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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00239
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 16, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00239

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fattest grow.
S Ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upkuliding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
esv growing little city. In
S T A R the heart of the pine belt.
eat rowig litlec~ty ,. I


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1947 NUMBER 32


Fires Burn Over Local Committee FIFTY YEARS WED Gunnery School

30,000 Acres of Named for County Site Taken Over

Land In Countv Defense Roundup A By Government
La~ndn fountv i^^ -R i: *


Three Wind-Swept Blazes In Be Held During Week of May
Vicinity of City Battled 30 to June 7
During Week I A committee consisting of W. O.
IAnderson, Robert Bellows and B.
A heavy pall of smoke hung over E. Kenney Jr., was named by
Port St. Joe this week as three Chairman George Tapper Friday
wind-swept fires raged through the night at a meeting of the Gulf
dense pine woods that, surround County Defense Council to act as
the city and resisted all attempts a registration committee to regis-i
to place them under control. At ter every man and woman in Gulf
one time the blaze extended to the county, listing their qualifications,
eastern city limits but was halted as a step in the national defense
at the Wewahitchka highway by a plan in case of emergency.
crew of CCC men who started a Date of the drive has been set
backfire at the highway, for May 30 to June 7 and places of
B. E. Kenney, a member of the. registration throughout the county
state forestry board, estimated will be announced later.
,yesterday hat approximately 30,000 The questionnaires will list voca-
acres in Gulf county and between tions of registrants together with
8,000 and 10,000 acres in Bay capacities in which they would
county near Beacon Hill had' been ,prefer to serve in case of local or
burned over. He was unable to national emergency.


give an estimate as to the.lose in-
volved which will not be known
until a complete survey is made of
the burned-over areas. The great-
est loss will be through -the de-
struction of small trees, which
were completely destroyed..
Thaslaygest tira .wa, in, the ,east-
ern section of the county and ex-
tended from the Willis Swamp
area to McNell's landing. Another
was near Lister's landing, on pri-
vate property. The greater portion
of the burned-over sections belong
to the 'dlPont Interests which op-
erate the St. Joe Paper company
mill here. '
Approximately 100 fire-fighters
.battled the three blazes night and
day through the week, but due to
the high winds, which shifted con-
stantly', waged a losing fight.
----- -

Holland Calls For

Increased Funds

From Motor Licenses and Other
Sources; Proposes New Levy
On Retail Store Stocks

Governor Spessard L. Holland
set a money-raising keynote Wed-
nesday for the final three weeks
of the 1941 legislature by recom-
mending more expensive license
tags for Florida's 300,000 automo-
biles and a new tax on $1e stocks
in retail stores, combined with
rigid economy to "avert a break-
down" in state operations.
As a factor in strengthening
state finances and supporting the
public schools, he proposed a
sweeping program to tighten tax
collection and assessment proce-
dure in the counties.
The governor delivered his 54-
minute message to assembled rep-
resentatives and senators who had
followed, every recommendation he
made when the legislature con-
vened last month.
In his message he emphasized
that the state no longer collects a
tax on real estate, thus losing al-
(Continued on Page 5)
-----+-P-----
PORT NEWS
Tanker Gulf Maid sailed Wednes-
day after discharging a cargo of
gasoline to the Southeastern Pipe-
line corporation.
---------
BAND BOOSTERS TO MEET
Bandmaster Howell Hampton an-
nounces that there will be a meet-
ing of the Band Booster's club next
Tuesday at the band room.


Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adolph Le-
Hardy who Wednesday observed
their golden wedding anniver-
sary.


Observe 50 Years

Of Married Life

Mr. and Mrs. C. A :LeHardy Cele-


Health Unit W ill brate Golden Wedding
Health Unit Will Anilversary

Hold Pre-School Complmenting Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Adolph LeHardy, who cele-
Roundun Soon brated their fiftieth wedding anni-
versary Wednesday,:Miss Blanche
SLeHardy and Mrs. C. D. Roberson
Director Extends Thanks for As-. of this city) and Mrs. Lee Stern of
istance, and Asks Co-rpera. Albany, Ga., were co-hostesses at
tion in Program a five-course dinner Wednesday
evening at the beach home of Mr.


"Schools in Gulf County will
soon close and your health depart-
ment wants' to take this means
o .personally thanking the super-
intendent of public instruction,
the principals of the various
schools, the teachers, the P.-T. A.,
the parents and the school chil-
dren themselves for the wonder-
ful co-operation they have given
the health department during the
school year about to end, for with
their efforts every undertaking in
carrying on the school health pro-
gram has been more or less a suc-
cess and with the fine spirit that
has been manifested we are look-
ing toward a much better year
for the 1941-42 term," says R. J.
Lamb, director of the Franklin-
Gulf-Wakulla health unit.
"We are now loolyng toward
our summer round-up of the pre-
school child, both colore)dj and
white; that is, every child that
is to enter school this coming
term to take advantage of the op-
portunity 'that your health de-
partment will give you this summer
(Continued on Page 5)


and Mrs. Frank A. LeHardy. The
home was decorated with baskets
of yellow roses entwined with
fern.
Those enjoying this affair with
the honorees were Mrs. R. A. Cos-
tin, Mrs. James Marea, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank LeHardy, Mr. and Mrs.
Gordon Thomas, Mrs. Onnie Lou
LeHardy and daughters, the Misses
Eugenie and Onnie Lou.
After the dinner Mr. and Mrs.
LeHardy celebrated their anniver-
sary with a public reception at
the Centennial building. The audi-
torium was beautifully decorated
in green and gold. More than 150
guests called during the evening
and presented Mr. and Mrs. Le-
Hardy with lovely' gifts as me-
mentos of the occasion.
In the receiving line with Mr.
andi Mrs. LeHardy were Mr. and
Mrs. F. A. LeHardy, Mr. and Mrs.
Gordon Thomas, Mrs. Onnie Lou
LeHardy, Miss Blanche LeHardy,
Mrs. Lee Stern and Mrs. C. D.
Roberson.
Throughout the evening refresh-
(Continued on Page 5)


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The publisher of The Star has been "on the job" in
Port St. Joe continuously for the past five years, and
during that time, outside of a day or so at a time spent
in fishing, has not taken time out for a vacation. .
The other day we decided that if we didn't want to be
planted under six feet of dirt, in a wooden overcoat, we
should "get away from it all" for at least a short time.
. So today we're packing up our other shirt, our
toothbrush and our wife and heading for parts unknown,
to be gone at least ten days or two weeks (depending
on how long our little dab of ready cash holds out).
During our brief sojurn in other climes The Star office
-both the newspaper and job departments-will be in
the capable hands of our nephew, Charles W. Sheppard.
and we ask that you give him full co-operation in gather-
ing the news and placing your advertising and job work.

W. S. SMITH, Publisher.


Work Expected to Start Soon 0
Project Covering 25,734 Acres
On Bay County Peninsula

A site consisting of 25,734 acre;
in Bay county, the entire peninsula,
south and east of Panama City and
extending down to the Gulf county
line near Beacon Hill, was taken
over 'by the federal government
last week for development as i
permaennt flexible gunnery school
The government took possession
when Judge A. V. Long in Unitec
States district court Issued a judg
ment on declaration of taking, at
ter there was deposited in the
[registry of court $185,765.70 held
'to be sufficient to cover "ulti-
mate award of compensation" for
the property.
It is expected that work on the
project will begin shortly and it Is
rumored about Port St. Joe that
a branch railroad will connect the
school with this city. However,
this could not be officially verified
and sl merely hearsay.


Second Annual

Boys' State Will

Be Held in June

Two Port St. Joe Boys Selected To
Attend By Local American
Legion Post

The second annual Boys' State


will be held June 14-21 at Talla-
hassee, sponsored by the Ameri-
can Legion.
Boys selected from the senior
and sophomore classes, of high
schools throughout 'the state for
their outstanding qualities in
scholarship, character,, courage,
leadership and a basic understandi-
ing of the social sciences, will as-
semble to elect a governor, cabinet,
house of representatives and a
senate, and will virtually take over
the state government, performing
all the functions of the offices for
which they are selected for a
week's period.
Representatives from Gulf coun-
ty, sponsored by Gulf County Post
116, American Legion, will be Ar-
ther Soderberg and Edward Eells.
The governor and high state
officials will advise and, help the
boys in their problem and the ex-
perience will help materially to
develop these youngsters as good
citizens and prepare them for
leadership in later years.
The various American Legion
posts and civic clubs throughout
the state are co-operating in spon-
soring the affair which is pat-
terned after the Boys' Town of
Nebraska that has proven so ef-
fective in preparing boys for citi-
zenship.


FOREHAND PLANS ADDITION
IN HIGHLAND VIEW TRACTi
Brooks Kennington recently pur-
chased a 13-acre tract in Highland
View from the McNeill-Higgins
company, and this land, the high- 1


Registration of GulIf Residents Will *%"s


est site in this section, has been
secured by W. C. Forehand who is palm trees and shrubs will be
placing it on the market for resi- planted down the center- of the
diential and business purposes. The street to create a beautiful drive.
tract will he known as "Forehand's He has also laid out a 100 by 270-
First Addition to Highland View." foot plot extending from Third to
Mr. Forehand has deeded 35 Fourth street as a park which will
additional feet to the county in or- contain a playground for children,
der to make Third street a 60-foot a horseshoe court and other rec-
boulevard in the addition, and rational facilities.


r


I


. w


Graduates To

Get Diplomas

Monday Night

Baccalaureate Services To Be
Held Sunday In School
Auditorium

' Twenty-five members of the
Sgiaduating class of Port St. Joe
high school will receive their di-
Splomas Monday evening at the
high school auditorium from the
Hands of Tom Owens county su-
* perintendent of schools. The class
Sof '41 is the largest ever to be
graduated from the local institu.
tion of learning.
Baccalaureate services will be
held Sunday-trening at the high
school auditorium -with Rev. Q'Sul-
lavan 'delivering the addrees to
the class. The public is invited to
attend both services.
Programs for the two days art
as follows:
Baccalaureate Service
8:00 p. m.
Processional Invocation
Song, "All Hall the Power".....
.................. C ngregatlon
Announcements
Scripture
Special Music .......... Glee Club
Sermon ........... Rev. O'Sullavan
Benediction Recessional
Graduation Exercies
8:00 p. m.
Processional Invocation
Salutatory ......... Maurice Fain
Special Music ........ Glee Club
Address.......Rev. Frank Dearing
Awarding of Honors...........
......Principal Jon L. Stapleton
Valedictory....... Ora Lee Goforth
Awarding of Diplomas'..........
.....Superintendent Tom Owens
Benediction Recessional
Members of the class are:
Mable Blount
Willie Lee Beard
Joyce Chatham
Betty Darcey
Auther Forehand
Maurice Fain
Ora Lee Goforth
Elaine Gore
Emily LeGrone
Lunette Hammock
Gewel Lewis
James Lillie
Edna McLeod
Jimmie McNeill
Elsie Nall
Naomi Parker
Billy Roberts
Jessie Stone
Vivian Straus
Vilura Straus
Gwendolyn Spencer
Murnice Taunton
Betty Jo Temple
Ellen Wallace
Cornelius VanHern
_____-tr__..._.._..
SCIENCE EXHIBIT TODAY
Parents and friends of students
of the science department of Port
St. Joe high school are cordially
invited to view an exhibit of work
by the students at the high school
building all day today.

Luncheon Postponed
The installation luncheon for the
Port St. Joe Woman's club has
been postponed indefinitely.


-------C------








PG SI TH STR POR ST JOE GUFCUTFLRDRDYMY1,14


Crocheted Cloth For Your Bridge Table


.js


4. 4'
', '. .., -.



.






EVEN an ordinary. bridge table can be transformed into a traditional
setting for afternoon tea when you cover it with a crocheted tea
cloth. Here' is one you can make yourself, to lend prestige to your
informal entertaining. Called "Jack Frost", it requires only 36 separate
motifs which you can make up in no time at all. It is crocheted in
mercerized crochet cotton and will remain crisp and new-looking after
repeated tubbings.' Directions for making this design may be obtained
by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to the Needlework De.
pairatent of this newspaper, specifying Design #659.

"FROM ONE PRODIGY TO ANOTHER"


CLUwji~I*


I


I


* A ~ L I


Kenneth Amada, 8-year-old musical and mental prodigy of Carteret
School for Boys at West Orange, N. J., performs for his teacher,
world-famed pianist Moritz Rosenthal, who was himself a musical
Wonder 70 years ago. Kenneth's 1. Q. is above 170, which makes
him one boy in a million. In his classes he is a mental marvel.


rest of Ma r state titles the clouds of unper-
S o aforme'd, boom-time contacts.
Sills Passed B HOLIDAY Making the last
PiT1S hursday in November official
1941 T gislatr Thanklsgiving in Florida.
1941 Legslat tre W IIFE-Pledging all hunt-
ing and fishing license funds to


New Laws Outlined Briefly By
Attorney General As Matter
Of Public Information
TALLAHASSEE, May 15 New
laws created by the 1941 legisla-
ture and briefed by Attorney Gen-
eral J. Tom Watson as a matter of
public information were announced
today as follows:
CONSTITUTION A proposed
amendment to permit election on
changes in constitution within 90
to 180 days.
CITY STREETS-Require state
road department to maintain the
streets which connect through
state highways.
CONSERVATION Propose an
amendment to t ihe constitution
placing control of game and fresh
.water fish in non-political commis-
sion with power to conserve and
restock.
DENTISTS Abolish unauthor-
ized dentistry, require all dentists
to be certified by state board.
COLLEGES -Designate Univer-
sity of Florida and Florida State
College as depositories for public
documents.
SALARIES-Require salary buy-
ers to charge no movie than legal
interest; in effect, abolishing sal-
ary buying.
PROPERTY-Remove from real


FOR BETTER
HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
early digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative


IN a world of rapidly changing
events, there's a lot of satisfac- ,
tion in realizing the advantages
we all have in our American way
of life. Along with being "all-out"
for Defense, we are also "all-out" for better living.
While Defense production may limit the manufacture
of some commodities in the future, the supply of elec-
tricity is ready for Defense and to serve the needs of
American living. Defense living need not, tlhrefore.
interfere with your plans to use electricity for ihe maaty
advantages of complete electrification. Elect, city is a
great servant for our Nation and for the individual as
well. Switch to S .witches for hvt !,:/:-- ,:'. conor nical
way.



FpLOR I A

PO W E A

CO PORATION


Dig

B


conservation purpoess.
NEWSPAPERS Prevent price-
cutting in legal advertisements.
DEFENSE--Punish sabotage on
national or state defense work,
Regulate making and handling of
explosives. Create state defense
council to co-ordinate activities.
1 stablish Florida defense force, or
home guard. Repeal 1917 county
guard law. Outlaw German bunds
and Communist party.
HOUSING-Allow city housing
authorities to build defense dwell-
ing projects outside city limits.
Create county housing authority
'o promote new homes for low in-
come farmers. To authorize hous-
ng projects for those employed in
nationall defense works.
GASOLINE Continue the 7th
cent of gasoline tax; half to the
schools and half to the general
revenue fund.
AUTOMOBILES Prohibit con-
tiacts in restraint of trade in the
sale of new automobiels. Prohibit
sale of used taxi or "for hire" car
without it being labeled as such.
Requre notice of liens on auto-
mobiles to be filed with the state
motor vehicle commissioner. Re-
quire registration of auto factory
representatives.
---------
British reports state that salvage
of sunken or damaged vessels has
rescued $40,000,000 worth of food.
munitions and other cargoes and
$48,000,000 worth of shipping.


The native home of the chukar India, Arbia, Egypt, Asia Minor-
partridge is inner Mongolia, Tibet, and southern Europe.




WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100

DAY OR NIGHT -
STAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT 1 i
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION JL

(^^^sks^^erj^aw-w-we-^ _-W??^J


A RE there days when it seems
S that the radio,'the ringing of
the" door or telephone bell, the
clatter of dishes, or even the laughter and voices
of children nearly drive you frantic-days when
you are restless, and cranky?
Do you lie awake nights?
When these hectic days and wakeful nights in-
terfere with your work and take the pleasure out
of life for you, try
DR. MILES NERVINE
Dr. Miles Nervine is a combination of effective
nerve sedatives. Originated nearly sixty years
ago. it is as up to date as today newspaper.
Dr. l'.Iil-s NE ir',;i- li A br.:.L-ht relief to millions
of ne~'.'.:. su i'i's Y.',aII m:l11:. lid it exaclly,' what
1 *',', c,-,.i r,.-,L' r~i i
'..- W I y.Will 1:*,u tri. Dr. _rl:is Necr inc- ? r.... r,
;..- Y ..iir .J, u- i t I ,s it. ""' "
:.\!*'AA ~-.T;". ?"-jlilb) K ';


THE STAR, PORT ST, JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1941


PAGE SIX


e
......... .... .......................


.. .......


CK- 23










CO NGRAT LATI NS


TO THE GRADUATES OF PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL


JOE LUMBER


P X





LeHARDY
PHARMACY




fofgWAD
ro


SUCCESS


It is our hope that the achieve-
ments you have made in the
classroom will be continued
in the still larger classroom
of life.

.Port Theatre


Good luck, Graduates of 1941! Soon you will have an oppor-
tunity to use the training you have received. Always remem-
ber that the surest road to success follows the path of
honesty and fair play.
FLORIDA POWER CORP.


Your diploma, Graduates, is testimony of a good job, well
done. We congratulate you for obtaining it. We only hope
our reputation is also testimony of a good job, well done,
in helping, like you, to build a better community for us all.
Chavers-Fowhand Furniture Co.


Congratulations to the gradu-
ates of '41! That your future
may be filled with success
and happiness is our sincere
wish.

SCHNEIDER'S
DEPARTMENT STORE


St. Joe Furniture
Company


. ..... .......... ... .... .... .. ,





,1O YOW

May your every ambition be
fulfilled, and may life flow
along smoothly for you now
and during the years to come.
MILES
5c-10c-25c Store



Our

Compliments
t lhhe

Yu JRAUATS E
You have a right to be proud
of your achievement, gradu-
ates, and we as fellow mem-
bers of your community are
proud of you.
THE LEADER
SHOE SHOP


You've done an excellent job in school. We are confident
that you will do just as well now that you are out o, school.
Continue your good work, and success will surely be yours.
Florida Bank at Port St. Joe


CLASS OF 1941


T~T~~~~~~~-rTTII~~-~~-----~I-


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


-TFRIDAY, MAY 16, IM4









AG O T 1 .A. S .GUL. R FY


Attend Garden Party
The Woman's Club of Wewa-
hitchka entertained with a garden
party Wednesday afternoon at the
bome of Mrs. Joe Whitfield. Mem-
bers of the Port St. Joe Woman's
Club attending were Mrs. W. H.
Wellington, Mrs. B. W. Eells, Mrs.
Robert Bellows, Mrs. J. L. Sharit,
Mrs. R. W. Smith and Mrs. G. A.
patton.


H^^^^ ^ ^---


SATURDAY ONLY

2-Action Hits-2

HIT NO. 1


HIT NO. 2
SABOTAGE and DEATH
UNDER THE SEA!!

iAi-t' L ouise
anrd



Dead End Kids in
"J U OR G-MEN"

SUNDAY MONDAY
May 18 and 19
Jimmy Sings-
Paulette Swings-
MUSIC DANCING
SWINGING-PRANCING
'1-ME9, vrS3EVELT
JAMES STEWART
LJ*%iGODDARD;.
HORACE HEIDT

-rFO'GoIwD"
Pete Smith
"MEMORY TRICKS"
LATEST NEWS


WEDNESDAY ONLY
May 21
If its a fight, they're in it!

James Cagney

Pat O'Brien
GEORGE BRENT
ALAN HALE
FRANK McHUGH


'Fighting


69th'


CARTOON and
"TRAVELTALK"

A^^AAA^AA- -+


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor,


I


BEACH PARTY ENJOYED
AT BEACON HILL


BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS AT BEACH
Mrs. C. G. Costin was hostess to
the Baptist Missionary society at
her beach home Monday afternoon.
The meeting was the regular Bible
study and was in charge of Mrs.
Curtis Palmer, Bible study chair-
man.
The Lord's Prayer repeated in
unison opened the meeting, fol-
lowed by the roll call with 33
answering and one visitor. Mrs.
Palmer gave a talk on "The Home
and Motherhood" in connection
with the study, which was the
first five chapters of Luke. She
also beautifully outlined the early
years of Jesus and John the Bap-
tist. Rev. Dempsey Hodiges of Do-
than, Ala., gave an interesting talk
on the subject, after which he dis-
missed the meeting with prayer.
A social hour followed during
which a contest was enjoyed with
Mrs. Palmer winner of the prize.
Refreshments consisting of a salad
plate and iced drink were served
by the hostess, assisted by Mrs.
Charles McClellan.

R. A.'s OF BAPTIST
CHURCH MEET
The R. A.'s of the Baptist
church met Tuesday afternoon at
the home of Wade Barrier, with
Mrs. J. O. Baggett as leader. The
meeting opened with sentence
prayers followed by a discussion
of the R. A. manual and a test.
P. B. Fairley gave "The Autobi-
ography of an Abandoned Garage,'
ifter which the meeting was dis-
'nissed by the leader and refresh-
ments served.

Mrs. Nelson Haygood of Mobile,
Ala., was the week-end guest of
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J
Belin.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith and
daughter, Marigene, and Mrs. J.
NV. Wes-t spent the week-end in
Dawson, Ga., the guests of W. W.
Kelly and family.

Mrs. Effie Temple of Little
Rock, Ork., is visiting her son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. J.
L. Temple.

Mr. and Mrs. O. L. McCranie of
Valdosta, Ga.. were the week-end
guests of Mrs. Sally Montgomery.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon had
as their week-end guests Mr. and
Mrs. R. S. Upshaw of Birmingham.

Mrs. B. B. Conklin left Monday
for St. Andrews to spend several
days with her mother, Mrs. M. J.
Thompson.

Bill Snellgrove spent last Friday
in Ozark, Ala.

Mr. and: Mrs. Harry BrewtoD
and Mrs. Philip Lovett visited in
Apalachicola Sunday.

Mrs. B. H. Smith visited friends
in Wewahitchka last Wednesday.

Carlyle Matthews and Bobby Co-
burn visited Tuesday in Panama
City.

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith, Mrs
T. W. Smith and Charles Sheppard
spent the week-end in Sumatra as
guests of Mr. andi Mrs. Jim Smith.

Mrs. C. C. Taunton and family
spent Sunday in Bristol visiting
her mother.

Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Stringfellow
and Mr. and Mrs. Shelby Stringfel-
ow spent Mother's Day with their
parents at Ashford, Ala.

Jim Bounds andi children visited
relativess Sunday in Panama City.


MRS. McNEILL ENTERTAINS
GRADUATING CLASS


NEW BUSINESS HOUSE TO .A
OPEN IN HIGHLAND VIEW

W. H. Weeks of Enterprise, Ala.,
after looking over locations for a
dry goods and notions store in
Quincy, Panama City, Pensacola
and other cities,upon seeing High-
land View and taking into consid-


Mrs. J. T. McNeill entertained eration the bright future or this
the members of the graduating section, last week began construc-
class of the Poit St. Joe high tion of a two-story building on the
school Wednesday morning at her highway at Highland View which
Indian Pass home, which was dec- will house two store rooms on the
orated throughout in red, white ground floor and a double apart-
and blue for the occasion. Place ment on the second floor. The
cards were miniature diplomas building is 36 by 42 feet in size,
with a toast written on them for --
the guests to read during the Visits With Parents
meal. Joe Lilienfeld of the U. S. navy
Prior to the breakfast', swim- is the guest of his parents, Mr,
ming in the surf and games on and Mrs. I. Lilienfeldi. He will re-
the beach were enjoyed. turn to duty tomorrow.


UPSY-DAISY VEGETABLE PIE

is quick to make and grand to eat
Dorothy Greig


A number of local people enjoyed
a weiner roast Wednesday eve-
ning at Beacon Hill beach. The
crowd met at the home of Mrs.
W. G. Alsip andi motored to the
beach where a fire was built and
weiners roasted and eaten with
cole slaw, pickles and iced drinks.
Enjoying this affair were Dr.
and Mrs. J. R. Norton, Mrs. W. H.
Wellington, Mrs. Della Spotts, Mr.
and Mrs. Sammie Davis, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Locke, Mr. and Mrs.
Buster Owens, Mr. and Mrs. Ron-
ald Childers, Mrs. Earl Lupfer,
Mrs. W. G. Alsip, Dr. and Mrs. A.
L. Wardi, Mr. and Mrs. Sammy Mc-
Call, Miss Kathleen Saunders, B.
B. Conklin, George Tapper, Bill
Fields, Buck Alexander and S. L.
Barke.

Sisemores Expected Home
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore
and children will return to the city
tomorrow from a two weeks' visit
with relatives in Amarilla, Texas.

Mrs. J. T. McNeill, Jimmie Mc-
Neill andi Miss Carrie Lee Sutton
visited Sunday in Palatka with
Mrs. W. A. Walker, Mrs. McNeill's
daughter.

Miss Rena WVatkins of Blounts-
town spent last week in this city
as the guest of her sisters, Mrs.
Bernice Richardson and Miss Lillie
Pearl Watkins.

Mrs. Max Kilbourne and Mrs,
Charles Brown were week-end visi-
tors in Carrabelle.

Miss Clarice Chafin spent part
of last week in Atmore, Ala.,
where she visited her father, M.
H. Chafin.

Alton Dendy and Miss Eva Me-
serve spent Sunday in Blounts-
town visiting friends and rela-
tives.


1 can condensed vegetable soup
1 cup mashed potatoes


CUT the frankfurters crosswise in % inch slices and then cook in the
hot melted butter. Add 1 can of condensed vegetable soup, just as
it comes from the can and mix well. Put the vegetable mixture into an
Individual pie dish. Cover with mashed potatoes, dot with butter and
bake in 4000 oven for 10-15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the pie with
a --'"e and turn upside down on a plate for serving. Serves 3-4.


U~llepiPa~*~ap ~ 05Sp~raq~ieai f~


THE


The Sign Board Bill has passed both House and Senate. It exempts the
GIANT PACKER POSTER BOARDS from State Taxation and Regulation
as 95 per cent of Packer's boards are inside City Limits. The president of
the Packer Sign Company is Senator W. A. Shands, the main sponsor of
Senate Bill 15. The law is UNCONSTITUTIONAL because it is not UNI-
FORM and EQUAL throughout the State. The tax is levied only on signs
outside city limits. The tax should be levied on all signs everywhere in the
State, then it would bring in some real revenue, and no one could complain.
The bill; is most DRASTIC. It gives the convict gangs and armed guards
the right to enter on private property with FORCE and ARMS and destroy
4 signs and buildings on which signs may be painted.
The bill is CONFISCATORY, as it widens the present rights-of-way on all
public roads an additional fifteen feet on each side without compensation
to property owners, and will deprive land owners of most of their rental
revenue.
The bill is UNCONSTITUTIONAL, because it actually takes fifteen more
feet of right-of-way from land owners without any just compensation; if
the State Road Department can STEAL your land, why should they ever
again pay you for additional right-of-way? Property rights in Florida mean
nothing if you allow this bill to become law.
GOVERNOR SPESSARD L. HOLLAND has only five days to veto the bill
after it reaches his desk. ACT NOW. Write, telegraph or telephone your
Governor in Tallahassee to veto Senate Bill 15 in its present form.



The Committee for Preservation



of Property Rights


DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA
(Paid Political Advertising)


1 tablespoon butter
3 frankfurters


SC- 1----I' an L L


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOF, GULF COUNTY, PLORIDA


PAGE FOUR


FRIDAY, MAY 16, 194-f


LOWDOwill


IRIVIERA HOTEL BUILDING









FRIDAY, MAY 16, 194 TH STAR,--- P--RT ST.~IY. JOE GU1... ONTY,, FLORID PAG FIV


HEALTH UNIT TO HOLD
PRE-SCHOOL ROUNDUP
(Continued from Page 1)
to come to some appointed place
at some future date that will be
announced from time to time and
have a complete check-up made
on every child that is to enter
school so that parents of these
children will have ample time to
make any and all corrections of
any physical defects found by
your local family physician."
"We are happy to say that
the P.-T. A. will take a very im-
portant part in co-ordinating this
program. I have not been able to
contact everyone, but I know from
past associations that all will as-
sist in every way with this bene-
ficial program. This is a program
that is recognized by the state
board of health and the several
local health departments to be of
great benefit to your children, as
many may have some slight defect
that would impair his ability to
carry Ion normally that can be
very easily corrected by your
family physician, perhaps a condi-
tion that you never knew that


your child had.
"Your health director may be
contacted In Gulf County, on Wedr
nesdays and Thursdays to discuss
the part you can take in making
this program worth while to your
community, but it will take all of
us to make it the success it should
be," concluded Dr. Lamb.
----k----


HOLLAND CALLS FOR
INCREASED


FUNDS


(Continued, from Page 1)
most $2,000,000 a year; that the
gross receipts tax, worth $1,900,000
a year, is about to be repealed. In
addition he pointed to a $750,000
deficit In the general fund and an
expected increase of state ex-
penses, which may reach $1,500,000.
To meet these costs he proposed:
1. That most low-priced cars
pay $15 instead, of $10 a year for
license tags, leaving a few old
models and the Willys in the $10
class and Model T's and Austins in
the $5 class. This would raise $1,-
500,000 to replace part of what
,public schools would lose from ab-
olition of state real estate taxes


and repeal of gross receipts taxa- Jo Lane, Eugenie LeHardy and On- sided until 1929 when they came
tion. ine Lou LeHardy. to Port St. Joe to make their home.
2. That a $10 license be charged Mr. and Mrs. LeHardy were ----- --- -
on each $1000 value of stocks in united in marriage at Palatka, Fla., Trade at home-your local mer-
retail stores, except on the first on May 14,, 1891, where they re- chants have just what you want.
$1000, to raise $600,000 a year for
general operations.
3. That most special funds of
state agencies. contribute 2 per
cent, or from $500,000 to $800,000
a year, for general state opera-
tions,
4. That a new tax on heavier
trucks and trailers, just enacted
into law over a veto by Governor
Cone, be amended to turn its
$425,000 of revenue into the fund For a limited time we will continue 30-35 milesper .
for aid to dependent children and to make this daring allowance-
the blind. (more if your car 8Is worth more) ,g ,nm
He coupled with -these specific to apply on the purchase of any
proposals a general request that delue 1941 modelLowestupkeepet
expansion of state activities be Paymnnteas taImeo
curbed, except where necessary. aV85

OBSERVE 50 YEARS W I LLYS 45 week
OF MARRIED LIFE WL.w
RA^ y ~ i"^~W


(Continued from Page 1)
ments of champagne, ice cream,
punch and cookies were served by
the Misses Louise Horton, Betty


M. G. LEWIS & SONS
MONUMENT AVE. PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


CONGRATUL ATONS



TO THE GRADUATES OF PORT ST. JOE I SCHOOL


Graduates of 1941 this
may well be a thrilliing sea-
son for you, for it represents
the realizing of a goal sought
after, now attained.

HAUSER'S
DEPARTMENT STORE


ALL OF LIFE IS A MATTER

OF EDUCATION
All life is a school -of hard knocks where
quarter is neither given or asked
and the prizes go to those who deserve
them.
Educational background means a head start
in the race to Success. You have
now completed your studies and many of
you are about to enter the great school of
personal endeavor where the edu-
cation you have acquired during your
school years will prove increasingly valu-
able to you and so we join in
congratulating each of you.


ST. JOE PAPER


COMPANY


A whole new chapter of your
life is opening before you.
We sincerely hope it will be
full of happiness and success.

M. P. Tomlinson
CITY CLERK


Tomlinson's

Gulf Station


--- -- '~T -T --- ----- --- --

QUALITY SERVICE



Congratulations




LILIUS JEWELRY CO.
WATCHES -- DIAMONDS JEWELRY



Watch and Jewelry Repairing PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


GREETINGS


. .


Graduates of 1941

And May the Remainder of Your Trip Through Life
Be As Easy As a Ride In a New


1941 FORD


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
Mercury FORD Lincoln


T31~_~__.____


- = . . . .


I I


RF-;- . . .


FRIDAY, M4AY 16, 1941


TME STrAR, FORT ST. JOEI, GULF COWQWTY. FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


1<








ATPUD 1941


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

En-tered as Secend-elass matter, December 10,
1937, at the Pos:o'fice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months,.....$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-{ Telephone 51 y*-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

OUR GRADUATES
Next Monday evennig the graduating class
of the Port St. Joe high school will receive
their diplomas and step forth into the civic
life of our community, some to take up their
life's work in the channels for which they
have been training, and others to continue
their studies toward fitting themselves for
the maxi lmum usefulness and service to maIn-
kind. These fine, robust young men, and the
beautiful, charming and cultured young wo-
men represent Port St. Joe's finest and most
priceless product.
'Those who compllr e the older cle:mnt inl
the ciicsship cur couilmuniityv, \:ho have
borne the burden of taxation for school pur-
poses, I:.'ve Ibut to lkl at these young peo-
ple ti forget what they mrny- have termed ex-
cessive levies for educational purposes. In-
stead they will feel a justified pride in tre
fact that they have been able to contribute
their share toward making it possible to add
this noteworthy contribution toward assuring
the future security and progress of our city.
For after all is said and don.-, citizenship
is the measure of desirability of a community,
and certainly there is no greater asset in citi-
zenship than learning, which is conducive to
understanding, tolerance, co-operation and
progress. Education is the foundation upon
which wholesome surroundings are created.
Society, therefore, is inestimably enriched by
the addition of these young high school grad-
uates to its ranks to take their respective
places of leadership.
We trust that the majority of the class ot
'41 will not feel that they have completed
their education when they receive their di-
plomas Monday night, but that they will con-
tinue their studies until they have earned a
college diploma. There may be those wvho
foolishly view higher education as more of
an ornament than an asset, but the high
school graduate should discount such ideas.
Higher education pays handsome dividends
as the years advance, not only materially, but
otherwise. Self-enrichments acquired in in-
stitutions of higher learning, the knowledge
gained of lore and literature of the ages, are
treasures that are best understood and ap-
preciated in the years that follow college life.
The important thing is to acquire them while
the opportunity it available. But equally im-
portant is the fact that higher education
equips the possessor thereof to better adapt
himself to the work that falls to his lot as
he takes his place in business or professional
life.
We urge the graduates not to worry about
the unsettled world affairs of today. Sanity
still prevails in sufficient degree to assure
these young men and women that the future
is not nearly so dark as it may sometimes
be pictured. Feel assured, too, that whatever
course events may take in the future, the
chances are greatly in favor of those possess-
ing educated minds occupying positions of
leadership.

Uncle Sam is hard at it training parachute
jumpers-but the business still is dropping
off.-Boston Transcript.

Looks like Rudolf Hess is in a mellofahess.


HELPING WIN A WAR
John Thomas Cain is a 15-year old London
costcrboy. Over here, we would say he ped-
dled vegetables. He has been given the
George medal, one of the highest awards
for gallantry, and is the youngest Briton to
wear it.
This is how he got his medal. One night
he heard the crash of a bomb, looked out of
the window and saw a paint factory down
the street start to go up in a roar of flames.
John didn't lose any time. With the help of
four policemen, he dug into the basement of
the paint factory and waded through a four-
foot flood of paint. Then he and the police-
men hauled ten workmen into the street, six
live. As they were carrying the last one
;wA-i -, the building collapsed. John woke up
in the morning to find himself a hero.
ViWhen incendiary bombs first started drop-
ping on Britain, citizens had not yet been
aroused to their responsibility. A nation-wide
fire prevention campaign was started. The
British were made to feel that every incendi-
ary bomb was an individual challenge. They
learned, not to sit and take it, but to stand
ulpand do something about it.
America will do well to take this example
to heart. Great Britaiin, in the midst of total
iwn r, is fighting fire by means of the intelli-
!'cint co-opleration of all her citizens. W:hy
cannot we Americansq in time of peace, do
the s;rmc? Our annual fire bill is nearly one-
ii'--d of a 1 million dollars. This is money tragi-
call-v wa;ntecd, since most fires could be pre-
vented )b the exercise of care and thought-
fulness. At this time of national defense
emergency, one-third of a billion dollars
Would give us 15 more light cruisers. It would
give us destroyers, airplanes, and anti-air-
craft guns.
The success of such a program depends on
every American citizen. Fortunately, our
men and women do not need to take the risks
that John Thomas took. But they, like him,
can be watchful. They, like him, can feel a
sense of individual responsibility for every
fire that may occur in their homes or com-
munities

ONE FORM OF SABOTAGE
The Coatesville, Pennsylvania, Record re-
cently published a letter written home by a
young man who had been taken into the
army under the selective service act. He
said: "We give up a year of our lives, the
comforts of homes, and countless other
things for barracks, hard work and duty from
sun-up to sun-down. We do our part and (do
it harder than anyone at home, and yet it's
the people at home who are doing the kicking
and squawking.
"They kick about wages and squeal about
hours, strike, threaten to strike, tie up ma-
chinery, and there you are The people
wanted soldiers-millions of them. Yet every
day it's becoming apparent that many of
these same people think more of a few cents
than they do their own children and rela-
tives."
It is interesting to know what young men
who are serving their country in the army for
less than a dollar a day think of the highest
paid workmen in the world who threaten to
block defense production unless they are paid
still more. How much longer will the Ameri-
can people stand for this form of sabotage?

Does the flight of Rudolf Hess from Ger-
many indicate that the Nazi leaders have
seen the handwriting on the wall and are
getting out before the collapse? We have
been informed that all of Hitler's aides have
sent enormous sums of money out of Ger-
many for such such an emergency.


SThe simile used
mushrooms"; now
debt" for the word


to be "spring up like
we substitute "national
mushrooms.


Keep smiling!


OUR DEMOCRACY byMat


Grandmother was old at 40. Or
if she was unusually vigorous she
might be 45 before sie took to
sitting by the fireplace and wear-
ing lace caps at home and "bon-
nets" for church.
Today, a woman of 40 still has a
firm hold on life. Some of the
glamorous ladies of Hollywood
have been making pictures for 20
years. Several of our most popu-
lar actresses are frankly this old.
And everywhere there are young
women of 40 and more still feeling,
and what Is more, looking young.
Perhaps that is half the battle.
Grane:dmother frizzed her hair
with curl papers and used a little
rico powder now and then. To-
ida's woman goes in frankly for
permanent waves, for creams and
!o :ns and make-up. The right use
of face powder is considered a vir-
tue, and lipstick is a badge of
courage with which nry wom:'n is
able to face the world more


and actions. She no longer has an
opportunity for higher education
or a professional career of her own
if her bent is that way.
The threat of the dictator coun-
tries is bad enough for men. But
for woman it means the end or
everything for which she has
struggled for hundreds of years.
Our freedom to take part in the
affairs of our communities to
13b cmnianions to our children .
to dress as we please and can af-
ford to use the beauty-giving
preparations thlt modern business
has provided to be young and
useful far into "middle age" aRl
depend on living in a country
whose government believes the in-
dividual is more important than
the state ... .And that women are
individuals as well as men!

CCC WILL TAKE IN
MORE ENROLLEES
Supplemental enrollment for the
Civilian (Cnnservatinn (nrnTs will


bravely. Indeed, with the help of 20 ... na. tinue
diet, exercise and cosmetics, sh- egin on May 20 ,an continue
has gone a long way toward dis- throughout the month, according
rveorin; tie fountain of 'youth and t to announcement by the state
er life of usefulness has bee welfare board, selecting agency.
her life of usefulness has been
lengthenedI It was announced at the same
lengthened by a decade or morei. time that Gulf county now has 13
But across the ocean there are young men enrolled in the corps,
countries where an interest in ':,. ,,om two were selected 'during
looks is frowned on and make-up the second quarterly enrollment of
is considered an affront to t thhe year in April. Total enroll-
state. Woman's place is definitely ment for the state at the time was
in the home and her job is mother- listed as 3,914.
hood, or work in field or factory,.
endinging on the demands of the Manufacturers state that the de-
stnte. So what does it matter how c,,, porm is taking up prac-
she looks? tically all of their facilities and
The men of those countries pro- there soon may be a possibility
pose to run them in their own that sportsmen may not be able
way without feminine suggestions to buy any kind of rifle or pistol
or advice, and each year womnln within a few months.
: re surrounded by more of the ----
limitations from which we ha'd, with The Philippines are principally
such pains, escaped. A woman in dependent upon agriculture, al-
these countries is no longer ah in- though the development of mining
divi:tal with freedom of expression has boomed in recent years.


FRIDAY, MAY 16, 194f


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA








- .~pRrDAY, MAY 16, 1941 THE STAR, PR~T ST. JOB~ G#~LF Q~W#-TV~ FLORIDA PAGE THREE
-x ,,. -


[ArmyInspectsPlaneEngineModel


~i~FrA


$49.00 to $99.00




NO FINANCE CHARGES


WEEKLY PAYMENTS

M mLL DOWN PAYMENT


'34 PLYMOUTH SEDAN '33 CHEVROLET COUPE

RUNS GOOD '41 TAG


$69.00 $89.00



'34 DODGE SEDAN '31 FORD SEDAN

ONLY ONLY ---


$89.00 $49.00


WILLIS SEDAN '34 CHEVROLET COUPE

RUNS AND LOOKS GOOD. ONLY LOOKS GOOD RUNS GOOD FOR
$79.00 .99.00



THESE PRICES 1936 FORD PICKUP SMALL DOWN
ARE ALL YOU
PAY! '41 LICENSE TAG PAYMENT
NO FINANCE A REAL BARGAIN AT ONLY SMALL WEEKLY
CHARGE PAYMENTS
INVOLVED $99.00 BUY NOW! !


MODEL A FORD TUDOR MODEL A FORD COUPE


$59.00 $49.m0

- ^-..^.... -- ^ ^ ------- .-^- ^^ ^ ^ ^. ^ -y im ri niiriiiiii 11111 1 i~


Here Are a Few Late Model Cars to

Choose From n

For a Limited Time Only!


1938 DODGE COACH '39 PLYMOUTH SEDAN
CLEAN IN EVERY WAY GENUINE LEATHER UPHOLSTERY
ONLY -- SEE IT

$299.00 $469.00


'40 FORD TUDOR DELUXE 1937 CHEVROLET SEDAN
LOW MILEAGE
LOW MIL E MUST SEE IT TO APPRECIATE
ONLY
THE VALUE

$599.00 $295.00



ST. JOE MOTOR CO.


Port St. Joe


Florida


SDEARBORN, Mich.-A model of
the 1,500-horsepower experimen-
* tal airplane engine being built by
'the Ford Motor Company was in-
Sspected recently by Maj... Gen,
H. H. Arnold (left), deputy chief
of staff, and other high army
officers during a tour of Ford de-


fense work. Gen. Arnold is shown
with Henry Ford (center) near
the engine model. This new super-
charged Ford aircraft engine, a V-
type,. .2-cylinder, liquid-cooled de-
sign, is expected to deliver more
power f6r its weight than any
engine now on the market.


Government Needs

Skilled Mechanics The Low Down
.V''1 C


Workers Needed for Arsenals, Ail
Depots, Shipyards and Na-
val Establishments

In the past eight months of in
tensive effort to, locate qualified
skilled machinists and shipbuilding
workers for arsenals, army air de-
-ots and naval shore establish-
ments, J. R. Cawthon, secretary of
'he locnl civil service boa:d, an.-
-tounced yesterday, over 10,00)0(
highly skilled munitions and ship-
building workers hlive ben uput on
the job at establishments where.
because of the labor supply or
,ng. rn' lial location, those skilled
-nosiions are particularly hard to
'ill. A number of men have gone
from Prot St. Joe and vicinity to
take so-me of these positions.
The needs of the various na-
ion! l defense agencies for skilled
workers have increased rapidly in
spite of more than 270,000' men al-
readyi having been placed by the
vwar and navy departments.
Shipfitters are urgently needed,-
the various navy yards, al-
hough in the past eight months
'ver 1-0b have been put on the
i'!,. Over 400, machinists are now
needed at the arsenals at Water-
,-'c'.. N. Y., Rock Island, Ill., Edge-
wood. Md., Philadelphia, Pa., and
Watertown, Mass.. at the six big
navy yards and at the naval sta-
tion at Key West, Fla.
Over 300 qualified toolmakers
are needed at the arsenals at
Watervliet. N. Y., Philadelphia,
Pa., Dover, N. J.. and Watertown
qnd Sirbgrfiecld, Mass.. and at thF
-nvy vards at Washingion. D. C..
Phiandelphia. Pa.. Charleston. S.
C., and Bremerton, Wash. Several
10ol atnd gage de'iners are n now
needed at the Watervliet arseons
and Wns'n!hiton. TI. C., navy yaid
Applications for any of these
n-sitinns at a navy yard should be
filcd with the lIhor board at the
nT.vy ',ird .-c"'o e o!'nsp v-ni- is
desired; or, for positions at an
arsenal, with the Secretary. Board
of U. S. Civil Seivice Examiners.
at the arsenal in which employ-
ment is desired.
-- --~
The midshipman fish is so
named because it has rows of lu-
minous silvery spo's on the body.
These spots are likened to the but-
tons on a midshipman's uniform.

An array of shiny lures will
catch more 200-pound bass fisher-
men than two-pound bass.


r Willis -wamp


Editor The Star:
If you were to ask the next per-
. son you meet how much do we av-
Serage in the lU. S. A. per day for
.fires, you wouldI get some wild
Answers.
I been reading' where we: burn
down-o-r up-aorund 30 million
*. Iai ..a, month. Brother, that is
hefty money. One million per day
ain't chicken feed.
And also I was reading' where
we could cut down on fires by a
half, easy as shooting' fish, by bein'
more careful. That is 500 thousand
saved per day. Flippin' a hot cigar-
ette butt-without a look-is the
champion way to start a fire.
Somebody is liable to say,
"What of it, I got no forest or
factory to burn." But if you ain't
got nothing to- insure your own-
self, look at your gas man and
your barber, etc. They all have
insurance. The more they dig up
for insurance, the more everybody
has to shell out for gasoline and
haircuts. I was tellin' Henry about
it, and he says, "Jo, if you figured
all that out on your own hook, I
been underratin' you." If anybody
ever reads your stuff, he says,
they can believe you-this time.
Yours with the low cown.
JO SERRA.

TOO HOT TO HANDLE
Ever burn the third layer of
skin off trying to fry fish over a
hot campfire? We did this until a
handy kink came to our attention
and now we don't practice the
harsher side of our vocabulary so
much and there is a wicked smile
of revenge on our face when fry-
ing. Just punch a hole in the cen-
ter of a tin or paper plate and slip
it over the handle of your frying
pan. This will protect your hands
from the heat of the fire and from
hot, spatteriing grease.
--I
CHIGGER CHATTER
There was a little chigqer,
And he wasn't much bigger
Thin the point on a very small
pin;
He is just like Mr. Hitler,
E-ccot that he is littler,
'Cause he hurts you most when
digging from within!

Geo. Cowden of Pearsall, Texas,
recently caught a four-pound cat-
fish which had three deer hooves
in its stomach.


FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1941


THE STAR, IPORBT ST.. JOE, GUL#F eOUNT-Y, I CLQRM


PAGE THREE







3"


Return From Alabama Visit
Mrs. J. E. Rollins and daughter
and Mrs. Sammie Davis returned'
home Sunday after spending the
week-end in Gordon, Ala.
Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!
Advertising doesn't cost--it pays!


Mrs. Balkcom Returns Home
Mrs. Annie Balkcom returned
last Friday from Pensacola where
she underwent treatment last week
at a hospital.
Send The Star to a friend.


You Get Them FREE!

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CASSEROLE with Pie Plate Cover

THREE 8J2-INCH PIE PLATES

SIX 5-OZ. CUSTARD CUPS

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treated Oven Glass

See your foods while they cook
Bake, serve and store all in the same dish
Easy to clean-smooth and sanitary

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THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"







NOTICE!


Old Reliable Mechanic


SIn a New Place -

I. B. TAYLOR
FORMERLY WITH M. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE
Now with W. C. Forehand in

Highland View

No job too small none too big. All work
and materials will be guaranteed and
prices reasonable
CALL AT THE GARAGE AND ASK FOR ESTIMATE
ON ANY WORK YOU WANT DONE

USED CARS FOR SALE
AT LOW PRICES AND ON GOOD TERMS
HIGH TEST 74 OCTANE GAS 911/
Equal to any Regular, at...-......... /2c
GOOD QUALITY MOTOR OIL 1
2 Quarts for 25c; One Quart............
(2 Gallons for 80c)
KEROSENE- 5Ga. 50
15c Gallon; 2 Gals. 25c UGals.UC
If you want your car rebushed, New Rings, Motor
Tuned Up-in fact anything-just call and get prices.


FOREHAND MOTORS
GARAGE AND FILLING STATION


F -'1


FIRST SINCE


An unusual view of the
000-ton United States 1
which is being commis
the Brooklyn Navy Yar
the first to be added to
since 1923 and the firs
war to be built in this


1923 LEWIS COMMENTS ON
HOLLAND'S MESSAGE
SGeneral endorsement of Gover-
!nor Holland's special taxation pro-
gram was voiced Wednesday in
Tallahassee by senators and repre-
sentatives.
E. Clay Lewis Jr., Gulf county
S representative, said: "If the legis-
lature enacts into law the program
recommended, it will mean great
advancement for this state."
SLIGHT ERROR
The lady of the house heard a
Knock at the door. Looking thru
the screen she saw a Chinese fish
peddler. Not wishing to be dis-
turbed, she called to her maid:
"You go, Ella.'
The Chinaman blinked his eyes,
thrust out his neck and' sung out
Belligerently: "You go 'ella your-
new 35,- i self."
battleship _____ _
sloned at One child in eight in the United
,d. She is States is born without medical at-
the navy tention, statistics show.
-1 _


et man-o'-
s country


.without portholes. War lessons
show that the force of large
bombs exploding nearby smash
even the steel battle ports and
cause damage inside.
---------------
MEET TO DISCUSS KIWANIS
Eleven local men gathered at the
Port Inn yesterday noon to fur-',
ther discuss the formation of a Ki-
wanis club here. No Panama City
Kiwanians were present and it
was not definitely settled wbhetWe
or not to have a meeting next
week.
"-
The breeding season of the
southern muskrat extends most of
the year, and each litter averages
four young.


PLUMBING

ST

PLU


HEATING-


.JOE

MBING


Softball League

Games Next Week '
May 19-Maintenance vs. Pulp
Mill. Merchants vs. Kenney.
May 20-Champs vs. Warehouse.
Bank vs. Maintenance.
May 22-Merchants vs. Bank.
Pulp Mill vs. Kenney.
The Star is $2 per year-sub-
scribe now!


At All leading Druggists

SE BAUT/FUL











r1J e re'p" A
J' -'


A record


never before


approached!


--- -- -- --- --- ---- --- -----3


*When the 29,000,000th Ford rolled
recently from the assembly line, an all-
time record for the industry was set.
29,000,000 units built by the same man-
agement and all bearing one name-a
name that has become one of the best-
known trade-marks in the world!
It is significant that this achievement
comes at a time when our country is
making a mighty effort to re-arm swiftly.
For to further that effort, to help speed
it along in any possible way, we have
offered the vast facilities of the Rouge
Plant and every ounce of our experience.
As you read this, a new $21,000,000
Ford airplane engine plant, started only
last fall, is nearly completed. A new mag-
nesium alloy plant, one of the few in the


country, is already in production on light-
weight airplane engine castings. Work
is right now under way on a new
$18,000,000 plant for mass production
of big bomber assemblies. Orders have
been filled for military vehicles of several
types, including army reconnaissance
cars, staff cars and bomb service trucks.
In the midst of this activity for National
Defense, building the 29 millionth Ford
car is simply one part of the day's work.
The public has acclaimed the 1941
Ford car as the finest in Ford history. Ford
Dealers are enjoying their greatest sales
and expecting their best year since 1937.
It is good to be producing the things
America needs, and to be setting records
on the way!


FORD MOTOR COMPANY


DR J. C. COE
- DENTIST--
effile Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 8
S'udays By Appointment
Coetin Btdg. Pert St Jee


F. J. CORBIN, Maaser

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


~j~l~g~h~~ ~1. ...--


1.


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 16, 194i'-.


HIGHLAND VIEW


FLORIDA