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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00226
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 14, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00226

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upLuilding of
the City of Port St Joe,


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500;000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. .. In
R the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14 1941 NUMBER 19
&r n ii i I


Sixteen Draftees

To Leave Tuesday

For Year I1n Cam

Last of Volunteers In Group an
Local Board Now Begins
Calling Selectees

The local selective service boar(
this week ianlounces that fourteen
white and two colored men will bi
sent from Gulf county on FelbruarY
8S to start their year's military
training. The white youths will go
to Camp Blanding, while the col
ored boys will be sent to Fort Ben-
ning in Georgia. In addition to
those called there will be foul
white alternates and two colored.
Volunteers to go Tuesday wil
be Hubert Allday, Roman Grovel
Pope. Horace Mayfield, James P
Whitfield, Buster Brown LeGear
William Dillon Linton, Clarence
Paul, David Lester King and Joe
Carlos Daniels, white; Arthur
Harris and Zannie Ferrell, colored.
Selectees to leave, with their or-
der numbers, are Cleland Leonard
Belin (29), Willie Alexander An-
derson (42), Frederick Wilson Sut-
ton (56). and Mitchell Lee Redd
(112). Alternates, Clarence Ivy
Hicks (122), William J. Boynton
(135), Robert K. Attaway (137)
and William Kemp Kennedy (143).
Colored alternates, both of whom
are volunteers, are Andrew Ash
and Max Williams.


DonM'Leod Praises

Work of Local Poet


Better Than "Grass," Says Col-
umnist Writing In Apalachi-
cola Times

The following is from Don Mc-
Leodi's "Comments" in the Apa-
lachicola Times of last week:
"I seldom read current amateur
poetry, though an occasional glance
at it tends to relieve my embar-
rassment at my own doggerel. In
the 'With Florida Poets' column
of the Times-Union of January 26
I read 'Fisherman's Wife' by Ruth
Allen Smith of Port St. Joe, and
if that isn't better poetry than
famed Carl Sandburg's 'Grass,'
then as an erudite art critic I am
a walleyed pike. And lest I seem
to damn with faint praise, I say
futrher that it is not only better
than 'Grass' but 'Fisherman's Wife'
is good. It's realism is remindful
of 'Spoon River'." Following is
'the poem:
Fisherman's Wife
The' clock sounds the alarm. It
may be twelve or three.
The baby wakes and frets. He did
not have milk yesterday.
The fisherman's wife, barefoot, in
faded house dress too torn for
folks to see,
Bars the door behind his sleepy,
lumbering steps. Her hus-
band goes his way.
From the window she sees the
wind is strong. The sky is over-
cast;
There's not much for him to go
on such a "mugged up" morn.
By daybreak he'll be back. How
can she stretch the food to last,
.To feed five hungry mouths' an-
other day (six, when you count
the one unborn)?
-Ruth Allen Smith.
,--------------
Indiana Visitor
Mrs. W. E. Gordon of Angola,
Ind., arrived Tuesday to spend
two weeks in the eity as the guest
qf Mr. ana MrI W, A. Smith.


"WE DO NOT NEED A SINGLE MAN"


Your Income Tax Approval Given


In A Nutshell

Who Must File a Return? Every
single person having a gross in-
come of $SOO or more; every mar-
ried person, not living with hus-
band or wife, and having a gross
income of $800 or more; and mar-
ried persons living as husband and
wife who have an aggregate gross
income of $2000 or more.
When Must Returns Be Filed?
For the calendar year, on or be-
fore March 15, 1941; for the fis-


Paving Project

For Port St. Joe

Congressman Bob Sikes Advises
That Citywide Project Has
Been Okehed By WPA

For a considerable number of
months the city of Port St. Joe
has had on file with the WPA a
request for a loan for the purpose
of imporving and paving streets


cal year, on or before the 15th day throughout the city, but with the
of the third month following the national defense program under-


Thus spoke Winstoni Churchill, the prime minister, in a broadcast
throughout the world last Sunday from London, England. Appeal-
ing to the United States to supply the "tools" to defeat Adolf Hit-
ler, he stressed the point that no American soldiers were needed-
that England can do the job alone just as the world learned of the
British conquest of Libya. Italy was further harassed in the bomb-
ing of Genoa, near the heel of the Italian boot. This action would
suggest the beginning of the final drive to eliminate Italy as a power
in World War II. Wendell L. Willkie, at the left, will be eagerly
litsened to in forthcoming addresses after his testimony of Febrt.-
ary 11 on the HR 1776 or !ease-lend bill.



Defense Garden Program


Should Fit Family Needs


Good Planning Will Give Balanced Diet.


Maximum benefits from the De-
fense Garden are reaped when all
work is done by the owner. The
size of the most profitable garden
will therefore depend upon the
amount of leisure the owner has,
and his inclination to do gardening
work.
Unless the product of the home
garden is needed for food which
could not be purchased, it is not
wise to plant a larger space than
will be well tended. Two hours on
each of three days a week devoted
to this leisurely, pleasant and
healthful physical recreation will
take good care of a garden 30 by 40
feet or thereabouts; and from this
space can be harvested vegetables
sufficient for the average family,
except for potatoes and sweet corn.
In deciding what shall be grown,
these crops may be considered as
necessary in most sections of our
country:
Beans Parsnips
Lima beans Parsley
Beets Peppers
Carrots Onion sets
Cabbage Peas
Chard Radishes
Cucumbers Swiss chard
Lettuce Tomatoes
Eliminate, of course, those you do
not like, and remember that it is bet-
ter to grow small amounts of many
things than to devote your entire


GETS TEACHING CERTIFICATE
Colin English, state superinten-
dent of public instruction, has an-
nounced that Mrs. Franklin L;
Jones of Port St. Joe has been
awarded a Florida teaching cer-
tificate baaed oa four years of col-
leg* traalaing,


area to relatively few vegetables
which will likely be overproduced,
and give you a monotonous diet.
One of the great advantages of the
home garden is the opportunity
it gives to grow annual vegetables
which you might not otherwise try.
To replace items eliminated from
the above list, or to add to it if you
have the space, here are some sug-
gestions: I
Brussels sprouts for fall crop;
celery, broccoli, especially the
green sprouting, Chinese cabbage
for fall salads; savoy cabbage, a
great delicacy; chicory or endive
for fall green salads; collards, corn
salad, eggplant, celeriac, cress,
kale, kohlrabi, leek, melons, mus-
tard greens, pumpkin, okra, oyster
plant, spinach, squash, both the win-
ter kind and the summer varieties
which are so delicious in the baby
stage, especially the vegetable mar-
rows; and turnips and rutabagas,
which are especially successful in
sections which have an early spring
and late fall.
A ramble through your seed cata-
logue will produce other suggestions
which should be considered in mak-
ing up your seed order. Come new
vegetable or variety added to your
list will give you more pleasure
than the staples, and it will be some-
thing to serve your friends when
they come to dine.


FIREMEN TO STAGE DANCE
The Port St Joe Volunteer Fire
Department members are planning
for a dance to be held February 22,
Waahington's birthday, at the Cen-
tennial building. Music will be
furnished by a well-kanow colored
orchestra.


close of the fiscal year.
Where and With Whom Must
Income Tax Returns Be Filed? In
the internal revenue district in
which the person lives or has, his
chief Ilace of business, and with
the collector of internal revenue.
How Does One Make Out His
Income Tax Return? By following
the detailed instructions given on
Forms 1040-A and 1040, the income
tax blanks.
What Is the Tax Rate? A nor-
mal tax of 4 per cent on the
amount of the net income, arrived,
at by deducting legal exemptions
and credits from the gross income;
a surtax on the surtax net income
in excess, of $4000; aitd: a defense
tax of 10 per cent of the combined
normal tax and surtax.

LEGION DINNER AT
CENTENNIAL BUILDING
Gulf County Post 116, American
Legion, is staging a chicken and
dumpling dinner at the Centennial
building Monday evening for all
Legionnaires, their families and
friends. As usual, Arthur Lupton.
chef supreme, will be in charge of
the kitchen.
It is expected that at least 200
guests will be on hand, many from
posts in adjoining cities, and tick-
ets are now being sold by members
of the local post and Auxiliary.

SCOUT TROOP GETS HUT
The Gulf Oil company .this week
donated to the local Boy Scout
troop a 15 by 30-foot frame build-
ing which had been used as an of-
fice and supply room during con-
struction of the oil storage tanks
in this city. The scouts are now
engaged in seeking a location for
the building, which will be used
as a meeting place by the troop.
---
BUILDING PERMITS
A building permit was issued
this week to C. G. Costin for con-
struction of a second story to his
residence on Monument avenue at
a cost of $1500.
Building permit issued this week
to Mrs. Nora Duren for construc-
tion of six frames houses in the
colored quarters at a cost of $600.
_______- ---
PORT NEWS
S.S. Jean of the Bull Line sailed
Wednesday for eastern ports with
cargo of paper from St. Joe Paper
company.
4-------
Goes To Washington
Miss Louise Wilson, formerly
employed by the St. Joe Paper
company, will leave this week to
accept a position in Washington,
D. C.
-K
Attends Missionary Conference
Rev. D. E. Marietta attended, the
District Missionary Conference at
Graceville Thursday,

To Make Home In Mobile
Mr. and Mrs. Wllard Gilbert left
Sunday for Mobile to make their
aturea hame.


way and statements issued from
authoritative sources that such
projects would be cut to the bone
there had been little hope of se-
curing the grant.
City officials and the editor of
The Star were agreeably surprised
therefore, when the following tele-
gram was received Tuesday from
Congressman Bob Sikes in Wash-
ington:
Hon. W. S. Smith,
Port St. Joe, Fla.
'Furthei' reference our com-
munications. WPA has just ad-
vised that they have approved
Port St. Joe citywide street pro-
ject 50247 in amounts federal
funds $62,057; sponsor's $46,135.
Am urging prompt presidential
approval.
BOB SIKES, MC.
While theproject calliI for the
grading and paviug So a number
of specified streets, it also allows
the city considerable leeway in
specifying what streets are to be
included in the work.
It will probably be some time
before the project gets underway,
as it has not yet received the
stamp of approval by Presildent
Roosevelt, and after it is approved
there will be considerable WPA
red tape to be unraveled.


Registration For

City Election 800


Polls Open At City Hall From 8
A. M. to 7 P. M. Next
Tuesday

Qualified voters of the city of
Port St. Joe will trek to the polls
next .Tuesday for the purpose of
selecting a city commissioner to
fill the seat made vacant by ex-
piration of the term of Mayor J.
L. Sharit, but, unlike other recent
elections, they will have the choice
of but two candidates Mayor
Sharit, who is up for re-election,
and Horace Soule, local hardware
store manager. The polls will be
open from 7 a. m. until 8 p. m.,
and while there is not much po-
litical talk on the streets, it is an-
ticipated that there will be a
rather heavy vote.
According to City Clerk M. P.
Tomlinson there were 71 new
voters registered during the time
the books were open, which gives
a total of approximately 800 voters
within the city limit.
In 1938 there were 325 ballots
cast, at which time B. W. Eells,
T. H. Stone and Horace Soule were
candidates, Eells being elected by
a margin of three votes. In 1940,
with 673 registered voters, there
were 613 ballots cast, which seems
to indicate that local citizens take
considerable interest in selecting
their city commissioners.
All qualified electors are urged
to go to the polls Tuesday and
have a voice in electing their city
commlitioner,


r.1"






PAGE~~~~~~~ TWOI TH TR "TS..O, UFGUTFOIAFRDY ERAY1,14


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,'
undet Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months...........65c

-4 Telephone 51 ji-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

RE-ELECT MAYOR SHARIT
The qualified voters of Port St. Joe will go
to the polls next Tuesday to select a city com-
missioner to fill the chair made vacant by
the expiration of the term of Mayor J. L.
Sharit, who is a candidate to succeed himself.
During his three years as a member of the
board and as mayor Mr. Sharit has handled
a hard job in a very creditable manner and
in a way that has brought innumerable bene-
fits to oui city that we otherwise might
never have received. He has been fair and
impartial in conducting the meetings of the
board and has at all times carried an open
mind and welcomed suggestions when mat-
ters of importance have been under discus-
sion, not only from the other board members
but from persons in attendance at the board
meetings.
Mayor Sharit has the city's best interests
in mind at all times and is always willing to
lay aside his work to attend to city business.
We can show our appreciation for what he
has done for Port St. Joe and our confidence
in what he can do for Port St. Joe in the fu-
ture by returning him to office next Tuesday
by an overwhelming majority.

HISTORY ON FILE
Along about the first of December each
year The Star receives a large book by ex-
press-the file of its issue for the preceding
twelve months bound permanently. To date
The Star has but three of these books which
probably is the most interesting collection of
reading material in Port St. Joe today be-
cause it is a history of the community from
the time its phenomenal growth began with
the erection of the paper mill. The books are
filled with the joys and sorrows, the achieve-
ments and failures, the important and the
insignificant, the births and the deaths.
These files are invaluable not only to this
newspaper, but to the community, because
they are irreplaceable. These bound files are
always available to the public for reference,
but in no case can they be removed from the
office, and they must be treated with the
greatest of care at all times, for in them lies
the history of modern Port St. Joe.

KITE-FLYERS BEWARE!
That the innocent, childish pastime of kite-
flying could, in certain circumstances, en-
danger life, seems incredible. Yet, in a letter
to Asher Frank, director of Florida's Safety
Council, no less a state dignitary than Com-
missioner of Agriculture Nathan Mayo de-
clares that this is so. In !his letter the com-
missioner cites the case of a boy in Winter
Haven recently who used a wire on his kite
for a cord which, falling across a high-tension
electric line, became a conductor of elec-
tricity, 'killing the lad instantly.
Boys would do well to keep to open spaces
while flying their kites and avoid strictly the
use of any metal whatsoever in the prepara-
tion of kite strings.

If you are a qualified voter, don't fail to
cast your ballot next Tuesday and have a
voice in selecting a member of our board of
city commissioners. /


WHAT WOULD YOU DO?
If you were elected governor of this great
state of Florida and found that the road de-
partment was in the hole, so to speak, to the
tune of approximately seven million dollars,
what would you do?
We believe you would get busy, especially
with the critical defense program looking you
in the face, and see if some of the political
contracts could not be retrieved.
That is just what has happened to our own
Governor Spessard L. Holland. He has found
himself in what the radio boys call "the dog
house." Now, it is up to him to get out of a
mess that he is in no way responsible for.
We say it takes a man with intestinal for-
titude to ask for road contracts to be can,
celled, especially one that runs through his
own town where his home folks were back
of him one hundred per cent.
Therefore, we ask those who have been
urging us to wire' the governor to just sit
tight. Spessard Holland knows more about
our needs that we know ourselves, and we
are willing to trust his better judgment on it.
We don't believe anyone wants the governor
to get us further in debt in order to ride
over good roads.-Lake Wales Highlander.

DESTROYING ILLUSIONS
One by one humanity's fetishes and beliefs
have been exploded. Our forebears shut out
the night air from their bedrooms because it
was "poisonous." We forced spinach upon
our children because we thought this vege-
table to be the open sesame to health. Then
scientists found night air was not harmful,
and spinach only mildly beneficial.
But we hung on to one belief. The deep-
chested man was virile and healthy. He per-
sonified physical perfection. Millions exer-
cised day and night to deepen their chests,
but they were just as wrong as the exponents
of closed windows and spinach. Dr. S. A.
Weisman, of the University of Minnesota, at-
ter studying 22,000 people, has found flat
chests are a sign of physical superiority and
that there is a distinct correlation between
the depth of the chest and certain lung ail-
ments.
The old beliefs have been taken away from
us by modern science. About all we have
left is the conviction that potatoes are fat-
tening Any day now these pesky researchers
will be telling us carrots won't make stringy
hair curly.-Miami News.

STILL A LONG DISTANCE FROM GOAL
Some progress is being made toward re-
armament-but we are still a mighty long
distance from our goal. Newsweek recently
surveyed the picture. According to it, on Jan-
uary 1 we had 4000 army planes-goal is
37,000. We had 2,590 navy planes-goal is
16,000. We had 1000 tanks and combat cars
-goal is 6,500. We had 600,000 soldiers-goa.
is 1,500,000. A good many of the planes, as
army men have testified, are trainers or art
obsolete. And a large proportion of the sol-
diers are new conscripts, with a year to go
before they will be versed in the military arts.
So far, of course, the defense program has
been largely in the tooling and plant expan-
sion stage. And it will remain in that stage
for some time to come, in the opinion of pro-
duction men. Most of what we are produc-
ing now is going abroad. There is no expec-
tation of building our own military establish-
ment to formidable dimensions in less than a
year. The navy program will require five
years.

A Frenchman says the people of France
are divided over the war. Half of them want
the British to win, while the other half want
the Nazis to lose.-New Orleans Times-Pica-
yune.

If a woman leaves without getting the last
word she is liable to come back after it.

It takes a bright light to make a shadow--
so why not look for the light.


EIRE POSSIBLE INVASION BASE FOR NAZIS


This map shows how Eire is on the alert for Nazi invasion should
Germany wish to use Ireland as A jumping-off place for an attack
on England. Dublin was bombed last week-ernd, increasing the ten-
sion throughout Ireland.


Mrs. Floyd Hunt, Mrs. T. E
Fisher and Mrs. R. W. Smith at-
tended the Woman's Club Insti-
tute Tuesday in Chipley.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
NOTICE OF REGULAR
MUNICIPAL ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the
regular municipal election for the
election of one City Commissioner
for the full term of three years
for the City of Port St. Joe will
be held, in the City Hall in the
City of Port St. Joe on Tuesday,
February 18, 1941.
The polls will open at 8 o'clock
A. M. and close at 7 o'clock P.
M., Eastern Standard Time.
Signed:
1-17 M. P. TOMLINSON,
2-14 City Auditor and Clerk.
GUARDIAN'S NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that G.
R. MADDOX, as Guardian of the
persons and estates of RICHARD
MADDOX and 'GEORGE MADDOX.
minors, will, on the 21st day of
February, 1941, at the hour of ten
o'clock A. M., in the forenoon, or
as soon thereafter as I may be
heard, make application to the
County Judge of Gulf County, Flor-
ida, at his office in Wewahitchka,
Florida, for authority to sell at pri-
vate sale, the interest of said mi-
nors, of the following described
real estate, situate and being in
Gulf County, Florida, to-wit:
East half of Southwest Quar-
ter, less three (3) acres in
Southwest corner of Southeast
Quarter of Southwest Quarter,
West of Locky Branch; also
'that part of the Northwest
Quarter of Southwest Quarter
lying East and South of Locky
Branch in Section Twenty-
eight (28); also Northeast
Quarter of Northwest Quarter,
less three (3) acres in Section
Thirty-three (33), Township
Five (5) South, Range Nine
(9) West; also Southeast Quar-
ter of Northwest Quarter;
Southwest Quarter of North-
east Quarter, less five (5)
acres in Southeast corner of
Southwest Quarter of North-
east Quarter, Section Two (2)
Township Fo u r (4) South .
Range Ten (10) West; also
Lots Three (3) to Twenty-two
(22) inclusive, Block B, Mad-
dox Sub., Section Thirteen (13)
Township Eight (8) South,
Range Eleven (11) West.
G. R. MADDOX,
As Guardian of the persons and
estates of Richard Maddox and
George Maddox, minors.
1-31 2-21


ASKOFOR- I
MENTHOfLSION,
FOWCO CfUGMV FROkiCbLDS-


DR.J. C. COE
-D, EN T I ST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


















Winter is at hand and we
have just received a carload *
of coal, one of the finest fueled.
that you can depend on for f
heating your home during the
* cold weather. Call us-
THE PHONECT FUEL70



:C. W. HORTONME!
Port St. Joe, Fla. .
Sthat you can depend on for
a a
* PHONE 70 :


: C. W. HORTON t


Gulf County's

ONLY Dairy

The Gulf County Dairy is the
only dairy now being oper-
ated in Gulf county, all other
mil k distributors bringing:
their products into the county
from outside sources.

Patronize a HOME dairy!

BE SURE ITS

Gulf County

Dairy Milk

PURE! FRESH! RICH!
WHOLESOME!
From Tested Cows
Our Milk is produced and
bottled under sanitary condi-
tions to assure its purity


THAT WON TURN LOOSE
ThAKNEML S, OF -
SMENTHd'.M tX[10-If
WAiM EN MITHN-M ES l GulfCountyDair

H. M. MCLAMMA, Manager


-- 4ri -T


I


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1941


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF 00UNTY, FLORIDAP


PAGE TWO








THE STAR, PORT 8T. JOE, rULP COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


Society


MRS. COSTIN HOSTESS
TO J. A. M. CLUB
The regular meeting of the J.
A. M. Club was held Monday eve-
ing at the home of Mrs. C. G. Cos-
tin. The Valentine motif was car-
ried out in the decorations for the
occasion. A contest was enjoyed,
with Mrs. Louis( Perrltt as win-
her of high and Miss Myrtice
Coody winner of low prize, after
which the hostess served refresh-
ments of heart-shaped sandwiches,
potato chips, jello with whipped
cream, cake and coffee.


QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
--WE DELIVER -


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY


6YPSY-D000DLE?
AMAZING. FUN' EXCITING
EJ I s, simple, you a bea a
expert GYPSY-DOODLER In 30
seconds. Packed with a thrill a
minute. 2 to 8 can play. Co-
.plete. No .cardst no de. no
wheels. A game O sill, bt \
Bl, r luck can wlnl Now IntrdMced
by mal for only SO. Mail the
S coapon. You must be thrilled
*with GYPSY-DOODLE or return
It for your money backl
AMa. T, lI-nT ODUCTOBiT COPM
BYPSY-DOODLE, I
SC Co-Opratil Featrml
S360 N. Mishigae Av.,
SChilago, Illnos. I
SEodlosed Is 6. Bend CYPSY-DOIE ad I
L Ua-A-LoN poMtpalid todr. I
I NAME ..... ..*
SADDRESS ........... ... ,
; STATE ........................ ......
- -i .. m. mm. a a. m* A


S Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MISS ALMA DAUGHTRY AND
EDWARD GUILFORD WED
Miss Alma Daughtry, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Daughtry,
and Edward Franklin Guilford
were quietly married Sunday af-
ternoon at the home of the bride's
parents. The ceremony was per-
formed by the Rev. J. W. Sisemore
in the presence of the family and
a few intimate friends.
The bride has spent her entire
life in this city and is a graduate
of the local high school. The
groom is the son of Mrs. Minnie O.
Guilford of Blountstown, having
come to the city several months
ago, andi is employed by the St.
Joe Paper company.
The Star joins their many friends
in wishing for them much happi-
ness.
*r
BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS


The regular Bible study of the
Baptist Missionary Society was
held at the church Monday after-
noon with Mrs. C. M. Palmer in
charge. The Book of Mark was
taught by the able leader. Follow.
ing the study the meeting was
turned over to the president and
plans made for the Day of Prayer
for Peace to be held at the church
with all churches of the-city par-
ticipating. The meeting was dis-
missed by repeating the Mispah.

F. O. Darke and family of Tal-
lahassee and Don Raye. Reed of
Hosford were the week-end, guests
of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake.

W. A. Smith spent Tuesday in
Dothan, Ala.

Mrs. G. W. Ward of New Or-
leans, La.. is visiting her son and
daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. A.
L. War.d

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett, Mrs.
Patty Lovett and daughter, Mar-
tha Louise, spent Saturday in Pan-
ama City.

Mrs. J. Larkin and Mrs. Hoke
Larkin of Bristol were week-end
visitors in this city.

Mrs. Mary Lovett and Miss Ella
Lovett left Wednesday to spend-
several weeks in Apalachicola, as
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Schoelles'.


ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE $7 O
WEEK

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ........ 35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner, Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


METHODIST WOMEN'S
CIRCLES ELECT OFFICERS
Circle No. 1 of the Women's So-
ciety for Christian Service of the
Methodist Church was entertained
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. B. H. Smith. In the absence
of Mrs. F. Hunt, the chairman,
Mrs. George Patton presided.
Study for the afternoon was
"Moses, the Dreamer,'' taken from

the.book "Great Souls At Prayer."
After the study and business the
following officers were elected:
Mrs. Floyd Hunt, chairman; Mrs.
B. H. Smith; vice-chairman; Mrs.
Joe Grimsley, secretary and treas-
urer; Mrs. R. A., Costin, chairman.
of Christian and social relations.
Mrs. B. E. Rawls, was welcomed as
a new member.
Those, taking part on the pro-
gram for the meeting were Mcn
dames R. A. Cotin, R. W:, Smith,
J. Grimsley and A. M. Jones.
Circle No. 2 met at the home of
Mrs. J. L. Temple Monday after-
noon with Mrs. ,Temple, the circle
chairman, presiding. After a short
business session the study, "Ex-
ploring the Bible," was held. Re-
freshments were served by the
hostess to the tefi members press
ent.
Mrs. Cecil Hewitt was hostess
to Circle No. 3 Monday afternoon
with Mrs. J. D. Teal as co-hostess
Following a short devotional thl
following officers were elected:
Mrs. B. S. McKnight, chairman-
Mrs. A. M. Jones, Jr., program'
chairman; Mrs. C. H. Johnson, sec
retary and treasurer. A business
session was held, after which thr
me-eting was dismissed by prayer

WOMAN'S CLUB NOTES
The garden circle of the Por'
St. Joe Woman's Club will mee
at the home of Mrs. Basil Kenne,
next Wednesday afternoon, Feb
ruary 19.
The Times current affairs con
test was held Wednesday afternoon
at the home of Mrs. Floyd Hunt
with 11 contestants. Winner war
Mrs. Bertha Bussells of Fleeton
W. Va., with a score of SS out oe
105 questions; second was Mrs
Roy Gibson with a score of 71
Plans were made at this time te
organize a literary department, the
first meeting to be held March 1-
at the home of Mrs. H. C. Spence

MRS. CONKLIN ENTERTAINS
EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
Mrs. B. B. Conklin was hostess
to the Auxiliary of the St. James
Episcopal church Monday after
noon at her home on Garrison ave-
nue. Wild flowers decorated: the
living room where the guests werc
sn.tertained. After a short business
discussion, refreshments of soft
drinks and sandwiches w~re serveC
to members present.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Samford are
announcing the arrival of a 71/-
pound daughter at a Panama City
hospital on Monday, February 10
The young lady has been named
Doorthy Ann.


Spend Week-End In Alabama
Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis and
Peggy Allen spent the week-end in
Newville, Ala., visiting relatives.

Rev. D. E. Marietta attended the
White House Conference Tuesday
Sin Tallahassee.

SGeorge Tapper attended the
Wiilliams-Lesene wedding in Mo-
bile, Ala., last Friday.

SMr. and Mrs. W. H. Sutton of
Mobile, Ala., are visiting realtives
Here this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hauser and
Mr. and -Mrs. J. Lilienfeld spent
I Sunday' in Panama City.


.- .I,


Continuous
Daily from
2:45 p. m.

Saturday's
1:15 p. m.


Open Sunday
1:45 and 8:30

Roy Williams
Manager

Phone 109


SATURDAY ONLY FEBRUARY 15
THRILLING ACTION HITS )
PLUS SERIAL THRILL
--HIT NO. -- -- HIT NO. 2 --

S LLOYD NOLAN

"BEHIND THE
ROY ROGERS
GEORGE "rUy4" HAYESK NEWS"

"KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED"


SUNDAY MONDAY FEBRUARY 16 17
SHOWS AT 2:00 AND 8:00 P. M. SUNDAY
MONDAY AT 12:00, 2:00 AND 8:00 P. M.
ADMISSION-Matinee: Children 25c, including tax;
Adults 40c, including tax
EVENING: ALL TICKETS 57c, Including Tax


NOTHING
CUT
BUT
THE
PRICE!

Full
Length


OF Ti~ oF;HE NATION.!i

GONE WITH THE WIND
&CHMCOM)LR -1SCLARK GABLE ,, *hll
LFSLIR HOWARD OLIVIA DMHAVILLAN D
,"i-A~m VIVIEN LEIGH uuriw oa
A SEICK ATZONCN PICnl"l


- NO SEATS RESERVED!


LIMITED
ENGAGE-
MENT!



Exactly as
Shown in
Atlanta!


NO PASSES!


TUESDAY, FEB. 17 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

B GSMASH2 WhoIs YEHUDI?
----HITS--


p-r- .P ,',- "TRAINING POLICE
HORSES'
% m -+,_ .- +i '4&T= _


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE


PHONE 100 *

DAY OR NIGHT -
STAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION

rP "wjT wnwisier^ww JiI^M UU UU


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14 1941



p~--~. 1.


Visiting From Kentucky Promoted to Captaincy
Mr. and. Mrs. Basil E. Kenney Ben Dickens of this city, a stu-
returned Tuesday from Montgom- dent at the University of Florida,
ery, Ala., after several days spent Gainesville, has been promoted
with relatives.. Mrs. Thomas E. from second lieutenant in' the R.
Kenney, of Frankfort, Ky., mother O. T. C. to a captaincy.
of Mr. Kenney, returned to this
city with them to spend the re- FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
mainder of the winter months.
-I hereby anonunce my candidacy
Advertising doesn't cost-it pays! for re-election to the office of City
Commissioner of Port St. Joe, sub-
ject to the will of the voters at
FOR CITY COMMISSIONER the city election February 18. If
I herewith announce my candi- returned to office, I promise to
dacy for the office of City Comn- carry on the affairs of the city in
missioner oT the City of Port St. the same manner as T have In the
Joe, subject to the will of the past, always working for the ad-
voters at the municipal election vancement and betterment of the
February 18. If elected I will community and for the best inter-
Poe tests :of'ithe people. On my past
:work for the best interests of Port tests of people. On my past
St. Joe and her citizens. Your record I respectfully solicit the
vote and -support will be appreci- vote and support of the electors
ated. Respectful ly, of-PortSt. Joe.
HORACE W. SOULE J. L. SHARIT


1GORRIE CABINS
CAFE AND BAR .- PACKAGE GOODS
SLPAUL JOHNSON, Prop.
East End Gorrie Bridge EAST POINT, FLA.



Compliments of


BRAKES FUNERAL HOME

PANAMA CITY, FLA.

AMBULANCE SERVICE


U.








PAZ" ~~__ IC'JR TH TR PR T JE UFCONY LOW DYFBURY1,14


PICTURE OF PICTURES AT PORT THEATRE SUNDAY AND MONDAY
. .. ... ... ... .. -- -- .- ... ,. .. ... ." -


~~ ~ ~... .- .' '

rr ,1. 1<

"4' 4" -- 'L
c~
~< .1.1,*-,
i ,u


Vivien Leigh and Clark Gablein "Gone with the Wind"


"Gone V.ith the Wind," the pic-
ture thpt theater-goers of this sec-
tii have c!:cn lool:ing forward to


seeing for months, will play at the
Port theater Sunday and Monday,:
February 17 and 18, with two
shows Sunday, at 2 and S p. m.,
and three shows Monday, 12, 4 and
S p. m. This is the same picture
as shown at the premiere in At-
laita, Ga., with nothing cut, and


R. A. F. BOMBS MILAN


t L ,

. -:1 -,- i ., .' ? ...
.' -

^.--.. .* s9 -


.
: -i E L. ''C
SThis is one of the first pictures to
reach this country showing the
damage done in Italy by the bomb-
ing raids of the Royal Air Force.
Photo shows firemen searching in
the wreckage of a bombed build-
ing after the R. A. F. attacked the
city of Milan.

NEW HUSKING CHAMP


M OST people who use Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills say that one
pill usually relieves their head-
aches. In the regular package,
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills cost
one penny each. In the economy
packages, one penny buys 1%4
;pills.
Why Don't You Try Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills?
They taste good, act promptly,
lo not upset the stomach, con-
tain no opiates or laxative medi-
cines.
You may be miles away from a
drug store when you are suffer-
ing from a Headache, Neuralgia,
or Muscular Aches and Pains.
Why not get a package of Dr.
Miles Anti-Pain Pills today and
be prepared for emergencies?
Beguar RPcage, 5 Pmia, 252
maonm rtImag, 1s5 PnM, s.W


When Eugene Crouse, 24-year-old
farmer finished his "land"' in the
Grundy county, Iowa, corn husk-
Ing contest recently he had set a
new world's record. He had picked
53.19 bushels net.


patrons will be surprised the way
time passes, with the better than
four hours spent viewing the pic-
ture seeming no longer than the
usual two-hour show, so interest-
ing is the film, which is entirely
in Technicolor. Everyone is urged
to see this outstanding picture.

Visiting Parents
Mrs.. Robert Buckles of Kissim-
me1e and Mrs. M. L. Strickland of
Vero Beach are guests of their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. R. L.
Carter.

Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!

S SE: OUR

NEW LINE
OF

CAMERAS

FILMS
AND

FLASH BULBS

LET US SHOW YOU
HOW TO GET BETTER
SNAPSHOTS

0-

Poehler's Studio
Port St. Joe, Fla.


Let Us Service

Your Car for

Winter
For economical and efficient
operation of your car during
the cold winter months the
battery should be checked,
Anti-Freeze put in the radia-
tor, crankcase oil changed
and the entire car greased.
Let Us Give Your Car a
WINTER CHECK-UP!
Wm. H. Tomlinson's
GULF SERVICE
GULF STATION
Monument Ave. at First St
..._. .I`.. s.-~`.. ...~-~--- 'am


Compliments of

Marks Brokerage Company

WHOLESALE GROCERS -

APALACHICOLA, FLA.



FRANKLIN TOURIST COURT
6 Miles East of Panama City on Highway 98
P. 0. Address Star Route No. 3 Panama City, Fla.
COMPLETELY MODERN 1 AND 2-ROOM CABINS
Gas Heated, Range and Refrigeration
Innerspring Mattresses "ON THE BAY"



FREEMAN'S SEED STORE

PANAMA CITY, FLA.
200 Fourth Street PHONE 240
DEPENDABLE GARDEN AND FIELD SEEDS

FEED SEEDS FERTILIZERS


S a *


PADGETT MOTOR COMPANY


DeSOTO


-:- PLYMOUTH


204-208 FOURTH STREET


PHONE 158


PANAMA CITY, FLA.
) = ##iE ^ *- *i~


SUPREMACY In Loving Tribute

SERVICES BY

WILSON FUNERAL HOME
PANAMA CITY

AMBULANCE SERVICE
PHONE 111


Apalachicola



State Bank



Serving the people of this section
of Florida for 44 years


1;- -.1 *


MEMBER
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


I


Chromium, valuable in plating Maine is the only state in the
other metals, was discovered in Union bordering on only one other
1797. state.


; "ALWAYS A GOOD SHOW"

S DIXIE THEATRE
APALACHICOLA, FLA.



Compliments of


! -*4 *4-**


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY,' FEBRUARY 14, 1941


PAC'E FC:)R


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