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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00221
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 10, 1941
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00221

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upkuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


Port-St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME iV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1941 NUMBER 14


UP FOR RE-ELECTION Colored Woman

L A As Result of

S.. .I ,. .-. Cracs


CHAIRMAN OF COUNTY BOARD


Spessard Holland

Takes Over Reins

Of Government


.5


Am*e

'I


'4. .

J, L. Sharit, who has tossed his
hat in the local political rlhg for
re-election as a member of the
board of commissioners of the
city of Port St. Joe.


Seeks Re-election

As Board Member

Mayor J. L. Sharit First 'to An-
nounce for City Election
February 18

This issue of The Star carries
the announcement of Mayor J. L.
Sharit that he will be a candidate
to succeed himself as member of
the board of city commissionerss
in the city election to be held on
February 18.
Mr. Sharit has served as a
member of the board, and as
mayor, for the past five years and
is standing on his past record of
service to the community in seek-
ing re-election.
To date no other candidates
have tossed their fedoras into the
local political ring, but there are
rumors rampant that at least two
other men will be opposed to the
incumbent.


Screen Thrills


Hit New High In

Mystery Film

"Foreign Correspondent," Playing
Sunday and Monday at the Port
Theater, Full of Excitement

Breath-taking excitement, mys-
tery and intrigue, romance and
drama are unfolded in the thrill-
packed story of "Foreign Corre-
spondent," slated for showing at
the Port theatre Sunday and Mon-
day. .
The picture was made in recog-
nition of the intrepid group of
American newspapermen who are'"
serving as; the nation's eyes and
ears during the European debacle,
risking their lives daily in order
to keep their own people informed
of the rapidly shifting panorama
of war.
Playing in the principal roles
are Joel McCrea, Laraine Day,
Herbert Marshall, Robert Bench-
ley, Edmund Gwenn, Harry Daven-
port and Eduardo Cianelli.
Most elaborate and extensive
settings seen in Hollywood in sev-
eral years. provide backgrounds for
the picture.

Attending. Convention
Ronald Outlaw left Saturday
night for Chicago to attend a con-
vention of furniture dealers this
-Week. .


A. N. Deisel-Electric Hits Lee Bus
At Crossing Here Sat-
urday Morning

Due to the fact that the rising
Ssun was shining into his eyes, J.
W. Lee, driver of the Lee Coach
Line bus leaving this city Saturday
morning for Marianna via Blounts-
town, drove his vehicle directly
into the path of the Apalachicola
Northern railroad deisel-electric
train at the Fifth street crossing,
which resulted in the death of
Marguerite Prather, colored woman
of Apalachicola, and the injury of
several more colored passengers.
The bus was struck in the cen-
ter, the entire rear end being torh
off, and passengers were thrown
from the vehicle. The dead colored
woman had one leg severed just
below the knee and she was thrown
into a water-filled ditch, faxe
down, from which she was re-
moved a few moments later by
members of the train crew, but
not before she had taken water
into her lungs.
The injured passengers were
rushed to offices of local doctors
for treatment and the badly In-
jured colored woman was taken to
a Panama City hospital, where she
later died.
Jesse Smith, engineer on the
train, who was slightly cut by fly-
ing glass, said he saw the bus
stopped for the crossing and took
it for granted that it would wait
until the train passed. He was
horrified to see the vehicle start
forward into the path of the en-
gine and immediately applied the
brakes, but to no avail, as the lo-
comotive was but a short distance
from the crossing.-
An inquest was held after the
death of the colored woman and
the jury. returned a verdict of
"death due to an unavoidable ac-
cident."
It is understood that no insur-
ance was carried on the bus. itself.
but that passenger insurance to
the amount of $50,000 is carried
by the Lee Line.
The accident was investigated
and reported on by Sheriff B. E.
Parker and State Highway Patrol-
man E. E. Shelby.

BODY OF WILLIAM /
GAINOUS IS FOUND


as well as those re-elected, took
over the management of county af-
fairs this week, getting down to
business without disrupting the
smooth operations of the county's
government.
J. R. Hunter continued to wield
his pen in the clerk's office, as
did Edd C. Pridgeon as tax collec-
tor and Sammy Patrick as tax as-
sessor. Sheriff Byrd Parker will
continue to be custodian of the
keys to the county bastile, and C.
G. Rish is still in charge of the
supervisor of registration's office.
Tom Owens of this city, taking
over the robes of learning of C. L.
Costin as superintendent of public
instruction, announced during his
first day in office that he had ac-
cepted the resignation of S. O.
Parker, social science instructor in
the Port St. Joe schools, who has
been commissioned as a lieutenant
in the CCC and called to active
service.
J. Earl Pridgeon, succeeding T.


R. L. Carter as county judge, took
up the gavel.of his office and has
ald hu .I n. number af Isesa


The body of William Gainous of and handed down decisions.
Cairo, Ga., who fell from his boat On the county board, three new
at Willis Landing on December 24 members took office, George Tap-
and, was drowned, was recovered per of this city, Jim Daniel f"'om
Tht(sday of last week a short dis- District 2, and Roy Whitfield from
t:ince from the spot where his District 3. Tapper was elected by
empty boat was found. the new board on Tuesday to be
Gainous, who was 70 years old, chairman, after a number of pre-
had been staying with his brother, liminary skirmishes, and replaces
G. G. Gainous, at the landing. Jesse Gaskin. He announced that
A coroner's jury, impaneled at a meeting of the board will be
the scene of the drowning, re- held today. E. Clay Lewis, Jr.,
turned a verdict to Judge T. R. L. local attorney, was reappointed as
Carter that Gainous had come to attorney for the board.
his death byi drowning. -----
Funeral services were held at SCOUT COMMITTEE TO
Jehu cemetery immediately after ATTEND DISTRICT MEET
the inquest, with Rev. C. G. Rish The annual meeting and Scout-
in charge, masters' Appreciation Banquet is
to be held Jannuary 16 in Pensa-
Mrs. Tomlinson Joins Husband cola at the San Carlos hotel and
Mrs. William H. Tomlinson and the local Boy Scout committee,
daughter, Judy, arrived Saturday consisting of B. B. Conklln, M. P.
from Douglas, Ga., to join her hus- Tomlinson, Roy Williams, Dwight
band, who operates the Gulf sta- Marshall, T. M. Schneider and B.
tion at First street and Monument W. Eells, Jr., with Scoutmaster
avenue. They will make this city Sammie McCall, are making plans:
their future home. to attend the affair.


Colorful Spectacle Marks Inaugur-
ation of State's Twenty-eighth
Chief Executive

An eight-mile parade which in-
:luded 33 bands, among them the
Port St. Joe high school band,
passed in review before Governor
Spessard L. Holland, his family
and official party 'in Tallaahssee
Tuesday afternoon while Floridians
by the thousands, representing all
walks of life stood in a chilling
drizzle of rain to witness the in-
auguration ceremony and view the
parade.
Governor Holland, attired in
formal morning wear with high
top hat, received the state seal
form his predecessor, Fred P.
Cone, following which Chief Jus-
tice Glenn Terrell administered
the governor's oath, and the reins
of government for the state of
Florida passed, into the hands of
the, twenty-eighth chief executive.
A battery from Camp Blanding
fired a 75 millimeter gun in the
traditional 17-gun salute to the in-
coming executive and Holland then
delivered his inaugural address.
Holland, World War flier, state
senator and lawyer, stressed pre-
paredness in his speech, saying
that' Floridians, first of all, are
loyal Americans, and-Leey should
gladly and naturally join with all
other states in preparing a strong
national defense in order that
peace may be assured us.


Spessard L. Holland, sworn in
Tuesday'as Florida's 28th gover-
nor, has called upon all Floridians
for assistance in operating the
state government efficiently,


Drill Date Is Set

For Home Guard

Will Meet Third Friday of Each
Month At Centennial
Auditorium

At a meeting of the Gulf County
Home Guard held Monday night
at the Legion Hut, it was decided
.that the organization would meet
for drill the third Friday uight in
each month at the Centennial au-
ditorium. Approximately 50 men
were present at the meeting.
Captain Byrd Parker called on


"And I am sure I speak for all every man In n e county LO uo
of our citizens when I say that we prepared for home defense should
hope for peace, we pray for peace the necessity airse and asked for
and we steadfastly believe that co-operation from every able-bodied
peace is possible only to that na- man in this section in making the
tion which is so strong that none outfit one to be proud of.
dare attack it," said Holland.
In regard to state finances, he Menhaden Plant
said that new sources of revenue
will be requierd to replace ad va- Is Being Moved
lorem taxes abolished by the peo-
ple, but he did not specify, from To Apalachicola
whence these new revenues would a
come.
In addition to a large group of Will Be Operated By Quinn Men-
students and teachers from the 1- haden Fisheries; Expect to
cal schools, a considerable number F
Make First Run May 1


oIf ort St. Joe citizens attendea
the inaugural, among whom were
Mayor and Mrs. J. L. Sharit, E. 0.
Lewis, Jr., Mr. and. Mrs. H. T.
Saunders, -Mrs. D. C. Mahon, J. L.
Perritt, Mrs. G. A. Patton, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Bellows, Jon Staple-
ton and Hampton Howell.

WEWAHITCHKA MAN
IN SUICIDE ATTEMPT

Richarl A. Redd, long-time resi-
dent of Wewahitchka, attempted
suicide Thursday; night of last
week at his home.
Redd first attempted to shoot
himself in the face with buckshot.


according to Sheriff B. E. Parker,
but the charge missed except for
several shot that entered his
cheek. When his wife, who heard
the shot and ran to the yard, went
for help after remonstrating with
her husband, Redd attempted to
complete the job by slashing his
jugular vein with a pocketknife,
but succeeded only In inflicting a
deep wound which was treated by
Dr. Redfearn, after which Redd
was rushed to a Panama City hos-
pital for further treatment. He
was then returned to his home.
Redd has been in ll health for
some time and stated that he no
longer cared to live.


All the equipment and buildings
of the Florida Menhaden Fisheries,
located' in this city near the St. Joe
Paper company mill, has been pur-
chased by the Quinn Menhaden
Fisheries, Inc., and will be moved
to Apalachicola .where work was
started last week on a plant for
the processing of the fish.
The Quinn Fisheries operates
similar, factories in Fernandina,
Fla., Pascagoula, Miss., and More-
head Gity, N. C. It is expected
that the Apalachicola plant will be
in operation by May 1.
Three 100-foot boats, carrying
crews of 20 men, will be operated
by the factory, two of which will
be brought from Fernandina and
the third is now being built in Pas-
cagoula. The plant will produce
fish meal, used for poultry, hog
and! dog food, and fish oil, used in
the manufacture of paint, soap and
animal food.
The Port St. Joe plant was
closed down in 1939 due to the
loss of one of the fishing boats,
the Novia, and other equipment
during a heavy storm in August of
that year, and also the fact that
during the previous two seasons
the catch of fish had been ex-
tremely light.


28TH GOVERNOR


lh


UIUC UU l lr Ule 1117SL Lime LO U~e


AAA


George G. Tapper of this city, who
was named chairman of the board
of county commissioners at the
meeting of that body Tuesday, re-
placing Jesse Gaskin.


New Officials Take

Ov e r Management

Of County Affairs

George Tapper Named Chairman
Of Board of Commissioners,
Replacing Jesse Gaskin

New county officials, those
electerl for the first timp to office


t








RAGETWOTHESTAR POT S. JO, GLF OUNT, FORIA FRDAY JAUARY10,194


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
unde- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year.:.. s..... Six Months .$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-*{f Telephone 51 p-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

PROSPERITY'S HERE
If all the figures are correct-and there is
no sound reason to doubt them-prosperity
is no longer "around the corner," but is here.
Of course, the thought occurs that the
country is lifting itself by its bootstraps. In
other words, by piling up debts for national
rearmament it' is spreading a lot of money
around. But the fact remains that this same
money is making airplane and munition fac-
tories hum, and these in turn are having their
effect upon many other lines of industry. The
backwash of this reaches far and deep
Figures presented by the federal reserve
board show a steady business climb. Building
permits in more than 200 cities reached a top
figure for December. Retail sales of automo-
biles have not shown the usual winter slump.
Tens of thousands of men have been taken
out of the ranks of the unempolyed. All this
was reflected in the better Christmas busi-
ness enjoyed by retail stores. Thus a great
deal of good comes out of a great deal of evil.
It is not a good thing that a peacefully in-
clined nation has to spend enormous sums to
build a great war machine for its protection.
A great deal less money would have equipped
the country with better schools, libraries,
hospitals and peacetime institutions of all
kinds. But war, or defense against war, is
always an expensive luxury. War always
costs more than peace. So does defense
against war.
Maybe something permanent will come out
of all this. Maybe, nowi that the wheels of
industry have begun to turn, they will con-
tinue to do so, even after the rearmament
program has been completed. Depression in
many troubled years seemed to be like a dis-
ease. It was "catching." Let's try to make
this new prosperity "catching."

PROTESTS DIVERSION OF GAS TAXES
The Florida State Road Department is pro-
testing vigorously against diversion of gaso-
line tax revenues and is endeavoring to have
the entire seven-cent gasoline tax restored to
the' highway fund for the exclusive develop-
ment and maintenance of a modern highway
system.
This is no more than just and proper, for
the gasoline tax was intended in the first
place to provide for construction .and main-
tenaii-e of our highway system. It is emi-
nently unfair to ask that motorists who use
our highways, particularly the millions of
tourists who visit Florida annually, contribute
to the upkeep of other state departments and
institutions through a tax on the gasoline they
consume.

Motorists who have survived the financial
debacle of Christmas are now faced with the
knowledge that they must dig down for more
dollars for their 1941 auto tag. Remember, the
deadline is Jannuary 15! The editor sympa-
thizes with car owners, but we did manage
to hold out enough to secure our tag from
Uncle Edd Pridgeon, realizing that the best
way out of the situation was to accept the
inevitable and pay up, thus getting the mat-
ter off our mind. We urge our readers to do
likewise in order that they may sleep easier
at night.


A GOOD MAN SEEKS RE-ELECTION
In this issue of The Star, Mayor Commis-
sioner J. L. Sharit announces that he will
seek re-election to the office of city commis-,
sioner of Port St. Joe, subject to the will of ;
the voters at the election February 18.
Mr. Sharit has served as commissioner and
as mayor for the past five years, and during
that time he has, in our opinion, done more
for the city of Port St. Joe than any other
one individual. At all times he has had the
best interests of the city and its people at
heart and has given unstintingly of his time
to work for projects that would be of benefit
to the city, even to the point of allowing his
work to go indone. At any and all times
he has dropped business to travel hither and
yon on city business, making important con-
tacts that would redound to the greater glory
of our community. I
Certainly there are those who will oppose
his re-election-they "hate his guts" as the
saying goes-but even his worst enemy, and
no man in public office fails to make a few
enemies, admits that Mr. Sharit, during his
five-year tenure as mayor of the city, has
more than merited the support and praise ot
the people of the city.
For the best interests of Port St. Joe let's
return Joe Sharit to the board of city com-
missioners for another term.

YCHAT WOULD 'OLD ABE' SAY?


Some people are wonderfully worried be-
cause preparedness does not progress more
rapidly. The people of the United States were
once before in that condition. When the
government is doing all that it can to pre.
pare there might be a better way to help
than to howl about the government's failures,
if there are any.
A story is told of Lincoln in the dark days
of the War Between the States. The people
of New~ York feared bombardment by Con-
federate cruisers, and complained because the
government did nothing about it. They or-
ganized their protest by selecting fifty of
their wealthiest men, representing hundreds
of millions of dollars in wealth, to go to
Washington to prevail upon the president to
detail some gunboats to defend New York.
Lincoln heard them politely, apparently
much impressed by the "hundreds of mil-
lions" represented. When they concluded, he
said: "Gentlemen, I am, by the Constitution,
commander-in-chief of the army and navy or
the United States, and as a matter of law 1
can order anything done that is practicable
to be done. 1 am in command of the gun-
boats and ships of war; but as a matter of
fact, I do not know where they are at this
time. I presume that they are all actively en-
gaged, and it is, therefore, impossible for me
to furnish you with a gunboat. The credit ot
the government is at a very low ebb, green-
backs are not worth more than forty or fifty
cents on the dollar; and in this condition of
things,'if I were worth ialf as much as you
gentlemen are reputed to be, and as badly
frightened as you seem to be, I would build
a gunboat and give it to the government."
The gentlemen filed out of the presence or
the president with their deflated "hundreds of
millions," and no more was heard about the
matter.-Holmes County Advertiser.

In referring to streamline railway transpor-
tation between Miami and the North, the
Miami Post headline says "Need Cincinnati
Steamlined Service." Can't be that the east
coast city is having cold weather?

Russia now has a machine that will fore-
cast earthquakes, according to recent foreign
dispatches. Yes,. but has she one that will
forecast Nazis ?-Washington Star.

Insurance statistics show that women live
longer than men, agairr proving paint is a
good preserver.-Bradenton Herald.

It used to be "millions for defense." Now
its billions for defense.


AUSTRALIANS SMASH THROUGH AT BARDIA


Australian troops smashed their way through the Italian defenses
at Bardia last week-end, capturing 25,000 Italian troops and; the com-
manding Italian general, according to a report by the high command.
This photo shows Australian tanks and infantry awaiting the zero
hour for the attack In the Libyan desert.

ELEVEN DIE IN NAVY BOMBER CRASH


In one of the navy's worst air crashes, eleven officers and mn were
killed last Sunday when a big navy bomber struck a mountain peak
45 miles east of San Diego, Calif. This picture- shows a cli.',-up of
the wreckage of the huge bomber in which the men lost their lives.


THE TATTLER
"Sees All, Knows All, Tells All
About Port St. Joe High School"
EDITED BY THE JUNIOR CLASS
Editor-in-Chief ....... Buck Waiters
Assistant Editor.... Royce Goforth
Society Editor....."The Snooper"
Sports Editor..........John Lane

HERE'S WHY
There seems to be a great deal
fa confusion and some resentment
on the part of the students as .to
,vhy we aren't allowed to loiter in
the halls like we have been doing
in past years. It's true that it has
somewhat cramped' the style of a
few of our fellow classmen, be-
2ause now the halls are too well
patrolled by the teachers to per-
mit congregation of our would-be
Romeos and Juliets.
But there's a reason for this
tightening of the reins. The main
one is that the smaller pupils have
literally been run over by, the
larger ones, and something had to
be done about it.
Then, too, there were other rea-
sons, such as congestion of traffic
in the halls, too much noise, and
1 general untidy appearance due
to the thoughtless throwing away
of waste paper.
Let's remember all these things
and do all in our power to he!1
the faculty in carrying out their
orders for orderliness.
-Editor-In-Chiet.

HERE IS OUR SIDE
Getting out "The Tattler" is no
picnic. If we print jokes, people
say we are silly; if we don't. they
say we are too serious. If we clip
things from magazines, we are too
lazy to write them for ourselves;
if we don't, we are too fond of our
own stuff. If we don't print con-
tributions. we don't ap,,-eciate
true genius; if we do print them


the column is filled with junk.
Now, like as not, someone will say
we swiped this from some maga-
zine. WE DID!

NEW PUPILS
The new year has brought us a
number of new pupils. We are
glad to have them, and we want
to welcome them to our school.

GOSSIP
At last! John L. has started
liking "1" girl. She could be J. H.
P. S.-She is.
Barbara, what red-head was that
we saw you with? Two to one it
was Tommy K.
We have a new quartet in our
school. They will be glad to sere-
nade you at any time. See Jimmie
Mc., Cornelius K., John L. or
Maurice F.
We haven't seen Pee Wee and
Tissy together for quite a while.
Wonder what's, wrong?

THE HOLIDAYS ARE OVER
Well, we're all back at school
again. It seems hard for us 'o get
down to work since our holiday.
But-we know we must, because
pretty soon we have another quar-
terly exam coming up and, if we
remember correctly, they aren't so
easy. So-o-o- we ,should all start
the New Year out right by study-
ing hard.

CAGE SEASON WILL
OPEN NEXT WEEK
The basketball season will open
in Port St. Joe next week when
the St. .oe Paper company team
plays Malone at the Centennial
building as the first tilt in a 30-
game schedule which includes
games with Pensacola Naval Air
Station and athletic club teams
from Donaldsonville, Ga., Dothau,
Ala., and Tallahassee.
The team is being coached by
Tom Owens and he believes his
outfit will rank among the top-
flight teams in the circuit.


FRI-DAY, JANUARY 10, 1941


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLOR.IDA


PAGE TWO









" ;' -


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


NAMED AS COLONELS Mr. and Mrs. Earl Waldo and
J. L. Sharit of this city and L. son returned Saturday from a
W. Evans of Wewahitchka have week's visit in New Orleans.
been named as lieutenant-colonels ----- ---
on the staff of Governor Spessard Trade at home-your local mer-
L. Holland. chants have just what you want.


SURPRISE STORK SHOWER NOMINATING COMMITTEE IS
HONORS MRS. STAMFORD I NAMED BY WOMAN'S CLUB
Mrs. Jack Samford was compli-i The regular meeting-of the Port
mented with a surprise stork St. Joe Woman's Club was held
shower Tuesday evening at the Wednesday afternoon at the Cen-
home of Mrs. .; M. Smith, with tennial building with ile presi-
Mrs. Smith, Mrs. B. J. Hull and dent, Mrs. R. W. Smith, in charge
Mrs. P. D. Prows as co-hostesess. Following the usual opening and
After the presentation and open- reports from various chairmen,
ing of the many. lovely gifts, re- Mrs. Roy Gibson gave a summary


freshments were served to Mes-
dames George Hudson, R. Carter,
J. Bounds, B. C. Glaillard, B. Har-
rell, B. A. Pridgeon, E. George, T.
M. Schneider, D. B. Lay, J. S. Da-
vis, M. B. Smith, M. C. Edwards, R.
Coburn, Geprge Gore, R. Childers,
H. A. Drake, C. C. Taunton, C. G.
Costin, F. Curtis and R. Chism and
the Misses Martha Belin, Louise
Horton and Edna Davis.

Mr. and Mrs. Ned Patton have
returned to their home in Jackson-
ville after spending several days
here as guests of Mr. and Mrs. G.
A. Patton.


At All Leading Druggists


BAYSHORE
GROCERY AND MARKET
Highland View
We Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts
STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS
We Keep Open Until Noon
Every Sunday


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute 'ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY



QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
-WE DELIVER


of the books of the year selected
by Time magazine; Mrs. W. A.
Roberts presented points on sheet
buying for consumers, and Mrs.
McKnight read a book report on
"The Patriot," by Pearl S. Bock,
for Mrs. Claude Adams, who was
unable to be present.
An Atlantic Monthly essay con-
test and a Florida Clubwoman
poetry contest" were announced.
At this time the club voted to pay
$5 or more per year for two years
for support of the school band. A
rising vote of appreciation was
given the president for her poem
published in the January issue of
the Florida Clubwoman.
A nominating committee con-
sisting of Mrs. W. A. Roberts, Mrs.
Floyd Hunt, Mrs. F. Maddox, Mrs.
Franklin Jones, Mrs. D. C. Mahon.
Mrs. C. C. Taunton and Mrs. W.
H. Wellington, was appointed to
nominate officers for the election
to be held in February.
Refreshments were served and a
social hour enjoyed following the
meeting.

BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The regular business meeting of
the Baptist Missionary Society
was held at the church Monday af-
ternoon with Mrs. W. H. Howell
in the chair. After the usual rou-
tine business renewals and new
subscriptions to the Baptist Wit-
ness, state paper, were called for,
and 22 were reported.
The following chairmen resigned
and new chairmen were appointed:
Mrs. L. R. Holliday, literature,
Mrs. William Quarles appointed;
Mrs. P. H. Windham, Margaret
fund, Mrs. W. H.- Yarborough ap-
pointed; Mrs. B. J. Grace, young
people's leader, Mrs. Frank Gunn
appointed.
It was announced that the Quar-
terly Woman's Missionary Associ-
ation meeting would be held here
January 30. Plans were made to
send flowers to Mrs. J. W. Sise-
more, after which the meeting was
dismissed.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore
are announcing the birth of a son
January 6 at a Panama City hos-
pital.
Mr. and Mr.s W. A. Smith are
announcing the arrival of a five-
pound daughter, born January 8
at a Panama City hospital.

Mr. and Mrs. N. W. Hoy of
Minneapolis, Minn., were the week-
end guests of Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Lovett.
** *
'Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Smith re-
turned Tuesday from St. Louis,
Mo.,where they spent ten days
visiting relatives and friends.


MEETING TO BE HELD TO ...I...
ORGANIZE GARDEN CLUB K to
A meeting will be held January When Acid Indigestion, Gas o%
22 at the home of Mrs. G. A. Pat- r Stomach or Heartburn make you
ton in.Oak Grove for the purpose feel uncomfortable or embarrass
of organizing a garden club. All isei you, try Alka-Seltzer, which con.-
persons interested are urged to be tains alkalizing buffers and a
present at thrat time. ; helps counteract the associated
Aa l 'se ~e Excess Stomach Acidity.
MEETING POSTPONED f*. "OteV B But the relief of these minoi
SThe regular meeting of the Wo- stomach upsets is only a small
The regular meeting of the Wo- ^ \on. 7 "{ part of what you can expect
man's Society for Christian Sarv- Alka-Seltzer to do for you. YouI
ice of the Methodist Church was will find it effective for Pain Re-
postponed from last Monday to LEliein Headache, N rlgia, Cold
next Monday, due to the illness of AMAZING! FUN XCITING1 M land Muscular Aches and Painsa
many members. sJJr, simple, cn be an It contains an analgesic, (sodium
Spe *t CY stM-DOLE in so acetyl salicylate), made more
seconds. Packed with a thrill
HISTORIC SOCIETY TO ELECT U mito 8- ca p" com- prompt and effective in its pain-
ET Caet. No ra, no "N, relieving action by alkaline butfe%
Rev. D. E. Marietta, president A o *M action sbyalka
of the Gulf County Historic So- m man la o When ard work or srenuou
00P yo aa SMbe Willed When hard work or strenuoug
city, announces that a meeting 1 E o exercise make you feel t and
tt fr m ona bk exercisemake you feeltr ani
of the organiaatiion will be held KI.L THR E ITRBODUCT COUPO Bdragged out, enjoy the refresh.
at his home, the evening of Janu- Y-M..M ........... ing; effect of a glass of sparkling
ary 16 for the purpose of electing j' ot ** F tangy Alka-Seltzer.
officers. Chig ea. At Drug Stores In packages lan
I bdam bs 60.. e WSY-nUt ad I at drug store soda fountains by ts
S, LaM-A-ULA rptpd mtw. glass
Mr. andd Mrs. T. M. SchnPlder I ...........
returned to the city Saturday a- A ..........
ter spending last week in Miami. b'm rn -m---- *u .-* I


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE


PHONE 100 *

-- DAY, OR NIGHT
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION 3
- -- - -/


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1941


THE STAR, PORtT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


W. D. DARE AND MISS ALICE
THEOBALD ARE MARRIED
Woodruff David Dare of this city
and Miss Alice Jeanette Theobald
of Apalachicola were married at
8 o'clock Saturday evening. De-
cember 28, in the home of the
bride's brother-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Marks, Jr., of
Apalachicola. The Rev. D. E.
Marietta, pastor of the Port St.
Joe Methodist church, performed
the ceremony in the presence of
relatives and a few friends of the
couple.
The bride was given in marriage
by her brother-in-law, Joseph B.
Gloeckler of this city, and was at-
tended by her niece, Miss Myrtle
Marks of Washington, D. C. H.
D. Marks, Jr., served as best man
for the bridegroom. Little Miss
Virginia Claire Gloeckler of this
city niece of the bride, acted as
a junior bridesmaid.
Immediately following the cere-
mony a reception was held for the
guests. Assisting in serving were
Mrs. J. B. Gloeckelr of this city
and Mrs. J. P. Hickey, aunt of the
bride.
Mrs. Dare is a native of Apa-
lachicola and is a graduate of St.
Patrick's Parochial School. For
several years she has been con-
nectedi with the staff of the Ap-
alachicola Times. Mr. Dare was
born and reared in Atlantic City,
N. J., and is employed by the city
of Port St. Joe in the water de-
partment.
Following a wedding trip to
New Orleans the newlyweds are
now "at home' in this city to their
many friends.

ALTAR SOCIETY IN
MEETING MONDAY
The members of the St. Joseph's
Altar Society met Monday after-
noon at the home of Mrs. J. J.
Darcey, with Mrs. Madeline Whit-
iker presiding. Following regular
business a committee was ap-
pointed to select new officers for
the enusing year, members being
Mrs. Darcey, Mrs. N. F. Allemore
and. Miss Carpentier.
Following adjournment the hos-
tess served sandwiches, salted
nuts and tea to members present.

EDUCATION HEAD SPEAKS
AT P.-T. A. MEETING
Paul Eddy of the state depart-
ment of education was the guest
speaker at the regular meeting of
the Parent-Teacher's Association
held last night at the high school
auditorium. Following the regular
business, Mr. Eddy gave an inter-
esting talk to the organization.
Before the meeting was called
to order the high school band en-
tertained with several selections.
*& **


POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
I hereby anonunce my candidacy
for re-election to the office of City
Commissioner of Port St. Joe, sub-
ject to the will of the voters at
the city election February 18. If
returned to office, I promise to
carry on the affairs of the city in
the same manner as I have In the
past, always working for the ad-
vancement and betterment of the
community and for the best inter-
ests of the people. On my past
record I .respectfully solicit the
vote and support of the electors
of Port St. Joe.
J. L. SHARIT
LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY
Caroline Bruner Smick, plaintiff,
vs. S. Layton Smick, defendant.
The State of Florida:
To: S. Layton Smick, .c/o Boys Vo-
iational School, Corner Illinois and
Arctic Avenues, Atlantic City, New
Jersey.
It is hereby ordered that you are
required to appear on the 3rd day
of February, 1941, before the above
entitled court, to the bill of com-
plaint filed against you in the
tbove entitled cause, and. The Star
is hereby designated as the news-*
paper in which this order shall be
published once a week for four
consecutive weeks.
WITNESS the Honorable E. C.
Welch and Ira A. Hutchison as
Judg-!; of this court and the seat
of this court in the City of We
wahitchka, Gulf County, Florida,
this 31st day of December, 1940.
3. R. HUNTER,
(CourtSeal) Clerk Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida.
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.
Solicitor for Plaintiff. 1-3-31
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In Court of County Judge of Gulf
County, Florida.
In re Estate of
0. L. MADDOX, Deceased.
To all Creditors, Legatees, Dis-
tributees, and All Persons having
claims or demands against said
Estate:
You, and each of you, are hereby
notified and required to present
any claims and demands which
you, or any of you, may have
against the estate of O. L. Mad-
d!ox, deceased, late of Gulf County,
Florida, to the County Judge of
Gulf County, Florida, at his office
in the Court House, in Wewa-
hitchka, within eight months from
date of the first publication of this
notice.
First publication December 20.
1940.
F. E. BAYLESS.
12-20 1-10 Administratnr.


DR. J C. COE
- DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE 7.00f
WEEK V700'

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....26C
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building



BE SURE ITS

Gulf County

Dairy Milk


PURE! FRESH! RICH!
WHOLESOME!
From Tested Cows
Our Milk is produced and
bottled under sanitary condi-
tions to assure its purity



Gulf CountyDairy
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager







PM" TH STR, ORTST.JOEGUL CONTY FLRID FRIAYJANARY10,194


Brother Taken By Death SEVENTY-SEVEI
Joe IL,:user left Tuesday evening
fo-. (' "-o. c:)!le to th 1 ", hc .n 1 ..
c(tv bt IP death of b'is brulthr. ''. .:
-._,-:-..- --_.. *.l.
Cecil Co:tin, Jr., returned Tues- .
day lo (iulfport. M;iss., to resume -
his studies at the Gulport Military K' .


.'-- -a' ',,*


Opens D-ily 2:45, Cotitinuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager

SATURDAY ONLY
2B IGSMASH 4
-- HITS --

HOPALONG RIDES!!






HIT NO. 2
JEAN HERSHOLT
EDGAR KENNEDY

"REMEDY FOR

RICHES"


Last Chapter
"DRUMS of FU MANCHU"

SUNDAY and MONDAY
January 12 and 13
This picture will make
you jump up and shout
"I'M GLAD I'M AN
AMERICAN!!"
JOEL McCREA
LARAINE DAY
HERBERT MARSHALL

"Foreign

Correspondent"


"Bookworm Turns" News


TUESDAY ONLY, JAN. 14


FEATURES


-- HIT NO. 2--


WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15
FUN MUSIC!!!
MARY LEE
RUFE DAVIS
"ALFALFA" SWITZER
Radio's Entertainers
CACKLE SISTERS
KIDOODLERS
-* in


NTH CONGRESS SWORN IN


WASHINGTON, D. C.-Photo shows a general view in the house of
representatives as the members of the 77th Congress were sworn
in last Friday. These are the men who heard for the first time
since the beginnings of our government a third term chief execu-
tive. President Roosevelt's message on Monday held international
significance and was heard throughout the world.


Al Schneider returned to U. of
F. Sunday to resume his studies.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
REPOtIT OF CONDITION
of FLORIDA BANK AT POtT ST.
JOE, of Port St. Joe, in the State
of Florida, at the close of busi-
ness on Uecember 31, 19'A0.
ASSETS
Loans and discounts (In-
cluding ------ over-
drafts) ............... $ 53,044.22
Obligations of States and
. political subdivisions 74,828.02
Cash, balances with- oth-
er banks, including re-
serve balances, and
cash items in process
of collection ......... 117,932.55
Bank premises o wned
$--, furniture and
fixtures $2,046.45 ..... 2.046.45
Other assets ........... 548.55
TOTAL ASSETS ....$248,399.79
LIABILITIES
Demand deposits of in-
dividuals, partnerships
and corporations .....$196,149.10
rime deposits of indi-
viduals, partnerships,
and corporations ..... 12,601.50
Deposits of States and
political subdivisions 5,254.32
Other deposits (certified
and officers' checks,
etc.) .................. 1,302.76
Other liabilities,........ 24.26
TOTAL LIABILITIES
(not including subordi-
nated obligations shown
below) ..............$215,331.94
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS
Capital ................ $ 2.,000.00
Surplus ....... 5,000.00
Undivided profits ..... 567.85
Reserves (and retire-.
ment account for pre-
ferred capital) ....... 2,500.00
TOTAL CAPITAL AC-
COUNTS ............$ 33,067.85
TOTAL LIABILITIES
AND CAPITAL AC-
COUNTS ............$248.399.79
* This bank's capital consists of
$ (nonel of capital notes and
debentures; first preferred stock
with total par value of $ (none),
total retirable value $ (none); sec-
ond preferred stock with total par
value of $ (lone). total retirable
value S (none); and common stock
with total par valie of $25,000.00.
MEMORANDA
On date of report the-re-
quired le gal reserve
against deposits of
this bank was .......$ 43,061.54.
Assets reported abo v e
which were eligible as
legal reserve amount-
ed to ................$192,760.57
I, S. L. Barke, Vice-President
and Cashier, of the above-named
bank, do solemnly swear that the
above statement is true, and that
it fully and correctly represents
the true state of the several mat-
ters herein contained and set
forth, to the best of my knowledge
and belief.
Correct.-Attest: S. L. BARKE
J. L. SHARIT,
ROBERT BELLOWS,
AIRRY H. SAUNDERS,
Directors.


State of Florida,
k -County of Gulf, ss:
#7. aA f nSworn to and subscribed before'
me this 8th day of January, 1941,
'and I hereby certify that I am noti
an officer or director of this bank.
4k WILIJM J. EDWARDS.
Notary Public.
...iSi DcelsMber expires
December n, 1944.


RADIO COMICS APPEARING
IN WEDNESDAY PICTURE
The Kidoodlers, Paul Cordner,
Bill Kearns, Eddie Lewis. and Bob
Remington have added drum ma-
joring to their bag of tricks. And
they received their lessons from
Dorothy Harrison, Wisconsin dairy
queen, who came to Hollywood to
play in "Barnyard Follies," which
will be seen Wednesday at the
Port theatre.
During filming lulls Dorothy,
who was a drum majorette for two
years In Sun Prairie, Wis., showed
the boys a number of twirls with
her baton. At the end of two weeks
they began to catch on, and by
now have probably included baton
twirling on their programs.
Dorothy gets to unse the baton
when a group of 4-H Club kids
stage a barnyard show in the pic-
ture. Mary Lee and Harry Pappy
Cheshire head the cast, which in-
cludes June Storey, Ralph Bow-
man, Rufe Davis. Jimi Jeffries,
Joan Woodbury,, Jed Prouty and
the Our Gang Kids and their dog.
"Pete."
-----------
THREE MORE VOLUNTEERS
TO GO TO CAMP BLENDING
Three more Gulf county volun-
teers will leave on January 16 for
Camp Blanding to fill this county's
quota in the selective service
draft. They are A. T. Pope of this
city, Ellis B. Roberts of Over-
street and. Marcus H. Linton of
Wewahitchka. Alternates, a 1 so
volunteers, are 0. U. Hill, Dalton
A. Walsington and Clarence Paul.
To date the Gulf county quotas
have been filled by volunteers and
it has not yet been necessary to
send draftees in the order called.


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with ether foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S


DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Julces

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
LoolA oReprvsentative


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THIS OFFER IN EFFECT FOR A LIMITED TIME!

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THE STAR


'I .p'.


A'JCRAGE AMERICAN4'
FAMILY HAS 3W3,249 O AIhFe
INSURANCE COMPARED WITH $273
IN GERMANtY, $mo IN ITALY
AND NONE IN RUSSIA WH11CH
Do05 NOT HAVE INSURANCe.


INSURANCE IS A GOOD THING TO HAVE!

Incidentally you can take out insurance for
greater mileage to the gallon of gasoline by
stopping at

Wmn. H. Tomlinson's


SERvICE


U L STATION

Monument Avenue at First Street
and filling the tank of your car with that

GOOD GULF GASOLINE

And, to insure your motor getting proper lubri-
cation, let us drain the crank case and fill it up
with

GULF PRIDE MOTOR OIL

With Good Gulf Gasoline in the tank and Gulf
Pride Motor Oil in the crank case you will be
carrying cold weather insurance which assures
you of quick starting on these cold mornings
and proper lubrication of your engine at all
times.



WE SPECIALIZE ON

GULFLEX LUBRICATION

SERVICE
> ''


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAPZ F""R


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1941


m~t~a


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