lamb, county been finished except for about 21
rangements for the visitors to take "This is the county's contribu- health doctor, will be Dr. J. R. miles, including sections' intended
a trip through the St. Joe Paper tion to the fund," said Mr. Bounds, Norton, Dr. L. H. Bartee, Dr. A. to cross under railroad property at
company mill, will stage a beach "but there are strings attached to L. Ward and Dr. J. C. Coe. 24 points and under highways at
party at Beacon Hill, serve a it You'll notice it is unsigned, and ------ 40 points.
sumptuous seafood dinhier at the it won't be signed until 80 per cent Kildare Hit Is Mr. tekes said an effort to build
Centennial building, show moving of the money pledged for construe- the pipe lines had been blocked
pictures of the firemen's college tion of the hospital is paid in. We Most Exciting in the Georgia legislature by the
held in Daytona Beach last year, hope that those who .have failed Excrairoads ery shortasigterdy.$
and top the affair off with a grand to pay the amounts they pledged The big hitch in completion of
ball at the Centennial auditorium will pay up immediately in order Picture Showing Tuesday Only at the Port St. Joe-Chattanooga line
with music furnished by the Flor- that we may cash this check and Port Theatre Filled With Ad- has been the fefusal of railroads
idia Foot Warmers, who played complete the hospital." venture and Comedy to allow the pipes to pass under
here during the Centennial cole- A letter from George G. Tapper; the tracks.
bration in 1938. chairman of the board, accompany- "The People vs. Dr. Kildare"
The public is invited to attend ing the check, said, in part: "In showing Tuesady only at the Port Next Five Months Will
the 'dance, and the business and approving of this contribution the ,theatre, provides Lew Ayres, Lar. Decide War, Says Pepper
professional men of the city who aoard instructed me to sign this aine Day, Lionel Barrymore and
have contributed so generously to warrant only after your committee others with adventure and comedy In a United Press dispatch from
the fund to stage the affair are has collected 80 per cent of the as they turn medical detectives to the nation's capital Sunday, Sena-
invited to attend the banquet and balance due the hospital through solve the problem of a malpractice tor Claude Pepper of Florida was
aid in entertaining the visitors. contributions promised by the citi- suit in what is hailed as the most quoted as saying that if "we can
A*" zens of Gulf county. dramatic adventure of the popular hold the lane until November 1,
FIREWORKS BANNED "It is the intention of the board "Kildare" pictures. Hitler cannot conquer the world.'
BY FLORIDA LAW through this manner to assist your Ayres plays defendant andl prin- "The future of the world will be
committee in the collecting of the cipal detective. The highlight of determined within the next five
A sad blow to a lot of kids-and promised contributions so that thd the courtroom sequence is an elo- months," said Pepper. "The su-
quite a number of oldsters, too- hospital may be completed an an quent plea by Barrymore who, in preme effort, therefore, of defense
was the signing of a measure this hospital may be completed at an a similar address to a jury, won must be concentrated in that short
week by Governor Holland outlaw- --- the Academy award for his per- time. If the line is to hold, Britain
ing the sale of fireworks in Flor- HOURS OF CITY CLERK formancu in "A Free Soul." must get the materials of war and
ida except for supervised public SHORTENED BY BOARD The guest star spot is filled by England must get food'. The sea
displays. However, the kids will The board, of city commissioners Bonita Granville, who plays the lanes of the world must be kept
have one final Fourth of July at their meeting Tuesd'ay night glamorous ice skating star plain- open. Our production must be
fling, as the law does not become set the hours of the city, clerk tiff, and Red Skelton has been stepped up aT least 50 per cent.
effective until August 1. from 8:30 a. m. to 12 noon and 1 added as the principal comedy fig- "But most of all, the people
Maximum penalty for violation P. m. to 4 p. m. The public is ure in the picture. must be aroused to understand
of the act ih a fine of $100 or 90 urged to confine their business at Thrills include a motor crash, a that the ruthless sword, of Hitler
days in jail, or both, the city hall ,to these hours in or- roadside emergency operation, am- is held over their heads."
,C der to lighlitn the burden on the balance dash, the tense moments --
clerk, of the final operation, and the PORT NEWS
Attend Dendy-Meserve Wedding -- dramatic courtroom sequence lead- Mlotorship Register of Jamaica
Mrs. E. B. Dendy of this city Visiting Relatives In Alabama ing to the climax of the picture. sailed Wednesday night with cargo
and Mrs. O. O. Miller of Blounts- Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Sutton and ------- of lumber from St. Joe Lumber &
town, mother and sister of the children, Merita and Elbert, are POPPY DAY SALE NETS $52 Export companyl.
groom, attended the wedding of in Tuscaloosa, Ala., this week vis- Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon, chairman S.S. Jean of the Bull Line sailed
Alton Dandy and Misi Eva Me- iting relatives. of the Poppy Day sale staged last Monday for eastern ports with
serve in St. Augustine Saturday. ------ ------ Saturday by the American Legion cargo of paper and lumber.
Attending Summer Session Auxiliary, reports that $52 was Tanker Munger T. Ball of thA
Returns From University Mrs. J. E. Rollins left Tuesday collected by the ladies on behalf Sabine Transportation company of
Al Schneider has returned to the for Troy, Ala., to attend the sum- of the disabled veterans who make Port Arthur, Texas, sailed last eve-
city to spend the summer months. mer session at S. T. C. Mrs. Gus the paper flowers. T. M. Schnei- ning after discharging 65,000 bar-
He has attended the University of Creech accompanied her to spend der was the purchaser of the first rels of gasoline for the Southeast-
Florida for the past school year. this weak visiting friends, poppy. Pipe Line company.








PAGETW@THE TAR RORr S. JE, GLF OUNT, POR1A FRDAY JUN 6,194


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year...........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-.F Telephone 51 )--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully we~ihd.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


THE PEOPLE HAVE FAITH
The editor of The Star, in his recent 2086-
mile trip over the greater part of Florida, was
particularly impressed with the manner in
which residents of the so-called "boom sec-
tion" are building and improving in spite of
the debts hanging over their heads from the
boom days which, in reality, were brought
on by outside speculators.
The editor was impressed by the growth
and development in the east coast cities and
towns which indicated the faith the people
have in the future of their various localities,
which leads them to continue to sink their
money and labor into new developments.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS
One of those shrill yells we keep hearing
from the cheer leaders for the dictatorship
teams is the one that goes: "Democracy is
through, done, finished!"
This is a strange package to peddle to men
whose hard-won democratic way of living
has just got a good grip on life after centuries
of the tyranny which the totalitarian glamour
boys would swap us.:It's the sort of interna-
tional horse trade that makes people with
horse sense laugh.
Unlike the current crop of dictators with
their jaloppy utopias for sale, democracy
never hands its people a blueprint for the
millennium. It never writes a book called
"Mein Kampf" and says: "Here's all the an-
swers to all your questions. Take them-
or else" Democracy doesn't work like that.
Democracy finished? Not by a long shot-
Its the biggest piece of unfinished business
in the world!

U. S. STILL GETS GERMAN GOODS
While the wording "Made in Germany"
does not appear on goods displayed in Port
St. Joe as it formerly did, Nazi goods con-
tinue to come into the United States in fair
quantities. In January, 1941, 116 varieties of
German merchandise, valued at $512,432, ar-
rived at west coast ports. This does not in-
clude goods arriving in American boats from
South America, Brazil in particular, with Ger-
many as the original starting point. Nor
does it include imports originally sent from
Africa to South America via Italy's South At-
lantic airline.
This means that for every purchase of'Nazi
goods over here, a United States customer is
making a down payment on a shell, a bomb
or a big gun to be turned against the British.
The editor of The Star urges every loyal
resident of Port St. Joe and Gulf county not
to purchase goods stamped with the words:
"Made in Germany." The battle Britain is
having to keep its own lifeline from being
snapped is grave enough without the Uniteu
States helping Germany to keep its trade
lanes open.

We've talked with a lot of fishermen who
went out on the opening day and they got
along fine until they got tangled up in their
lyin'. : "

If you want to hear some real yelling, let
a girl step on a roach with her bare foot in
the bath room.


BANKS IN A NEW ROLE
Writing in "Banking," Albert W. Atwood
makes this observation: "Shakespeare said
that one man in his time plays many parts,
and so it is with the banks. Throughout the
long depression they absorbed the mounting
national debt, then as the defense program
got underway their lending function became
of vital importance, and now they have still
another great role to play. It is their privil-
ege and duty alike to educate and assist the
public to invest in the three new kinds of
United States savings bonds."
The banks are caking on this job purely
as a necessary public service in a time of un-
precedented spending. The banker knows the
dangers of inflation. He knows that thrift and
common sense must rule if we aren't going
to go on a spending spree that wM produce
the worst hangover in our history. He knows
that the worker who has a reserve fund in
the form of government bonds has a cushion
which both he and the country may require
in the future, when the war ends and tne
boom deflates.
Thousands of banks are now selling the
new defense bonds, including the Florida
Bank at Port St. Joe. For those who are
unable to buy bonds now, inexpensive de-
fense stamps may be purchased and accumu-
lated until a total sufficient to obtain a bond
is reached. All of the stamps and bonds are
fully guaranteed by the U. S. treasury.
Visit your bank and investigate this method
of defense investment. A defense bond is a
safe place for your money-and each one
purchased helps build a barrier against in-
flation. Buy all you can.

APPLICABLE TODAY
I preach to you then, my countrymen, that
our country calls not for the life of ease, but
for the life of strenuous endeavor. The 20th
century looms before us big with the fate or
many nations. If we stand idly by, if we seek
merely swollen slothful ease-then the bolder
and stronger peoples will pass us by and will
win for themselves the domination of the
world.
Let us, therefore, boldly face the life of
strife, resolute to do our duty well, and man-
fully resolute to uphold righteousness by deed
and by word; resolute to be both honest and
brave, to serve high ideals, yet to use prac-
tical methods.-Theodore Roosevelt.

To be honest, to be kind-to earn a little
and to spend a little less, to make upon the
whole a family happier for his presence, to
renounce when that shall be necessary and i
not to be embittered, to keep a few friends s
but these without capitulation-above all, on
the same grim conditions, to keep friends
with himself-here is a task for all that a
man has of fortitude and delicacy.-Steven-
sonI.

The new federal tax proposals are drawing
strong protests from representatives of spe- '
to
cific groups that would be affected. What
this country needs is a tax plan to raise the b
defense money without anybody having to.
pay.-Savannah Press. p
6
We heard a Port St. Joe man bragging
that he ran things at his home. We happened
to drop in on him a few days later and we
found that his statement was correct-he fo
runs the lawn mower, the baby carriage and 1
errands. o

t
Women are naturally shy about telling tt
their ages-in fact, about ten years shy.- o
\Winter Haven Herald. h

Those aren't periscopes in the waterway ee
program they're porkbarrel bungholes. (
Greensboro News. 5
L


THAT MEANS AU I Of US


Port St. Joe Makes Time Magazine

PIPE LINES OR BOTTLENECK?
From Time Magazine price-holding job more ticklish
than ever.
FOR MONTHS the U. S. has been than ever
heading towards a transport Meanwhile, oilmen have pushed
bottleneck. Last week it was just plans to increase thc U.. S.. pipe
around the corner-and so, as a line network, which carried only 7
'esult, were gasolineless Sundays. per cent of the East's oil last
A transport shortage complicated year. In that effort they have lost
other bottlenecks, notably steel. It valuable tme bucking the rail-
also created new bottlenecks in roads, who lobby against pipe lines
commodities of which the U. S. just as resolutely as they used to
commodities of whicHi the U. S. fl.... ..


still has surplus-notably oil.
The U. S. has plenty of oil, pro-
i!n-es 60 per cent of the wort.
supply. In fact, the oil industry
has been one of World War II's
conspicuous orphans, having suf-
-:e:l consistently from overpro-
n'ction. But the oil fields are far
from the oil markl Last week's
nrospective shortage at consumn)-
tion points sent gasoline prices up.
ind fuel-oil distributors refused to
guarantee prices for next winter.
As war spreads into the Middlu
E-ist and tankers continue to sink
n the Atlantic, the Maritime Com-
nission planned to withdraw 50
bankerss of the 3-15 in the U. S.'s
ntercoastal trade, put them into
shuttle service for Britain. This
w ,k the first batch of 25 tankers
ire being shifted.
't.er(-oasntal tankers cirry over
'0 per cent of all the oil consumed
in the U. S. Atlantic cai',oard.
hlich is nearly halL Ihe 1. S. mar-
::r f, me:or fuel. The 25 tankoi's
withdrawn this we.!:c normally car-
ied 100,000 barrels from the Culf
o eastern cities every day. When
he second 25 follow soon, the s(.a-
oard oil stringency will be acute.
.The East has enough sur-
lus of stored furnace fuel to last
7 days, enough gasoline for 31
ays.
Only alternatives to the tanker
aul are railroads and pipe lines
lut railroad tank cars, used mostly
or refined products, number only
40.000 for bthe whole U. S., carry
nly 250 barrels a car, and charge
rate many times as high as tho
banker. Admittedly, they can't fill
ie hole. The oil companies, which
wn most of the pipe lines anyway,
ave therefore turned to pipo lines.
To avert exhaustion of its east-
rn stocks, Standard of New Jer-
ey last week started pumping 27.-
00 barrels of Texas, Arkansas and
ouisiana crude, a day via Tulsa


S.- and southern Illinois to its New
Newspapers in Germany and Italy have .Jrsey refinery, 1700 miles in all.
about as much says as a man who has mar- The cost of this overland route is
ried a red-headed woman. 60 cents a barrel, against 21 cents
or less by tanker. The rail rate
would be about $1.80. Such cost
Have you bought your Defense Bond yet? increases make Leon Henderson's


n' ec Itheim in tle oil w ars of the
I'80's. Their most successful lobby
is in Georgia. Pure Oil and Gulf,
trying to run a line from Port St.
Joe in Florida to Chattanooga, laid
pipe on much of the route, but
could not get permission to close
the gaps across the railroads'
rights-of-way.
Standard and Shell, too, have
planned a line from Louisiana -to
North Carolina. About as long as
Irah's famous line, it would? run.
1262 miles and carry up to 72,000
barrels a day, enough to fill half
the gasoline needs of the five
Southern states to which it would
run. Sinc 17 per cent of the
United State's needs for aviation
gasoline is centered in those
states, President Roosevelt tried
to speed thu line by writing a let-
ter (for transmittal to the Georgia
legislature) to his old enemy, Gov-
ernor Eugene Talmadge, who tried
to start a Grass Roots revolt
against him in 193S.
But the railroads, two months
ago, held tha project up. Arguing
that they had plenty of tank cars
to do the work of any diverted
tankers (in which the army and
navy supported them), they per-
suaded the legislature to adjourn
without taking action. Now the
Southeast faces an oil shortage.

ANOTHER DRAFT CALL
ISSUED BY PRESIDENT
Along with approximately 1,000,-
000 other young men of America
who have become 21 years old
since October 16 or will reach that
age in the next five weeks, youths
of Gulf county will be required to
register on July 1 for possible mil-
itary training.
The registration will be con-
ducted by the selective service
boards and the new men will be
put at the bottom of their local
draft lists in an order of priority
to be determined by a new na-
tional drawing of numbers.

One construction company ad-
vises that for adequate lighting
and ventilation a living room
should have window surfaces equal
:o one-eighth of the floor area.


I wr vl t f. in t i i


PAGE TWe


THE STAR, POR(T ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, PL~ORIVAA


FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1941










A1OUR


MISS EVA MESERVE AND
ALTON DENDY ARE WED
The wedding of Miss Eva Me-
serve, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
G. U. Meserve of St. Augustine,
and Alton D.,ady, son of Mr. and
Mrs, E. B. Dendy of *this city, was
solemnized at the Triny Episco-
pal church of St. Augustine last
Saturday afternoon.
1i e bride, who was given in
marriage by her Tather, wore a
lovely outfit of white trimmed in
red and blue and' was attuided by
Miss Betty Pinkham, whose en-
semble was of dusty rose with
navy accessories. The groom was
.attended by Seth Meserve, brother
'o tho brid.e
Mrs. Dendy is a graduate of
Ketterlinius high school, later at-
tending Brewton Parker junior col-
lege and graduating from Stetson
University at Deland. She has
taught in the local school for the
past two years and was roap-
pointed for the coming term.
Mr. Dendy is a graduate of the
loca Ihigh school, was a member
of the legislature in 1937 as rep-
resentative from Gulf county and
was county judge for two years.
He is now employed by the St. Joe
Paper company.
'The young couple is at home on
McClellan avenue.

ALTAR SOCIETY PLANS
FOR CARD PARTY
The St. Joseph's Altar society
of the Catholic church hcid its
regular meeting Monday afternoon
at the home of Mrs. C. F. Gaut-
reaux. The meeting was called to
order by the president, Mrs. Made-
lino Whitaker, and the minutes of
I, las; meeting were read and ap-
proved, followed with a report by
the treasurer.
During the business it was an-
nounced that Mrs. B. W. Eells
would be hostess for the card
panty in June for the society. It
was announced that the July meet-
ing would be h'.d at the home of
Mrs. Charles Stevens, after which
the hostess served cake and lem-
onade to members present.


DR. J, C. COE
- DENTIST -S
Otf;ce Hours: 9 to 124 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


AVOID TROUBLE!
. .If your car gets out of con-
trol you know what happens
-TROUBLE.
S. It's the same way with
you.- system, so it's wiser to
rely on your doctor and our
accurately compounded pre-
sciptions. .... There can be no
trouble then.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY



fBEA/TIFUL




\ Roffeeyy








Sonyer m mee. o
.11 yMn emuse hl sm r*
.twotl. 24 ker wvkie. A

Mi^HBIS3Z0 0
I \ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^


Kc


SURPRISE PARTY FOR
MISS BETTY DARCEY
Miss Betty Darcey was compli-
inented with a surprise birthday
party Monday evening at the Dar-
cey home by her sister, Miss Juli-
ette Darcay, and Brady Jordan.
Miss Darcey was invited out for
a bowling game, during which
Lime the guests assembled in the
living and dining rooms, which
were attractively decorated for
the occasion, and upon hwr return
sang "Happy Birthday' amid the
bursting of vari-colored balloons.
The dining table was covered
with a lace cloth and the birthday
cake, lighted with 18 candles,
.orned the centerpiece. Games and
contests were enjoyed, winners be-
ing Evelyn Tharpe, Susan Saun-
ders, Brady Jordan and Maurice
Fain. Cake, lenonade and candies
were served by the host and hos-
tess.
ft *&
MISSIONARY SOCrETY TO
OBSERVE CENTENNIAL DAY
The regular monthly business
meeting of the Baptist Missionary
society was held Monday afternoon
at ithe church with the president,
-irs. W. H. -owull in charge.
The meeting opened with the
W. M. U. hymn and was followed
with the devotional and prayer by
.vMrs. Kate Harrell. The roll was
called with 18 answering. Reports
from the Auxiliary and circle
:.ainmen were heard, after which
parts for the Centennial Day, of
Prayer, to be held June 16, were
given out to the mcambers. Mrs.
Nick Kelley will be ih- c i-rge of I
the Centennial Day program.
Next Monday's meeting was 'an-
announced, a Bible study at the
,nuren with Mrs. Curtis Palmer
as leader, after whiclh-the meeting I
was dismissed by repeating the
Mlispah.


METHODIST SO(
HOLD HAM SUF
The Women's S


CITY TO
'PER
society for Chris-


tian Service of the Methodist
Church held its regular mecding
at the church Monday afternoon
with Mrs. A. M. Jones presiding.
The meeting opened with a song,
followed by prayer.
During the businciss it was an-
nounced that a "Ham Supper"
will be held at the Black Cat cafe
building Saturday evening. Plates
vi!l be 25 and 50 cents, proceeds
g o for furnishings for the par-
sonage.
The mleting was dismissed with
prayer.

,Mrs. Basil Kenney Jr., and chil-
droa spent Tuesday in Paanma
City.

Mrs. Pat Revell of Sopchoppy is
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
McPhaul.

Miss Mary Louise Edwards spent
the week-end in Apalachicola, the
guest of Miss Mercia Oliver.

Mrs. Lovet't Mahon and daugh-
ter spent last woek in Apalachi-
cola, the guest of Mrs. Annie
Myers.

Miss Jane Fields of Valdosta
wq' the week-end guest of Miss
Kathleen Saundlers.

Merc': Spear of Apalachicola
was a business visitor in this city
last Friday.

Mrs. C. Bray and daughter spent
Tuesday shopping in Panama City.

Mrs. Elgin Bayelss and sons of
Tallabassee are the guests of
Mrs. Nora Howard.

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Routh and
children of Mobile, Ala., wero the
week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs.
George Johnson,


SHOWER HONORS
MRS. ROY GASKIN
Mrs. G. L. Kennington, Mrs. W.
Dandridge, Miss Vivian Patterson
and Miss Marigene Smith were co-
hostesses last Friday evening at a
miscellaneous shower given at tho
home of Mrs. Kennington honoring
Mrs. Roy Gaskin, a recent bride.
Games and contests were played
throughout the evening width Miss
Ora Lae Goforth as winner. The
honoree was presented with many
lovely and useful gifts, after which
refreshietns were served by the
hostesses.

SUPPER HONORS
MRS. EARL LUPFER
Honoring Mrs. Earl Lupfer, who
left Saturday for Camp Livings-
ton, La., to join her husband, a
chicken supper was given at Mat
tie's Tavern in St. Andrews last
Friday evening. Those enjoying
this affair with the honoree were
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Locke, Mr. and
Mrs. W. H. Wellington, Miss Helen
Hunt and Tom Coldewey.

RECEPTION TO BE HELD
FOR REV. AND MRS. MARIETTA
All members of the Methodist
church and -their friends are in-
vited to attend a reception this
evening from 8 until 10 o'clock at
the home of Rev. and Mrs. D. E.
Mariotta.

Mrs. Charles Brown and Mrs. J.
B. Gloecklor spent Wednesday and
Thursday in Warm Springs, Ga.,
visiting Lenohr Brown, who is a
patient there.
er d
Mr. and Mrs. Jon Stapleton ufIt
Saturday for Marianna and Grace-
ville to spend a week before en-
tering the University of Florida
for the summer session.

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake will
return this week from Atlanta, Ga..
where they have been guests of
Mrs. Nole Tucker for several days.

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin left
Saturday for a two weeks vacation
to be spent visiting relatives in
Bristol.

APPRECIATION
The American Legion Auxiliary
expresses its deep appreciation to
the public for the splein'lid support
given during the Poppy Day salo.
Special thanks is extended 'to The
Star for the red. white and blue
page advertisement.
Mrs. W. C. Pr!dgeon, Pres.


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


Wednesday

Only

JUNE 11


Cesar ROMERO
Virginia Gilmore
Milton BIERLE


'THE

SEEING

EYE"


DISCOVERED HESS


When you feel well. It is misery when you don't.
Have you ever dragged through a day made miserable
by a Headache, Neuralgia, Muscular Pains or Functional
Menstrual Pains-a day when only your sense of duty;
kept you on the job?

Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills
usually relieve Headaches. You will find them effective
also in the relief of the other nagging pains mentioned
above. Regular Package
A package of these Econoy Package
prompt acting pain re- 125 Tablets, $1.00


David McLean, the Scottish plow-
man who discovered the Nazi
deputy leader Rudolf Hess lying
injured in a field near his humble
farmhouse 10 miles from Glas-
gow, Is shown with his mother.


Visitors From Sarasota Return From Wedding Trip
Mr. and Mrs. C. Fred Hoffman Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Marietta re-
and son Charles of Sarasota vis- turned to the city, Wednesday, aft-
ited last week with Mr. and Mrs. er a wei'k's wedding trip spent in
T. V. Morris. visiting points in Alabama.
---^-- ----K------
Advertising doesn't cost-it pays! Save money by reading the ads.



PORT THEATRE

Theatre Opens Sundays at 1:45 P. M. and 8:30 P. M.
Saturday 1:15 Daily 2:45 Admission 10c-16c-30c


'e GO TO THE MOVIES FOR ENTERTAINMENT


FRIDAY NITE SATURDAY JUNE 7

10:30 P.M. 2SMASH HITS

OWL SHOW -- HIT NO 1--

ADMISSION 16c JOHNNY MACK
BROWN i

ALL COLORED CAST Law on the Range

Henry HIT NO. 2

ARMSTRONG RICHARD ARLEN and

"The Colored Champ" ANDY DEVINE iin
in-

"KEEP

PUNCHING"

JITTERBUGS WHAT --
REALLY JIERS! Dead End Kids in

ITS FU N !! "JUNIOR G-MEN"


SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY ONLY
June 8 and 9 LEW AYRES
(p LIONEL BARRYMORE
S A LARAINE DAY


,Wallace BEERY
LIONEL BARRYMORE
LARAINE DAY
o-

Our Gang "Going Fishing" MARCH OF TIME
Latest News Events "Crisis in the Atlantic"


--RIDAY, JUNE 6, 1941


THE ST~AR, 'PORT ST. JCPE, OULF MMITYlf, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE







A O T S P


Softball League

Results This Week
Merchants 16, Pulp Mill 0.
Bank Building 8, Warehouse 6.
Maintenance 18, Warehouse 15.
Laboratory 12, Kenney. Mill 10.
Team Standings
Team- W L Pet.
Laboratory ............ 7 1 .875
Champs ............. 5 2 .714
'Kenney Mill ......... 5 3 .625
Bank Building ....... 4 4 .500
Merchants ........... 4 .500
Pulp Mill ............ 3 5 .375
Warehouse .......... 2 6 .250
Maintenance ......... 2 6 .250
Games Next Week
June 9-Warehouse vs. Kenney.
Bank vs. Maintenance.
June 10-Merchants vs. Labora-
tory. Pulp Mill vs. Champs.
June 12-Bank vs. Champs. Ken-
ney vs. Maintenance.

NEW BUSINESS BUILDING
FOR HIGHLAND VIEW
Cliff Gay. has purchased, a lot
in Highland View from W. C.
Forehand on the highway and has
under construction a store build-
ling with living quarters in the
rear. He will open a grocery store
and filling station.
The two-story store building and
apartments started some time ago
by W. C. Weeks at Highland View
is progressing rapidly and he an-
ticipates opening his dry goods and
notions store very shortly.
--.g. ----.. .
Attend Family Reunion In Tampa
Mrs. Asa Montgomery and sons,
Billy and Jimmy, returned to the
Oety last week after spending a
week in Tampa, the guests of her
father, M. L. Simmons. While
there Mr. Simmons, a former resi-
dent of this city, celebrated his
85th birthday. Forty-five members
of his family were present at the
reunion.

SOAP EFFECT ON GERMS
Despite the possibility that a
person suffering from a disease
may have. used a cake of soap,
there is no danger of infection for
.subsequent users. Germs cannot
multiply on soap.

Anthony Eden. British foreign
minister, took honors in Oriental l
languages when a student at Ox-
ford.


New March of Time at
Port Theatre Tuesday

"Crisis in the Atlantic," the new-
est issue of The March of Time,
has been scheduled for showing
Tuesday only at the Port theatre.
Already widely discussed thru-
out thu country, this March of
Time is the first motion picture
story of the latest phase of the
war -the current bitterly-fought
Battle of the Atlantic.
The picture features many thrill-
ing scenEs filmed by March of
Time cameramen aboard a tanker
in convoy, and the first pictures to
arrive from Greenland-Denmark's
strategic island continent in the
western hemisphere, now under
full U. S. protection.
--------4--------
BUILDING PERMITS
City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson last
week issued the following building
permits:
G. S. Croxton for construction of
five-room dwelling on Palm Boule-
vard; cost $2400.
C. G. Costin for construction of
two dwellings on Third street;
cost $1250 and $1500.
A. J. Hill for construction of
residence on Monument Avenue;
cost $2500.

Guests of Sheriff At Fish Fry
Mr. and Mrs. M. O. .reeman, Mr.
and, Mrs. M. Coe and small daugh-
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Childs
and daughters, Mrs. Theima Mc-
Cranie of Valdosta, Ga., Mr. and
Mrs. D. Whitfield and children,
Mrs. Sally Montgomery, Mr. and
Mrs. Asa Montgomery and chil-
dren, Mrs. Iluffy, Lewis and small
daughter, Mr. and! 1rs. Philip Lov-
ett, Mrs. Jewel Ray and Jack
Fowler were guests Monday of
Sheriff and Mrs. B. E. Parker and
family at a fish fry at Cole's Land-
ing.
---*-----.
BUSIVES UP AT GARAGE
Since Ira T-aylor has taken over
the mechanical department of the
Highland View Garage business
has been improving steadily, re-
ports W. C. Forehand, owner of
f~h wnrapm


t


LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR


W. S. Smith, Editor
The Star
Port St. Joe, Fla.
Dear Comrade-Just a note to
tell you I think your red, white
and blue Memorial Day page in
the May 30 issue of The Star is
one of the finest things I have
seen. Wish more editors would
think of those things.
Your paper is one of the many
I see that almost always has some-
thing in it about the veterans.
And I am glad that you always
find something to say about thum,
because the veterans compose the
finest cTass f citizenship.
Sincerely,
ARTHUR G. KEENE, Editor
The Florida Veteran
Miami, Fla.


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
Away back yonder wu put a lot
of stock in the argument about
woman suffrage, and how it would
clean up everything and make poli-
tics sweet. Big problems would
flatten to mole hills,
I been thinking' about it on ac-
count of Japan. Our diplomats are
not having' much luck with Japan.
And our economists aru arguin'
pro and con on what to do. But
our wimmin folks keep on with
silk hose. And nobody is getting'
any place.
We got a problem on our hands
In -the U. S. A. with cotton, too.
The whole South is bulgin' with
cotton. 'Course, we don't raise
any cotton down here In the
Swamp-only hogs, honey, fish and
kids-but we do take an interest
in what's goin' on in the outside
world.


Sgar Sisters, if you're on your toes
and want to kinda live-down the
The Academy of Motion Picture and want to inda live-down the
T h rA dm heo ionP o "clean up everything" promises,
tq An qe4U Ofel has 12-000


Arts ando uciencesii is o i,uuv
members.


You Get Them FREE!


SUBSCRIBE TO THE STAR
AND TAKE YOUR CHOICE OF ANY TWO OF THE
FOLLOWING PREMIUMS:

CASSEROLE with Pie Plate Cover

THREE 82-INCH PIE PLATES

SIX 5-OZ. CUSTARD CUPS

These are made of genuine "FIRE-KING" heat-
treated Oven Glass

See your foods while they cook
Bake, serve and store all in the same dish
Easy to clean-smooth and sanitary

Take your choice today by subscribing to The Star
for one year-only $2.00--or renewing your
present subscription
THIS OFFER IN EFFECT FOR A LIMITED TIME!

Send In Your Subscription TODAY





THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"


you got a slick chance now. Just
switch to cotton stockin's versus
silk and soT'v the Japanese prob-
lem overnight-also the cotton
problem. Show up the diplomats,
and the economists. And the old
head of the household, so-called.
show him up, too.
Yours with The lowdown,
JO SERRA.

Grimsleys Have Visitors
Mrs. Aurie V. Grimsley of Troy,
Ala., and Dick Grimsley of Wash-
ington,D. C., are guests this week
of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Grimsley and
family.


AUTO WORK
See the
Highland View Garage
and get prices for any and
all repairs. ALL WORK AND
PRICES GUARANTEED
W. C. Forehand



ROOM AND:

BOARD
BY THE 70
WEEK 7

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....265
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 2rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


URGES DRY ZONES


PLUMBING HEATING


ST. JOE

PLUMBING

F. J. CORBIN, Manager

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Heading a committee represent-
ing national church and welfare
groups, Mrs. Ida B. Wise Smith
is urging congress to "give the
young men of 1941 the same
chance their fathers had In '17"
by restoring the firr.t World
War's ban on liquor in camps
and liquor and vice in military


camp areas. She is president of f ;ilA 5 .
the National W. C. T. U. I ,l q J

FIRST CUTLERY FACTORY RA P
Although some tools weru man- '-.B ZN Ws
ufactured in Pennsylvania as early
as 1810, the first cutlery factory
was at Worcester, Mass., and
dates from 1829, when a pen and
pocketknife factory was estab-
lished there

Certain types of laurel roots ob- l C
tainted In the mountains of North
Caorlina are being used for pipe
bowls.
4vw ve s V- ,. f' i11 -


et



S


FOR BETTER
HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It li
easily digested and Is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of -the
valuable vitamin content of
Presh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protetotion



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative


COME IN AND REST!
I Am YOUR Servant- L
Me Serve YOU!


JOHN HENRY JONE


Final Notice to Dog

Owners

Notice is hereby given that Dog Licenses are due for
the period ending lIarch 31, 1942.
I will be at the City Hall between the hours of 2:00
and 4:00 o'clock until June 7 for the purpose of is-
suing licenses and inoculating dogs for rabies.
All dogs not licensed after June 9 will be impounded
and disposed of as provided by Ordinance of the City
of Port St. Joe.
TROY JONES, Chief of Police.


MIDWAY PAfRK
On Waterfront, Calhoun-Gulf I
County Line

Main Entrance for YOUR
Fishing Pleasure
DEAD LAKES


Good Fishing
Good Boats
Good Cagins
Good Beds
Good Meals
Gooir-uides


-- -- ----XIO- -M --- -PANY -


FOR PROMPT SERVICE

* PHONE 100

- DAY OR NIGHT


TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION


row


I '-


I Y


FRIDAY. JUNE 6, 1941 -V)


PAGE POUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


I


t


- Pq awo
AF
-Ta-lt be dWk6W


I