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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00214
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 22, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00214

Full Text






The Star-Florida's farthest grow-
ing little newspaper--ddicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
.3i the City of Port St Joe.


Port St. Joe--Ste of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUN-TY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1940 NUMBER 7
i *i. .


Questionnaires

Mailed to Second

Group In County

Must Be Filled Out and Returned
By Saturday; First Quota
For County Is Three

The second group of 50 ques-
tionnaires to draftees in Gulf
county were mailed out Monday
by the local draft board and these
-must be filled out and returned by
tomorrow, according to B. W.
Eells, chairman of the board.
The quota for Gulf county in the
first requisition of 242 white men
and 99 negroes for a year of mili-
tary training was set Wednesday
at three-two white men and one
negro.

FIFTEEN VOLUNTEER
Chairman B. W. Eells of the lo-
cal selective service board stated
yesterday that fifteen young men
of Gulf county had volunteered
for the year's military training,
being Dalton A. Walsingham, Cor-
nelius Britt, Clarence Paul, Arthur
Harris, Abraham Chambers, James
Leslie Pope; Lige James Wood,
Thomas Jefferson Harris, Herbert
Lee Halter, Sylvester 'Shaw, Jr.,
Allee Thermon Pope, Joe Carlos
Daniel, Marcus H. Linton, Robert
James Melvin and Ellis D. Roberts.
These men will 9tand the regu-
lar army examination and will re-
ceive notice of acceptance through
the -local board:;.-'--,. .-
-I\ ---' -b
LEGION TO DISTRIBUTE;
CHRISTMAS BASKETS

At the regular meeting of Gulf
County Post 116, American Legion,
held Monday at The, Hut, it was
decided to distribute Christmas
baskets again this year to needy
families.
The welfare department will fur-
nish names of those to receive the
baskets, which will contain candy,
nuts, fruit and toys.
----- *------
PRESIDENT APPROVES STREET
PAVING PROJECT FOR WEWA
Among a number of Florida WPA
projects approved Wednesday by
President Roosevelt was one for
city-wide street improvements in
the city of Wewahitchka. Cost is
to be $73,876.

FIRST DRAFTEES GO DEC. 4
The initial group of Florida
draftees will enter service at
Camp Blanding December 4. Forty-
eight men will report at camp on
December 4, and' a second group I
of 39 on December 12. Twenty-one
more will report to Fort Barrancas
on December 13,


No Time for Complacency
Lives depend upon the success
of the Christmas Seal Sale this
year.. Even
though the
death rate from
S tuberculosis is
being forced
lower and low-
er, faster and
faster, the dis-
eazse is far from
being van-
quished. Last year, 64,000 per-
sons died from tuberculosis in
this country. That means 175
died each day, or one person
every eight minutes. Hence, we
cannot afford but a quick glance
at past victories, great though
they have been. We must face
what lies before us-finishing
the fight


t





n

i







t
t:


St. Michael's Cathedral In Ruins


Cablephoto flashed to New York Coventry, England, after German steeple of the cathedral, 303 feet
from London last Saturday show- raiders subjected this noted Eng- high, escaped. There were about
ing the ruins of the lovely 14th lish city to tle greatest terror of 1000 casualties and great property
century St. Michael's Cathedral at the war. Only the tower and the damage in the city.


Mayor Endorses

Seal Campaign


County .Health Officer Also Gives
Approval to Drive In
Gulf County

Mayor J. L. Sharit yesterday en-
dorsed the 1940 Christmas Seal
campaign oft.the' Gul, County Tu-
berculosis association which will
open next Monday, November 25,
saying:
"With a sense of fulfilling my
official duty as mayor and with
wholehearted commendation as a
private citizen, I hereby endorse
the purchase of Christmas Seals
as a method of raising funds for
the great national fight against
tuberculosis.
"I hope that all our citizens will
buy as many seals as possible this
year. Let every greeting card' and
gift package that goes forth from
Port St. Joe carry these small dec-
orations, attesting that our com-
munity is alive to its responsibili-
ties and is doing its part in a
great national drive."
Dr. R. J. Lamb, director of the
Gulf-Farnklin health unit, added
his approval to the campaign, say-
ing: "I am glad to give my sup-
port to the Christmas Seal cam-
paign and recommend it as a
worthy cause for community in-
terest. In Gulf county we have a
year-round program for tubercu-
losis prevention and control. I
recommend! that purchasers of the
Christmas Seals follow the prog-
ress of that program and see for
themselves what headway is being
nade."
-- ---.~----
JENKINS BROTHERS TO
OPEN USED CAR LOT

Expecting to open for business
tomorrow, the Jenkins Auto Ex-
change, on Reid avenue, opposite
the potsoffice, is the latest addi-
tion to the business establishments
of Port St. Joe. The exchange will
be operated by J. C. and S. P. Jen-
tins and George Cooper.
------X------
STORES TO CLOSE 28TH
Business establishments of Port
St. Joe will close their doors next
Thursday, November 28, to ob-
serve Thanksgiving. The postof-
lice will be open that day due to
he fact that it closed yesterday
n observance of President Roose-
relt's Thanksgiving Day.


NEW LABOR BOARD HEAD


Dr. Harry A. Millis, University of
Chicago economist, who has been
named by President Roosevelt to
be chairman of the National La-
bor relations Board.


Commissioners i/

Will Cut Millage

Increased Valuation Will Allow
Reduceion of One Mill On
1940 Tax Roll

Meeting Tuesday afternoon to
discuss budget requirements for
the ensuing year, the board of city
commissioners decided that due to
an increase in assessed valuation
of property within the city limits
that'a cut of one mill can be made
in the 1940 tax roll.
The present rate is 10 mills,
which will be cut to 9 mills. This
village will take care of the 1941
requirements of the city govern-
ment.
____----
SCHOOL ENROLLMENT JUMPS
Principal Jon- Stapleton of the
Port St. Joe schools announces
that enrollment since opening of
school in September has jumped
from 510 to 612-an increase of
112. The majority of new students
have come from West Florida and
South Alabama.

WILLKIE VISITOR IN STATE
Wendell L. Willkie, defeated Re-
publican presidential candidate,
and Mrs. Willkie arrived in Flor-
ida this week and plan to spend
two weeks near Miami resting and
visiting friends.


Florida Powcr to

Pay Part Salaries


To All Employes Selected for Mil-
itary Service or Who
Might Enlist

The Florida Power corporation
announces that the company will
continue to -pay parsalaries'to all
regular employeeswho might .he
selected fpr military service, or
who might enlist in the- armed
forces.
In addition to continuing to pay
the employee 16%% of his annual
saalry, the company will regard
the employee as on leave of ab-
sence and seniority rights will
continue to accumulate as though
the employee were in active com-
pany service. One-half of the pay-
ment will be given the employee on
leaving for training and the other
half in 11 monthly installments.
As an additional benefit, all in-
surance payments- in the com-
pany's group and individual ordi-
nary life insurance programs will
be met wholly by the company, and
all policies will remain in full
force and effect.
-- -
'FLORIDA GETTING RAW
DEAL ON SUGAR QUOTA'
SAYS U.S .SEN. ANDREWS

"Florida is getting a raw deal
in spite of everything that can
be said contrary to this reason-
ing," Senator Charles O. Andrews
told the U. S. senate last week
while summ ing up the sugarcane
situation in support of amend-
ments which he had offered to the
sugar bill.
"Home production should not in
any event be denied or restricted'
so long as America produces less
than it consumes," Andrews said,
referrisg to the "iniquitious" Su-
gaR Act of 1937 "under which we
must get two-thirds of our sugar
from areas outside our mainland,"
Under the present Sugar Act,
Andrews explained, "Florida pro-
ducers of cane sugar get less than
1 per cent of the American mar-
ket, or about 60,000 tons. Accord-
ing to statistics; Florida consumes
120,000 tons of sugar per year, yet
under the act Florida is not,al-
lowed to produce enough sugar for
her own use."
However, in spite of Senator An-
drews' forceful presentation, his
amendments were defeated.


Red Cross Roll

Call Drive Gets

Under Way Here

Committees and Chairmen Named
At Dinner Meet Held Wed.
nesday At Port Inn

At a dinner-meeting held in the
Port Inn dining hall Wednesday
plans were worked out and com-
mittees named for the annual Red
Cross Roll Call in Gulf county,
Chairman Robert Bellows was
in charge and gave a brief resume
of what the local chapter had
done during the past year and how
the money had been spent.
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney was intro-
duced as Roll Call chairman and
gave a short pep talk, saying the
total for the Roll Call was not of
great import this year, as no chap-
ter had been given a quota, but
that it is entirely up to the indi-
viduals to see that Gulf county
this year exceeds the mark set last
year when this chapter ranked
first in the United States accord-
ing to population.
Mrs. Robert 'Tapper spoke on
production and what Gulf county
has to do with the national organi-
zation.
Jon Stapleton told what the Ju-
nior Red Cross is attempting to
do and how they expect to organ-
ize the schools of the county, also
announcing that Mrs. Roy Goforth
has accepted the chairmanship of
the Junior Red .Cross ,or Gulf
county. -
Floyd Hunt told how indistriesti
can be organized in the Roll Call
drive.
Chairman Bellows named Mrs.
D. B. Lay to be in charge of the
woman's division for the drive, to
be assisted by Mrs, Larry Evans
for the Wewahitchka district, Mrs
Paul Brigman, Highland View,
Mrs. G. A. Pat-ton and Mrs. Mc-
Clellan, Oak Grove, and the fol-
lowing in Port St. Joe: Mesdames
J. J. Darcey, B. W. Eells, Thos. R.
L. Carter, H. H. Saunders, B. J.
Hull, Claude Adams, C. A. Le-
Hardy, Marc Fleischel, Jr., R. V.
Coburn, J. E. Bounds, Robt. Tap-
per, R. A. Costin, M. P. Tomlinson,
R. R. Minus, Harold Palmer, B.
H. Dickens.
J. E. Bounds will be in charge
of the paper mill, assisted by H.
R. Woodin, D. W. Smith, R. S. Car-
ter. A. F. Allemore, Royce Chism
and M. J. Ward; Floyd Hunt the
St. Joe Lumber and Export com-
pany. assisted by Harry McKnight
and Aelx Young; Tom Coldewey
the bank and paper mill office, and
Roy Whitfield the Overstreet sec-
tion.




The Star Will Be

Issued Day Early


In order to allow the pub-
lisher and "the force" to en-
joy Thanksgiving in a proper
and fitting manner and, in-
cidentally catch a few fish
and bring home a limit of
squirrels to stock the family
larder, next week's issue of
The Star will go into the
mail Thursday morning in-
stead of Friday morning.
So, if you have any import-
ant news items or advertising
for next week's issue be sure
to bring them in before Wed-
nesday noon.


pwagr-%


: I






PAGE TWO



THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company,
W. S. SMI;TH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year.........$2.00 Six Morths......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-.<{ Telephone 51 }.-

The spoken word is given scaut attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

THANKSGIVING
Three hundred and nineteen years ago the
Pilgrim Fathers instituted a day of Thanks-
giving. It was in celebration of the first har-
vest in the land of their adoption, a land
then of suffering, of deprivation, of terror
and of sorrow. But the brave little band that
had survived those first struggles looked into
their hearts and found reason for thanks-
giving.
Their first harvest gave promise of peace,
of security and of freedom. Theirs was a rich
land for a strong people. The promise made
by that first harvest has been bountifully ful-
filled and we, as Americans, have gratefully
consecrated that day dedicated to us by our
forefathers.
Today America stands forth a united na-
tion. It knows not East nor West, North
nor South, border nor breed nor birth. The
East, West, North and South join strong
friendly hands across great cities, stately
mountains, vast prairies and wide waters.
There is no unsympathetic border between
states, no hatred of breed and no accident of
birth to estrange its peoples. There is but
one God,-the God who watches over us as
He did over that struggling band of Pilgrims.
But across the seas on each side of us
War pulls the strings to his marionettes and
roars to the antics of cruelty, destruction,
suffering and torture. Laws of decency and
Christianity have been thrown to human
wolves. We are appalled and horrified at the
threat to civilization that echoes from the
chaos of other nations and we in America
should realize that we, of perhaps all the peo-
ple of the world, have something to be thank-
ful for, something which a now unhappy
world will need later. They need the blessing
of liberty, democracy and peace.
And so on this Thanksgiving Day it is not
enough to give thanks to a merciful provi-
dence that has saved us. We should pray
that we may be permitted to hold fast to the
fruits of the years of civilized endeavor-
peace, democracy, justice for all men and all
nations.

SALAS, FOR TRUFFLES AND JAM
Don't say we weren't warned. They said
we would have to make sacrifices, and here
they are-already.
Chefs in big New York luxury hotels are
already bemoaning the fact that truffles have
become very scarce. Pate de fois gras? The
shortage is grave. Filets of anchovy? The
price is rising. English jams are scarce. Irish
bacon can't be had. No Belgian endive. And
Italian salami is off the menus entirely.
Well, there it is! Just think of the times
during the past few years when you had
truffles and pate de fois gras for dinner, and
you see immediately how serious all this is.
Who can tell? If this sort of thing keeps,
up it may be necessary to turn to consuming
some of our vast agricultural surpluses, the
wheat, the corn, the dairy products, native
fruits, which our own farmers have produced
by the sweat of their brows and can't sell for
enough to make a iiving.-Tallahassee Demo-
crat.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


ALFRED I. duPONT, PHILANTHROPIST
The great majority of the people of Port
St. Joe know little or nothing of the late Al-
fred I. duPont, and probably there are but a
few, if any, who had met and talked with
him. All we do know is that he is responsible
for the muishroom-lilke growth of our city,
and had it not been for his great vision iin
seeing the commercial. possibilities of this
section lnd the opportunity it ,~Ered (or ith
rchabilitaJtion of this portion of the state
mnst of us, imork thian likely, utild nolt .
in I'orft St. Joe today, aLtracted here Imainiy
for C(onninlercial reasons.
All we have seen has been the coinlierciai
angle and we know little of the benefactions
that were a part of the life of Mr. duPonL.
One of the greatest of these, in our opinion,,
and one that will do much for the rehabilita
tion of young people who might have been
forced to travel through life as helpless
cripples, is the million-dollar crippled chil-
dren's home which has just been completed
at Wilmington, Del., and which was provided
for under a foundation set up by Mr. duPont.
This home will bring hope, health and hap-
piness through the years to thousands of
youngsters who otherwise might never have
had an opportunity to live normal lives. It
will brush aside the dark clouds that have
obscured their lives and let through the sun-
shine-the blessed sunshine that always
shines brighter for having been obscured.
We sincerely wish that there were more
philanthropists in the world akin to the late
Alfred I. duPont.

THE CHRISTMAS SEAL
Three children lifting their voices.in a carol
of the season is the pictorial theme of the
Christmas Seal which the Tuberculosis Asso-
ciations throughout th'e nation will offer foi
sale next Monday, November 25: .The faces,
expressing the spirit of youth, anddjoy, comrn
from the brush of Felix Ikwis.Martini of Loe
Angeles, famous for his landscape paintings.
Inspiration, Martinii said, came firom his two
young daughters and-a a second hobby, which
is music.
The Christmas Seal committee is working'
in Gulf county, preparing for the opening ot
the sale-next Monday. Plans are being de-
\veloped to make it possible for every citizen
of the county to have an opportunity to buy
seals which help to support a program of tu-
derculosis work in Florida and in the indi-
vidual communities.
Christmas Seals sold in Florida in the past
have made it possible to find many cases ol
tuberculosis through X-ray examinations.
They have financed programs of health. edu-
cation in the schools and have assisted in in-
forming the public of a disease which still
takes the lives of approximately 1000 Florid-
ians annually.
When you, Mr. and Mrs. Public, are asked
to buy Christmas Seals this year, be generous,
with your contribution.

Our German fifth columnists up in New
York, who every week mail us "Facts In Re-
view," strictly a German propaganda organ,
gave us a laugh in their latest issue of bull.
Under a caption "Greece Must Pay the Price"
it was stated that Greece would soon be in
control of Italy. From present indications -
seems as if the Greeks are going to take Al-
bania away from Italy. More power to 'em!
We're looking forward to the next issue of
"Faets In Review" to see just how they will
explain away why Greece isn't "paying the
price."

" They say of the new Johnson gun-rival of
the Garand-that it is so fast you wipe out
an enemy detachment without knowing it was
loaded-Richmond Times-Disnatch,

Trade with your home-town merchants.
t
Send The Star to a friend-only $2 a year


Read tle ads and reap.


THANK GOD, WE'RE AMERICANS!


.POPEYE

/ OR, W I YAM GONE MAE A SPEECH.
GsoooDhSSE. I YAM GONR TELL ALLTHE PEOPLE
POPEVE, THAT WE CAN UCK TB IF WE
THE PLACE BUY AND USE CHRISTMAS'
15 FULL- SEALS. WE AREG'OT IT
6E E ALLJ ON THE iUN, SO LET US
10o PEOPLE GO AFTER THE BLASTED
LOOKI\N6 GERM AND WIPE IT P5-S-T- :
SAT us QPUT. POPEYE-TELL
THEM ABOUT THE
THEE KIDS ON
\ THE CHISTMA5
SSEAL.


FISHING FEAT
Tips To H ntr A fishing feat which experts say
p o uners is probably a record for light
tackel was performed at West
With the general hunting season Palm Beach by Joseph M. Patter-
opening Wednesday. hunters should son, publisher of the New York
observe bag limits, as follows: Daily News, when he hooked and
Deer-Season bag limit is two; landed a 7-foot sailfish on a three-
day's limit, one. Bucks only mayounce tip pole with a six-thread
be killed, and evidence of the line
deer's sex must be left on the car- .
cass while it is in camp or forest. 86 per cent of a motor ned.
Turkey, Quail and Squirrel !
The day's bag limit on turkeys s
tw':; for the season, five. The' Educ n Is
day's bag limit on quail and squir- en ouh no vacine has
rels is 1I, with a limit of 200 for been perfected for prevention
beee seas. perfected
the season. and no drug is
Doves-Daily bag limit of 12. ,' available for
Variations to the general hunt- cure, we are far
g ::' i s 1).M cure, we are far
g i:''. .by; count ties, is printed; cia from being help-
on the back of hunting licenses, less against
Put out your campfire when go- tuberculo-
ng out to hunt or breaking camp sis. We can con-
ac trol, eventually
If you see a deer with a red rid this country
rid this country
shirt on, don't shoot it-it won't of, tuberculosis through educa-
)e a deer. tion. There are only a few facts
-- ---- we need to know and act upon.
Just 21 years ago the first state Tuberculosis is catching. It can
tax on gasoline, a mere one-cent a be in an advanced stage before
gallon levy, was inaugurated by any symptoms appear. Early tu-
S.levy, i augur ed i berculosis can be discovered
Oregon. In 1939, state gasoline with the X-ray and- early tuber-
axes reached a record, high of .- culosis can be cured.
-513,133,000.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1940


Keep smiling I








FRIDY, OVEBER 2, 940THESTAR POT S. JE, GLF OUNY, LORIA PGE HRE


REV. DANIEL TO REMAIN
Rev. W. A. Daniel, pastor of the
Presbyterian church, recently ten-
dered his resignation, but the Pres-
bytery of Florida requested that
he reconsider and remain on the
field. So the services will go on
as usual every Sunday except the
third, which Rev. nDaniel gives to
the church at Orange.


-
PORT NEWS
SS.. J.'in o0' he I uil Line sailed
Tuesday in ';iii-' "or e ''2' P'uNl'
with cargo of lumlbr and pp1Icr.
-l
Hiram Sandsbu.ry spent sev'cra!
adys last week ill ibis city ;':1 the
guest 1o his brother, Oliver Sands-
bury.
------ -
Every ads carries a message-
a message that will save money.


ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE $7.0 t
WEEK

Dining Room

S Open to the Public

Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....250
Lunch, 12 to 2 ............35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. 0. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


















THE PERFECT FUEL
FOR EVERY HOME!

Winter is at hand and w.e
have just received a carload
of coal, one of the finest fuels.
that you can depend on for
heating your home during the
cold weather. Call us-

< ag" PHONE 70
O)


SC. W. HORTON

Port St. Joe, Fla.
e^-<>-xO-^ <<^Si an0-@^'


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S


DAIRY
Distributors of: Brucebk. Juices

SHELBY: STRIN0FELLOW
Local Representative


Society


WOMAN'S CLUB SPONSORS
ART EXHIBIT AND TEA
The Penny Art Exhibit sl)11-
sored lVeinesday afternoon by tlhe
Port St. Joe W'oman's Club was
lieil in the form of a silver tea
'. tlie ihoe of .Mrs. B. W. EBells.
ilouit 1 'ty guests at lenldilg.
'i he dti n room ofn the Eells
;o;e v';was deco!'r;ed with yellow
',r' -.::nhlle lnms ald tlie Lea, Laten
'.as covered with a lace cloth cen-
tored with a bowl of chrysanthe-
mums and balanced by lighted yel-
low tapers. Mrs. MI. P. Tomlinsoih
poured coffee at one end of the
table and Mrs. D. B. Lay poured
tea at the other end. The living
room was decorated with youpon.
Sandwiches, cookies and salted
nuts were served by the hostesses,
Mesadmes Franklin Jones, Claude
Adams, Victor Johnson, Edwin
Ramsey and Norman Briggs.
-. h *o u
MRS. HUNT HOSTESS TO
BAPTIST W. M. S. CIRCLE 3
Circle No. 3 of .the Baptist Mis-
sionary society met Monday after-
noon at the home of Mrs. B. F.
Hunt at Kenney's Mill. Mrs. W. ,.1
Daughtry, circle chairman, was in
charge and gave the devotional.
The roll was called with 14 an-
swering, and four new members
were added to the circle at this
time. A discussion of the new
year book was held and general
business transacted, after which
the Mispah was repeated in unison.
A social hour followed the meet-
ing during which time the hostess
served tuna salad, saltines, cake
and coffee to members present.

MRS: FULLER HONORED
AT SURPRISE PARTY
Mrs. M. L. Fuller, who left last
week to make her home in Jack-
son, Ala., was the honor guest last
Friday night at a surprise farewell
party given by American Legion
Auxiliary members at the home of
Mrs. W. H. Wellington on Hunter
Circle. Fall flowers and fern dec-
orated the living room.
Mrs. Fuller was presented with,
a gift from each member, and all
expressed their regret at the loss
of their president.
The hostess served refreshments
of hot chocolate and sandwiches
to those present.

LYDIA CIRCLE IS RENAMED
LOUISE BANCROFT CIRCLE
The Lydia Circle of the Baptist
church met Monday afternoon at
the home of Mrs. William Quarles
on Long avenue. Proceeding the
business hour the circle was re-
named the Louise Bancroft Circle
in honor of the wife or a former
pastor of the church. The business
and devotional hour was presided
over by Mrs. Charels McClellan,
after which the hostess served re-
freshments to members present.
'f *r *
RUTH CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. PATTERSON
Mrs. J. M. Patterson entertained
the Ruth Circle of the Baptist
church at her home- on Third
street Monday afternoon. Mrs. W.
C. Pridgeon presided over the
business meeting and also led the
devotional. A social hour followed
during which. games were enjoyed
and refreshments served.

MRS. D. C. SMITH ENTERTAINS
Mrs. D. C. Smith entertained at
one table of bridge Tuesday after-
noon at her home at Niles. After
scores were tallied Mrs. W. S.
Smith was presented with high
prize for the afternoon. Cake and
coffee were served, to Mrs. Smith,
Mrs. J. A. Christmas and Mrs. M.
B. Larkin.

Mrs; G4fford Bowers of Mhrlanna
is the guest this' week. of Mr. and
Ms. B B;B....I~enney.


SPersonals


W'OMIAN'S SOCIETY FOR
H-IRISTIAN SERVICE
The regular meeting of the Wo-
'nan's Socity for Christian Ser-
vice of the Methodist church was
held Monday afternoon at the
church and the following program
presented:
Hymn, "The Voice of God, Is
Calling." Reading by Mrs. A. M.
Jones. Hymn, "0 Jesus, Master."
Silent meditation and prayer by
the president. Reading and approv-
ing minutes. Report on presenta-
tion of love gift to Mrs. M. L. Ful-
ler who moved to Jackson, Ala.,
last week. Report on charity
cases by Mrs. Jones and Mrs. J.
Grimsley.
Plans were made for a "hot
dog" sale tomorrow by Circle 3.
Discussion was held- on sewing for
the Red Cross and report made by
Mrs. R. A. Costin on the patient in
the hospital. Plans were made for
the zone meeting on December 11
and for the young people to at-
tend the- general conference in
Panama City tomorrow night. An
excellent report on church finances
was made by Rev. D. E. Marietta
after which he dismissed the meet-
ing. The next meeting will be
joint session November 25.

MRS. TOMLINSON ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
The members of the Thursday
Evening Bridge Club were enter-
tained last evening at the home of
Mrs. M. P. Tomlinson on Eighth
street. Fall flowers decorated the
living room where the guests were
entertained. Following several pro-
gressions, high and cut prizes
were awarded after which delect-
able refreshment swere served, by
the hostess.

NOTICE
There will be a meeting of the
executive board of the Port St.
,Joe Woman's club next Wednes-
day, November 27, at the home or
Mrs. Floyd Hunt.

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith and
Charles Sheppard spent the week-
end in Tallhassee, guests of Mr.
andi Mrs. G. M. Sheppard.
S* Wr
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin spent
Sunday in Bristol visiting rela.
tives.

Mrs. Hoke Larkin spent Satur-
day in the city, returning Saturday
night to her home in Bristol.

Miss Roxie Nichols of Orlando
was the week-end guest of Mr.
and Mrs. Fred Maddox.


Tuberculosis Seeks Youths
It strikes at little children un-
der five, taking its grim place
among the child-
hood diseases,
killing more
than either diph-
theria or scarlet
fever. It re-
treats somewhat
during the years
between five
and the early
teens, but continues steadily to
kill boys and girls. It swiftly ad-
vances to the first place among
the disease killers during the
ages of 15 to 19, and it holds this
first place as a cause of death
until the late thirties. It kills
more girls- than boys, more
,young women than young, men.


- Churches


MRS. BOYER HOSTESS
TO J. A. M. CLUB
Mr.s. C. E. Boyer entertained the
members of the J. A. M. club at
her Oak Grove home Monday eve-
ning. Two contests were enjoyed
;;ad winners of prizes were Mrs.
Lewis Perritt and Miss Myrtice
Coody, high, and Mrs. 0: M. Mor-
ton, low.
A delicious: salad plate with tea
and coLfee was served to Mesdames
Perritt, A. D. Lawson, B. A. Prid-
geon, Leroy Gainous, J. M. Smith,
J. A. Connell, E. C. Pridgeon, S.
C. Pridgeon, W. C. Pridgeon, W.
H. Howell, H. A. Drake and Sam-
mie Davis, Miss Coody and invited
guests, Mrs. B. E. Kenney, Mrs. E.
Ramsey and Mrs. Morton.

Mrs. M. B. Smith has returned
to her home after spending four
weeks visiting in Hartford and
Newville, Ala. Mrs. T. B. Smith of
Montgomery and Mr. and Mrs. J.
T. Graves of Newville accompanied
her home.




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I
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, .1940


THESTAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY,. FLOMPAA


PAGE THREE








PAGEFOU THESTA, POT S. JO, GLF CUNT, FLRID FRIAYNOVEBER2,194


Advertising doesnT cost-it pays!



Purity Assured


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Crippled Children To Be Cared For In duPont Institute


The Gulf County Dairy's
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of production our milk re-
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Gulf County Dairy
H. M. MoCLAMMA, Manager.
Leave or .Phone Your Orders
to 3. Lamar Miller's Standard
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Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager


SATURDAY ONLY


These are views of the first unit
of the Alfred I. duPont Institute
of the Nemours Foundation for
Crippled Children. This free ortho-
pedic hospital for children has
just been completed at Wilming-
Lon, Del., as the first of a group of
such institutions provided for in
the will of the late Alfred I. du-
Pont.
The little patients may be indi-
gent and crippled but not incur-
able. Mr. duPont's will has here
provided the only opportunity any
of these crippled boys and girls
would ever have had to receive
the best in food, nursing and med-
ical attention, and puts no. limit
on the expense which may be in-
curred in treating, curing, educat-


H3 IHSASH 3 THE TATTLER


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with John McGuire-Margoret uill'i r

-- HIT NO. 3

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November 24 and 25




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JON HALL and
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I liUUU HI llRll 11fBS( ll


EDITED BY THE JUNIOR CLASS
"Sees All, Knows All, Tells All
About Port St. Joe High School"
Editor-in-Chief .......Buck Walters
Assistant Editor.... Royce Goforth
Society Editor.... ."The Snooper"
Sports Editor .......... John Lane


SHARKS WIN WEWA
GRID GAME 56 TO 6
The Sharks were victorious last
Friday in their football game with
Wewahitchka, the score at the end
of the last quarter being 56 to t
in our favor.
Today the Sharks meet the Sop-
choppy team on Centennial Field.
We hope all of you will come and
help make this another winning
game. So make it a point to be
there this afternoon for the kick,
off.

OUR NEW SENIOR
This week we had, a new mem-
ber added to the senior class.
Vivian Patterson, better known
as "Pat," came form St. Pete Hi
in St. Petersburg. Her hobby is
collecting hair ribbons and dan'c-
ing. Her ambition is to travel.
We are glad to have her in our
school and we'll do our test to
make her glad she's here. P. S.-
She's single, too.

JUNIOR DANCE
The junior class is still work-
ing assiduously for their banquet.
As most of you know, it is the
privilege of the juniors to give all
the high school dances. Since
there are quite a number of town
people who like to dance, the ju-
niors have decided to give a pub-
lic dance every other Friday night.
Tonight our dance will be open
to the public, and we want every-
one to come. We will appreciate
help from the general public at
these affairs.-Junior Class.

GOSSIP
Songs of Yesterday and Today
"Our Love" is the theme song


ing and fitting the crippled chil- discharged,they will be thoroughly pl'eparinS for this great charity,
dren to go out and take a normal trained in the trades and arts so All these things, he hoped, would
place in the world. His will pro- they will go out again upon the give t he crippeld' children a
brighter outlook upon life.
videos only that the patients shall world fully capable of being useful This crippled children's institute
not be incurables. citizens. is only a part of the charity un-
This first unit of the institute When this first unit of the Al- dertakings which are carried on
cost more than $1,000,000 and this fred I. duPont Institute is filled by the Nemours Foundation cre-
country and continental Europe and, running smoothly, then the ated under Mr. duPont's will. An-
were searched for the best in or- construction of the remaining other charity will provide a home
thopedic equipment, not only for units will begin, so that at least for the care and maintenance of
the proper treatment of the pa- 300 children can be constantly old -people, especially elderly mar-
tients, but for the maximum of kept upon the road to recovery. ried couples.
comfort, convenience and pleasure. The site of the institute is on When the foundation is fully
The children will stay in the Mr. duPont's former magnificent completed', the entire income of all
main hospital building for an av- estate near Wilmington. For 20 the companies and vast invest-
erage period of three months and years his favorite occupation was ments of Mr. duPont's estate will
will then be moved to the sur- to improve these grounds by land- be devoted exclusively to the sup-
rounding convalescent cottages scapiig and beautifying them with port of these charities.
where they will receive proper ed- fountains, statuary, marble stair ---
ucational, physical and vocational ways and other works of art gath- Trade at home-your local mer-
trainino RBaform the nntints r arcerl from oll -n ...... t ne + wr ,-A ... -... i4.- +. A .: _-wn


of Marianne and Oortlen.
Miss Arnold sings "I Have Eyes,'
(could they be for "coach"?)
Billy Hammock is singing "Baby
Me." Try it sometimes, grls.
Fay was heard to remark "Don't
Look Now" while dating Margaret
Coleman.
Before Luther left he and Tresia
were heard singing "I'll Never
Smile Again."
The Costin sisters illustrated
that "Romance Runs In the Fam-
ily."
Jimmie T. was heard to say:
"The Lady, Said Yes."
We're sure the students of St.
Joe Hi wish "An Apple for the'
Teacher Would Do the Trick."
Gewel Lewis said to Maurice
Fain, "I Can't Leave You Any-
more."
Buck and Royce have been sing-
ing "This Can't Be Love."

Miss McClellan (after handing
back an English paper): "Gordon,
this paper is both good and, or-
iginal."
Gordon: "Then why did you give
me an 'F' on it?"
Miss Me: "Well, the parts that
are original aren't good and the
parts that are good aren't orig-
inal."

Mr. Hannon: "Why don't you
answer me?"
John L.: "I did, sir-I shook my
head."
Mr. H.: 'rBut you don't expect
me to hear it rattle way up here,
do you?"
-------------
ORCHIDS TO FLORIDA
A thousand orchids belonging to
the Duke of Westminster were re-
ceived in Miami recently. A bomb
hit the greenhouse where the col-
lection was kept, and James Dunn,
Miami florist, who will care for
the "refugees," said their destruc-
tion would have ended strains re-
quiring generations to produce.

American automobile factories
have produced 79,000,000 motor
vehicles valued at $53,000,000,000
in 40 years.


7 s A RE there days when it seems
S that the radio, the ringing of
the door or telephone bell, the
Clatter of dishes, or even the laughter and voices
of children nearly drive you frantic-days when
you are restless, and cranky?, ;
Do you lie awake nights?
When these hectic days and wakeful nights in-
terfere with your work and take the pleasure out
of life for you, try
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Dr. Miles Nervine has brought relief to millions
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News


---- -


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1940


Ll IL11l tllle We )ELIUIU U't:eru iuv ai -art o Ln w ri


etkants hae just wlat you want.