<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00240
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 23, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00240

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbullding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. .. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1941 NUMBER 33
."


WITH THE

EDITOR


'ST. AUGUSTINE-Our first real
stop since leaving Port St. Joe and
a short hop from Palatka, where
we remained overnight and .got
an early start to view this oldest
of cities Naturally our first
thought was to see old Fort
Marion, known to its Spanish
builders as Castillo de San Marco,
which was started in 1672 and
completed 84 years later, the work
being done by the Spaniards,
their slaves and Indian laborers.
The fort is a symmetrically
shaped, four-sided structure sur-
rounded by a moat 40 feet wide,
Its only entrance being across a
bridge, formerly operated as a
drawbridge. The great walls, from
9 to 12 feet thick, are built of co-
quina rock, and we were struck
*by Ithe beautifully arched, case-
mates and carved cornices testi-
fying to the fact that the old
Spaniards still had time for art
and beauty while building this
fortress to protect their sometimes
precarious foothold in this hew
world.
The fort is built around a court
about 11 feet square on which
open living quarters, store rooms,
council chamber, .a chapel, dun-
geons and .powder room. In some
bf the rooms, all of which are
built with arched ceilings, beau-
tiful clusters of Maidenhair.. fern
cover the walls and lend a note
of beauty to the sombre cells that
have looked upon no one knows
what during their 270 years' ex-
istence.
We spent several hours at the
fort and finally left with reluc-
tance, after taking a number of
interesting pictures, as our itenary
called for stopovers at other inter-
esting places on Florida's east
coast, so we headed south for .
MARINELAND Where' we
stopped to see the sights of the
famous OCENARIUM, the only
one of its kind. in the world, where
we were guests of the manage-
ment.
This unique structure consists
of two large concrete and steel
tanks built in such a manner that
spectators may travel along gal-
leries inside and look through
portholes at the thousands of fish
of all varieties that have been
placed in the huge tanks.
Here we saw innumerable odd
fish that we had heard about but
never seen, and others that we
were acquainted with but had
never viewed in their native habi-
tat. As we peered through win-
dows, huge man-eating sharks and
300-pound turtles would swim lazi-
ly up and return our stares, prob-
ably getting as much of a kick
out of seeing us as we got in
watching them.
Tarpon, kingfish, huge trout, a
large blind jewfish, porpoises and
hundreds of smaller fish of which
we did not know the names, glided
past the windows or stopped to
gaze fishily at us, their mouths
agape.
Like the old fort at St. Augus-
tine, we hated to laeve this under-
water wonderland, but time
pressed, so we piled into our car
for the next stop .. .
DAYTONA BEACH-Here we'
Were guests of the famous Riviera
4Hotel, one of the finest in Day-
tona, and the management pro-
vided one of the best suites in the
(Continued on page 4)


Bill to Protect

Bears Defeated

TALLAHASSEE-Rep. E. Clay
Lewis, of Gulf County, Monday
took a leading part in the Florida
House of Representatives, in de-
feating a bill to protect the Flori-
da black bear from hunters in a
closed season.
During debate on the measure,
Lewis offered an amendment to
exempt Gulf county from the por-
visions of the proposed act.
The Gulf county representative
said his amendment was designed
to protect the beekeepers of his
county from the damage done by
thee black bear. Other opponents
of the bill described the animal as
being dangerous to both men and
livestock.
,Proponents of the measure de-
clared the bill was sponsored by
the Florida Game and Fresh Wa-
ter Fish commission and was for
the purpose of protecting the
bear from extinction.
The house voted, to indefinitely
pos-tpone further consideration of
the bill, thus shelving it for the
duration of the 1941 session.


Civil Service

Jobs tre-Open

Civil Service examisatlona for
positions described below were
announced by the U. 'S. Civil
Service Commission teday. Appli-
,ations will be a.crp:r'-r at the
Commission's Washington office
not later than the closing dates
specified.
'Junior custodial officer, $1,860
a year, Bureau of Prisons in the
Department of Justice. Junior cus-
todial officers supervise and in-
sturct inmates empolyed in work
provided by the institution. They
are also responsible for prevent-
ing escapes and for enforcing the
rules, and regulations of the insti-
tution. Applicants must have com-
pleted at least 14 units of high-
school study and must meet high
and rigid physical standards. Ap-
plicants must be at least 25 years
of age, but must not nave passed
their forty-fifth birthday. The
closing date is June 19, 1941.
Junior stenographer, $1,440 a
year; junior typist, $1,260 a year.
This examination is open to both
men and women. Appointment will
be made in Washington, D. C.,
only. The closing date is June 9,
1941.
The following two examinations
for inspector positions in the Navy
Department have been r e an-
nounced with modified require-
ments. Persons now qualified are
urged to apply. at once, although
applications will be accepted un-
til further notice. The maximum
age is 65 years.
Inspector, engineering materi-
als. $1,620 to $2,600 a year. Per-
sons may qualify in these optional
branches: Steel hulls, mechanical
electrical, and radio. For part of
the testing and inspectional ex-
perience that is required, persons
may substitute appropriate educa-
tion or mechanical experience.
Inspector, ship construction,
$2,00 to $2,600 a year. There are
four optional branches: Electrical,
mechanical, steel hulls, and wood
hulls. For part of the testing or
inspectional experience required,
applicants may substitute cer-
tain kinds of mechanical experi-
ence, appropriate education,, or


PROCLAMATION


WHEREAS, Saturday, May 24th, has been desig-
nated as National Poppy Day. in commemoration of the
distinguished services rendered to our country by the
veterans of the World War, and
WHEREAS, the American Legion Auxiliary, on
said Poppy Day, offers for contribution poppies made by
disabled veterans in our Veterans' Hospitals, for which
they receive little or no compensation, and
WHEREAS, it has been the custom to outline this
day in raising funds such as are possible through the
sale of poppies for the benefit of disabled veterans, and
it being the desire of the citizenship of America gener-
ally and of Port St. Joe in particular, therefore,
I, J. L. SHARIT, MAYOR OF THE CITY OF PORT
ST. JOE, BY VIRTUE OF THE POWER VESTED IN
ME, DO HEREBY PROCLAIM SATURDAY, MAY 24,
1941, AS POPPY DAY, and request our citizens to co-
operate and assist our Legionnaires and the members of
the Auxiliary in the sale and distribution of poppies for
the benefit of our disabled veterans.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my
hand and caused the official seal of the City of Port St.
Joe to be affixed hereto, this 19th day of May, A D 1941.
Attest: ,


J. harit,
MAYOR


-)'Y:'9i~i~


M. P. Tomlinson,
City Auditor and Clerk.


Trucking Firm

ODened Here

A service which has long been
recognized as a need in this sec-
tion is now being offered by the
St. Joe Bus and Truck Co., Inc.,
which recently has begun opera-
tion under a charter granted by
the state of Florida.
L. W. "Red" Horton will be in
charge of the local office and has
announced that freight trucks
will ply between Port St. Joe and
Panama City daily.
Mr. Horton says that he ex-
pects a tremendous volume of
freight because of the greater
~.--A 1 -3 -.---- fCprn.^ 11, fl-i,.


Cash Benefit

Payments High

In Gulf County

Public assistance cash pay-
ments to Gulf county recipients
for the period July 1, 1937, when
the State Welfare Board was in-
ducted, into office, through April
30 of this year, aggregated $64,-
415, according to announcement
from the state office in Jackson-
ville today.
These were broken down as fol-
lows: Old Age Assistance, $57,-
456; Aid to Dependent Children,
$4,239; Aid to the Blind, $2,720.
The cash grants were only a


speeu ailu ecoumy o u uy ,s part of the relief extended to the
company. county, State Welfare Commis-
sioner C. C. Codirington pointed
Count-' Funds May out, other direct benefits includ-
ing the distribution of surplus
Be Used for Port commodities, mattersses and cloth-
ing and compensation paid to CCC
St. Toe Hosuital enrollees. Indicating the extent of
the latter, it was stated that dur-
ing the 6-month period ended De-
The Florida House of Represen.- ,ember 31, 1940, 27,339,183 pounds
tatives Monda.y night passed unani of foodstuffs, exclusive or Duval
-mously a bill authorizing the and Hillsboiough counties, where
Gulf County Board of Commission- the food stamp plan was in ef-
ers to pay $2500 for the use and fect, and 59,785 pieces of clothing
benefit of the Municipal Hospital w, ere ,distributed throughout the
building fund of Port St. Joe. state, and that Florida CCC en-
The bill was introduced by E. rollees received $838,160 in wages.
Clay Lewis. He said the money The State Welfare Board al
was to come out of any available contributes to the solution of the
funds of the county. state's relief problem through
The meausre now goes to the certifications for WPA and NYA
senate hereee iSenator JI.Frank employment and through :the
Adams is expected to push school lunch program, which has
through early passage. been expanded to include more
than 100,000 school children.
possession of a marine engineer's -.


license.
Full information as to the re-
quirements for these examinations,
and application forms, may be ob-
tained from the local post office.


All Persons Asked

To Register for

Nation's Defense


TALLAHASSEE, May 22 (Spe-
cial)-In a proclamation issued
yesterday, Governor Holland des-
ignated the period of May 30 to
June 7 as Florida Defense Regis-
tration Week and called upon all
loyal, patriotic citizens of the
state to go to such places as may
have been set apart for that pur-
pose by their respective county
defense councils, to enroll their
names and to offer their services
for such duties as may be assigned
them in connection with State De-
fense program.
In his proclamation Governor
Holland called, attention to the
fact that under the state of emer-
gency proclaimed ,by the Presi-
dent of ,the United States and
recognized by the legislature of
the State of Florida in the act of
creating the State Defense Coun-
cil, it has become the duty and-
the privilege of all loyal citizens
of Florida to contribute, as each
Is able, to such volunteer services
as may be calculated to promote
the sfaety of the State and Na-
tion against the threat of agrea-
sion and to insure the security of
civilization an democracy through-
out the world.
Attention Is also called to ef-
forts of the State Defense Coun-
cils and the several County De-
fense Councils to secure the name


of such )volunteer| through {Eh
registration of aH citizens, both
men and women 15 years of age
or over, for such services as they
be called upon to perform in fur-
therance of State and National se-
curity.. This registration is essen-
tial to efficient organized defense
activities, in the judgement of the
Governor, in order that the ca-
pacities, skills and inclinations of
all available persons may be cata-
logued], classified and assigned to
appropriate duties, when needed
to further the defense program.
As set forth in the Governor's
proclamation and as announced by
the State Defense Council in let-
ters to. all officers of the County
Defense Councils, the registration
thus authorized will begin May
30 to run through June 7. The
opening Jay ;will, be Memorial
Day, generally observed as a holl-
day and has great patriotic signi-
ficance and because of that sig-
nifance will afford wonderful op-
portunity for assembling perspec-
tive registrants to visit the places
designated iby Counlity Defense
Councils as places where registry
books will be kept for the con-
veniende of .the people of that
community or district, thus mak-
ing registration as easy as pos-
sible.
The chairmen of the various
county councils have been ad-
monished to register only those
boys and girls and men and wo-
men in their respective jurisdic-
tions as will do so voluntarily.
No pressure is to be brought to
bear upon any who may hesitate
when asked to sign their names
and list their qualifications. "We
want it. distinctly understood,"
said Executive Director Burr of
the State Defense Council, "that
we want the names only of those
who will sign the registration


Miss Ruth Moore Connell who books or sheets of their own free
is in Tallahassee during legisla- will and, offer their services to
ture spent the week-end in the city their country as volunteers, should
with her mother, Mrs. Florazelle they be called upon to serve at
Connell. (Continued on page 2)










k -~ 1


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-4f Telephone 51 )--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.



If our standard of living is going to be re-
duced very much, we can stand most every-
thing except to go back to celluloid cuffs.
-Eustis Lake Region.


When money goes to a man's head it
touches his soft spot.-Columbus Ledger.

A painter was fined for slapping a girl in
Chicago. Maybe he just wanted to see if the
paint was dry.--Columbus Ledger.


ALL PERSONS ASKED
TO REGISTER FOR
NATION'S DEFENSE

(Continued from Page 1),
any time during .the existing
emergency. No undue pressure of
any kind must be brought to bear
in any instance."
"The object of the registration,"
said Carl Brorein, vice chairman
of the State Defense Council, "is
to provide a necessary personnel
pool from which to draw volun-
teer workers in every division, in
case these workers should be need-
ed. Not only the names, ages and
addresses of the toen and 'wo-
men registering are wanted but
wee would like to have an idea of
what each registrant is best fit-
ted to do, so that he or she may
be properly classified. That is ab-


AUTOMOBILE DOORS SHOULD AL-
WAYS BE LOCKED
The realization that the safe operation of
a motor vehicle is a careful job was recently
stated in a letter written by. Commissioner
Nathan Mayo to the Florida Safety Council
in which he writes if drivers will keep their
doors locked the falling of persons from cars
will stop.
The wide awakeness and the earnestness
of desire of the ommCissioner to really help
make Florida a safer state is reflected in
that advice.
On April 27th, little Bonnie Brown, 3-
year old child fell out of the car in which
she was riding with her parents near Lake
City and an oncoming car killed her. This
would not have happened had the doors of
the car been locked.
In 1940, 11 persons met their death fall-
ing through unlocked doors, of this number,
8 were children, in one instance a jmothr
with a child in her arms and one sitting next
to her opened the door, the mother in trying
to close the door and going at a fast pace
leaned over and fell out with the baby in her
arms, both were killed.
The Florida Safety Council reminds-the
selves in their cars and keep their 'doors
locked so that smash-up will not permit
the driver to fall out and get mangled by
the car. -
driving public that racing drivers.strap them-


auspiices, to register again, this the men and women who, from
time so thatiour files will be the sense of patriotic duty will
volunteer to do what may be
complete. Our registration will needed to li6 done to defend the
not conflict with amy other or nation and the state against foes
place the registrant under any who might seek to destroy the
further obligation."
further obligationAmerican way of life."
"I regard the registration of --
volunteer defense workers, as a TWENTY-FIVE GRADU-..
patriotic duty and responsibility," UATE FRO SCHOOL
said Lisle Smith, past Commander
of the American Legion in Florida The graduation exercises; Of
and now a member of the State the Seniior Class of Port. St.
Council of. Defense. "The Ameri- Joe High were held in the high
can Legion and, iits Auxilliary did school auditorium Monday even-
carry out a statewide registration ing at S o'clock, with Rev. Frank
of their respective memberships Dearing of the St. James Episco-
but I am firmly of the belief that pal church as guest speaker. The
those who registered then should Salutatory address was. given by
register again so that records of Maurice Fain and the Valedictory
the state and county councils may address was given by Ora Lee Go-


be as complete as possible and
save the time which might have
to be wasted if it were necessary
to ask the keepers of American


solutely necessary if the best re- Legion records for volunteers
sults are to be obtained. If a man from their registration lists to fill
is a steam fitter, for instance, calls, state or national calls for
we w-nt to know that so that in volunteers of certain callings or
a call for carpenters, he would not qualifications. As far as it lies in
waste his time in being sent to my power, I am urging my Am-
fill that-call. What is true of men erican Legion friends and com-
is also true of women. We want rades to register again."
to know what she wants to do and The officials and department
can do best, so that if she is a and division heads of the state
stenographer, and, wants to do defense Icouncil have asked the
stenographic work, she will not be newspapers of the state as well
assigned to fill a call for nurses, as radio and other speakers, to
"We hope the registers filled emphasize that promptness in the
out during the registration week matter of classifying registrants
will be as explicit as to the quali- will be of prime importance. Age,
fications, of the registrants as it ability in any particular line of
is possible to make them. It will work, preferences as to work, ex-
greatly facilitate the work of the nerience and availability of reg-
county council as well as the istrants is particularly needed so
state council. The real work in that the chairmen of the Division
connection with the registration of Labor and Personnel may be
will come after the lists are all in position to furnish workers for
in the hands of the officers of the all activities and projects. To help
several county councils and the in this classification,, the riegis.
cataloguing and classification of trants can do much by giving the
the volunteers is undertaken, most complete possible answers to
"Here is something the mnem- the questions which will be aske.
bers of the state council as well them or which they will find on
as those (of the several county their registration blanks.
councils wish the newspapers of "I hope it will be made clear to
the state as well as any speakers all registrants that they are reg-
who may talk at meetings or *istering themselves as volunteer
over the radio would impress, up- workers," said, Executive Director
on all prospective registrants: We Burr. "This registration is by no
want all to register even though means a listing of applicants for
they have registered for the same paid jobs. That particular form of
similar purpose during the last registration is being handled by
few weeks or months, under some the Federal government througB
other auspices. We know that the State Employment Service. The
American Legion and is Auxiliary Florida Defense Registration pro-
and some other organizations have claimed by the governor and Wbing
conducted registrations and that carried out under the auspices of
many have signed them. However, the State Defense Council is solely
we would like to have all those for the purpose of securing the
who did register under any other names of the boys and girls and


forth. Supt. Tom Owens presented the
Special music was rendered by diplomas to the twentyrfive gradu-
the Glee club, accompanied by ates.
Miss Erline McClellan. The Bacculaurate address was
delivered Sunday evening by Fa-
Special awards were presented their O'Sullivan of Apalachicola.
to Ora Lee Goforth for outstand-
ing scholastic record and to Ar-
thur Forehand for outstanding
athletics and the American Le- PLUMBING HEATING
gion award for Good Citizenship
was presented) to Maurice Fain ST. JOE
and Gewel Lewis, after which


DR. J C. COE
- DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12, 1 to 5
Sundays By Appointment
Costiri Bldg. Port St. Joe


PLUMBING

F. J. CORBIN, Manager

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


.,.t/ i AARE there days when it seems
A that the radio, the-ringing of
S-- the door or telephone bell, the
clatter of dishes, or even the laughter and voices
of children nearly drive you frantic-days when
you are restless, and cranky?
Do you lie awake nights?
When these hectic days and wakeful nights in-
terfere with your work and take the pleasure out-
of life for you, try.
DR. MILES NERVINE
Dr. Miles Nervine is a combination of effective
nerve sedatives. Originated nearly sixty years
ago. it is as up to date as today newspaper.
Dr. Miles Nervine has brought relief to millions
of nervous sufferers. You may find it exactly what
you need. Read full di-
Will you try Dr. Miles Nervine? reactions in
Your druggist has it package.


why WEAR m;r-~:ii I
-- .I ----- ----' -."-';II___I'_~=~
'-LIAN',KEV FEEL Lh' E L iDY_ \OU II DED
14AD SMOKED GLASSES oN1 MHOE U GHI 7 H
-' .
A-7

ILIGH PWT

NH EYES ~
"'I


I. 150.WATT BU
NOT LIGHT-IT'S GLARE AND 2. SHAE OPEN
SHADOW THAT HURT! SEE-. 3. DI.FFUSINGU
!M. WHTHAT *ITE SHADE
THIS .S. LAMP ENDS THAT!
1 /


REDDY DEMONSTRATES SAFE-SECINC LIGHT

I.E.S. Lamps are scientifically de-
signed to protect precious eyesight
and provide just the right amount
of light for safe, easy seeing .


SEE YOUR

Light Conditioning

Dealer


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


PAGE TWO


THE STPAR, PORT ST. JOE, GU1LF COUtNTY, FILOMDA


FWDAY, MAY 23 194--


I




i







I









(3










"RID Y.. M Y.2. .194. T 8- ., .. T J .L O .-- P.. ,* T %M r.


L.-.


Society


GASKIN-TAUNTON
The wedding of Miss Murn
Taunton, daughter of Mrs. C.
Taunton, to Roy Fitzgerald G
kin, son of Judge and Mrs. R.
Gaskin, of Blountstown, was qui
ly solemnized at the home of t
bride's mother on McClellan Av
Monday evening, with Rev.
E. Marietta, pastor of the Metl
dist Church, officiating.
The living room where the ce:
mony took place was beautiful:
decorated with roses Queen An
lace and fern. Soft music w
played by the mother of t
groom.
Attending the bride were h
aunt, Mrs. B. R. Bateman of Att
pulgus, Ga., and H. B. Gaskin,
Blountstown, brother of the groo
acted as best man. The bride
blond lovliness was enhanced 1
her outfit of heavenly blue sheet
with white accessories and off-th
face hat. Mrs. Gasllin came
Port St. :Jboe several years al
with her .parents, from Carrabell
She is a garduate from the loc
high school.
The groomm', s. a graduate frol
Calcohi, 'Blountstown, and attend
ed Normal PhArk college in No
man Park; ~ Ga.- He is now' ei
played by the St. Joe Paper Co.
Immediately following the cerE
mony, the. young couple left for
short wedding trip, the destination
unknown, after which they wi
be at home on 6th street. The
have many friends in' Gulf, Franl
lin and Calhoun Counties wh
join the Stai in wishing there
much happiness.

MRS. PRIDGEON HOSTESS
TO J. A. M. CLUB
-Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon entertained
the members of the J. A. M
Club at her home on Second St
Monday evening. Vases of Easte
lilies and bowls of nasturtium.
added, to the attractiveness of thi
living and dining rooms.
Sewing and chatting was en
joyed, after which the hostes:
served frozen salad, cheese sticks
saltines, and iced ginger ale t(
Mesdames Leroy Gainous, W. C
Pridgeon, A. P. Lawson, Sammih
Davis, B. A. Pridgeon, J. M. Smith
W. H. Howell, J. A. Connell and
Miss Myrtice Coody.

RUTH CIRCLE OF BAPTIST
MISSIONARY SOCIETY
Mrs. Victor Johnson entertained
the Ruth Circle of the Baptist
Missionary Society at her home
on McClellan Ave., Monday after-
noon. Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon, chair-
man was in charge. The meeting
opened with the deevotional taken
from Heebrew II. and was follow-
ed by prayer by, Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett. After the regular business
the meeting Was dismissed by
prayer and the ten members pres-
ent enjoyed a social hour with
the hostess.

SCHOOL FACULTY ENJOYS
BEACH PARTY
The members of the local school
faculty, their husbands and wives
and friends enjoyed a delightful
beach party at Beacon Hill Tues-
day evening. The party motored to
the beach and a delicious supper
was served, after which dancing
was enjoyed.
Those present were Mr. and Mrs.
Gus Creech, Mr. and Mrs B. Ken-
nington, Mr. and Mrs. Joe FerrelI,
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Owens, Mr. and
Mrs. Andy Martin,, Miss Juanita
Gunn, Miss Eileen Arnold, Tom
Coldeway, Frank Hannon and
Howell Hampton.

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Upshaw, of
, Pascagoula, Miss, were the week-
end visitors of Mr. and Mrs. W. C.
Pirdgeon and family.


SPersonals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


A .
d MISS McCLELLAN
COMPLIMENTS SENIORS
Complimenting the Senior Class
r Miss Erline McClellan entertained
s at a dinner Friiday evening at he
e home in 11th and Palm Boulevard
Attractively arranged bowls o
. vai-colored flowers were placed
s at vantage points throughout the
, home for the occasion. Following
o the .dinner the entire class en
joyedd the hospitality of Roi
e Williams, manager of the Port
Theatre, who presented each mem
Sber with a pass to the theatre
Others. enjoying this delightful af
fair with the Senior Class and
hostess were "Mr. and Mrs. Jpn
Stapleton.

SMRS. J. E. BOUNDS
ENTERTAINS
Honoring Mrs. Claude Adams,
who left this week with her hus-
Sband for Camp Livingston, ;La.,
Mrs. J. E. Bounds entertained
with a hankie shower last Thurs-
day afternoon. Vari-colored spring
flowers beautifully decorated the
home fdr the' occasion. Several
progressions of bridge were en-
joyed after which prizes were
awarded to Mrs. R. F. Miller and
Mrs. S. B. Shuford. Strawberry
shortcake topped with whipped
cream and iced, drinks were served
to the honoree, the prize winners
and Mesdames 'Howell Hampton,
A. L. Ward, Massey Ward, D. B.
Lay, Robert Tapper, S. L. McCall,
Roy Williams and J. B. McKissack.

METHODIST SOCIETY FOR
CHRISTIAN SERVICE
The Methodist Women's Society
for Christian Service held their
regular stewardship meeting at
the church Monday afternoon
with Mrs. George Patton in charge.
The topic for the afternoon was
Stewardship in Christian Educa-
tion, and was developed, by Mrs.
A. M. Jones, Sr., Mrs. J. T. Mc-
Neill and Mrs. A. M. Jones, Jr.
** Tr
Ronal Outlaw was a week-end
visitor in Lake City.


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS'
AUXILIARY
S The Lottie Moon Junior Girls'
SAuxiliary of the Baptist Church
. met at the home of Geraldine
SParker last Friday afternoon for
Their regular meeting. Nine mem-
bers answered the roll call with
Bible verses, after which the stu-
dy was held with the topic being
"On Missions," during which the
main and different phases, of the
work of the W. M. U. was brought
out.
Geraldine Parker rendered a
solo, followed by a prayer by Car-
olyn Gangneuix. Mar.y Louise
Wooden sang a solo after which
the meeting was dismissed :by
sentence prayers. Refreshments
were served, by the hostess, as-
sisted by her mother, Mrs. Tom
Parker.
The next meeting will be a
business meeting at the church
Friday afternoon.

MAR.:HA CIRCLE BAPTIST
MISSIONARY SOCIETY
The. Martha Circle of- the Bap-
tist Circle of the Baptist Mission-
ary society held their regular
meeting at the home of Mrs. E. C.
Cason Monday afternoon. In the
absence of the chairman Mrs. Ca-
son presided over the meeting.
Mrs. D. F. Taunton gave the
devotional and prayer after which
the minutes of the.pre'ious meet-
ing was read and the roll called
with nine answering.
The regular routine of business
was carried out after the meeting
was, dismissed by Mrs. Nick Killy
and refershmeats were served by
the hostess.


Mrs. B. B. Conklin returned to
her home Tuesday] after spending
Sthe last week in Saint Andrews
d as the guest of her mother, Mrs.
r M. J. Thompson.

f
d Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Costin and
e Family and Mr. and Mrs. S. C.
g Pridgeon attended the graduation
-exercises at the Gulf Port Military
y Academy in Gulf Port, Miss., Mon-
t day.

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Costin and
- family, of Lake City, spent the
Sweek-end in the city as guests of
Mrs. A. A. Costin.

Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis and
B. B. Conklin visited, in Saint An-
drews last Friday evening.

Mike Kennedy, of Gordon, Ala.,
has accepted a position with
Creech Brothers Dry Cleaning es-
tablishment.

Mrs. George Montgomery and
children returned to their home in
Port, St. Joe from Valdosta. Ga.,
where they spent the week as the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Mc-
Cranie. Mrs. McCranie accom-
panied them home, returning to
the Georgia city, Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Y. Wages and son.
Freddy, returned Monday from
Tastman, Ga., where they visited
relatives for several days.

Mrs. O. M. Morton and small
son, Mike, returned Sunday from
Carrabelle where they spent a
week with relatives.

The Misses Louise and Marilyn
Solomen who have taught in the
local school left Tuesday for their
home in Perry to spend the sum-
mer months with their parents.

Judge and Mrs. R. S. Gaskin
and son, H. B. Gaskin, of Blounts-
town, attended the graduation ex-
ercises here Monday evening.





LETTER TO PUBLIC FROM
P.-T. A. PRESIDENT
We take this opportunity to
thank the executive officers, the
faculty and the public for the fine
cooperative spirit with which
the-f met every request made by
the Parent-Teacher's organization
this yeta0. The flag was given,
books were bought for the library,
new equipment and improve-
ments were made in the lunch
room any many children were pro-
vided with lunches. The beautifica-
tion of the school grounds was a
big step forward. We are sending
two delegates to the Parent-
Teacher training school at Gaines-
ville June 10th. The time and ef-
fort we give to the schools is a
great step in the making of our
Democracy, so when we analyze
the far reaching effect of our
organization we have. knuch for
which to be thankful.
The public had been most co-
operative and helpful in any pro-
ject for the benefit of our chil-
dren so with this fine spirit I
am sure we will progress in Port
St. Joe.
Mrs. W. H. Wellington,
President.

B. T. U. OFFICERS TO MEET
There will be an officers and
leaders meeting of the Northwest
Coast B. T. U. Association on
Sunday, May 25, at 2:30, Central
Standard Time, at the Southport
Baptist Chuirch.

Mrs. J. E. Jenkins was a busi-
ness visitor in Wewahitchka last
Thursday.


Tuesday, May 27


CONVENIENCE...0



Is Now Offered to the Merchants and Public at Large

Through the Facilities of the Newly Organized





St Joe Bus and


Truck Co., Inc.




With Their Freight Service Between Port St. Joe and

Panama City



Trucks leave daily at 8 a. m and arrive

From Panama City at 2:30 p. m,

(Daily Except Sunday)





C. W: HORTON, Agent


Hugh Howell, of Orlando, spent Miss Eva Meserve left Wednes-
Tuesday in the city. He returned day for her home in St. Augus-
to Orlando Wednesday and was tine to spend several weeks with
accompanied by his wife who has her mother.
been teaching in the local high *
school.Mr B. R. Bateman, of Attapul-
gus, Ga., was the guest of her
,Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Rolilns and sister, Mrs. C. C. Taunton, Monday
daughter, Peggy, will spend the and Tuesday.
week-end in Gordon, Ala., visiting a
relatives. Mrs. A. Drago and,chil- Miss Betty Marks, of Apalachi-
dren of Ashford will accompany cola spent part of last week in
them home to visit for a week. Port St. Joe visiting relatives.


PORT THEATRE
Theatre Opens Sundays at 1:45 P. M. and 8:30 P. M.
Saturday 1:15 -'Daily 2:45 Admission 10c-16c-30o


GO TO THE MOVIES FOR ENTERTAINMENT ,


SATURDAY ONLY, MAY 24



Zs MET HITS

Hit No. 1 Hit No. 2


.
DA EN KD in "J -


DEADENDKIDSin"JU N I O R G- M E N"
DEAD END KIDS in "J U NI OR G -ME N"


Sunday-Monday, May 25-26

Poullette Goddard
PAULETTE GODDARD

-CeaIB.DeMiMe
e NORTH WEST
W MOUNTED POLICE

In Technicolor

LATEST NEWS


Y ,,


FRIDAY, MAYV 23, 1941


TH STR, PORT ST. Jl*E, GUI,F "00ftTY, FLORIDAA


PAGE THREE







PAEFORTE TRPR S.JOGLFCUTY LOIAFRDYMY2314


LOCAL GAS TAX BILL INTRO-
DUCED BY REP. E. C. LEWIS

Representative E. Clay Lewis,
Jr., yesterday introduced a bill in
the House of Representatives to
give the c-y of Port St. Joe the
right to levy a one cent sale tax
on every gallon of gas sold in the
city limits of Port St. Joe.
The bill passed the house and
was sent to the senate. Local
legislation introduced in the pre-
sent legislature is necessary to
exempt the city from the new
state law which gives the gas tax
to the state rather than the city.
WITH THE EDITOR

(Continued, from Page 1)
hostelry, where we were fanned
by ocean breezes and lulled to
sleep by the wind whispering
through the stately co-conut palms
that surround thelhotel.
We d ,ove through the city,
down onto the famous beach
where so many automobile speed
records have been set and piloted
our car for 23 miles down the
wide stretch of hard sand. As the
beach is the main attraction in
this city, we felt that our over-
night stop would be sufficient, so,
in spite of protests by the man-
ager of the Riviera, we left early
Sunday morning with the thought
in mind to see the McKee Jungle
Gardens at .
VERO BEACH-Arriving here
about noon, we presented our cre-
dentials to the manager of the
McKee Jungle Gardens and were
extended all courtesies.
.i guidl4 took lus' in hand to
show us over the 80-acre 'tract
which contains thousands of rare
and exotic plants, shrubs, and
trees gathered from all parts of
the world and brought to Florida
for the edification of all who de-
sire to view them.
In addition to the plants and
trees, the garden also has mon-
keyis, bears and other animals on
exhibit, as well as curios from all
parts of the world. We spent pos-
sibly two hours here, but covered
only about one and a half miles
of the five miles of trails in the
garden, and while we saw hun-
dreds of odd and curious p'Tnts,


trees and orchids, undoubtedly
there were hundreds more that we
did not see.
Leaving the jungle gardens we
passed through Ft. Pierce and
West Palm Beach, feeling that
outside of the beautiful residences
in these sections there was no-
thing to be seen,so our next stop
was .
FT. LAUDERDALE-Where we
were the personal guests of Clyde
"Bring 'Em Back Alive" Beatty
at his world-famous zoo .As it
was rather late in the afternoon,
the regular show was over, but,
we viewed the wild animals -
tigers, lions, bison, wolves, orang
outangs, hundreds of monkeys,
seals, bears and innumerable
smaller animals Our wife
was particularly attracted by the
monkeys-said they reminded her
3o much of her husband's antics.
After leaving Beatty's, with a
number of pictures added to our
-'rowing collection of snapshots,
,ve stopped at .
DANIA-To call on Mr. and
Mrs. Victor Sirman We found
Vic at home, but his wife was
away, for a visit in Mulberry.
Mr. Sirman, after taking us to
dinner in North Miami, took us
on a personally conducted tour of
Miami and Miami Beach, which
Mrs. L. M. Cook, of Marianna,
visited with heir 4augrter, Mrs.
L. O. Freeman, last weekend.
-*- -- .-- -- -

,ROOM AND
BOARD
BY THE $700
WEEK

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....265
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35e
*D inner, .6 to.-8.-.:i .*,S::..35e

MRS. M. 0. FREEMAN
Coiner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building
b--------


was indeed a revelation to your such a small area. day tour of the Magic City, and
editor Never before nave we Having spent the night in Da- from there we go on, over the
seen so many hotels crowded into [nia, we are now preparing for a overseas highway to Key West.


You Get Them FREE!

SUBSCRIBE TO THE STAR
AND TAKE YOUR CHOICE OF ANY TWO OF THE
FOLLOWING PREMIUMS:

CASSEROLE with Pie Plate Cover

THREE 8-INCH PIE PLATES

SIX 5-OZ. CUSTARD CUPS

These are made of genuine "FIRE-KING" heat-
treated Oven Glass

See your foods while they cook
Bake, serve and store all in the same dish
Easy to clean-smooth and sanitary

Take your choice today by subscribing to The Star
for one year-only $2.00-or renewing your
present subscription
THIS OFFER IN EFFECT FOR A LIMITED TIME!

Send In Your Subscription TODAY





THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"


L


The VELVET you ride on
SROUGH ROADS and boulevards all look alike to the
'41 Ford-they're all paved with velvet!-thanks to
those long, slow-motion springs and velvet-action
hydraulic shock absorbers. Now, for the first time
Sin the low-price field, you get that luxurious velvet
ride you expect only in big, costly cars.
S-- -- -


PHONE 39


The VELVET you save-
AND THESE big 6-passenger velvet-riding Ford
"Special" sedans are actually the lowest-priced sedans
among the low-price leaders! There's velvet on first
cost. And here's more velvet: In the Gilmore-Grand
Canyon Economy Test-over 23 miles per gallon.
And there's still more velvet when you trade.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA


SLE.iLEP ADVFPTTSFME

'our FORD-MERC.dieY-dler"
S^ l ff ?&* ": deEul^t~yl r M%H


WE TRADE FOR ANY AND ALL MAKES



ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
AUTHORIZED FORD DEALER


~ ~L~


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST, JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 23 1941