<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00230
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: March 14, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00230

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


Pnrt St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine blt.


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941 NUMBER 23


TO GIVE FIRST AID LESSONS


HIARRY KENNING
Mr. Kenning is field representa-
tive of the first aid, life saving
and accident prevention service
of the American Red Cross and
will be in charge of the training
course here March 17 to 28.


Red Cross to Give

First Aid Cours(

Nationally Known Expert to Cbo
Mere Under Auspices of
Local Chapter

Robert Bellows, chairman of th
Gulf County Red Cross Chaptei
announces .that the local chapter
will sponsor a series of first ai
instructor training classes begin
ning next Monday, March 17, a
the club rooms of the Port St. Jo
Woman's club in, the Centennia
building, as a part of the national
program of the. American Re
Cross to reduce the number o
deaths and disabilities throughout
the country.
"Accidents are no respecters o
states, cities or individuals," sait
Mr. Bellows. "They invade ever
city, every state and every com
munity. They threaten persons or
every street, at every place o
work and in every home.
"We are trying to spread
knowledge of first aid and it
proper administration everywhere
possible," Mr. Bellows declared
"Port St. Joe has great need for
more persons trained in caring fo:
tre injured and for traiend person
nel in case of emergencies. We are
therefore urging those persons in
terestedi in such training to en
roll."
The lessons will be held for 10
evenings, March 17 to 28, and wil
be in charge of Harry A. Kenning
field representative of the Ameri
can Red Crosa.

SIX SELECTEES TO
LEAVE TOMORROW

B. W. Eells, head of the local
selective service board, states that
three colored draftees, Andrew S.
Ash, Max Williams and Willie J.
McNair, left Tuesday for Camp
Blanding, and that three white se-
lectees, Luther Eldrldge, Frederii
W. Sutton and Albert J. Melvin,
will leave tomorrow for Camp
Blanding.
Eight more men from Gulf
county will be sent to Fort Bar-
rancas, Pensacola, on Saturday,
March 22.
------t------
Spend Week-End In Newville
Mr. and Mrs. J. M Smith spent
the week-end in Newville, Ala.,
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. T.
Graves.


e



no

le
w,
ar
id

)e
9


PIPE LINE BILL

IS AGAIN UP IN

GEORGIASENATE

Revised Measure, Now In
Committee, Is Linked With
National Defense Program

The controversial pipe line bill
which is holding up completion of
the Southeastern Pipe Line com-
pany's gasoline line from Port St.
Joe to Chattanooga, Tenn., was re-
vived Mondiay in the Georgia legis-
lature when it was introduced in a
now form in the state senate andc
referred to the general judiciary
committee.
It is believed that the new meas-
ure is sufficiently different from
the bill killed last week by the
Georgia house of representatives to
warrant its consideration by both
houses.
The new bill gives the right of
eminent domain to all corporations
carrying out any form of construc-
tion or development essential to
national defense.
The measure provides that it
shall become effective upon a dec-
laration by the president of the
United States, the secretary of war
or the secretary of the navy that
.the construction or development
is of importance in connection
with the national program for the
defense of the nation.
It gives corporations engaged in
an essential national defense de-
velopment the-right to,.condemnn
private property, limited, to, not
morn than 100 acres of farm land.


BRITISH OCCUPATION OF ICELAND


A Canadian motorized unit passing along a road in Iceland en route
to an encampment. The truck in foreground carries ti'e Darrel of
a heavy gun (note it has been camouflaged). The peaceable land
has become a virtual aJ tress as the Britis!h have rushed supplies
to strengthen her against kosaible attack by the Nazis. Photo
paased by the Uritish censor


THEATER OWNER

IN APPEAL FOR

REMOVAL OFTAX

sc__oaa n.%. r. i. nn \


Child Hurt When

Struck By Taxi

Small Daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
W. D. Wilson Steps In Front
Of White Top Cab


A..,llu t v -~ r nt A vy vn Shirley Ann Wilson, five-year-old
All Soft Drinks As Alter daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. D.
native Revenue Source Wilson of Highland View, was.
struck Monday afternoon by a
Hugh G, martin, owner of the ihlte Top taxi driven by Charles
Port theater in this city, has been Scott while .passing throutn High-
endeavoring to appear before the land View.


1l and easements across property al- board of city commissioners for The. child was rushed to a Pan
l1 ready devoted to a public use, pro- some time past to request in per- ama City hospital where she wae
d vided that there is not unneces- son that the amusement tax im- examined and found to have suf
Zt sary interference with such public posed by the city during the lat- fered severe bruises and cutb
Suse. ter part of 1939 be rescinded, as he about the head and body. Last re
Specifically, the measure carries avers, the tax is cutting down at- ports wer that she was resting as
f the right to condemn easements tendance at the theater, but each comfortably as could be expected
d across the rights-of-way of rail- time he has made the long trip A witness to the accident stated
Y roads and to build under state here from Columbus, Ga., the that the child apparently became
L- highways without condemnation, meeting of the board' has been frightened, as she stood, by the
n The Georgia senate spent its. en- postponed for various and sundry side of the highway until the car
f tire session Tuesday debating the reasons, and Mr. Martin has been was but a short distance awa3
pipe line bill, and finally left it mission: and then dashed out into the patio
a just where it was, in the hands of Being unable to appear before of the oncoming vehicle.
s the judiciary committee. This com- the commissioners, Mr. Martin
e mittee was to hold a public hear- last Saturday wrote the following JIM BOUNDS INJURED
Sing on the bill yesterday at 3 letter to the mayor and the corn- AND MOBILE MAN DIES
Sp. m. mission, stating his case: IN ACCIDENT SUNDAY
r I---- -on. J. L. Sharit, Mayor,
- TWELVE SIGN UP WHEN And City Commission, J. E. Bounds, city commissioner
e ARMY'S MfOBILE UNIT Port St. Joe, Florida. and an empolye of the St. Joe Pa-
,A Gentlemen-On October 19, 1940, per company was injured and Mar-
VISITS PORT ST. JOE I wrote you a plea, asking you to vin Carter, 41, an official of the
,--- fulfill your ,promise to me of re- Southern Krt Paper comp
When the United States army's moving the present theatre tax if,
After a year's trial, the tax ac- at Mobile, was killed Sunday morn-
mobile recruiting unit pulled out tually hurt our business at the ing when the car driven by Canter
of ,Port St. Joe Monday night it Port theatre, left the highway west of this city.
i hid signed up six young men of In addition to the letter, I sent t the hi ay ws o th
this section for three-year turns ia sworn statement proving that The dead man is a brother of
this section for three-year turns the theatre tax had caused our Ralph Carter of Port St. Joe and
and six for selective service train- gross business to decrease a :otal was on his way here for a visit
lig of one year. of $4,340.11 during the first year when he met his death. He was
,The six going in for the regular of the tax-October, 1939, through
hitch were George Dasher, Hildur September, 1940. All profit on joined in Panama City by Mr.
hitch were Glorge Dasher, Hildur more than a $25,000 investment, as Bounds.
Sorensen, Olin Orawford, Kenneth well as the film companies share The two men were taken to a
D. Williamson and Bernard Boy- of gross on percentage pictures hotal whr ar
Less, all of whom left for Fort were involved in the loss of reve- Panama City hospital where Car-
nM. H nue caused by the theatre tax. ter died and Bounds received first
Benning, Ga., and William M. Hr- No action has been taken by aid' treatment for his injuries
K ton, who left for the 41st Air Base your body on that letter. I did re- which were not serious.
at Orlando. ceive a letter informing me my C i
Those going to army bases were message had been received. I have Cause of the accident is un-
made three trips to Pobrt St. Joe known, as Commissioner Bounds
W. J. Ludlum, Gordon Mayo, D. B. to meet with you, in an attempt said that he was asleep when the
Rich. Quincy J. Heath and James to state my position personally, car crashed.
F. Stevens. driving more than 1200 miles for car crash
that szr'e purpose, only to learn
TELEPHONE COMPANY each time your meeting had been LOCAL STREET PROJECT
postponed to a later date. GETS STATE WPA OKEH
WILL EXTEND LINES The Port theatre not only is the
h-ub of clean entertainment in your Word received, this week from
The St. Joseph Telephone and city. showing every good picture the Jacksonville WPA office stated
Telegraph company this week or- made at an admission price 40 to
50 per cent lower than Tallahas- that the first unit of Port St. Joe's
dered poles, wire and other neces- see and other large cities, but the $108,192 city-wide street improve-
sary material for extension of Port theatre also contributes $900 meant project had been approved by
their lines from this city north per year in state, county and city Adm rator Roy Schroder
ad valorem taxes., $90 in license, State Administrator Roy Schroder.
through Wewahitchka to an undes- and a payroll in excess, of $4500' The initial work calls for an ex-
ignated point. (Continued on Page 2) penditu're of $12,372.


n-


tb
e.








r


i ~
-i-- I, 2~~
i '9

4' d
b" ~ew


DR. LAMB URGES

IMMUNIZATION

AS CHILD DIES

Diiphtheria Can Be Prevented
If Toxoid Is Administered,
Says Healh Head

Robert Eugene Davis, 13-month-
old son of Mr. and, Mrs. Dewey
Davis. pasesd away last Friday
night, following an' illness of two
days from diphtheria. Funeral ser-
vices were held Saturday after-
noon at the Youngstown ceme-
wtor, with Rev. C. Waller officiat-
ing.
As a result of the death of the
Davis child, Dr. R. J. Lamb, head of
the Franklin-Gulf county health
deDartment has issued an appeal
to parents to have their children
immunized against this dread dis-
ease. Says Dr. Lamb:
"We have stressed immunization
where and when possible; we have
written articles for the papers. and
talked to parents on every and all
occasions about this very import-
ant matter." Our nurses have been
into the homes trying to make peo-
ple understand the importance of
these immunizations, and to my
great pleasure a large number
have had their children immunized
but there are still a large number
of parents who have failed to pro-
vide this protection for their chil-
dren.
"It is an awful thing that these
lessons have to be brought to you
by such a horrid occasion as the
death by diphtheria of some unifor-
tunate child in your community
when it is so simple and easy to
prevent this disease. Two little
pricks of the needle and you can
rest practically assured that this
awful thing will not happen to
your child.
"I appeal to you parents. not to
let this happen to your small
child," concluded, Dr Lamb, "Just
because of your neglect, when your
physician or your health depart-
ment can prevent this."
The health department holds a
well-baby clinic in Port St. Joe
once each month, and parents are
urged to bring their children in
and have them immunized.
All children from six months to
six years should have toxoid for
diphtheria. They should be vacci-
nated against smallpox at about
one year and should be given ty-
phoid Immunization at about siX
years, or their first year in school.
q-K
WARDS ARE VICTIMS
OF HOLD-UP ARTIST

Leaving the San Carlos hotel in
Pensacola early Monday morning,
Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Ward of this
city were held up in broad daylight
by a lone bandit and Dr. Ward re-
lieved of- iis wallet containing
about $25.
The man stepped up to them
Just as they were about to enter
their car, saying: "This is a stick-
up." He had his hand in his coat
pocket and informed the Wards
that it contained a gun. After re-
moving the money from the wal-
et the bandit courteously returned
t to Dr. Ward&
.
Down With Measles
Mayor Joe Sharit, City Clerk fM.
'. Tomlinson and Miles K. Hurl-
but have all been down with the
measles this week. We also under-
tand that there have been several
:aess of mumps reported.










,'G TOT-E STR OTS.J.,GL ONY L RDY M- CH14 194


k colorful display of Hudson Con- it was announced today by the Hud- mounted on 121-inch wheelbase. Tops
rertible models will officially herald son Motor Car Company. Shown which raise or lower automatically at
the approach of spring this week in above in a spring setting is a Hudson the touch of a button are standard
Iudscn showrooms over the country, Eight Convertible of 128-horsepower equipment


On F. L C.

.' i g > n


M. J. oley (above), of Fole
recently succeeded Herbert We
is employer representative on tl
Florida Industrial Commissio
Mr. Foley is ilirector and vi
president of Brooks Scanlon Cor
He is 31 years old. a member
Rotary and a graduate of Not
Dame class of 1933. He is tf
yor---- member to hold a pos
tion on the commission.

Mrs. J. E. Rollins. and Miss Mai
Poole returned 'unday from Go
don, ,Ala., where they visited rE
atives over the week-end.



Gulf County's

ONLY Dairy

The Gulf County Dairy is the
only dairy now being oper-
ated in Gulf county, all other
mil k distributors bringing
their products into the county
from outside sources.

Patronize a HOME dairy!

BE SURE IT'S

Gulf County

Dairy Milk

PURE! FRESH! RICH!
WHOLESOME!
From Tested Cows
Our Milk is, produced and
bottled under, sanitary condi-
tions. to ,ssure Its, purity



Gulf County Dairy
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager
.


THEATER OWNER APPEALS ordinance was discriminatory and
FOR REMOVAL OF TAX even though an effort was made to
incorporate other amusements in
-- the same act, that the ordinance
(Continued from Page 1) was primarily and; ahnost wholly
per year, in addition to $2109 tax aimed at our theatre. I also agreed
from our patrons. Therefore you that the one and .two cent admis-
can readily see we do play an i o- sion tax would definitely hurt our
portant role in the actual welfare business.
of Port St. Joe'and Gulf county. Each commissioner was of the
Anyr man that invests the money opinion that the tax would not af-
we have spent there in giving a fect our business, although I of-
.'li, *'rity something as vital as feared as proof that' sucr a tax had1
we offer, compared with your inul hurt our business, in both. Mart-
from a standpoint of need and ser- anna and Panama City. Several
vice, certainly deserves the right citizens at the meeting assured me
to make a fair return on such in- t hlt a tax on admissions would
ves lent. but you nave deprived -ot affect our business. Naturally,
us of making a. profit by discrimi- as the tax was not being placed on
p'f-v taxation As an examnie. anyone except us, it was easy tc
we all agree the bank was needed presume that such taxation would
there, i .that a real serv-ic" i, beina not hart.
Srelldered the comunnitv by tha1 t Your commissioners assured me
institutioif. By all laws of t'airncs th'la if the tax dlid hurt our busi-
Sa customer of the hank noun,l h ness. after a fair trial, that the
I taxed for a banking tIran.action, r.,'-: ll1d ib rem voved. Now, after
just as vou tax each hel :itre na a full year of operation under th(
tron. A customer of thp bl:.1k iV'- tax ordinance, I offer figures and
dently is more able to pay the city a S"'or'n ll',ttelmeni to the effect
a.tax than a lotf o the io'l',le whol that the figures are correct, prov-
attend the theatre, yet you would ing that the lax on admission has-
P not think or niacin snih t ~-- ni eist, the PorIt theatre the greater
Sl the bank's customers. Where then. part of $-1,4-1,0.1.
is the fairness in your exclusive ":' entl'lemnc know that we
+.,-, have paid all city licenses to do
Olt You have made a vital htIsi'" business: in action have paid
he unprofitable. You promilcis. rlint [n01 roi the pockets of our pa-
he if the tax hurt. yet vonu do nothing lrons, and at a terrific cost to us,
iniol-'rr! reliWvine the pstlntion. 1 "",m of money -larger than the
ce On one trip there this -C1r welin n'Pcs of eberi taxable merchant
rp. _-- )' i ,, meetir- '"qs nest. vId '' establishment put ---. t.i-, in
ol noned, I talP-d witih (oprim ioP-' Poart St. Joe during the last year.
re Tlls and told him of a way to ol- I view of the fact that the tas
h let m-re tax than you are now is unfair and applies to. just one
ci- ollecting. Relieve us of the tax merchant in your city, and the fact
a-' instead. tax every soft drink that such taxation has hurt our
sold one cent. as is (bone through- business to the tune of $350 or
out South Carolina. There are no better each month, won't you gen-
ryl hottling plants in your city. and tlemen be fair with us and rescind
r- such a tax woul6i not affect an, the admission tax ordinance?
el- investment. The tax could be col- wro have fulfilled our every
elected and give our theatre relief promise to your city. We have
if you would, brought clean, wholesome enter-
If you gentlemen will abolish tainment to the working class, as
the theatre tax we will reduce our well as others. at an. admissiiont
admisson. thereby canusin a say- more reasonable than larger cities.
ina to many people that have no andl 11 that iust to get taxed out
nthlr- for' nof entertainment with- of business by well-meaning offi-
i'l their -ea". and at !ipe P'ne calls ,',h wr-pe pa,"aldi to before
lmne allow offers to attend the we built such a fine theatre build-
'be-t'rp who cannot afford to now. ";-'- th-er nd asked that you gen-
'.... -z .- '-,-1 "o..-- o ,Ti-:'ns tlemen please not pass such an
are.both affected by the tax. lere i "..---.- '-in"n" s .f,- ir," of-
,no n' .moe than 200 difference in forts to do wiat we considered
the decrease in admissions sold right.
during the last year. Yours very trnlv.
We propose to charge the fol- HUGrH G. MARTIN.
lowing prices if you will stop all ----- ---
forms of taxation other than your BAR ASSOCIATION PLANS
present open-dool license and ad LEGAL HOUSE CLEANING
valorem tax: Chilaren 30c. a.s Pr
present; adults, balcony 15c all The legislature next month will
nay; matinee, downstairs, 20c, a be asked to put all lawyers into
10c saving; night, downstairs, : association as a further step
and 3c defense tax, total 25c, orne association a a further step
5c saving over present prices. in the legal house cleaning now in
P'lasip It me have your reaction pro-ress.
to the above. Velma Keen, president of the
Yours very truly, Florida State.Bar association, said
HUGFI G. MARTIN. his association will offer a legisla-
Tp l Ietter wri ten by Mr :,Iartin tive bill calling for an integrated
to the commissioners on October bar ;or Florida. This bill, he said,
19, 1940, and which is referred to will authorize the state supreme
in the above letter, follows: court to organize and supervise
Hon. J L. Sharit, Mayor, one association of lawyers, to
And City Commissioners, which all lawyers must belong.
Port St. Joe, Florida Such .an association will be able
Gentlemen-Before the present to weed out the shysters and pre-
city ordinance was passed, the
writer made a trip to Port St. Joe vent the spread of unwholesome
and pleaded with aeach cbmmis- practices in ;the profession.
sioner, asking that the city not _.--
allow an ordinance to pass that Denmark, formerly the leading
'would place a large part of the
city's load on the shoulders of one butter exporting country of Eu-
business. I argued that such an rope, is now rationing butter.


All-Colored Cast

In Owl Show Film

'Lady Luck' Playing 10:30 Tonight
.And 9:30 Tomorrow viorn-
ing At Port Theater


United States exports' of iron
and steel in 1939, excluding scrap,
amounted to 2,799,000 net tons.


N 1)~ T~ I (--: E
NOI4E

1~i7~TT; *


Hudson Convertibles Herald Spring


+ :_v-' -.. .,.' '. '' .. .. .. '. :, '',*.*." -


;,-;. .. ,- ,, ; -, .: :. *. '. .,.

I.
; -A 49
.. ....
.. .




;-,, -: .. ,i ,.' t' o .. :"


country road to the ownership of
one of the swankiest night clubs
in Harlem.
Racing through adventure after
adventure, coming up against a
r:oukcd night club owner, and a.
spook-haunted night club, Miller
and Mantan are at their best as
the two dice throwers whose luck
exceeds their expectations.
A laugh hit from start to finish,
"Lady Luck" is sure-fire entertain-
ment, consisting of a side-splitting
story acted by one of the finest all-
colored casts ever assembled.

PORT NEWS

Tanker Spencer Kellogg of the
Eastern States Oil Co., Houston.
Texas, sailed Tuesday after dis-
charging a cargo of fuel oil for the
St. Joe Paper company.
S.S. Jean of the Bnll Line sailed
yesterday with a cargo of paper
and lumber for eastern ports.

FILE NOW!
Florida home owr.c's desiring to
enjoy the benefits of homestead
exemption must file applications
with their tax assessors before
April 1.



CLASSIFIED APS

REAL ESTATE WANTED

WANT TO BUY LOTS-At least
50-foot frontage, preferably on
Monument Ave. or near R. R.
TVill pay, CASH. Write Joseph
Sihelnik, Star Route 3, Port St.
Joe, Fla. 3-8*
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisenrent in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying...
Try it today, tf


At All Leading Druggists



DID YOU KNOW THAT




Ci O Of T A oSi051
C,. C OUS ".ACT4 OF
'..o'N '. ,- Oe 5NAC-1LP IN
1961, WAHM A
^liu ~OE ^e A oiON (A'./ a
5PSc/AL ACT OF
"'Fco6R Esk W,9
!yf IOWEP TO PRES;
_-IN- v /_ t5Cll/NF qTr1f-


GOOD GULF GASOLINE

NO KNOX ETHYL

GULFLUBE MOTOR OIL

and We Specialize on
GULFLEX LUBRICATION
SERVICE

-----o----- .


Wm. H. Tomlinson's

AV 'T SERVICE
Mne % Ae a STATIONs

Monument Ave. at First St.


*. e-.* **.. ." **










Homewoman-


SHE'S THE SAME PERSON, when she goes to -
store.
.At her club meeting, it's kind of fun to"
hear some radical lecturer "prove" that most.
manufacturers are slickers, most store cheese
is chalk, and most advertising is ballyhoo.
But watch the clubwoman when she starts
buying. She wants her money's worth and she
gets it. How? By first consulting the adver- ,
tisements. Then by choosing the products she
knows--the trade-marked, nationally adver-
tised products that have been on the market
for years.,
Those trade-marked, advertised articles are
the ARISTOCRATS among all the things she
buys--or that any of us can buy.


S... ********e**.*......00


"Lady Luck," rated as one of the ., A Ji.-, ti e
lost amusing all-colored cast com-
"d0" of the season, plays tonight "J '-'- L
at 10:30 at the Port theater's Owl -
hiow and' at 9:30 tomorrow morn
ing. The fil tells the story of the C' T -' .L
two comedians, Miller and MIantan, ,, ',,J
'.;io, with the aid of lucky dice,..
gamble their way from a dusty '- .. -: .


IAGE TWO


T~It.STAR, PO)RT ST. JOE; GULF COUNTY; FLORIDA


FRIDAY; MARCH 14, 1,941


T
\,.


___










FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMI'TH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year...... $2.00 Six Months......1.00
Three Months..........65c

-.{ Telephone 51 J-

The spoken word is given scant attention:
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


FERRETING OUT THE FLU
One day, not so very long ago, a doctor
walked into his laboratory in the Rockefeller
Foundation. He peered through the glass
door of a ferret cage, expecting to see the
tiny animal listless and ill from influenza
germs with which he had been inoculated.
The doctor got the surprise of his life when
the ferret stared back at him with bright,
vicious eyes, dangerously healthy.
That marked a milestone in a work which
began in 1920, after the deadly World War 1
flu epidemic. The medical profession knew
two things-influenza would strike again in
20 years and no preventative had been found.
For 19 years the doctors worked. But vac-
cines taken from influenza-infected ferrets
proved ineffective-the vaccinated ferrets
died as easily as the others. Then fate stepped
in. In November, 1939, four ferrets con-
tracted distemper and died. Fear was felt in
the Rockefeller laboratories, for if the dis-
temper spread, all the costly ferrets might
die. Distemper shots were administered.
Then, following the two-decades-old routine,
the ferrets were inoculated with the flu virus,
And they didn't get sick!
Had the long-sought solution to flu beer/n
found? For months the doctors worked with
their new vaccine, consisting of distemper and
influenza solutions mixed. Human volunteers
were called 'for tests. And it was found that
the new vaccine put into their blood 70 times
the normal amount of influenza-fighting anti-
bodies.
The tests still go on-the medical profes-
sion never claims success until it is certain
beyond question. In the meantime hundreds
of thousands of doses of the new vac-
cine have been sent to England, where an in-
fluenza plague is a dread possibility as a re-
sult of war conditions Soon the world will
know definitely whether a certain immuniz-
ing agent for influenza has at last been found.
That is the way private medicine works. Its
war against disease never ends. One by one,
the plagues which have killed so many mil-
lions are shorn of their menace.

Poor old Mussolini is in one tough spot,
for. no matter how the war ends, he must
lose. He must take Hitler's orders if Ger-
many wins; he will have to accept harsh Brit-
ish peace terms if England wins. From what
we read in the papers, we wouldn't be at all
surprised to see the Italian people rise up in
their wrath, denounce both Mussolini and
Hitler and throw in with the British.

The series of first aid instruction lessons
th, be given next week by the American ReoI
Cross is something well worth while, and we
should see a large number of local citizens en-
rolled for the course.

The earth will last but another three bil-
lion years, says an astronomer, That was last
Tuesday-if you have begun counting.-Ma-
con Telegraph.

Wolf meat is nourishing, according to an
explorer. Now we know what to do the next
time the wolf comes around to our door.---
St. Petersburg Times.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


NEW USE FOR COTTON
If a New York engineer, E. C. Wallace,
knows what he's doing (and apparently he
does) crop worries of southern cotton growers
are over. Ever since the war in Europe be-
gan, Wallace has been interested in discover--
ing a material for the fabrication of air raid
shelters that would be lighter, more econonm-
cal and safer than the now universally-used
concrete.
.Before enthusiastic Washington congress-
men last week Wallace declared that his ex-
periments had been crowned with success.
He said that his tests had proven beyond the
shadow of a doubt that a seven-foot thick-
ness of cotton would resist the penetration
of a 6000-pound bomb falling from a height
of 30,000 feet, whereas a 2000-pound bomb
falling from 15,000 feet would penetrate six
feet of reinforced concrete. Furthermore,
Wallace said the cotton could be fireproofed
so that incendiary bombs would have little or
no effect.
Naturally, most interested of all were con-
gressmen from cotton-growing states. They
called for a practical demonstration of cot-
ton's bomb-resisting qualities, at which units
of the nation's army, navy and air forces
would be present.
Cotton's future, then, hangs on the out-
come of this impending, though not yet defi-
nitely-set crucial test. If results come up to
Wallace's predictions, then a new prosperity
era for cotton-growing Dixie seems assured.
For a world at war should keep cotton far-
mers humping to produce the staple in suf-
ficient quantity to meet air raid shelter de-
mands.

The increasing -number of strikes in defense
industries shows that the organizations fos-
tering the strikes are conspiring to obstfluct
and dc L-.,i ;the essential defense-of the nation
at a time when a national crisis faces this
country. At the time the draft for soldiers
was set up, provision was 'made for exempt-
ing individuals whose employment was neces-
'sary for production of goods required by the
various departments of government. Now thai
these individuals are refusing to work unless
given large increases in pay, the government
might, schedule them for induction into the
defense force and let some of the soldiers and
sailors now drawing $30 or $40 per month go
back into the production of goods.

The attention of the public at large re-
mains focused on Europe's war, but the eyes
of many experts are watching the Far East.
There is almost no possibility of our going to
war in Europe in the near future, but there
is a very definite possibility that we may en-
gage in hostilities with Japan. Japan means:
to dominate the Pacific, and her statesmen
have said that all of Oceanica must be brought
within her sphere of influence.

When a people forget how democracy was
born, and ignore the principles that keep it
alive, it is hard to see what will stop the
growth of a bureaucratic system which will
destroy it. Democracy is non-existent whe<.
socialism gets the upper hand, and the indi-
vidcal's vote becomes more of a formality
than a formidable weapon to reckon with.

Florida sheriffs, meeting in Bradenton last
week, endorsed a proposed law requiring
front and rear license tags for automobiles.
A good idea. When a pedestrian is run over
if he fails to see the front plate he can turn
and get the number off the rear one.

Nazis didn't so much mind Halifax coming
to the United States. What hurt was his com-
ing on a new British battleship they hadn't
known about.-Montgomery Advertiser.

That petrified forest found in Russia prob-
ably consists of a lot of the old royalty's fam-
ily trees.-Macon Telegraph.

Time marches on, and the dictators march
into new territory.


PAGE THREE


THE LIGHT THAT MUST NOT FAIL!


If you were stanl':ing som.ewherec
outsidee the world and were told
*on could choose any country on
arth to live in, which one would
.on, as a woman, pick? Where
would you find t he greatesi
mount of personal freedom fos-
ourself the widest range of
opportunities for your children .
he highest standard of living for
our family, and the most recog-
iition for you as an individual?
T'!e answer is not hard to guess.
ou would choose America, for
everything about this bi';. newi
country has combined to make i:
?rve the individual in his or her
pursuit of happiness." Its vast
health. its variety of climate, and
ibove all. its form of government
i' t' e people, by tie pe:uple, and
for the people" makes this the
t'st country in the world for wo-
men.
The state, in our democracy, ex-
ists for the sake of the individual
and not the individual for the sake
of the state, as in a totalitarian
country. The result is a nation of
independent, hopeful, ambitious
fearelss men and women and rosy,
bhlildren who look forward to a
life of the kind they choose to live
And perhaps that is the most im
portant thing about America ir
these fearful days. If your sor
wants to go into business, he ma.-



The Low Down
from I.
|is Swa' |i1
.. .. i i

Editor The Star:
In Arizona a person predicting' o,
the weather is ci;her a tenderfoot
or is slightly "teched"-as the na-
tives say out there. But you go up
to our nation's capital were the
prediction' is even tougher and
where the wind changes every half
hour, and you'll find everybody
guessin'. Our two-column column-
ists wade in and predict exactly
what's gonna happen next-and
don't bat an eye.
No man-black, white or bronze
-can tell what'll happen next up
there. Anybody trying' to do so,
the safest place for him is in the
calaboose.


'o soi. if he wants to be an elee-
'-l;al esnineer. that, too, is. al.
.ilgt.' But in a totalitarian country
I yl iryo: must be fitted into the
same pattern;
if yoi have a short wave radio
you and your friends can listen to
programs from all over the world.
"n dictator-ridden countries they
must listen only to the programs
::'Lr'oved by the state.
You read what you please and
can get hold of. You can say what
you please, "right out in meeting'
if you want to. In dictator coun-
tries you may be arrested for the
things you say, even to members
of your own family in the privacy
of your own home.
You can go to church if you
'ike, and to whatever church you
choose. In totalitarian states re-
.,loVs freedom is a thing of the
past.
You can save money if you
can, at least a little almost every
month while in dictator coun-
ries more and more of it is con-
iscated by the state.
Probably you have a car and go
,'here you please. Only a few of
the very rich women of dictator
countries have cars, and even they
can't go where they please.
It's a great land we live in-
broad in fertile acers-rich in re-
sources and' a free govenmen-
blessed by God!

what to do now, when defense
S 1; sR is. 1.iae a mountain goat,
we go from crag to crag, and each
crag is more slippery.
How any nation can keep on ex-
perimenting year in ana yetu- o li
-::::. cnomie home in a barrel e ich
iIIe---s something' for the histlr-
')- to ponder.
I',--.: -:: o" there bc;:n s;'v n'
'o,''l'rs of the world, we i;ma'!:e it
eight.
Yours with the low down.
JO SE13RA.
---$(
Northwest P)orida has been di-
vided into two districts by the
Florida Industrial Commission and
Charles M. Guyton of Marianna
was appointed this week to repre-
sent the workmen's compensation
division of the commission In the
counties of Gulf, Escambia, Santa
RosP. Okaloosa, Walton, Washing-
ton, Holmes, Jackson, Gadsden,


Today the super-latest idea is Calhoun, Liberty and Franklin.








an


U SLUC


Leading Manufactur
Bring These and MI
During This Gi


DELIVERS
IN OUR


-pay 0
~XXN~ILW


COSTS ONLY A PENNY A NIGHT


FLORENCE
Florence Console 011 Ranges have I
for many years. Five standard wic
for easy lighting. Cooking top is w
sshelf over, the tank. Convenient shell
parts concealed behind white porcela
For economy, general, utility and as
stove. Come in and see. it today!


WHETHER IT'S COOK

POTATOES

it's FUN to cook with i


/--^SS^J-- "

::..... .".' ,,,::.; ^^:. :':: ^|~i
h^4


A 9A OPPt


to own America's Finest Mattress


Now you can get a Beautyrest on terms that
make it especially easy to own the world's
finest mattress.
The Beautyrest is not like other mattresses.
Every spring in it is separate from the next.
So each "gives" independently. Heavier
parts of your body can't pull springs away
from lighter parts. You get proper buoyant
sleep every minute of the night. In durabil-


ity tests by the United States Testing Com-
pany, the. Beautyrest lasted three times longer
than other mattresses. Simmons guarantees
that it will give you 10 years' service.
See the Beautyrest during our 18th Anniver-
sary Sale. Learn about its many advantages.
Then, if you feel that it is the mattress for
you, use our special "Beautyrest Anniversary
Terms."


1I40COOKI01
protc am ns minerals and
rich, natural food flavOrs-
it'8 sipip.o and easyvt'
W5i~f~re~)ti


A ,,- 7sasU


18c


- c PI -LIP"ICPaLIP~I~ rrr --~rre I ~3~SLIP ~C~.. ~.I.....


FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941


THE STAR, PORT7 ST. JOE8, GULF OOUNFTY, FLOWDA8


PAGE FOUR


"SJFLLE


64444












'GOverboard,- .G at. s
I7' U Si] rea a th,


SCo-operating to

Other Bargains

SSale Event!

Y ITEM 18
'ORE! -8c


ACT NOW! ALL PRICES AT BAR LEVEL

SPECIAL SALE ON FLORENCE OIL RANGES


CONSOLE E-
IL-"_ A A IN 0
leaders in style and quality
kerosene burners, designed
md deep; with a handy end
psa9ishes warm. All working
id,%aked-on enasmel $ 9'95
motion, this is your O UP
EASY TERMS


Good looking? It certainly is! Porcelain finished, in pure white but
built for heavy duty, too. One look behind the doors at its extra large
oven and five big "Focused Heat" burners will convince
you of that. Sturdy, attractive and thoroughly practical, $ ,;As;
this range will meet a family's need at moderate cost. EASY TERMS


9 x 12 Congoleum
Rug FREE!


You Will find this compact but very practical range just the thing
for a small kitchen. Finished in white porcelain with black porcelain
cooking top. This modern cabinet stove offers you beauty, 95
convenience and economy. And at such a popular low price. OJ )
EASY TERMS


A BREAK FOR BUDGETERS!

WESTINGHOUSE 1941



',OL oR $124.95


3R POT


Ever w
into r<
dough.
can-v
S ,. taint"
t oven li
itho
It's I
tri wa
wails a
ac- id

COOK


ROAST


ELECTRIC RANGE



ratch a pan of popovers puff up
ows of golden shells? Or pale
turn into beautiful pastry? You
with this Westinghouse "Cap-
aodel. The "Look-In"' door and
ght let you see foods browning
t opening the oven door.
FUN to cook this modern elc-
y because it's FAST and EASY.
AN, todl No smoke or soot to soil
d cuttainv. P ans stay bright and
king. All porcelain fi ish with
sting platform is easy to clean.
AL. the features of thisbeautiful
Then you'll see why VITAmi ed
ing with a Westinghousc "Cap-
ais so y s o ip.o ando
up. -


09
imra








m
CiO
C g

y****


-I:


SEE, LitheAmnrcan Special"-also other-,West-
Inghpuse models with EXCLUSIVE Tnia.smp,
Colyol-the amazing. liountIon that RiVa you.
SUPER MARKET REF910RATIQN in yOur.- hamo


Genuine
Westinghouse Quality
at a low, popular pric~-
Yesl You CAN afford a new 1941 Westinghiousc
Refrigerator. The "American Spccicl" o:i"s
ALL THESE VALUES at a price to fit '.he
closest budget-
FULL 6 cubic foot Family Size-standard
Westinghouse ECONOMIZER Mechanism.
Sanalloy SUPER FREEZER with 2 quick-
release. SELECT-O-CUBE Trays and extra
space for frozen storage.
All-Steel, Turret-Top Cabinet, with Bond-
crized Duuxfinish and FIBERGLAS insulation.
WhiteMoonatonaGlass CHILLNG TRAY.
Standard 8-POINT TEMPERATURE
CONTROL.
CHROME-PLATED Shelves and tall stor-
age. walls.
EZY 3-way release Door Latch.

COME IN I Ask for
"X-RAY" PROOF
of Westinghouse Imprevements
and Quality Features
IT'S NEWJ IT'S DIFFERENT SEE IT TODAYt


o., o167.5o Danley Furniture Co.
(Timer. a n d MIuir MY l .


. $ee this stand-out value a.0
ai on VI-TAmned OOQKr


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


Aw
~Y"0


OME INI.


got ful d"t


p I I





,, ~


I ~P sl I~ ,- .


v FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941


PAGE FIVE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


Wesfing, oase







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


Florida Must Develop Highways

For Large Increase In Traffic

Anticipated traffic demands, as riod since 1935.
reflected by trends in gasoline The state road department es-
onsumption and motor vehicle timates that by 1950 motor ve-
hicle operai~rs will use 450,000,-
registration, indicates that Flori-
000 gallons of gasoline annually
a must provide facilities for an and in doing so will travel 6,500,-
.ncrease of 100,000 motor vehicles 000,000 miles over our highways.
in the next ten years. The state This traffic represents an increase
,oa.d department estimates that by of 1,500,000,000 miles over traffic
950, traffic moving over the for last year.


highways of Florida will be in-
reased by 30 per cent. These es-
imates are based on normal, peace
time trends and do not include
highway improvements which will
)e made necessary by our rapidly
expanding national defense pro-
gram.
Motor vehicle operators con-
iumed 350,015,898 gallons of gas-
)line in Florida in 1940 and in
long so traveled some five billion
miles on our highways. Gasoline
consumption shows an increase of
36.4 per cent for the five-year pe-


Robert Taylor As

Flying Cadet In

New Air Thriller


Will Be Seen With Ruth
Is "Flight Command"
The Port Theater


SINGAPORE: NEW


THEATER OF WAR?


Hussey
At


Spectacular thrills of the air are
comingg to the Port theater Sunday
ind Monday with Robert Taylor,
.uth Hussey and, Walter Pidgeon
n "Flight Command," smashing
Irama of naval aviation.
Taylor plays Alan Drake, Pensa-
2ola cadet, assigned to the crack
'Hell Cats" squadron. Amid thrills
)f battle practice and intimate de-
tails of life at an air base, he
seeks to comfort the wife of his
commanderr when her brother, his
cest friend, "cracks up." Members
of the squadron, loyal to their com-
nander and his wife, as, is Drake
himself misunderstand the situa-


Passenger car and truck regis-
trations for the show show a 29
per cent increase for the five-year
period since 1935. It is estimated
that by 1950 registrations will
reach the 550,000 mark.
An analysis of motor vehicle
registration for the year of 1937
reveals that many cars more than
15 years old were still being op-
erated on the highways. Half of
all the cars in operation at that
time were five or more years ol1
and one-fourth were eight or more
years old.


tion and In his anger Drake re-
signs. After a sensational rescue
during maneuvers, the misunder-
standing is cleared and the squad-
ron, reunited in loyalty, takes to
the air.
Amid the dramatic episodes run
thrills of dive bombing, forced
landings, battle practice, Taylor's
close escape when his fighting
plane tangles with an aerial target.
and other peak moments of ex-
ritement in the air


DR. J C. COE
-DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12, 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative


i. .t,. :. ,,


Britisr anti-aircraft guns in emplacement at Singapore, Straits
Settlements. In the background are barracks ur.,d by the' gun crews
and other military forces. The largest contingent of troops, mostly
from Australia, have been quartered here. Singapore is the most
formidable fortess in the world in air, anti-aircraft and naval de-
fense. The British naval docks can easily berth the navies of the
world.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST- CHAMPION PLOWMAN






$ %. .~;LIT


A Of IYA IO #C O!


World's homliest man, William
Riley, meets the fairest of the fair
In the personages of Mise. Patricia
Donnelly, left, "Miss America" of
last year, and Miss Southwestern
Michigan.


Fred Timbers, 33-year-old farmer
from Stouffyville, Ontario, Can,
ada, who won the first interna-
tional plowing match held re-
cently at Davenport, Iowa.

The silkworm and the bee are
the only insects that man has do-
mesticated.

Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!


M. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE

PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA


.i't


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100

DAY, OR NIGHT
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
S OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION


__


PAGE SIX


FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941










IAY M 1 4TTJO T R


AYRSHIRE COW HAS IDENTICAL TRIPLETS


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor
/ * *


P,-T. A. ENJOY INTERESTING BAND BOOSTERS TO HOLD BAPTIST MISSIONARY
FOUNDER'S DAY PROGRAM -REORGANIZATION, MEET SOCIETY IN MEETING
The regular meeting of the Par- The regular meeting of the Band The regular meeting of the Ba]
ent-Teacheis association was held Boosters club was held Tuesday tit Miissionary society was hel
in the high school au'uiiorium on evening at the hgn school audi- in ihe chut-ch lMonday afternoon
Thursday, evening of last week, t:r'iumn, with B. D. Conklin presid- with Mrs. W. I-. Howell presiding
The meeting was called to order ing. An open discussion was held The prayer service was in charge
by the president, Mrs. W. IH. Well- on ways and means for taking care U0 .\i's. (urtis I'almer, after which
ingion, after which it was turned of the debt for band, uniforms and ith meeting was turned over t
over to Mrs. Louise Howell, who tlhe purchasing of new uniiorlms. iie Drehident, w ho held a shol
presented an intcresiing Founder's It was moved and approved to se- business meeting.
Day porgram. During the program cure a settlement with the uniform It Was announced that the North
44 candles were lighted on the company and if possible order new west Coast Baptist association coil
birthday cake. uniforms. ference would bti held is Apalach
After the program a business Motion was made and carried cola on April 1.
session was, held and a committee that the club reorganize, and a a *
appointed, consisting of Mrs. I. nominating committee consisting METHODIST SOCIETY FOR
Hampton, chairman, Mrs. Basil E. of Mrs. H. C. Spence, Mrs.. J. L. CHRISTIAN SERVICE MEETS
Kenney and Miss Louise Solomon, Temple and. Rev. D E. Marietta. The Woman's Society for Chris
to present a bridge tournament at was appointed. A meeting was tian Service of the Methodis
the Centennial building, the date called' for next Tuesday evening church held its regular mission
to be announced later, funds to be at which time officers will be se- study at the church Monday after
used in sending a representative elected and a complete reorganiza- noon with Rev. D. E. Marietta giv
to the annual, convention of the tion of the club will be held. T. ing an interesting review of the
P.-T. A. at Orlando. M. Schneider stated that if pos- study book. The president presided
It was, announced that a school sible he would have samples and during the short business, sessiior
of instruction would be held in prices for new uniform materials held prior to the study.
Port St. Joe for the P.-T. A. in the to present to the club at the meet- *
near future and all parents are ing. All parents who have children MRS. DARE HOSTESS TO
urged to co-operate. and all citizens interested in the THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
band in any way are urged to at- Mrs. W. D. Dare etertained the
MRS. LEROY GAINOUS tend the meeting Tuesday night. members, of the Thursday After
ENTERTAINS J. A.M. CLUB Band' Director Howell Hampton noon Bridge. club at her home on
Mrs. Leroy Gainous entertained stated that he still has approxi- Garrison avenue last week. Vases
the members of the J. A. M club mately 100 auto tags to be sold. of vari-colored flowers added a
Monday evening at her home on and that if these could be disposed touch of spring to the living roor
Eighth street. A .profusion of of immediately it would be possible where Lahles were placed for play
spring flowers decorated the home to 'obtain new uniforms for the At the conclusion of several prc
for the occasion. During the eve- band before gong -to the music gressions prizes were awarded t
ning the hostess served delectable festival in DePuniak Springs next Mrs. B. E. Kenney, Jr., and Mrs
refreshments to members and in- month. Every automobile in the J. L. Miller. The hostess served
vited guests. city should' carry one of these refreshmentss to her guests.
S.. tags, thereby becoming a sup- 'n '% "'
Mrs. Coy Redd of Panama City porter of the band and subscriber MRS. MASSEY WARD
was the guest Monday and Tues-' to one of the biggest assets of the ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
day of her sister, Mrs: Leroy Gain- city. By boosting your band you The .Tuesday Bridge club wa,
ous. ., are. boosting : your city. entertained'this week at tire hoam
a.a .- ~ i Mrs Aassy Ward on Garrisol
Miss Geraldine Smith of Tampa. :.Mr. and Mrs' H. Roberts were avenue. Narcissi were used in dee
arrived in the city 'Sunday to at- week-end visitors in Panama City. "'ting the living room wiere-sev
tend school. She is staying with While there they were guests ot eral progression were enjoyed. Af
her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Russ. er scoring tallies, high and second
W. S. Smith. a A. high prizes were presented and the
Mr. and, Mrs. Philip Lovett, Mrs. iosless served a delicious sala(
Mrs. M. Doty and daughter, Miss Patty Lovett and d ughter, Mar- course to members present.
Mary, of Panama City, spent Sun- that Louise, spent Wednesday in
day in Port St. Joe. Panama City. BURCH-CANNON
SMiss Ruby Cannon of Cross City
and Maurice Burch of this cit}
N were quietly married last Saturday
.n ein Wewahitchka. Immediately fol-
lowing the ceremony the younl
SG couple-left for a short wedding
trip to Tampa. Mr. Burch is an
S N *mnploye of the St. Joe Lumber &
Export company.,

SUBSCRIBE TO THE STAR ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED

AND TAKE YOUR CHOICE OF ANY OF THE Mrs Addie Bond of Blountstowo
announces the engagement of her
FOLLOWING PREMIUMS: daughter, Kathryn Naomi Dearing.
of Port St. Joe, to George Y. Core

CASSEROLE with Pie PlateCover -f this city, son of Mr. and Mrs.
A. A. Core of Apalachicola. The

THREE 8 -INCH PIE PLATES wedding will be an event of Thurs-
day, April 3.


SIX 5-OZ. CUSTARD CUPS

These are made of genuine "FIRE-KING" heat-
treated Oven Glass

See your foods while they cook
Bake, serve and store all in the same dish
Easy 'to clean--smooth and sanitary

Take your choice today by subscribing to The Star
for one year--only $2.00-or renewing your
present subscription

THIS OFFER' IN EFFECT FOR A LIMITED TIME!

Send In Your Subscription TODAY






THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"


Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith and
Vrs. J. W. Smith spent Sunday in
Tallahassee.

Miss Mary Lee Hayles left Mon-
day for Pensacola to visit her
mother for week.
r.. *
Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Ward were
week-end visitors in Pensacola.

Miss Jewel Presnell of Panama.
City spent Sunday here visiting
friends.

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Holliday and
children are the guests this week
of Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Holliday.

Mrs. Gus Creech spent Saturday
in Dothan, Ala., visiting friends.

Mr. and' Mrs. M. Dean spent
Sunday in Panama City, guests of.
Mr:i ai'd: Mrs.' W. 'J.- Gwaltney.-
*


U Cornelius VanH-orn, Jessie Stone
Sand Carlyle Matthews spent Satu-
day in Panama City.


I-
iil
lc
OIL
g
ch
t o








*1




V-


:'S

.
.i .".

Although identical twins, those that are exactly alike, are no- e:n-
tirely uncommon, the first case of identical cattle triplets bocn to
an Ayrshire cow on the farm of Fred Hoeger at Maynard, Iowa,
has excited those scientists who are interested in oddities of the
bovine world. These three heifers have the same color markings
which are patterend after those of their mother. In disposition, as
well as in eating habits, they are described as identical.
. '- .. 5 -.t. : ,., < ., .,, ,.u ,











well as in eating habits, they are described as identical.


FRIDAY, MARCH 14, .1941


THE STAR, PORT S8T. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FL-ORIDA


PAGE SEVEN







PPr El-W TH TR OTS.JE UFCUNY LR RDY AC 4 194


THE TATTLER
"Sees All, Knows All, Tells All
About Port St. Joe High School"
EDITED BY THE JUNIOR CLASS
Editor-in-Chief.......Buck Walters
Assistant Editor.... Royce Goforth
Society Editor....."The Snooper"
Sports Editor..........John Lane

CONGRATULATIONS
The band is really to be con-
gratulated on its splendid work.
Of course if they did not have
such a good director they would
never have been able to accom-
plish so much. The play they pre-
sented at the theater was a big
success, due to much practice and
a eood instructor. As a reward for


ST. JOE SHARKS LOSE COUNTY RECEIVES $1482 IN
IN CHIPLEY TOURNEY JANUARY FROM WELFARE
The Port St. Joe high school Gulf county received an income
basketball team was eliminated of $1,482 for January from public
by Chipley, 31 to 17, last Friday assistance cash grants, according
in the annual class "B" basketball to figures released by the state
tournament held at Chipley. welfare board this week.
The Sharks had hopes of going Grants paid were: Old age as-
into the finals after they had de- distance $1253 to 112 recipients;
feated Ponce de Leon 21 to 12 and aid to dependent children, $169 to
Magnolia 43 to 14, but the Chipley 6 cases (19 children); aid to the
aggregation was a bit too strong blind, $60 to 5 recipients.
for them and quashed their hopes. "---- ---
The tourney was won by the WEINIE SALE SATURDAY
Chnmuckli team ,which defeated The Woman's Society for Chris-
Chipley Saturday by a score of 18 tian Service of the Methodist
tio 15. Church will hold a wienie sale Sat-
---------- urday afternoon next to the Port
Named to Forestry Board theater. In addition they will have
D7-i E. Ke:noy of this city last .ihome-made cakes and pies and hot


all their efforts, new uniforms are ridav ws named a member O coffee. Everybody is urged to stone
being contemplated.. lh 'sat; hoarfl vf firestry by Gov- by and sample their wares.
Sernor Spersslrd Holland. ----
VACATION IN OFFING I Called North by Son-in-Law's Death
Well, maybe we won't mind our Bob MLhain left Thursday of Mrs. M. B. Smith was called to
exams so much this time, because jlast week for his home ;n Pensa- St. Louis. Mo., Saturday by the
we have a nice litte. l' t.r ite pios fo-ur weeks he death of her son-in-law, E. R.
we have a nice little vacation comt-
ing up. The teachers are going to has beon employed at :Tiller's Werngren. Mrs. D. C. Smith ac-
Tampa to a meeting, so if the d"g store. companies her.


SNamed Lieutenant-Colonel
W. S. Smith, publisher of The
Star, this week was appointed a
lieutenant-colonel on the staff of
Governor Spessard L. Holland. It
is now "Kunnel Smith to you, suh."
-----c--.---
Return From Honeymoon
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Burch re-
turned Monday from their wedding
trip to Tampa.
------^-------
New Soda Jerker
Gene Camp of Dothan, Ala., has
accepted a position with Miller's
drug store in this city.


PLUMBING


HEATING


ST. JOE

PLUMBING

F. J. CORBIN, Manager

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Hoag of
Armenia, N. Y., were the guests
Monday and Tuesday of Mr, and
Mrs. B. B. Conklin.
----
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Hobbs and
daughters of Troy, Ala., were the
week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Gus Creech.


ROOM AND
BOARD
BY THE 7
WEEK $7.00

Dining Room
E Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c

MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


town is turned upsi,'oedown next.
week just be to'eranit a'id rel:n m-
be;- that it wil! last 'or olIiv a :1w
days


WE'SR INTRODUCING
Mils Addie Deahklo of lMobile.
Ala. She has brown eyes a-l
brown hair, a fair complexion an.:' I
soft on the eyes, eh boys!
Miss Dekle attended Murp:y
high school and was a very po'u-
lar member of the younger crowa.
Her hobbies are sewing and danc-
ing. She is five feet four inches
tall, just the right height for you
boys.
Oh, yes. Her blfthday Is on Sep-
tember 25, and' she was born in
1923.
We hope you will reel at home
with us,. Addle, and learn to- like
us all as we will like you.
GOSSIP
Melba has a new boy friend,
hasn't she, Billy, W.
These girls that have to go af-
ter boys for a party-that's bad!
Sorry to see Lenora go home
Wednesday with- the measles,
'weren't you, Foy?
Willie Lee sure did look good
Saturday; all dressed up and no
place to go (maybe we're wrong,
and, she did have some place to
go).
Gloria has finally bitten on
somebody else's bait!
Talmon may come to the junior-
senior prom, so he says.
Pee Wee seems to be giving our
new pupil from Tampa a big rush.
Plan to Attend Legion Meet
A considerable number of the
members of Gulf County Post 116.
American Legion, ,are planning to.
attend, the district meeting to be
held' Sunday in Apalachicola. The
ladies of the Auxiliary will also
attend a district conference.


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified In-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

LeHARDY
PHARMACY


QUALITY
GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
WE DELIVER -


C PS Grocery & MARKET
Y PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


No. Ilbs.
No.l POTATOES 15c


ALL M L SMALL
BRANDS I L 3 LARGE 20c
?p LARGE




Bulk SUGAR 5 Ibs. 25c


A No. 1 F L U R ....................5c
A N o24 bs...................85


CALL FOR THE BEST-




7-DAY COFFEE GROUND5c




COOKING OIL Gallo Can..........................39c
Gallon Can ..............................70c


TOMATOES No. 2 Can 6c MACARONI or SPAGHETTI 4 for 9c

Aunt Jemima GRITS Pkg. 7c PURE LARD 4-lb. Pail 35c

Kellog's CORN FLAKES each 6'2Vc P & G SOAP 5 Bars 20c


MARKET .


PORK CHOPS lb. 19c SALT BACON Lb. 14c

Western CHUCK ROAST lb. 19c OLEOMARGARINE lb. 9c


Western ROUND STEAK lb. 28c PICNIC HAMS Lb. 17c


PAY CSH AND SAVE! FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
A MARCH 14 AND 15


i


~8~fg~er~i~uR~ ~5W~p~W~


Pt,!F EIWT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF OADUNTY, FLO#=AJ


FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941


t