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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00212
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 8, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00212

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe. T


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. .. In
S TR the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940 NUMBER 5


Gulf County, With Rest


Of Nation, Goes For


Franklin D. Roosevelh


Unofficial returns in Tuesday's the state as a whole seem to indi-
history-making election gave Pres- cate that the only one of the six
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt a to- amendments rejected by the voters
tal of 468 of 531 electoral votes, wa-s the one which would have au-
with the issue settled in all but a thorized the state legislature to
few states, and a popular vote of fix the number of county commis-
24,363,798 to Willkie's 20,282,049. sioners and making commissioners'
A total of 266 electoral votes, the terms four years instead, of two.
number needed for election, were This amendment was opposed' by
assured Roosevelt at 10:40 a. m. The Star, as well as a great num-
Wednesday. ber "of country weeklies all ove'i
Gulf county polled 1,526 votes the state. Figures on the state
for Roosevetl and 199 for Willkie. vote, with 996 precincts out of
Of the six amendments voted 1428 reporting, follow:
on in Gulf county, four carried Amendment For Against
and twd were defeated, according70,154 50,393
Parole Comm..... 70,154 50,393
to the following unofficial returns:oney .... 66,925 48.713
Amendment Yes No Racing Money .... 66,925 48.713
Parole Commission ..... 260 298 Supreme Court .. 67,731 46,399
Racing Money .......... 288 254 Ad Valorem ...... 72,080 51.723
Racing Money ........... 288 254 C commissioners 55,786 61,6n
Supreme Court .........555 156 Co. Commissioners 55,786 61,650
Ab olh Ad Vlorem ...... 5319 2 Tax Exemption ... 107,585 30,249
Abolish Ad Valorem .... 319 222
County Commissioners .. 219 494 Complete returns for the county
Tax Exemption ......... 634 106 with state returns, will be pub-
Latest available figures from listed next week.


DRAFTEES MUST NOTIFY
BOARD OF ANY CHANGE

Law Requires Immediate Notifica-
tion of Change of Address

B. W. Eells. chairman of the
Gulf county selective service board,
yesterday issued a statement to
those young men of draft age who
have made or intend to change
their place of residence.
"When any change of residence
is made." said Mr. Eells, "it is re-
quired by law that draftees notify
the board immediately. This is ex-
termely important, as the ques-
tionnaires are now being mailed
out, and this must be filled out
and returned within five days. In
case a registered man has moved
and doesn't receive his question-
naire he is still responsible and
will be subject to the penalty pro-
vided by the conscription bill."
------*------
CITY STREET PROJECT
RECEIVES APPROVAL

Is Now In Washington Awaiting
Final Approval and Signing

The city-wide WPA street pav-
ing project for Port St. Joe, which
has been held in abeyance, for a
-considerable period, has at last
received approval of the Pensacola
district office and has been for-
warded to Washington for final
,approval of WPA high moguls and
_signature of President Roosevelt.


Leaves To Attend' Trade School
Carlyle Matthews left Saturday
for Tampa, where he will enter
Conm DeSoto Trade School.


Red Cross Roll Call

Will Open Monday


Annual Membership Drive To Be
t Initiated On Armistice Day;
Everyone Urged to Join

Red Cross Roll Call time is here
Again, and beginning next Monday
-Armistice Day-every individual
in Gulf county
will be given an
N opportunity to
join.
"In last year's
Roll Call Gulf
county chapter
RDS brooke recod-ss,"
EUM s;Intes Chairman
oc-rt Bellows. "It was among
the four chapters in Florida on
the honor roll, was second in the
state in the per cent of members
to total population, and made the
highest membership percentage in-
crease that was ever made in the
entire United States. That's quite
a record and one that we must
live up to.
"Naturally everyone wants to
know what has been done with the
money we received last year, and


we give here a brief report of ac-
tivities during the past twelve
months."
Roll Call collections. $595; Al-
bany storm relief, .$95.50; war re-
lief fund, $164.
Local Activities Total number
handled, 71; total amount dils-
bursed, $578.88; one service man'
case handled; first aid class con-
ducted and 27 certificates were
awarded. Expenditures were as
follows: Medical aid and food, 51
cases; hospitalization, 6; shoes
and clothing for children, 5; milk
to invalids, 3; glasses provided, 1;
loan closets fitted out, 2; families
assisted after homes turnedd, 2;
yeast provided for county-wide pel-
legra control project.
Everyone in Gulf county is earn-
estly urged to join the Red' Cross
during Roll Call and aid in carr'
ing on the great humanitarian
work of the organization.

PORT NEWS
S.S. Ruth. Bull Line sailed Wed-
nesday for Port Newark with cargo
of naner and lumber.


Expect Armistice Day


Celebration To Draw


Throng To Port St. Joe


Staging what is expected to be
the biggest and best Armistice Day
celebrations in the annals of this
section, Gulf County Post 116,
American Legion, has complete
plans for a "Home Defense Day"
celebration Monday which it is an
ticipated will draw several thou-
sand visitors from the surrounding
territory.
The fete will open at 10 o'clock
in the morning with a parade
through the business district, led
by the St. Joe high school band
and participated in by marching
units of various civic organiza-
tions, unions, school children, Boy
Scouts, members of the Legion and
Auxiliary, and many decorated
cars and trucks.
The parade will disband at the

LEADS GREEKS


Premier John Metaxas of Greece,
69-year-old leader who is heading
Greek resistance against Italian
invasion. The Grecian strength is
amazing all peace-loving nations.

Probably more than half the
'ood of North American birds con-
sists of insects, biologists say.


'Hell Drivers' Fe tiuire of Armistice Day Celebration


As one of the main attractions Drivers" in a death defying, thrill- flaming boards, see them turned
for Armistice Day-as well as Sun- ing, chilling exhibition at the local over at 50 miles an hour!
day-Gulf County Post 116, Ameri- ball park beginning at 3 p. m. each Don't fail to see this startling
show next Sunday and Monda>.
can Legion, Is presenting that of the two days. Above is shown two cars bein
daredevil stunt driver, Miss Jessie See automobiles crash head-on, crashed, as will be done at the ex-
Miller, and her troupe of' "Hell see them driven through walls of hibition in Port St. Joe.


Port Inn Park shortly before 11
o'clock, when "Taps" will be
sounded for a moment of silence
in memory of the World War dead,
Pubilc speaking will be held at
the band stand in nthe park, with.
Comptroller Jim Lee scheduled to
make the main address of the day,
Post Commander T. M. Schneider
will act as master of ceremonies,
introducing Colonel Lee and other
dignitaries.
Following the speaking, a free
fish fry will be open to the public
in the park, prepared under the
expert direction of Arthur Lupton.
When everyone has been sated
on fish and settled comfortably on
the park benches, an old-time
fiddler's contest will be staged o0-
the band, stand, with prizes of $5
and 10 being awarded.
Immediately following the fiddl-
ing bee-at 3 o'clock-Miss Jessie
Miller and her "Hell Drivers"
will stage a thrilling exhibition I
the ball park.
Concluding the day's festivities
will be a grand ball at the Centen-
nial auditorium given by, the Pa-
per Makers Union, with music fur-
nished by Curtis Davidson and his
orchestra from Quincy. I
Invitations have been extended
to American Legioiiposts in near-
by communities, and it is ex-
pected that Legionnaires will be
on hand from Panama City, Ap-
alachicola, Blountstown and Marl-
anna.

STATE TB HOSPITAL FILM
WILL BE SHOWN HERE

Residents of County Will Be Able
To See How Money Is Spent

Dr. R. D. Thompsoa of the state
tuberculosis sanitorium at Orlando
will be in Port St. Joe next Thurs-
day. November 14, for the purpose
of presenting a moving picture in
Technicolor of the sanitorium and
its activities. The film will be
shown at the Centennial building
at 4 p. m.
This will be an opportunity for
the residents of Gulf county,
which participates with the rest
of the counties of the state in
maintaining this institution, to
see just how their money is being
used in combating tuberculosis.
W". T. Edwards of this city is
chairman of the state tuberculosis
hoard, and it was through his un-
tiring efforts that the sanitorium
at Orlando was constructed.
----------
DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE
THANKS COUNTY VOTERS

Expresses Sincere Appreciation to
Party Workers and Directors

Chairman Floyd Hunt and Sec-
retary Sammy Patrick of the Gulf
County Democratic Executive Com-
mittee yesterday expressed their
appreciation of the efforts of the
party voters, workers and direc-
tors for the large vote marked up
in Gulf county Tuesday.
"We are happy that residents of
the county, voted overwhelmingly
in favor of the entire Democratic
ticket," said-Chairman Hunt, "and,
we want to congratulate the actual
'vote-getters', the precinct com-
mitteemen and women and the
precinct worker'."'


I


9~







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months:.....$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-,*J{ Telephone 51 }f>--

The spoken word is given scaut attention:
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

ARMISTICE DAY

Next Monday Port St. Joe will observe the
twenty-second anniversary of the signing of
the armistice of what at that time was be-
lieved to be the last great war, and optimists
thought the world would go on from there in
perpetual peace and harmony-but there has
been very little of either among nations since
that time, and today Europe is being ground
under the heels of the dictators and this na-
tion is preparing frantically to avert the
tragedy of unpreparedness which cost the
lives of so many of our young men in World
War I.
Armistice Day is a time for celebration, a
time to express a shadow of the joy we felt
on that day twenty-two years ago when we
knew that the wholesale murder was ended.
It is also a time for other thoughts.
It is a time to think of the thousands that
were killed in that war who would yet be
alive if America had been prepared for the
emergency.
It is a time to think of what it mean to
live in a' country such as ours. Although
conditions may not be ideal and we think
many of us are suffering almost unbearable
hardships, we 'are yet living better, getting
a great deal more joy out of life than mil-
lions of people in other countries.
It is a time to make a pledge that we will
not let paid propagandists poison our minds
against the people of another nation and force
us into another needless war.
It is a time to forget our political preju-
dices and devote our thoughts and efforts to-
ward making this country just what our fore-
fathers dreamed it would be.
World War I should be a lesson to us and
on each Armistice Day we should review that
lesson and refresh our minds on what we
learned.

WHAT! NO CAVIAR?

We were reading a news article the other
day which informed us that there's only suf-
ficient caviar in the United States to last un-.
til Christmas, and supplies of pate de fois gras
are practically exhausted.
That may be a great blow to some people,
but personally we don't give two hoots in
hades for spoiled fish roe, and as for pate de
fois gras-well, we never did care for liver,
and goose liver in particular. Instead of im-
porting these so-called delicacies, why not
stick to solid American foods like pork and
beans, sweet corn on the cob, turkeys and
cranberries, pumpkin pies, buckwheat cakes
with maple syrup, ham and eggs?
Maybe we shouldn't be too severe with the
pate de fois grassers and the caviar connivers,
and perhaps we should regret the lack of
these exotic items, but we of America can
live without these expensive items and live
the abundant life. For nature has blessed our
land with fertile soil and such a range of cli-
mate that we can grow an almost complete
variety of fruits, vegetables and meats with-
in our own borders.
All those residents of Port St. Joe who
will miss caviar and pate de fois gras will
please line up at the right.

Time to start your Christmas shopping


PROTECTION WHILE IN SERVICE
The young men who enter the military ser-
vice through the workings of the selective
service act will have certain protection given
them. And this is as it should be, for many
of them have already made financial obliga-
tions by which they would suffer losses un-
less their rights are protected.
Man v who will enter the service are prop-
crty owners and will have taxes to pay.
/The payment of taxes may be postponed un-
til six months ,after the termination of niil-
tar) service, by filing tlhe prescribed affidavit
with the tax collector.
If any of the men have contracted to pur-
chase automobiles, tractors, clothing or fur-
niture on the installment plan before October
18, 1940, and are unable to make payments
due to military service, such articles cannot
be repossessed without court order. The
courts have several courses they may pursue
in such cases. They may even order all or any
port of the deposit or installments repaid to
the purchaser before the seller can repossess
his. goods.
No man in military service can be sued un-
less he is represented in court either by his
own attorney or one appointed by the court,
and he is not bound by the action of the at-
torney so appointed.
Generally no judgment can be collected
against a man in service unless a bond is
posted to reimburse him should the judgment
be reversed after he has completed his mili-
tary service.
Those are a few of the protections offered
men who enter the military service. Uncle
Sam is doing his best to see that the boys
get a fair deal while they are serving.

THERE'S FARM WORK TO BE DONE
While reports of military strife in other
countries continue to flow in an endless
stream into this country, where peace pre-
vails, there's the everyday work of planting
and harvesting and fighting bugs and, doing
other things that must be done on the farm.
What the future will be insofar as interna-
tional affairs are concerned is as unfathom-
able as many other things of the future. Right
now it's the job of the farmer to go ahead
with his work of construction-to build a
better living for rural people. They must con-
tinue their efforts to raise good crops for
themselves and for supplying others and to
make their lives more satisfactory and full.
It is somewhat difficult to maintain orderly
activities of the day in the face of the reports
we are receiving, but it is necessary to do so. r
Crops must be planted and harvested, stock
must be watered and fed, fences must be
repaired, homes improved, food and feed prc-
duced and conserved, and all the other t
things on the farm must be done The wars t
will end some day, and when they do the '
constructive things will be more than ever l
t
necessary. t

It was a sad day for the world when the
Berlin bully changed his name to Hitler. No
man calling himself Schriekelber (or however d
his real flame is spelled) could have won the
idolatry, of a nation and piled up all the ,
raw, unshirted hell he has.-Macon Telegraph.
T
Best simile of the week: Pitiful as the look
on the face of a man who takes a letter out
of his pocket that his wife gave him to mail C
a weekiago.

Among the ingenious suggestions is one
for National Keep-Your-Shirt-On Week, pro-
viding it isn't red, brown or black.-Sarasota ci
Herald-Tribune. d
G
After the many years in which we, the m
light-hearted, have been singing "o'er the
ramparts we watch," a question suddenly
arises: "What ramparts?"-Richmond Times. -
SI
A London news item advises that a parrot


there has learned to make a noise like an air
raid siren. Maybe she wants a firecracker.
-New York Sun.


co
sil

si


ARMISTICE


They tell me that it was
"wild" day in the United States.
have seen pictures of mad crowds
swarming the streets, singing, way
ing flags, cheering, and with here
and there, one-weeping-alone.
It was the day when a reveren:
"Thank God" was. uttered mor(
times than any other day in his
tory.
Over There?
If by "Over There" is meant the
front line, it was a far different
picture. There were no crowds, nc
flags, no cheering, no weeping.
There was Simply a vast-Un
belief.
Mud!
Weariness!
Silence!
That silence when the guns
stopped was perhaps the most ter-
rible moment of the war.
Slumped down in the clinging
mud, with packs resting against a
parapet, heads bowed with weari-
less under tin hats where the rain-
drops spattered, soldiers-slept.
A moment of sleep snatched at
he instant of salvation from the
'Valley of the Shadow" and then
trut nerves unable to withstand
lhe strain of the dreadful silence
would stir the sleeping clods to
ife. A peek over the parapet with
he quick, instinctice head-duck
hat had become second nature.
No answering crack of bullet!
.Then came-Astonishment.
Afraid to believe, dreading to
isbelieve, standing like dumb
riven cattle, the infantryman-as
'as his custom-waited.
Oh, the Infantry, the Infantry.
with the mud behind the ears.
'he Infantry, the Infantry, that
drinks a million beers.
'he Cavalry, the Artillery, the
Engineers.
ih, they never catch up with the
Infantry in a hundred thou.
sand years."
They never did'.
Throughout 'the day, as the guns
'ere still, the nerve tension be-
ame acute. Teeth gritted as the
oughboys prayed to a tolerant
od that something-anything-
ight happen.
Nothing happened.
Waiting.
Long hours of it. Mud-hunger
-rain-cold, and above all-the
:LENCE.
Two or three rasping grunts, a
ough, a rough laugh, then-
lence.
"I can't stand: this!"-and a tall
nper stood erect with his head


full over the parapet.
Nothing happened'.
Astonishment more heads
popped up and eager eyes scanned
a perfectly blank horizon.
a Silence.
I Slowly the mis-ty rain and the
s, rainy mist darkened and deepened.
- In' the gathering gloom the silence
e became agony. 'Hysterical, ribald
laughter .swept down the long,
t dumb ranks.
e 'Then came the dark.
S Infantrymen, used' to darkness
that was absolute, where no tiny
spark was permitted to betray
waited in 'tne deadly, dark, dank
e eerie silence.
S Way off in the dim distance
across the tangled wire, in the
Jerry lines, there was a feeble
flame. A hundred hands leaped 'to
grips on rifles and a hundred
fingers twitched against Spring:
field triggers. There came another
glow, then another, another-and
soon, over there in the German
Line, there were'thousands of tiny
bonfires.
Fires? Open in the night?
Then it is TRUE!
THE WAR IS OVER!
Home.
A roar from a thousand throats
-a scurrying for firewood-Ameri-
can fires warming American sol-
diers.
ARMISTICE.
But all through the night, silent
hulking figures paced back and
forth-unable to endure
The Silence.

SLEEP ON BRAVE LADS
(Dedicated to our soldiers wh(
gave their lives in 1917-18.)
Sleep on brave lad's, in the slum-
ber of death,
Heed not the thundering guns ol
war;
Heed not the tramp, tramp, traml
of marching men
That comes from cities, towns and
shore.
We know the flush of life for you
is o'er,
The star of Peace refused to shine
And battlefields again are stained
with blood
Of Europe's young mankind.
Sleep on, brave lads, in 'the slum-
ber of death
Beneath the lonely sod,
For he who started' this cruel war
Must some day turn to God.
For a self-made god may tule for
awhile,
Crush out humanity to win his
goal;
But his final battle is yet to come
With the Maker of his soul.
-Mary Donate.


A TIMELY REMINDER


PAGE TWO


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER%8 1940I






FD NOVEMBER 8 10 TE TR, .i JOE- ,i GULFcii. COUNTYi FLORIDA..... PiAGEg TH RiE


PORT ST. JOE


Home Defense



CELEBRATION

SPONSORED BY

GULF COUNTY POST

116, AMERICAN

LEGION


ARMISTICE


DAY


Armistice Day is a vivid reminder of the fact that safety
lies in PREPAREDNESS. ... This Armistice Day, as
we pause to honor our heroes of the World War, pre-


paredness


is being


keynoted as


a national


policy .


preparedness against invasion from abroad..


. Let us


co-operate to the fullest extent in this program. .


Free Fish


Public Speaking


SFry Dancing

Fiddler's Contest


Hell Drivers--Thrills, Spills, Chills

This page is sponsored by the following patriotic businessmen of Gulf County:


Parker's Barber Shop
Paper Maker's Local No. 379
Port Theatre
LeHardy Pharmacy
H. A. Drake, Postmaster
LeHardy's Bar and' Pool Room
Kelly's Cafe
Carver Drug Company
Hinote's Barber Shop
St. Joe Stevedoring Company
St. Joe Bowling Alley
St. Joe Bar and Billiard Parlor


Dr. J. R. Norton
Miller's Drug Store
C. N. Hobbs
Sunny State Service Station
St. Joseph Telephone & Telegraph Co.
Gulf Hardware Company
Creech Brothers Cleaners
St. Joe Hardware Company
Barrier's 5 and 10c Store
The Leader Shoe Shop
Griffin's Grocery and Market
Danley Furniture Company
Suwannee Store


St. Joe Motor Company
St. Joe Furniture Company
Chavers-Fowhand Furniture Co.
Quality Grocery and Market
Arthur Lupton
Bayshore Grocery and Market
Schneider's Department Store
S. L. Barke
J. Lamar Miller's Standard Service
Suwannee Store, Wewahitchka
The Star, Your Home Town Paper
McCoy's Grocery and Market
Zim's Men's Wear


Vic's Service Station
Apalachicola Northern Railroad
Mile's 5 and 10c Store
Costin's Department Store
St. Joe Texaco Service Station
City of Port St. Joe
St. Joe Paper Company
'St. Joe Lumber Company
The Sentinel
Lilius Jewelry Company
Motor Parts
St. Joe Lumber & Export Co.
Florida Bank at Port St Joe


Parade


p1 rrsb 9 rI'~~sse'PS~~~ -


PAGE THREE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940







PAG* -~ THE5 S T Si


Spend 70 Days At

Sea In Open Boat

Experience of Two British Sailors
Rivals That of the Famous
Captain Bligh

Two British sailors have reached
the safety of British soil at Nas-
sau, the Bahamas, after spending
70 days at sea in a tiny open boat
on a voyage that rivals that of
Captain William Bligh following
the mutiny on the Bounty.
As far as is known the two men,
Robert George Tapscott, 19, and
Wilbert R. Widdicombe, 24, are
the only survivors of the freighter
Anglo-Saxon, sunk by a Nazi sea
raider about 500 miles southeast
of the Azores on August 21.
Widdicombe, who lost 80 pounds
during t he amazing 2,500-mile
transatlantic voyage, said that
seven men climbed? into the 16-
foot lifeboat when the raider
opened fire on their ship. Two of
them died of machine gun wounds
inflicted by the raider; two more,
crazed by heat and thirst, leaped
overboard, and another slashed
his throat.
"When we took to the boat we
had 20 pounds of biscuits, four
gallons of water, 11 tins of con-
densed milk and 16 pounds of
tinned beef," said Widdicombe.
"This lasted 15 days. Gradually
the other three men started to
lose their minds and one night
two jumped overboard. The next
lay the other cut his throat.
"We just sailed and drifted end-
lessly. We ran into three hurri-
canes. We had no fishing tackle,
but a sail fish and a gar washed
into the boat and we ate them
raw. Seaweed was our only food
tor most of the journey. Tapscott
was sinking fast when we sighted
a white beach and ran the boat
ashore. Then we staggered and
crawled to some trees and fainted.
"The next thing we realized we
were surrounded by dark, kindly
Eaces, but didn't know where we
were until we were addressed in
English to our unbounded relief,"
concluded Widdicombe.
That was at Eleuthera Island.
They were brought to Nassau by
plane.
The two men, burned almost
black by the sun, said they had
only rain water to drink most of
the voyage, and had no water at
all during the last eight days.
Captain Bligh's famous voyage
covered 3,600 miles, but he and his
18 men completed it in 47 days, 23
less than the time Tapscott and
Widdicombe took.

During the past 10 years an av-
earge of 2,388,000 motor vehicles
annually have been scrapped.


Purity Assured


~18529~I~~


The Gulf County 'Dairy's
quest for perfection empha-
sizes purity. In every detail
of production our milk re-
ceives the benefit of scientific
methods and discoveries.

Gulf County Dairy
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager
Leave or Phone Your Orders
to J. Lamar Miller's Standard
Station, Phone 98, ro Bua
Station Cafe, Phone 12


DIPHTHERIA IS AN
UNNECESSARY MENACE

It is very unfortunate that we
have had the death of a 2-year-old
child from diphtheria at Lanark.
Of all acute communicable dis-
eases, diphtheria is *the one dis-
ease that can be prevented by Tm-
muninzation with toxoid, and the
Franklin-Gulf county health de-
partment holds a well baby clinic
once each month in Port St. Joe
and Wewahitchka so that parents
may bring their pre-school chil-
dren in and have these immuniza-
tions given.
Diphtheria is a dangerous catch-
ing disease that causes the death
of many children if it is not
guarded against, and there is no
reason in the world for any child
to ever have diththeria, for we
can definitely protect them almost
100 per cent with toxoid.
The most dangerous period of a
child's life is before it's sixth year
and if you will protect them up to
this, age we will have very few
cases develop.
I am urging parents 'to avail
themselves of this service. At the
same time have your child) vacci-
nated against smallpox and during
their first year in school have
them immunized against typhoid.
I will be in your schools before
the Christmas holidays to do these
things. There is no compulsion
about these things and it is abso-
lutely voluntary on your part in
co-operating with your health de-


PHONE 99
WE DELIVER


apartment.


R. J. LAMB, M.D.
Director Health Dept.


FIND FOSSIL REMAINS

Fossil remains of primitive dogs,
horses, camels and rhinoceros,
dating back to the Miocene period
of some 18,000,000 years ago, have
,been discovered in a sink hole in
Gilchrist county, according to Dr.
Carr of the University of Florida.


ART
PROJECT
MAKES COLOR
PORTRAITS .-,,
OF CIILD PICTURES
FREE
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enlargement of any picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any snapshot, any fa-
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hand-colored. Theae enlargements will
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enlargement, hand-colored-in-oil-
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$3.00 in any photographic store. To
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for the enlargement and the hand-
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Simply send a print or negative of
your favorite picture and fifty cents
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COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC.
360 N. Michigan Aye., Chicago, Ill.


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never know when you or some
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At Your Drug Store:
Small Bottle 25
Large Bottle 1.00
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FURNITURE COMPANY


PORT ST. JOE,
FLORIDA


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Il ______________ M ._


PAGE F.btn


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBERS. 1940lod


V#







FRIDA, NL O M


PA.G FIVe


Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!


II


S E E ---
SEE

Miss Jessie Miller

and Her


HLL 1diVcERS

Sunday Monday

NOV. 10 and 11 3 P. M.


St. Joe Ball Park


Thrills Chills Spills




ROOM AND:

BOARD
BY THE 7 ^0
WEEK, 7.00

Dining Room

Open to the Public

Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....26C
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building
1 4
















I THE PERFECT FUEL
FOR EVERY HOME!
Winter is at hand and we
h,
have just received a carload
of coal, one of the finest fuels.
That you can depend on for
heating your home during the
cold weather. Call us-

y PHONE 70



C. W. HORTON

S Port St. Joe, Fla.
S4 9


FOR BETTER

:HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.,
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S


DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Juices

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative


Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


WOMAN'S CLUB ENJOYS
INTERESTINGG PROGRAM
The Port St. Joe Woman's club
met Wednesday afternoon at the
C(.'tennial building with the pres-
ident, Mrs. R. W. Smith, in the
chair.


After the ire ular business ses-
sion the following interesting pro-
granm was presented: Mrs. Pate o:
Peii.acola gave a talk on "We Car
Have Flowers,'' telling how some
of the materials we have at hano,
such as muck from drainage
canals, can be mixed with our
I sandy soil to form a bed adequate
to meet the need's of plants. Mrs.
Fred Curtis gave a resume of cul-
rent events, after which Mrs. D,
B. Lay gave a review of Osa John-
son's "I Married Adventure."
Refreshments were served by
the hostesses for the afternoon,
Mrs. B. B. Conklin, Mrs. B. W.
Eells, Mrs. Fred Curtis, Mrs. Roy
Gibson and Mrs. R. V. Coburn.
Mrs. Jon Stapleton was received
as a new member.

MRS. HEWITT ENTERTAINS
FOR CHICAGO VISITORS
Complimenting Mrs. Richardson
and Mrs. McDonald of Chicago,
who are guests of Mr .and Mrs. A.
Hensley, Mrs. G. D. Hewitt entei-
tained with bridge and Chinese
checkers at her home Thursday of
last week. Fall flowers decorated
the room where the games were ih
progress and at the conclusion of
play, scores were tallied ana
prizes awarded to Mrs. M. B. Lar-
kin for bridge and Mrs. R. Byrd
for checkers. The honorees were
presented with souvenirs of the
city. The hostess served a salad
plate and iced drinks to her guests.

JOYCE FULLER HOSTESS
AT HALLOWE'EN .PARTY
The home of Mr. and Mrs. M. L.
Fuller at Kenney's Mill was a
veritable land of spooks last Frt-
day evening when Miss Joyce Ful-
ler entertained a number of her
friends.. The home was decorated
throughout in the Hallowe'en me-
tif. Games and apple bobbing were
enjoyed, with Billy Howell and
Billy Trawick as prize winners.
Miss Joan Hickey, dressed as a
Gypsy, delighted the guests with
her fortune telling.
Ice craMm and cake were serve
by Mrs. Fuller, assisted by the
Misses Joan and Virginia Hickey.
--k r (
ATTENTION, MEMBERS
LEGION AUXILIARY
The Third district is leading in
the three-cornered contest with the
Fourth and Seventh districts. Re-
member, there is an award for the
winniing side. So if you can get
a new member by Armistice Day.
November 11, please do do.
To those who have not paid '
their dues, please d:o so by that
date and put Gulf County Unit on I
top. e


Mrs. M. L. Fuller, Pres. T
ful

ENGAGEMENT OF MISS &
FILLINGIM ANNOUNCED b:
Mr. and' Mrs. J. A. Fillingim of 1e
Telogia announce 'the engagement C,
of' their daughter, Myrle Shuler. i
to Jacob Chapman Belin, son of
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Belin of o01
this city. The wedding will be an hi
event of November 28. a
S-Sr ca
CIRCLE MEETINGS POSTPONED
The circles of the Woman's al
Society for Christian Service of 'v
the Methodist church will meet ne
next Tuesday. instead of Monday.
due to Armistice Day. Circle 1
will meet with Mrs. M. L. Fuller;
Circle 2 with Mrs. J. L. Sharit, and Ki
Circle 3 with Mrs. D. B. Lay. All sp
meetings will be at 3 p. m. Jo
E.
B. B. Conklin, A. E. Conklin and
Sammy Davis spent Monday in
Pensacola. wee


MISS GWENDOLYN HOWELL
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Miss Gwendolyn Howell cele
brated her fifteenth birthday las
Tuesday evening with a lawn party
at the home of her parents or
Eighth street. The home and lawr
were attractively decorated, de
picting Hallowe'en.
A witch greeted the guests and
served them wi with "itch's' brew
and told their fortunes. Games and
proms were enjoyed, after which
all were invitedto t he dining
room and many gifts were pre-
sented to the honoree as the
guests sang "Happy Birthday to
You." The tae lewas centered with
a large birthday cake with lighted
candles.
Refreshments of cake, cookies,
peanuts and punch were served to
Janie LeHardy, Onnie Lou Le-
Hardy, Helen Wright, Wimbreth
Manasco, Imogene Manasco, Bar-
bara Edwards, Lanell Rowan, Le-
nora Johnson, Bobby Bellows, Ed-
win McGill, Gewel Lewis, Gwen-
dolyn Spencer, Talmon Smith, Foy
Scheffer, Carolyn Baggett, Roy'ce
Goforth, Buck Walton, Joyce Nor-
ris, Gordon Farris, Julianne Hin-
son, Marianne Lewis, Marguerite
Williams, Margaret Colema, Betty
To Lane, Bernice Schneider,,, Mar-
jorie Costin, Dorothy Costin, John
Lane, Billy Hammock, Mary John-
son, Jimmie Taylor, James Tra-
wick, Pigeon Bray, Bennie Tra-
wick, Maurice Fain, Buck Pearsel,
rex Pearsel and WiTbur Darcey.

P.-T. A. EXPRESSES THANKS
TO RESIDENTS OF THE CITY
The Parent-Teachers association
of the Port St. Joe schools is very
grateful for the splendid help it
received from residents of the
city and the business firms when
t staged its annual Hallowe'en
Carnival Saturday.
A large number of people at-
ended during the day and most
f them viewed all the attractions.
L variety of booths provided food
nd refreshments, andi others fur-
ished entertainment. There were
special sideshows and games or
kill, in addition to free entertain-
n the stage.
Coronation of the king anc
ueen took place at 6 o'clock, fol-
owing a parade from the Port Inn
ed by the school band.
People all over town contributed
generously of their time and what-
ver goods were asked of them.
he lumber for the booths was
irnishedi by the St. Joe Lumber
Export Co., the paper and felt
y the St. Joe Paper Co. and the
ectricity by the Florida Power
orp. The city was of assistance
n many ways.
It is impossible to thank every
ne individually who assisted, but
s or her help was very welcome
nd needed, and ft served a good
cause.
The amount the P.-T. A. re-
ized above expenses was $264.25,
which will be utilize for things
'eded in our schools.

TO BE WEEK-END GUESTS
The Misses Sara Hall and Alice
ennedy of Gordon, Ala., will
end the week-end in Port St.
e as guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.
Rollins.

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake were
ek-end visitors in Marianna.


ter, Mrs.. D. Prows aind Mrs.
George Hudson entertained at thli
home of the latter on Seventii
street. Bridge was enjoyed during
the evening and when scores were
tallied, prizes were presented to
Mrs. C. C. Taunton, high; Mrs. V'.
A. Wood, low, and Mrs. T. M.
Schneider, consolation.
Refreshments were served to
. Mesdames Taunton, Wood, Schnei-
der, Bob Smith, Jack Samfordi, B.
,J. Hull and H. C. Spence.
L. *
YOUTH CONFERENCE RALLY
TO BE HELD IN PANAMA CITY
The Alabama Conference Youth
Rally will be held in Panama City
the evening of November 23 at
7:30 o'clock.
All Methodist churches and' the
young people are.urged to co-op-
erate by attending, as this meeting
affords opportunity for all young
people to meet other young peo-
ple, assemblians and district di-
rectors from -the entire conference.
Dr. Watler Towner of Nashville,
Tenn., director of young people's
work, will be in attendance, and it
is hoped that the Marianna dis-
trict, which includes Port St. Joe,
will have a full representation.
*Tr f
ALTAR SOCIETY MEETS
WITH MRS. WHITAKER
The St. Joseph's Altar society
met Monday afternoon at the
home of Mrs. Madeline Whitaker.
The meeting was called to order
with prayer by Mrs. Charles Ste-
phens, with the re-ular business
following. Mrs. J. J. Darcey was
appointed .finance chairman for
the month after which the meetinR,
adjourned and a social hour was
enjoyed during which the hostess
served refreshments. Mrs. Gordol
Warner was a visitor.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Harrelsoc
are announcing the birth of a
daughter, Verna Elaine, on Thurs-
day, October 31.

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Goodman an
nounce the birth of a daughter on
Tuesday, October 29, at their Oak
Grove home.

Mrs. C. A. LeHardy, Mrs. R. V.
Coburn, Miss Myrtice Coody and
Billy Coody spent Monday in Do-
than. Ala.

Mrs. B. F. Hunt has returned to
her home after spending a week
in Blountstown as the guest of her
daughter, Mrs. Addle Bond.


CLASSIFIED ADS

CANARIES

HARTZ MOUNTAIN CANARIES
FOR SALE-Singers, $4 and $5;
hens, $1. See Mrs. W. S. Smith.
Star Office, phone 51.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
MAKE APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE.
Notice is hereby given that I
have filod my final report as ex-
ecutrix of the statee of C. A. I.e-
Hardy, deceased; that I have filed
my petition for final discharge,
and that on the 12th day of No-
vember, 1940, I will apply to the
Honorable Thomas R. L. Carter,
County Judge of Gulf County, Flor-
ida, for approval of said final re-
port and for final discharge as ex-
ecutrix of the will of C. A. Le-
Hardy, deceased.
This 14th day of October, 1940.
ONNIE LOU LeHARDY.
1O 18-11 8 Executrix.


I, t. hiorton o Jacksonville
spent three days this week in the
city on business.

The motorist of today can buy
three new cars for the price he
used to pay for one.



DR. J C. COE
DENTIST--
Office Hours! 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



BAYSHORE
GROCERY AND MARKET
Highland View
We Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts
STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS
We Keep Open Until Noon
Every Sunday


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

SLeHARDY

PHARMACY



QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food'
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
WE DELIVER -





$5

CAN'T BUY A

FINER MAN'S HAT


THAN A$5 DOBBS
0 .,


Believe it or not, a fine five-
dollar Dobbs hat for men is
being made today... and it is
a genuine Dobbs! All the
Dobbs style and good looks.
Everything the Dobbs $
name stands for. 5





/Mai YOW, STOFR

Marianna, Fla.


WILL ATTEND MEETING

ST Bragg and Mrs. R. W. Smith ex-
pect to attend the sectional meet-
ing of woman's club at Quincy to-
morrow.

SHOWER COMPLIMENTS Miss Louise Solomon will leave
MRS. RUSH CHISM today for her home in Perry to
Mrs. Rush Chism was honored spend the week-end with her par-
at a miscellaneous shower Tues. ents.
day evening when Mrs. Ralph Car-


FRIDAY, NOVEMBERS8, 19401


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


so







PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940


BOWLING LEAGUE GETS
UNDER WAY NOV. 11TH

The St. Joe Bowling League will
get underway at the St. Joe Bowl-
ing Alleys on Armistice Day, No-
vember 11, with the following
schedule:
Nov. 11-Paper Makers vs. Little
Potatoes.
Nov. 12-Independents vs. All-
Stars.
Nov. 13-Port Cleaners vs. Tech.
Nov. 1S-Cleaners vs. All-Stars.
Nov. 19-Tech vs. Paper Makers.
Nov. 20-Independents vs. Little
Potatoes.
Nov. 25-Paper Makers vs. In-
dependents.
Nov. 26-Little Potatoes vs. Port
Cleaners.
Nov. 27-Tech vs. All-Stars.

MOTHER OF MRS. McKISSICK
DIES AS RESULT OF INJURY
James McKissick. operator of the
LecIardy Pharmacy, returned to
the city Tuesday from Roanoke,
Ala., where he attended the fu-
neral of his wife's mother. Mr. and
Mrs. McKissick were en route to
Roanoke Saturday when a message
was received here and forwarded
to them that Mrs. McKissick's
mother had been fatally injured
when struck by an automobile in
front of her home.
-- -
Enters Hospital for Treatment
Mrs. Joe Mira and small daugh-.
ter, Dolores, left Thursday of last
week for Pensacola where Dolores
entered a hospital for treatment.
Her many friends hope that she is
improved. Mr. Mira spent the
week-end in the neighboring city
with his wife and daughter.
------- -------
Busses carry 3,742,000 school
children daily.


MERIT SYSTEM EXAMINATION
WILL BE HELD IN DECEMBER
Claude Arrington, chairman of
state welfare district No. 2, an-
nounces that the merit system ex-
aminations to be held jointly by
the state welfare board and, the
Florida Industrial Commission of-
fer an excellent opportunity to
Gulf county residents to qualify
for clerical and professional posi-
tions. Included in the list are ac-
countant, accounting clerk, junior
claims examiner, statistical clerk.
typist, stenographer, junior and
senior interviewer, key punch op-
erator.
Those desiring to take the ex-
aminations must file their applica-
tions not later than November 12
with Jas. E. Chace, Jr., merit sys-
tem supervisor, Gainesville., Fla.,
and that the applications must be
filed on blanks obtained from him.
The examinations will be held
during December in this section ait
DeFuniak Springs, Pensacola, and
Tallahassee.
$(----
STORKS CARRY TRAGIC
PLEAS TO SOU- H AFRICA
Boer farmers in the vicinity of
Johannesburg, South Africa, re-
port that some of the storks ar-
riving there in 'their annual 7000-
mile migration from the Nether-
landis are carrying written mes-
sages on the condition of the
Dutch under Nazi rule.
One farmer said he untied this
scribbled message from the leg of
a migrating stork: "We inhabit-
ants of Bergen-op-Zoom tell you
German occupation is just hell."
Another said, "The Dutch peo-
ple are dying under injustice."
---4-------
By a new system of air condl-
tioning a .tenant pays for 'the
amount of cold water used as in-
dicated by a meter.


"TOM TURK]
m a aaaamUI
WEDNESDAY NOV





.* -2:' / ," .- 1
W .... I ".


BRIGHT LIGHT


JUDY AND MICKEY AT
PORT ARMISTICE DAY

Mickey Rooney annd Judy Gar-
lannd, those amazing adolescents,
are teamed again in "Strike Up
the Band," a tuneful, zestful con-
coction of comedy and music play-
ing Sunday and Monday-Armis-
tice Day-at the Port theater,
which will further solidify their
popularity with film patrons. Paul
Whiteman and his orchestra also
appear in the picture.
The theater will open at 1:15
Monday afternoon for the benefit
of those who desire to see the
picture early and' then participate
in the Armistice Day activities.


Mrs. W. H. Howell, Mrs. J. O.
Bagget.t and Mrs. J. Fillingim at-
tended the Methods Clinic of the
With this new lantern, believed to Baptist Northwest association held
be the brightest portable lantern
in the world, pretty Ida onerman
lights a night target for Fred
Marx. The new lantern, invented WHITE TOP T
by Jackson Burgess of Chicago, is, E T P
180 times as powerful as the best
two-cell flashlight. It is possible to
read a newspaper by its light a FOR PROMl
half mile away. Many defense
uess are foreseen for the lantern, P
especially as an emergency light P H N
for airplane,
----- -- DAY, OF
The state hospital .at Chattahoo-
chee has been accredited by the TAXIS ALWAYS AV
American College of Surgeons. OF ST. JOE TEXACC
giving it as high a rating as gny
institution in the country.


Es l 1 l U


Continuous
Daily from
2:45 p. m.
Saturday's
1:15 p. m.


Open Sunday
1:45 & 8:45
Roy Williams
Manager

Phone 109


Saturday Only-2 BIG FEATURES *


Serial Thrill "DRUMS OF FU MANCHU"
I DR E m In 11'.H 1 W W ME, 9 Em- M E a Ra 0 FI r
Sundav-Moiidav November 10-11
THEATRE OPENS SUNDAY and MONDAY at 1:15 p. m.


LATEST NEWS EVENTS

* TUESDAY ONLY
* NOVEMBER 12

LC I -'L-- LAr.FF






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Danley Furniture Co.

Gulf County's Oldest and Largest Home Furnishers


PHONE 56


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Sat New Hope church, Panama
I City yesterday.



Miss Jessie Miller
THE MOVIE STUNT QUEEN
and Her

IELL DRIVERS
Sunday Monday
NOV. 10 and 11 3 P. M.

St. Joe Ball Park

Thrills Chills Spills


AXI COMPANY


PT SERVICE

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PAUL WHITEMAN and Forces
PAUL WHITEMAN and Orchiest


I


I a -1 I rr


T.HE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE EIGHT


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940


AAAA


. . A,


yidJvf ~


Judy



7i-i


i