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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00211
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 1, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00211

Full Text






The Star-Flori
ing little news
the betterment
the City of


da's fastest grow.
aper--dedicated to
and upt uilding of
Port St Joe.


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Fnture Industrial Center


VOLUME IV PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY,, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940 NUMBER 4
,I


Draft Numbers


For Gulf Listed


In Order Drawn


Selection Indicates Order ir
Which Men Will Appear
Before Local Board

Below are published the Selec-
tive Service serial numbers apply-
ing in Gulf county in the order in
which they were drawn at Wash-
ington. Men holding these num-
bers will be called before the lo-
cal draft board in this order (for
example, No. 105, the 19th number
drawn will be third in order; No.
125, the 1048th number drawn, will
be 36th, and so on).
The highest Gulf county number
assigned is 1427, and those above
that figure, do not apply here un-
less late registrants should be re-


ported:
1- 158
41- 188
119- 161
211- 153
288- 172
412- 167
499-1300
571-1295
602- 156
702- 185
938- 109
955- 174
1050- 138
1145- 135
1165-1373
1262- 146
1399- 83
1668- 181
1538-1398
1644- 72
1707- 702
1763- 136
1804- 612
1817- 203
1863- 165
191-- 159
IS9-- 782
1924- 45
2008- 603
2029- 160
2108- 190


2- 192
46- 120
131- 14
251- 19
309- 126
426- 162
.502-1355
581-1234
657- 676
76,4-1362
944- 184
999- 131
1104- 142
1157- 183
1251- 198
1299- 6
1433- 280
1671-1305
1601- 145
1654- 121
1744- 86
1783- 820
1810- 231
1826- 196
1872- 768
1894- 79
1916- 678
1949- 25
2016- 154
2057- 764
2134- 210


19- 105
94- 846
203- 57
268- 766
367- 187
495- 147
533- 689
582- 31
699- 112
798- 108
949- 116
1048-- 125
1126- 166
1164- 148
1261- 139
1316- 122
1466- 169
1680- 660
1621- 9
1664- 625
1758- 114
1793- 228
1816-1421
1850- 21
1876- 747
1895- 681
1921- 78
1954- 609
2021- 77
2058- 666
2137- 67


No. 130 Is 100th In County
2140- 107, 2173- 130 2188- 59
2200- 74 2231- 246 2265- 667
2270- 176 2274- 781 2329-- 134
(Continued on Page 8)


Home Guard Unit

Is Taking Shape

Non-Commissioned Officers Named
At Meeting Held Monday
Evening

Meeting at the Legion Hut Mon-
day night, recently appointed of-
ficers of the Port St. Joe Home
Guard unit, headed by Sheriff B.
E. Parker as captain, assisted by
Lieut. E. F. Stapleon of the Gult
county CCC camp, named non-
commissioned, officers to carry on
the work of organization, as fol-
lows:
C. H. Johnson, first sergeant;
Arthur Lupton, mess sergeant; W.
C. Wellington, supply sergeant;
W. C. Pridgedn, company clerk;
C. C. Wilson and E. R. Nelson,
platoon sergeants; M. L. Fuller,
G. W. White, D. B. Lewis and F.
Christiansen, section sergeants.
Membership in the organization,
which is voluntary and without
pay, will be open to men from 18
to 20 and 36 up. Uniforms and
equipment will be furnished by
the federal government and the
unit will be maintained by the
state.


I


First Ten In Gulf County Draft

The first ten numbers and the (Gulf county men hold-
ing, them, \\ho will be called first before the locai draft
bo)'iard for consideration of their clans to deferment are:
1. No. 158-Grady McDaniel white, Wewahitchka.
2. No. 192-Otis Hays, colored, Port St. Joe.
3. No. 105-Charlie Watson, colored, Port St. Joe.
4. No. 188-Hurburt A. Davis, white, Port St. Joe.
5. No. 120-Roy A. Myers, colored, Wewahitchka.
6. No. 846-James Sapp, colored, Port St. Joe.
7. No. 161-Jim A. Curry, colored, Port St. Joe.
8. No. 14-George C. Adkins, white, Port St. Joe.
9. No. 57-Dempsey Hewitt, colored, Port St. Joe.
10. No. 153--Henry T. Copeland, col., Port St. Joe.
Additional numbers called in the draft in the order of
the national drawing will be found elsewhere in this issue.


Mrs. Patton Head

Of 1940 Xmas Seal

Drive For St. Joe

Names Committee to Aid In Sale
Of Tuberculosis Stamps; Cam-
paign Opens November 25

Mrs. G. A. Patton has accepted
the post of chairman of the 1940
Christmas Seal campaign in Port
St. Joe and has appointed the fol-
lowing committee members to aid
her in the drive: Mrs. Robert Tap-
per, Catholic Altar society; Mrs.
William Bragg, welfare depart-
ment, Port St. Joe Woman's club;
Mrs. Robert Bellows; Episcopal
Guild; Mrs. L. R. Holliday, Bap-
tist W. M. S.; Mrs. M. L. Fuller,
American Legion Auxiliary; Mrs.
Floyd' Husnt, Methodist Woman's
Society for Christian Service;
Mrs. H. K. Wellington, Parent-
Teachers association; Robert Bel-
lows, Business Men's association,
Jon Stapleton, school principal.
"As in former years," said Mrs.
Patton yesterday, "the school chil-
dren have pledged their help. The
willingness of boys and girls to
help in the fight against tubercu-
losis is of great significance to the
ultimate success of the campaign
to eradicate tuberculosis. Through
active participation in this work,
the boys and girls get valuable
information regarding one of their
deadliest enemies, for tuberculosis
is still the arch-killer of youth in
this country.
"Like all other communities,
Port St. Joe has its tuberculosis
problem, and at least once a year
we should intensify our efforts to
help solve the problem.
"Christmas Seals have helped to
wage a winning fight," concluded
Mrs. Patton, "but we must not be-
come over-confident. As an enemy.
tuberculosis is far from being van-
quished."
The Christmas Seal campaign
opens November 25 and will con-
tinue through Christmas.
-----~-- -
IMPROVING STATION

In keeping with the continued
growth of Port St. Joe the Stan-
dard Oil company this week is
improving the J. Lamar Miller
Standard' Service Station by en-
closing the lubritorlum and install-
ing an additional wash rack. In ad-
dition, the room now occupied by
the present wash rack will be con-
verted into a display and sales
room. This station, Incidentally.
will be the only one in the city to
have a colored rest room. D. it
Lewis, local contractor, is doing
the rg odelrg work.


Rate Reduction

Is Announced By

Power Company

5 Will Affect Commercial Lighting
Rates In West Coast System
Of Florida Power Corp.

Good news indeed for business
houses of Port St. Joe and Apa-
lachicola is the announcement yes-
terday by A. W. Higgins, president
of Florida Power corporation, that
a substantial reduction in commer-
cial lighting rates will be made.
effective with meter readings on
and after December 1.
The new rate is effective in all
territory served by the company's
system on Florida's west coast,
and it is estimated that the reduc-
tion will involve an annual saving
to business firms of more than
$85,000. The new and old commer-
(Continued on Page 8)
-K

P.-T. A. Hallowe'en

Carnival Saturday

Many Attractions at Annual Fete
To Raise Funds for Carrying
On Association Work

Beginning at 4 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon and continuing un-
til 10 o'clock at night, the Pori.
St. Joe Parent-Teachers associa-
tion will hold a Hallowe'en Carni-
val on the vacant lots on Reid
avenue opposite the postoffice for
the purpose of raising funds tb
carry on the very necessary work
of the organization in our schools.
Coronation of the queen will be-
gin the festivities, followed by
free entertainment consisting of a
Hill Billy show, musical selections
by the high school band and glee
club, and a boxing exhibition on.
the outdoor stage.
Booths planned by the students
and teachers consist of the Freak
Show presenting the fat woman.
the two-headed woman and other
sideshow oddities.
There will be a number ot
booths to cater to the inner man
with hot dogs, an assortment of
sandwiches, coffee and confec-
tions. Games of skill will be in
progress at many points on the
carnival grounds.
One of the main attractions will
be "The Wonders of Science and
Magic" show under the direction
of Mrs. Gus Creech and Charles
Brammar.
There will be many amusing
and entertaining booths, so bring
yotlself and the family and let,
the carnival help you have a gay
time while you are helping your
schools.


ST. LOUIS RIOT


The above picture was taken dur-
ing the height of pitched battle
between non-union and union con-
struction workers at Velda Village
Hills, a St. Louis, Mo., subdivision.
last week. A member of the A. F.
of L. picket line of 50 men, routed
by 200 non-union employes of a
building company, died of a frac-
tured skull; 34 were injured and
a number of automobiles smashed.


S i x Amendments

To Be Passed Upon

By Voters Tuesday

83 Changes Proposed In Past 55
Years, 26 of Which Have
Been Defeated

Since it was adopted in 1885, the
constitution of the state of Florida
has been amended 57 times, and if
the voters think it wise it will get
six new patches next Tuesday if
the six amendments on the ballot
get the official okeh of John Q.
Public. In 55 years the legisla-
ture has proposed 83 amendments,
and of these the voters have
turned thumbs d.wn on 26.
Briefly stated, the six that win
be on the ballot Tuesday provide
for:
1. Extending from two to four
years the terms of county com-
missioners and giving the legisla-
ture control over the number of
commission districts in the county,
now limited by the constitution to
five.
2. Creating a state parole com-
mission whose duties would be es-
tablished by the legislature. This
amendment does not repeal the
present constitution's provisions
for the state pardon board com-
posed of the governor and four
cabinet officers, nor does it take
away any of the pardon board's
powers.
3. Extending to every widow
property tax exemption up to $500
nsissed valnuation. The present
constitution limits such exemption
to widows who have dependent
families. The amendment is not
related to the homestead tax ex-
emption because homestead ex-
emption, up to $5000 assessed val-
uation, is extended to every pei-
son who is the head of a family
and occupies the homestead prop-
erty.
4. Abolishing ad valorem tax
upon property for state govern-
ment purposes, including the one
mill now levied for schools. The
present state levy, 3% mills, pro-
duces about $1,250,000 annually.
5. Appointing a seventh justice
to the Florida Supreme Court,
which now has six justices.
6. Authorizing equal distribu-
tion among the counties of money
,(Cetinusei O Page 4)


Grady McDaniel


Is First Called


In Gulf County


Is From Wewahitchka; Otis
Hays, Colored, of This City,
Holds Second Number

The first number drawn in
Tuesday's historic peace-time lot-
tery at Washington, D. C., was 158
and it was that of Grady McDaniel
of Wewahitchka. Secretary of
War Stimson drew it from a big
glass bowl at 12:16 p. m., eastern
standard time, a minute or so af-
ter President Roosevelt said in an
-opening speech that the purpose
of raising a draft army Is "the de-
fense of our freedom."
Standing on a platform in the
large auditorium which was the
scene of the lottery, Mr. Roose-
velt told an audience of more than
1300 that "only the strong may
continue to live in freedom and
peace."
In quick succession other nun-
bers were drawn by high officials
who, like Stimson, were blind-
folded before their hands dipped
into the bowl of blue capsules.
Number 2, drawn by Secretary
of the Terasury Morgenthau, was
announced' by Mr. Roosevelt as
serial number 192. In Gulf coutny
it is held by Otis Hays, colored,
of Port St. Joe.
In his-brief address President
Roosevelt said: "You who will en-
ter this peace-time ..army will be
the inheritors of a' proud history
and an honorable tradition. You
will be members of an army which
first came together to achieve in-
dependence and to establish cer-
tain fundamental rights for all
men.
"You have answered that call,
as Americans always have, and' as
Americans always will. .. YOU
have the confidence, and the grat-
itude, and the love of your coun-
trymen.. We are all with you in
the task which enlists the services
of all Americans-the task of
keeping the peace in this New
World."


Jim Lee to Deliver

Armistice Address

Annual Event This Year Will
Take Form of Defense Day
Celebration

The American Legion committee
in charge of -the Armistice Day
celebration November 11, whicm
this year will be termed "Home
Defense Day" to impress upon the
public the necessity for defense at
home during these parlous times,
announces that State Comptroller
Jim Lee has accepted the honor
of delivering the main address o0
the day for the celebration. There
will be several local speakers on
the program, with Post Com-
mander T. M. Schneider acting as
master of ceremonies.
Details of the celebration were
published- last week in The Star
and the complete program will be
published next Friday.
---4-----
NOTICE

Extra copies of this issue and
last week's issue of The Star,
containing the complete list of
Selective Service numbers for
Gulf county may be secured at
The Star office. Onh a few left.


rTAR








A TN


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMI'TH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year.........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-.{ Telephone 51 )*-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printbd
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

SIX AMENDMENTS TO VOTE ON
The voters of Florida will be called upon
next Tuesday to pass judgment upon six
amendments to the state constitution, that
document which was first drawn up in old
St. Joseph in 1838, although the present con-
stitution as a whole was adopted in 1885.
The voters should carefully consider all of
these amendments on their merits before cast-
ing their ballots, but one of these should by
all means be defeated. We refer to the amend-
ment that would make the term of county
commissioners four years instead of the pres-
ent two years, and which would place future
changes in county commissioners' districts in
the hands of the legislature, as well as give
the legislature power to reduce or increase
the number of county commissioners' districts
in any county at will.
By its passage the various boards of county
commissioners would be placed under the
complete control of the legislature which, if
it saw fit, could abolish or change any district
in which the commissioner did not suit the
member of the legislature from the district.
The office of county commissioner should
be kept close to the people, as it administers
practically all the affairs of local government
and spends the county's own tax money. For
a political football, the result of the passage
of this amendment would hardly have an
equal, for the main platform plank of an as-
piring legislative candidate would be the num-
ber and location of commissioners districts.
In addition, if the county board or any one
of its members choose not to "play ball" with
their legislator, or if a county commissioner
fails to vote to suit some large community to
which the legislator may be indebted, he will
be subject to extinction through a special or
"local" bill to change or abolish some of the
commissioners' districts of that county.
We do not want such an occurrence in Gulf
county, and when the voters consider this
amendment from all angles they will surely
go to the polls Tuesday and defeat the amend-
ment decisively.

Many residents of Port St. Joe who have
been watching Europe during the past year
have had their attention suddenly diverted to
the Far East. At the present time the action
there, so far as we are concerned, is of a dip-
lomatic and not of a military character. But,
in the opinion of many, the question of
whether this country is to remain at peace
or go to war will be answered in that vast
Oriental land that lies some 6000 miles away
from our Pacific coast. We possess the only
checkrcin that can be used against Japanese
ambitions to dominate and control all Asia,
and thus to establish herself as a world
power equal or superior to the United States
and Great Britain.

The number of automobiles and telephones
in use in the United States today is at an all-
time high.


She first has a coming-out party.
that they're staying-out parties.


After


Imagination can spend a pay check before
it is earned.


VOX POPULI, VOX DEI
Next Tuesday the people of Port St. Joe,
along with the rest of the nation, will exer-
cise the most vital of all rights-the right to
vote. They will do it without fear of coer-
cion. Andbefore the calendar moves forward
another day, the world will know whom the
people have selected to head their govern-
ment for the next four years.
In normal times it is important that every
accredited citizen vote. In these chaotic days
we are living through, it is infinitely more
important. In pitifully few great nations does
the right of free and secret franchise still ex-
ist. In country after country the vote has
been taken from the people, or has been
turned into a mockery. And in all the coun-
tries where this has happened the people have
become the slaves of a small and ruthless rul-
ing class-a new race of uncrowned emperors
with unlimited powers whose answer to pro-
test is death and torture and imprisonment.
The ballot is any people's first and last line
of defense against tyranny.
The true feeling of the people can be known
only if all the people are heard-and the bal-
lot is the sounding board for the collective
public voice. The citizen who does not vote is
helping to break down democracy here, and
is undermining the very foundation of our
constitutional system.
Vote Tuesday. Vote for the men whom
you think best qualified to have charge of
government-national and local. That is your
duty and your responsibility.
"Vox populi, vox Dei" still holds true in the
United States.

Congressional reapportionment will not be
the only change of that nature due in Florida
in 1941. The state senate is subject to an
overdue realignment. The constitution re-
quires the governor to call the legislature
back into special session at any time it fails
to reapportion both branches the next session
after completion of a state census. This
hasn't been done since 1935 figures were
marked. Under the constitution, such a spe-
cial meeting can consider no other legislation
and must remain in session until reapportion-
ment is completed.

The increase in volume of business among
the large cypress producers of Florida will
be the greatest in the history of the industry,
according to Ben Ellis, secretary of the South-
ern Cypress association, who credits much of
the increased popularity of cypress as a build-
ing material to the interest aroused by the
cypress display at the Florida building at the
New York World's Fair. The response of
those viewing the display is being felt in
Florida by the demand for cypress by build-
ers from Maine to California.

We were talking to C. W. "Red" Horton
Tuesday about the present upward trend of
business and the let-down that is bound to
occur when the European war ends. Busi-
ness barometers are soaring, and but for one
reason-the arms drive. Hardly an industry
is immune from its temporarily stimulating
effects. We shouldn't get too enthusiastic
over the upturn, but should consider what
will happen when the war ends. We don't
want to seem like gloom dispensers, but it
seenis inevitable to us that one of the great-
est world depressions in history will occur
then.

Bernarr McFadden, we understand, expects
to oppose Claude Pepper for U. S. senator in
1944. Wonder whether he'll be a Democrat,
Republican or Socialist ?

Purchasing power in the United States in
the first half of 1940 was above that of any
comparable period in the nation's history.

With cold weather coming on, the girls
are changing to a warmer shade of chiffon
hose.


Keep smiling!


SUSAN THAYER


THERE she stood on the plat-
Sform before us-a woman, like
the rest of us-yet different. For
she had taken part in one of the
most terrifying dramas, the world
has ever known. That explained
the look of lasting sadness on her
ace and the emotion behind her
low voice as she spoke of her ex-
periences in Europe this past year.
She was in Warsaw when that
ancient city was bombed and told
is what it is like to exist under
that kind of attack. She was in
the Balkans during several weeks
of the winter in a hotbed of inter-
national intrigue. She was in Hol-
land when the holocaust descended!
upon the unprepared Dutch. And
when the great German war ma-
chine swept through the low
countries to Sedan, she was in
Paris.
Those days, she told us, were
he worst in her whole life, as she
waited with the rest of that great
city for-they knew not what-
hearing wild rumors about what-
was happening to their armies in
the north. Then came her flight
from Paris along with hundreds of
thousands of other refugees-the


very well and essential for protec-
tion in these frightful days, but
the great thing that America can
do for the world is to protect the
spark of liberty and to continue to
function on that "tripod of free-
dom" which is composed of repre-
sentative democracy-civil and re-
ligious liberties and free private
enterprise.
Only by clinging to these can we
continue to guarantee the right to
"life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness" which is the very es-
sence of the freedom the whole
world will value again some day.


slow progress on the crowded "" A; .
roadss-the h u n t for food-the
weary weeks in Bordeaux where .;'
'or nights she slept on the floor. ) '
Then the final agony when old .
Marshal Petain announced the sur- .
render of France.
Having told us all she could of
this tragedy of Europe which she
had seen with her own eyes and .,
felt with her own heart, she began
to speak of the future and of our
responsibility as a nation.
No matter what happens now. Until such time as streets and
she sqid, there is little chance for roads can be modernized, the II-
individual freedom in Europe for- linois Road Builders' association
no one knows how long. And if wonders if such a sign as repre-
the idea of the value of the indi- sented here by Shirley James
vidual is to be kept alive it must wouldn't stop the motorists at in-
b- here in the United States. tersections. We'll say it would, if
Armies, navies, airplanes are all a pretty girl held each signrt


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1949







If


HR[COV[ ,-0


You asked for it MR. WILLKIE; Here it is


When in your acceptance speech

at the outset of this campaign you

asked that question "Where is the

Recovery?" you used those very

plain English words-for just one of

two reasons. Either you asked it

honestly-not knowing whether there

had in fact been any recovery under

the Roosevelt adminitsration-or you

sought, by inference, to convey the

impression that there had actually

been no Recovery.



What was your purpose in pro-

pounding that question the answer

to which is so transparently obvious

to every fair-minded open-minded,

American citizen?



If you were asking for informa-

tion if you did not know that there

had been the most amazing recovery

under the Roosevelt administration -

you certainly are not the great suc-

cessful business executive you are

supposed to be; in fact, it can in all

fairness be said you are incredibly and

abysmally ignorant or uninformed.



If, on the other hand, you really

did know of this unprecedented record

of Recovery exceeding that of any


Reprint of an Editorial in Tampa Morning Tribune,
August 25, 1940.
WHERE'S THE RECOVERY?
In his acceptance speech, Candidate Wendell Willkie
said:
"The New Deal believes, as frequently declared,
that the spending of vast sums of money by the gov-
ernment is a virtue in itself. They tell us that gov-
ernment spending insures recovery. Where is the re-
covery?"
That question is answered' by Alan Freeman, a member
of the Ohio bar and a -widely experienced business man,
now sojourning at Auburndale, who recently gave, in this
column, a thorough and convincing statement of New Deal
principles and achievements.
Mr. Freeman referred to his up-to-date and authentic
store of financial and business reports, and he fully and
specifically answers Mr. Willkie's question, "Where is
the recovery?':
First, 'dealing with big business interests, he gives us
this incontrovertible statement of fact:
Comparative earnings of 12 of the largest and most
successful industrial enterprises in America: DuPont,
General Motors, Chrysler, Republic Steel, Bethlehem
Steel, Montgomery-Ward, Goodyear, Goodrich, Gen-
eral Electric, Sears-Roebuck, Westinghouse, Penny.
These 12 firms, employing billions of capital and mil-
lions of workers, made no profit or practically no
profit in 1932. These same firms made a net profit
of $554,000,000 in 1936 and these same firms made a
net profit of $549,000,000 in 1939.
Mr. Freeman accompanies this assertion with the indi-
vidual statements of the companies named-and that is
the answer, in specific financial and industrial instances.
Then he shows "here is the recovery'' in the various
lines of national industry and activity, with the following
verified comparative figures:
Employment 1932, 37,704,999; 1936, 44,783,000
1939, 46,358,000.
Unemployment-1932, 12,478,000; 1936, 7,568,000.
Automobile Production-Passenger cars, 1932, 1,-
186,185; 1937, 4,068,935. Trucks, 1932, 245,282; 1937,
947,502.
Radio Sets in use-1932, 18,000,000; 1940, 40,000,000.
Iron (gross tons)-1932, 8.781,000: 1937, 37,137,000.
Steel-1932, 13,681,000; 1937, 50,569,000.
Electrical Energy (kilowatt hours)-1932, 82,376,-
772,000; 1937, 121,836,813,000.
Building Industry-Dwellings built, 1932, 27,380;
1938, 157,104. Value of all new buildings, 1932, $481,-
219,448; 1938, $1,175,841,359.
Prices received by Farmers for Various Commodi-
ties-1932 compared with 1936: Wheat, 32.9 to 92;
corn, 19.1 to 53; hogs, 3.8 to 8.91; beef cattle, 4.3 to
6.22; sheep, 2.5 to 4.34; wool. 12.5 to 24.1; cotton, 5.6
to 11.1; potatoes. 47.1 to 65.4.
Rayon Production-1932, 134,000,000; '36, 277,000,000.
Value of Manufactured Products-1935, $44,993,-
698,000; 1937, $60,993,600,000.
Total Foreign Trade-1932, $2,933,790,000; 1937,
$3.349,167,000.
Total Exports-1932, $1,611,016,000; 1937, $3,349,-
167,000.
New and Refundinq Capital Issues-1932, $1,751,-
000,000; 1936, $6,214,000,000.
New Capital Issues-1932, $720,000,000; 1936, $1.-
949,000,000.
Bank Clearings 16 Larqest American Cities-1933,
$222,272,000,000: 1938. $257.637,000.000.
Bank Deposits-1932, $41,634,000,000; 1938, $55,999,-
000,000.
Postal Revenues and Expenditures-Gross revenue,
1932, $588,171,000; 1938, $728,634,000. Gross expense,
1932, $793,648,000; 1938. $772.445,000.
National Income-1932, $38,000,000,000; 1939, $68,-
o00.000,000.
Retail Sales-1933. $25.037,000,000; 1935, $33,161,-
000,000. Latest authentic figures substantially larger
-not available from same source.
Ciciret and C nar. C.ninmrntion--Ciaarets, 1932,
106.nno0 noo.00 : 9q37. eiq.nnn.o00.000. Cigars, 1932,
4,382.000.000: 1937. 5 303.000.000.
Bank'Failures-1930 to 1933 inclusiv- (Hnnver al-
ministration) 5730: total deposits, $3,619.000,000. 1934
to 1937 inclusive (Roosevelt administration) 194: to-
tal deposits. $76,000.000 (30 times as many under
Hoover as under the first four vears of Roosevelt,
with 50 times the amount of deposits.
Commercial Failures-1932, 31 8A2: liabilities, $928,-
000,000. 1937, 9490; liabilities, $183.000.000.
Do we azain hear from Indiana the plaintive inquiry:
"Where is the recovery?"
There it is, in the plain, unmistakable terms of statis-
tical fact.
Mr. Freeman is justified in commenting: "There was
absolutely no foundation for the claim made by Mr. Will-
kie as to the non-success of the New Deal. It has worked
and has worked magnificently, and if he thinks for one
moment that this nation would tolerate a Hoover agarn,
serving as an adviser, a President Emeritus. or perhaps
in the cabinet, he just doesn't know the American people."


like period in the Nation's history -

and sought by inference to create the

impression that there had been NO

recovery, you were then guilty of a

flagrant wrong in that you were

trying to misinform to mislead and

delude your vast audience.




In that event you certainly

are not entitled to the trust, the con-

fidence, or the votes of any fair part

of the Electorate for we in Amer-

ica want unswerving integrity, com-

plete candor and undeviating honesty

in the man we select tor the highest

office within the gift of the Ameri-

can people.




In the event you are unbelievably

ill-informed we give you herewith

the facts you certainly ought to

know.




We also call them to the atten-

tion of the voters you are either ig-

norantly or willfully trying to mis-

lead.




Even you, Mr. Willkie, on the

basis of the record, really ought to

support the President.


I(Paid Political Advertising)


PAGE THREE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE,. GULF COUNTY,'FLORIDA


FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 1, 1940


r


nERE S


Emmm m m




HE








A OE LP


Big Western Cast

In 'Rangers' Film

"Rangers of Fortune," At the Port
Theater Sunday and Monday,
Is Tale of the Old West

A resounding tale of the cactus-
covered plains of tile old west-
of romance, f'm!iiing conurag aend
plain and fancy gun-fi'rhting--is
on its way to the Port theater.
where "Rangers of Fortune" will
play Sunday and Monday.
The drama is wound about the
fortuens of three caballeros played
by Fred MacMurray, mastermind
of the trio; Albert Dekker, a
brawilng fool who never uses his
gun where his hands will do, and
Gilbert Roland, whose romantic
heart gets him into more trouble
than his friends can fight their
way out of.
The story hits its pitch in a
town near the Mexican border
where a newspaper publisher is
fighting the violence of a sinister
gang. Casting tieir lot with the
editor, the trio finds itself involved
in necktie parties, shooting scrapes
andi finally in a battle that clears
out the gang preying on the local
ranchmen.
$(-------
CARD OF THANKS
We take this method of express-
ing our heartfelt thanks to our
friends who were so liberal with
their kindness of deeds, words and
sympathy, and beautiful floral ot-
ferings during the illness and
death of Mr. Jones' sister, Mrs.
Violet R. Morris.
Mr. and Mrs. Troy Jones.


CLASSIFIED ADS

CANARIES

HARTZ MOUNTAIN CANARIES
FOR SALE-Singers, $4 and $5;
hens, $1. See Mrs. W. S. Smith,
Star Office, phone 51.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
MAKE APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE.
Notice is hereby given that I
have filed my final report as ex-
ecutrix of the estate of C: A. Le-
Hardy,'deceased; that I have filed
my petition for final discharge,
and that on the 12th day of No-
vember, 1940, I will apply to the
Honorable Thomas R. L. Carter,
County Judge of Gulf County, Flor-
ida, -for approval of said final re-
port and for final discharge as ex-
ecutrix of the will of C. A. Le-
Hardy, deceased.
This 14th day of October, 1940.
ONNIE LOU LeHARDY,
10 18-11 8 Executrix.


Bowl for Sport

Some sports cost a lot of
money, demand trips away
from home. But bowling gives
maximum sport at minimum
cost. It's a sport that any-
one can learn and enjoy.
You'll enjoy it more on our
splendid alleys, in a pleasant
atmosphere.




ST. JOEBOWLING


ALLEYS


Lewis and Sons

Hudson Dealers

For Port St. Joe

Invitation Extended to Public to
Inspect 1941 Line Now
On Display

The MI. C. Lewis and Sons Gar-
age, newly appointed lHudson deal-
ers for Port St. Joe and vicinity.
have on display one of the 1011
models of this well known car and
extend a cordial invitation to all
motorists of Gulf county to drop
in and inspect it.
"Three new lines of 1941 I- Hud-
son cars featuring a brand new
style achievement called 'Sym-
phonic Styling', striking new body
designs. longer wheelbases and a
host of new features are embodied
in these cars," states Hilton Lewis.
"In the lowest price field Hud-
son offers a new 92-horsepower
six on a 116-inch wheelbase with
a longer, lower body, increased'
performance and an extensive list
of refinements and improvements,
and a still lower priced model, the
Hudson Six Traveler, with the
same power and wheelbase.
"Hudson's new 1941 front-end
design is distinctly re-styled in a
more decorative chrome treatment.
Scores of new comfort and con-
venience features appear on all
1941 models, and the luggage com-
partment, already the largest in
the industry, is still larger for
1941.
"There are hundreds of other
improved details," concluded Mr.
Lewis, "and the best way to ap-
preciate them is to see the car
now on display at our salesroom.
We invite everyone to drop in at
any time, and we will be glad to
noint out to them the many su-
perior advantages embodied' in the
new 1941 Hudson line."


DEATHS


MRS. VIOLET MORRIS
Mrs. Violet Morris, 43,. passed
away early last Friday morning
at the home of her brother, Troy
Jones, after an illness of .several
weeks. Funeral services were held
5'riday afternoon at Hinson Meth-
odist church, with interment in
Concord cemetery. W. G. Alsip ot
this city acted as one of the pall-
bearers.
Dereased is survived by her
husband, R. C. Morris of Atlanta,
"a.; two children, Horace Man-
ville andi Mrs. T. V. Rivers, also
of Atlanta; three brothers, Troy
Jones of this city, Harvey Jonqs
of Havana, and Hillei'y Jones of
Quincy; three sisters, the Misses
Kathleen and Bessie Jones of Tal-
lahassee and M.rs. C. E. Dickey of
Hinson.

G. L. DUREN
G. L. Duren, 45, passed away at
his home here Tuesday morning
following an illness of several
months. -ie came to Port St. Joe
:"oam CGor giaa about three years
ago and established a small grocery
business. Funeral services were
held yesterday at the Big Creelt
church near Thomasville, Ga. De-
ceased is survived by his widow,
three sons, John, Walter andl En-
gene Duren, and one daughter-
Mrs. J. E. Jenkins of this city.

"LONDON CAN TAKE IT"


One of the most patriotic pic-
tures to be seen at this time will
be shown at the Port theater next
Tuesday, according to Manage~
Roy Williams. It shows the actual
bombing of London, uncensored. It
also shows the high morale of the
people under the heavy bombarc-
ment and the retaliatory measures
Britain is taking against the Nazis.

August Mahon of the U. S. naval
training station at Norfolk, Va., is
visiting his parents', Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Mahon.


New Style Idea Featured in 1941 Hudsons


C.
S ( 5r ~ .5


This inew 1941 Hudson Six Sedan features longer, lower
body design, longer wheelbase and a new styling devel-
opment called Symphonic Styling which appears for the
first time in standard production and is offered to buyer,


SIX AMENDMENTS
TO BE PASSED UPON

(Continued from Page 1)
raised by taxes on pari-mutuel wa-
gering and admissions to horse
and dog racing and jai alai estab-
lishments. This method of distribu-
tion never has been contested in
the courts, and the amendment
would specifically authorize it.
There in a nutshell are the
amendments, Mr. and Mrs. Voter,
and it is in your hands to decide
whether or not these amendments
shall become law. Study them
carefully before voting, andi then
vote accordingly-but vote!
Affirmative approval by a ma-
jority of the voters who partici-
pate in the general election is
necessary to ratify a constitutional
amendment.
--K----
Billy Coody, Max Maddox and
Willis Rowan expect to leave
Tuesday for Tampa, where they
will enter training in an aeronau-
tical school.


at no extra cost, even in the lowest price field. This
model is mounted on 116-inch wheelbase, 3 inches longer
than previously, and is powered with a 92 horsepower
engine.


PORT NEWS
Motorship Aztec from Houston,
Texas, sailed Tuesday after dis-
charging cargo of fuel oil for the
St. Joe Paper company.
S.S. Ruth, Bull Line, is due to
make port Monday for cargo of
paper from St. Joe Paper Co.

Trade at home-your local mer-
chants have just what you want.


BUILDING PERMIT
A building permit for $1000 was
issued this week to J. Lamar Mil-
ler for construction of an addition
to his Standard service station.
-____--___
It is predicted that 25 per cent
of the textiles that will be In gen-
eral use five years from now will
be made from materials not now
available.


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE


PHONE 100 *

DAY. OR NIGHT
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT ,
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION C-

Bt g e^pfs'"-i^'taiiafe;iC>',crta


Wle Are Proud to AlnouInce .


WE'RE SELLING HUDSON NOW!
It gives us -recar pleasure to announce our oew association n ith
Hudson...in association that makes it possible for us to bring
our Iriends and customers rodj\'s finest automobile values.
Come in and see us-we proumse )ou lasting satisfaction.


. :. ".<^,9:w ise aver5 a.rsy-maiUs.1

A BIG NEW SITLE IDEA! ~AEST CAR EVER BUILr! VA E W T EQ
Ptented Douhle-Safe Hydrau- VALUE WITHOUT EQUAL
(k.lics (two-way stopping from Longer Wheelbases, Roomier
Forthe firsttim in low priced cars, ihe same foot pedal); Patented Bodies, Still Easier Riding and
a choice of interior color com- Auto-Poise Front Wheel Control, Driving, New Improved Type
binations that harmonize with for extra safety even if a tire Synchronized Silent Mesh Trans-
exterior colors. NO EXTRA COSTI blows; and other unique safety mission... 1941's Best Investment
features, in All-Around Value.
s~ ~---~_--~p. I-A-o-mr-


Hudson Offers Fine Automobiles In Every Popular Price Class
AT NEW PRICES STARTING AMONG AMERICA'S LOWEST
New Hudson Six and Super-Six (in the lowest and low price fields); New
Commodore Six and Eight and Commodore Custom (in the moderate
price field). MORE CAR for LESS MONEY in Every Popular Price Class.
Car illustrated is new Hudson Six De Luxe 4-Door Touring Sedan, $856*.
\White sidewall tires and De Luxe Running Boards extra; with or without
standard running boards-no extra cost.


$695
fornew 1941 Hudson SixCoupe, *delivered
in Detroit, including Federal taxes, not in-
cluding state and local taxes, if any. Low
time payment terms. Prices subject to
change without notice.


M. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE


Monument Ave.


Port St. Joe, Fla.


- -- - - -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940


PAGE FOUR


L ~"' '
---~-- ... ...i~i~-u~.... w\ ..r *.rrr* r-~u r~ --~. ...n. w~.' .......... .r ...xr








Ri I Y, N 4- T 4T- F


PAPER MILL EMPLOYES
HONOR NAVARRES
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Navarre were
honor guests last Friday evening
at a farewell dance held in the
Centennial auditorium, tendered
by employes of the St. Joe Paper
company, Mr. Navarre having re-
signed as mill superintendent.
Mr. Navarre was presented, with
a sterling silver loving cup as a
token of esteem, and Mrs. Navarre
was the recipient of a spray of
American beauty roses. Approxi-
mately 200 guests attended the af-
fair.


ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE 7 0
WEEK -$7.

Dining Room

Open to the Public

Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....26e
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 0 to 8 ..........35


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


9*0 **S** 4 <




|OOA

-
* *-


STHE PERFECT FUEL
* FOR EVERY HOME!
Winter is at hand and we 4
have just received a carload
Sof coal, one of the finest fuels.
* that you can depend on for
* heating your home during the
41 cold weather. Call us-

g PHONE 70
* TV *

" C. W. HORTON '

I1 Port St. Joe, Fla.
41@ <#+ A


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection



SOLOMON'S


DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Juices

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative


s


w
P
*<


Dates to Remember


The next meeting of the Parent-
Teachers Association will be on
Thursday night, November 7, at 8
o'clock, in the high school audi-
toriiun.
The next meeting of the Parent-
Teacher association is scheduled
for Thursday night, November 7.
at 8 o'clock. Everyone is urged to
attend.


WOMAN'S CLUB EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE MEETS
A meeting of the executive com-
mittee 'of the Port St. Joe Wo-
man's Club was held Wednesday
afternoon at the home of Mrs. R.
R. Minus on Eighth street, with
Mrs. R. W. Smith in charge.
Purpose of the meeting was to
discuss a heating plant for the
Centennial building, a project of
the club year, also curtains for
the stage. A report was heard from
the committee investigating the
purchase of a piano for the club
room. A current affairs group was
organized at this time.
It was announced that the sec-
tional meeting will be held in
Ocala, November 7 and 8. Plans
were made for the next meeting.
Wednesday, November 6, after
which adjournment was in order.

RUTH CIRCLE IN CHARGE
OF BAPTIST W. M. S. MEET
The monthly stewardship pro-
gram for the Baptist Missionary
society was presented Monday at-
ternoon at the church by the Ruth
Circle, with Mrs. J. 0. Baggett
presiding. Topic for the month is
"God's Unchanging Plan of Stew-
ardship."
Following the regular opening
interesting talks were given by
members: "Unchanging Steward-
,hip" by Mrs. Baggett; "The Un-
changing Tithe," by Mrs..L. R-
T-olliday; "The Motive of the
Tithe," by Mrs. Charles McClellan;
"The Measure of the Tithe," by
Mrs. Johnson; "The Method of
Tithe," by Mrs. E. B. Dendy; "The
Debtless Denomination," by Mrs.
C. Palmer and Mrs. C. G. Costln.
The meeting was dismissed with
prayer by Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
AUXILIARY INSTALLS
The Iottie Moon Girls' Auxiliary
of the Baptist church held the h
installation services at the church
last Friday afternoon with the fol-,
lowing taking office: Carolyn Gag-
neiux, president; Mary Louise
Wooden, vice- president; Jackie
Fillingim, secretary, and Margaret t
Mincey, treasurer. Geraldline Park-
'r was named program chairman;
Dorothy Minus, social chairman;
Wilna Wooden, personal service
chairman, and Sadie Wooden as
stewardship chairman. w
After the business meeting a
weiner and marshmallow roast
vas enjoyed. B


MRS. LARKIN ENTERTAINS
Mrs. M. B. Larkinn entertained
Tue-rday with one table of bridge
at her home on Eighth street. Af-
ter an hour of play, delectable re-
ir-nshmn-ts were served to Mes-
dames Joe Grimsley, C. Trammell
and D. C. Smith.

Russell Cawthon and sons were
visitors Saturday in DeFuniak
Springs.

Mrs. Russell Morris and Mrs. C.
Gainer visited last Saturday in
Chattahoochee.

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Zachry,
Miss Clei Zachry and the Misses
Doris and Judy Greer of Cussetai
Ga.. were -the week-end guests of
Jimmie Greer.


BAND BOOSTERS CLUB TO
SELL SCHOOL CAR TAGS
At the Band Booster's club meet-
ing at the high school Tuesday
night it was reported that automo-
bile plates in the school colors had
bioeu ordered and would soon be
placed on sale. Everyone owning
a car is urged to buy one andl help
the band.
The nieeling was presided over
by I-owell Hampton, bandmaster,
in the absence of the president.
Reports of committees were heard
and payment of bills approved.
It was agreed that a committee.
be appointed consisting of the
president, a trustee and other
members of the club to contact
civic organizations and ask for
v~pn-Tv larlpQ fn, qinr 1


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor
/


yearly pledgers ovr support~ of n th atti ilb hiln
bandl~~~~~~~~~ ac nhtaea ~rnA~n


WOMAN'S SOCIETY HOLDS
STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM
The Woman's Society of Chris-
tian Service of the Methodist
Church met at the church Monday
afternoon for their stewardship
program, with Mrs. J. L. Sharit in
charge. The following program
was presented:
Hymn, "We Give Thee But Thine
Owfi";. scripture by Mrs. A. M.
Jones, Jr.; prayer by Mrs. C. A.
Lupton; talk, "Stewardship," by
Mrs. D. B. Lay; affirmation of
stewardship, read in 'unison; con-
cluding hymn.
After the program plans were
made for the week of prayer be-
ginning Sunday and continuing
through November 11. Next Mon-
day a luncheon will be held at the
church at 12 o'clock, followed by
a business meeting and the first
meeting of the week of prayer.

MRS. MORTON HONORED
WITH SURPRISE SHOWER
Honoring Mrs. Jimmy Morton, a
recent bride, Mrs. Harry Brewton
and Mrs. James Duffell were co-
hostesses Tuesday evening at a
surprise shower given at the home
of Mrs. Duffell. The Hallowe'en
motif was carried out and at the
appointed time the gifts were pre-
sented by a witch. Pumpkin sand-
wiches. black cat cookies an,
witches' brew were served as re-
freshments.

MRS. T. OWENS HOSTESS
TO THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Tom Owens entertained the
Thursday Bridge club yesterday at
her home on Long avenue. Mari-
golds and black-eyed Susans aided
in carrying out the Hallowe'en dec-
orations. After several progres-
sions, scores were tallied and high
and cut prizes presented. The hos-
tess served delicious refreshments
to members and invited guests.

LEGION AUXILIARY MEETS
The American Legion Auxiliary
net at the Hut last Friday night
with the president, Mrs. M. L.
'uller, in the chair.
The meeting was opened by
bandmaster Howell Hampton play-
ng "The Star Spangled Banner."
allowed by Allegiance to the Flag
nd the preamble to the constitu-
ion repeated in unison.
After the business was dispensed
'ith, Mrs. Madeline Whitaker
ave a very interesting report o0-
he luncheon-meeting held in Ap-
lachicola honoring the state and
district Auxiliary presidents. Mrs.
ois VanHorn of Pensacola, past
resident, gave a short talk, after
which the meeting adjourned.

Charles Lewis of the T. S. train-
Ig station at Norfolk, Va., is the
uest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
B. Lewis.
*f *&r **
Mrs. C. P. VanHorn of Pensacola
enrt Thursday and Friday of last
eek here as the guest of Mrs. J.
Gloeckler.


tion and undefeated.

DANCE TONIGHT
The juniors are still trying to
reach their goal for the junior-
senior banquet. Since the game
with Chattahoochee today is prob-
ably one of the biggest games of
the season, the juniors are spon-
soring a dance at the Centennial
auditorium tonight a~ 7:30 o'clock.
The juniors will appreciate all co-
operation of the student body.

LET'S ALL GO TO THE GAME!
Let's all give Chattahoochee a
warm welcome today. It has been
arranged so that each class can
attend the game for one dollar,
therefore we want to see all of ou-
studentbody out there backing the
Sharks and rooting them on to
victory. It is rather hard for the
cheer leaders to get the crowd to-
gether due to lack of bleachers,
but with the support of the stu-
dentbody our yells will go over
big and help our players.


Why did
of the bus
S.-Maybe


GOSSIP
Gordon sit in the front
going to Sopchoppy? P.
he had orders.


CAN YOU IMAGINE
Ora Lee G. with "Hoot" R?
Gordon without Marianne?
Seniors that aren't "bossy"?
Gordon F. saying "no ma'am"?
Bernice S. quiet in school (or
out)?
Fay Scheffer always working?
Gewel L. another Heddly Lamar?

LOGIK
Question: Why are fire trucks
red?
Well, a fire truck is a truck (na-
turally). A truck is a dance. A
dance is two people. Two people
is four feet. One-fourth of four
feet is a ruler. Queen Mary is a
ruler. "Queen Mary" is a ship on
the sea. There are fish in the
sea. Fish have fins. The Russians
were fighting the Finns. Russians
are Reds. Fire trucks are always
"rushing." Therefore fire trucks
are red. Q. E. D.
-------r-i
Autha Forehand spent the week-
end in Pensacola. He was the
guest of Cornelius VanHorn.

Carlyle Matthews and Jessie
Stone were week-end visitors in
Newville and Ozark, Ala.

Mrs. A. E. Sarvis of Carrabelle
-'-?s t ru' nest Tuesday of Mr. and
Mrs. R. W. Smith.

Mrs. Philip Lovett was dismissed
from a Panama City hospital Mon-


Mary. we wouldn't trust Jimmie day and has returned, to her home.
T. out on Sunday afternoons --- ----
alone. He might get in Edward The Star is $2 per year-sub-
E.'s car with F. M. C. (He might). scribe now!


] u sinrti


/ f it






"-.4-, '.


, You'll notice the greater beauty
of Humming Bird Nylon Hosiery
when you first see them. When you wear
them you'll find many other fine qualities
... greater strength, higher elasticity...
more comfortable fit. Select Humming
Bird Nylon to match your navy blues,
grays and pastels. Two weights,'


- ,..,'- U










H N.








I


Marianna, Fla.


Sissy and Luther were doing ai-
THE TATTLER right together Monday night. What
do you think?
"Sees All, Knows All, Tells All What happened to Buck Monday
About Port St. Joe High School" night, Royce?
J. S. seems to be a ladies' man.
EDITED BY THE JUNIOR CLASS: Or should we say a "lady" man,
Editor-in-Chief.......Buck Waiters G. H.?
Assistant Editor.... Royce Goforth The junior boys are really learn-
Society Editor....."The Snooper" inc how to dance.
Sports Editor..........John Lane We are all glad to see Buck P.
taking to our nightt life.
Boy! Did we have a shock when
UNDECIDED VICTORY 'FOR we saw Merrill all dresesd up Mon-
THE SHARKS; PLAY CHAT- day night!
TAHOOCHEE HERE TODAY It surely w;s foggy Mionday
The Sharks played a hard-fought night. Foy had to stop three times.
grid game last Friday in Sop- Betty J. L. and "Hoot" don't
choppy, which is still undecided as seem to be losing any time.
Susan and "Cou'n" are doig
to which team was the victor. usan and are d g
There were~ no .lsubsiittions madrl "rite fine." Don't you think so?


1(


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE l:IVEl


throughout the game for the local
team.
Today the Sharks play the big-
gest game of the season when
they tangle with Chattaohochee on
the local field'. We assure you








PAGESIXTHESTAR POT S. JO, GLF OUNT, FORIA FRDAY NOEMBE 1.1g4


Final Listing of

Draft Numbers


The Star herewith publishes the
re-mainder of the Selective Service
numbers, the first of which were
printe'l !ast week. The Star re-
c'eives no pay for this, but believes
it to be a public duty for the bene-
lit of Gulf county residents. The
list should be published in the "of-
ficial" county seat paper, which
receives all paid county legal ad-
vertising, but since it is not, The
Star is glad to perform this public
service without cost.
PORT ST. JOE (White)
(Continued from Last Week)
747 Williiam Dunkin Wilson
748 Murray Hollis Poole
749 Willard Jones
750 Frank Versiga
751 Cliff Gay
753 Norton Elmer .Roberts, Jr.
754 Walter Edwin Tryon
757 Vernon Summers
759 Hugh Willard Griffin
768 Edward David Daneault
769 Harry Daniel Johnson
770 Chajlie Franklin Morlow
773 Spence Evins Griffin
774 Homer Alfred Smith
775 Curtis Ediward Armstrong
779 Albert Alton Wynn
789 Robert Alton Dendy
791 Cecil Vance McMillan
792 John Calvin Thompson
793 William Allison Bounds
794 Frank Winfred Locks, Jr.
795 Paul Justice Blount
799 Kenneth Clyde Grant
S01 Ronald Hugh Outlaw
802 R. E. Greene
803 Miles Kenneth Hurlbut
804 Charles Norman Cooper
S05 L. E. Hencerson
806 Arthur Lee Ezell
807 Walter Brownle Richards
808 John Wesley Maddox
809 Willie Redman Blount
810 Otis Riley Pyle
814 George Geraud Tapper
815 Albert Theodore Gagneux
816 William Morgan Coody
817 John Edward Harrison
818 Arthur Henry Hill
S21 Johnnie Roy Carroll
823 Samuel Alexandler Young
824 Theodore Okley Rfchards
825 Barney Henry Mashburn
826 Marvin Anderson Foley
827 Madison Brooks Kennington
828 John Rufus Holcombe
830' John Parker Morrison
232 Oliver Durward Stringfellow
834 Kenneth Alwyn Creech
836 Sibley Lee Alford
837 Basil Edward Kenney, Jr.
838 Youal Lee Wages
840 Robert Leon Daniels
847 William Carl Kelly
848 Lonnie Gay
849 Thomas Andrew Owens
S50 John Weems Core
851 William Arvis Johnson
852 Aubry McWilliams
853 John Wesley Blount
854 Jack Thorne
855 Charlie Russell Morris
856 Gerald Jordon
857 Leslie D. Davis
858 Leonard Price Sutton
859 Coleman Wilmer Tharpe
860 James Leslie Pope
861 Wilburn Alexander Mims
862 Willard Land
864 Fred, D. Warren Kemp
865 George Allie Whittington
867 Thomas Austin Huggins
868 Paul Edward Bass
869 John Pascal Duren
870 John Green Blount, Jr.
871 John Herbert Gould
872 David Conely Raiford
873 Earnest John Rich
874 Lennie Starford Morris
875 Joseph Duke Sherrer
876 Aubrey Lee Williams
877 William Clay Stokes
878 'M. C. Wood
880 Norman McLeod LeMaistre
883 Howell Morton Hampton, Jr.
884 James Pickette Kilbourn
885 Charles Leland Byrd
886 Lawson Martin Denton
887 Tom Levins
891 Robert Henry Sewell
892 William Henry Blount
893 Stokee Anthony Domengeaux
901 Howard Larry Bare
902 John Dorman Goodman
903 Henderson Charles Spence
904 David Ellis Malone
905 Eugene Wesley Webster
909 Jack Clayton Hall
912 Chesley James Curry
915 David Russell Nelson 1
919 Benjamin Waldon Stevenson 1
920 Rupert Randall Ray
922 Allen Vincent Kemp 1
923 Lewis Paul Curtis Padgett 1
925 Marion George Grogan 1
930 James Albert Haarala
931 David Henry Jones 1
932 Isaac Watson- Dodson 1
933 Carl Levoid Armstrong 1
935 Isaac.Walter Duren 1
9fi6 'Gordon Lord Bowen 1
937 Lewis Columbus Gay 1
938 Doyle Jackson Miller 1
941 'Ihomas Edison Allen. 1
942 Theodore Roosevelt Bishop 1
944 Ronald Deamond Eubanks 1
945 Talmadge Brook Bullock 1
946 Thomas Marvin Glisson 1
947 James Daniel Holland 1
948 Earl Mack Crum 1
949 Harvey Alfred Stevenson 1


050
951
952
953
957
958
9(63
984
9S5
986
987
991
992
1001
1008
100!
10B
101:
1011
101:
101'
1014
101'
1017
1018
1019
1020
1023
1024
1025
1026
1027
1028
1029
10.34
1036
1037
1038
1041
1042
1056
1057
1061
1062
1063
1065
1066
1067
1069
'078
1081
1089
1090
1091
1092
1093
1099
1100
1108
1110
1113
1114
1119
1120
1121
1122
1123
1124
1125
1126
1130
1131
1132
1138
1139
1140
1141
1142
1143
1144
1145
1147
1148
1152
1153
1154
1155
1156
1157
1159
1160
1161
1162
1163
1164
1166
1167
1170
1171
1172
1174
1186
1187
1188
1189
1191
1193
1196
1198
1199
1207
1208
1211
121.6
1221
1222
1923.
1224
1225
1226
1229
1230
1231
1234
1234

1941
1242
1946
9.477
1250
251
952
255
256
257
258
259
260
9112
267

2687
275


George Henry Whitside
Gabe Wood
lMathis Franklin Wood
Samuel David Sapp
Charlie Ruben Clanton
Wilon Obediah Kennedy
Leonard Garrett
Shelby Lee Stringfellow
Brown Hunter Byrd
Jack Ivan Samford
lWilliam Judson Edwards
George Bernard AicLawhon
William MIyles Danderidge
0 James Robert Norton
8 Clarence Bazell Chavers
9 Willie Otway Nichols
0 Welton Chester Roche
I James Roy Bush
2 Bertel Jabez Hull
3 Wilbur A. Wells
4 Theodore Graham Frary
6 Barney Franklin Foley
7 James William Burns
8 George Wesley White
SJon Lawson Stapleton
) William Franklin Harris
3 John Henry Smith
I Homer Lee Goff
Ben Scott
SAlcus Cook
7 Walter Daniel Nelson
Marrin Jackson Fillingim
SMaxwell Woodrow Fleming
SWerley James
Clyde Richard Allen
Ben Lee Smith
IH enry Clay Thomason
SNoah Nathaniel Danley
SGeorge Lampkin Kennington
Medie White Rogers
William Woodrow Melvin
Charles Harper Scott
Edgar James Wynn
Benjamin Thomas Ansley
Andrew Preston Martin
Noah Abe Rushing
Jack Walton Sisemore
Lewis Elzie Bass
William Henry Welmon
Jesse Lester Burkett
Birtie L. Watson
Sam Linton
Frank White
J. C. Thomas
Jeff Dykes
Colice Francis Guertin
Will George Alsip
Robert S. Lee Williams
Clarence Edward Boyer
George Charlie Dykes
SBertis Thomas McKnlgnt
Arthur Mixon
Jenning Jerome Earnest
David Ambers Boyett
Ausley Charles Stoutamire
Edigar Hagans
John Kramer, Jr.
Hilery Hibbert Bell
Johnny Dewitt Todd
George Edward Meek
B. F. Daughtry
Eddie C. Gibson
Alex LeGrone
John Wesley Gilmore
Harvey Meigs Hallman
Charles Roland Mahon, Jr.
'Charles Burl Crawford
Ira Leo Maddox
Hughie Wilson Weldon
Ingran Reginald Ingram
Deey Covington
Henry Barnett Blackmon
,George Horace Byrd
James Curtis Evans
Dewey Earl Robertson
Gord(dn Allen
Curtis Talmadge Obrian
,AugustusWashingtonThomas
Murray Hayze Wilson
Morris Allan Geiger
Dennis Jefferson Norris
Woodrow Wilson Campbell
Walter Broward White
Wm. Alexander Childs, Jr.
James Elfer Bounds
Woodrow Wilson Ferrell
Ronald Aziel Adams
DeLamar Sansom
Thurman James Melrin
Jacob Chapman Belin
Coleman Clayton Smith
Roy Benjamin Evans
John Willie Brooks
Floyd Hawthorne
Jerome Evans Lester
Oradv W lliamsn
James Edward Lindsey
Charley McMullen
Lester Bniamin Benner
Malcom E. Wiclke
James Lvmon Fuller
P. Q Johnson
How,-rd Taft Nowling
James Aubrey Graves
Chlnrlie Thomas Sullivan
William Gordon Slemmons
Arthur Perrine Collins
Stetson Connell Pridigeon
Charlie Anderson Cannon
Harvey Burns Boyett
Joseph Malcolm Arrant
JaRm s Ambrus Whitehurst
William Joseph Ferrell
Joel Aubrey Carr
Rolhrt Knz'e Attaway
William Malcolm Ebersole
Fred PPerv
Novel FrIward Gore
Mervin Daniel Thurman
James Fdward Dunlap
JTosePmh T'llw Davis
Harold Curtifs Palmer
Mack Alien Kigdon
Woodrow Lerboy Talley
'Cleo Clyde Lunsford "
William Edward Whaley
Jim Harrison
Mark Martin Sapn
CharlieM Wa*insion Sapp 1
Thomas Van'horn Mizner ,
Gradv Henry Keels
Hershel Watson 1


445
446
447
448
449
450
452
454
456
475
484
501
596
682
690
708
709
710
718
721
722
723
724
725
737
758
762
763
764
765
780
781
785
786
790
812
820
822
833
881
882
921
929
934
939
983
994
996
997
998
"n9
1002
1004
1005

1006
1007
1015
1030
1040
1047
1053
1054
1055
1058
1059
1060
1077
1083
1133
1158
1184
11R5
1190
1192
1195
1197
1202
1203
1204
1906
1209
1210
1218
1219
1240
1243
1244
1245
1248
1253
1254
1261
1263
1264
1265
1272
1273


127
127
127
128
128
12S

128
129
129
129
129
129
130
131
131
131
131
132
132
132:
132
132'
1328
133:
133
133
133'
1338
1339
1341
134:
1344
1345
1346
1349
135:
135-
135'


7 Crowell WV'ilson Horton
S Albert Comer White
9 Jackson Lafayette Suggs
1 Once Odwell Cutrer
2 Jerldie Gomillion
4 Omar Eugeie Branch
S Robert Edward Nelson
9 James H'enry Geddie
0 WVoodrow Lewis
1 James Edgar Bell
2 Luther Eldridge Creel
3 Woodrow 'Wilson Aultmain
4 Russell Develden Prows, Jr.
2 Lester Gibbson
4 Charles Wesley Sheppard
5 Jerry Gilbert Nunery
6 Amos Lewis Johnson
9 James Oliver Wester
1 Singleton Thomas Cralley
2 Allen Fuqua
3 Eafie Tolbert
6 Berniss Hudson
7 Roberta L. McLemore
8 Joseph Joe Hauser
3 Opal Grice Ogburn
4 Jack Summers
5 Ira Clarence Tolbert
7 Masie Donie Brown
8 Jerry Mitchel Roberts
9 Chester Edgar Stokes
1 August William Bremer
3 Silas Roselle Stone
4 Charles Andrew Browne
5 Jacob 'ves Bandy
6 Charles James Sullivan
9 Herbert Lee Halter
1 James Manassa Carter
4 John Jackson Sewell
7 Moulton Albert Freeman

WEWAHITCHKA (White)
James Leon Parish
Rudy Gaskin
Henry Cortez Barton
Hollis Hiller Miller
SByron Auber Barber
James Eftus Kirkland,
Travis Walton Davis, Sr.
Clifford Weldon WhitEield
Jackson Ellis Lanier
Troy James Holmes
Loule Phillips
Marcus Huppy Linton
Leland David Hughes
Aldeen Williams
Tilldon Lee Alford
Clemence Paul
Rubin Glass
James Claude Hanlon
Elmer Grey Nunery
Cary Thomas
Joseph Lawrence Alford
George Washington Martin
George Dasher
David Lester King
Vernon Carl Burdeshaw
Joseph Edward Weeks
Eugene Victory Kemp
Edward Marlin Smith
Harvey Dell Kemp
Otis Davis
Thomas Loren Tillman
Joe Edwin Poole
Roy T. Jinks
Marvin Walter Pitts
Alfred Edward Joines
T. D. Whitfield
Lem W. Williams
Howard Leavins
Barney Clifford Bragg
Emmett A. Blackman
Sears Roebuck Linton
Charlie Franklin Causey
Drakeford Ellis Gray
Sam Pridgeon
William Dillon Linton
A. C. Chumney
Charles Dunn Scott
Sovereign Burnham
John Paul Burnham
Buck Woodrow Miller
PRul Revere Smith
Virge Thompson
John D. Bryant
Samuel S. McCall
William Herman tripling
Ross Ellson Stripling
Joe Whitfield
Alfredi P. Strange
Lonnie Vertis Nunery
Earl J. Roberts
Willie Frank Parish
Samuel Alexander Patrick
Roy Joseph Capps
Clyde Finch Brogdon
Roy Edward Taylor
James Curtis Paul
Jessie Buna Thomason
Charlie Daniel Henderson
Herman Jerome Clewis
Caston Alford
Tobe Gay
'Coy.Capps
William Bryant Clemmons
Warren Prescott
Fletcher Allen
Mack Tipton
Richard Levaine Hanlon
Oscar Lee Redd
Jesse Gaskin
Dalton Alex. Walsingham
Troy Samuel Champion
Jim Span Daniel
Bevley Conley
Floydi Clav Lister
Claude Ellis Lister
Chauncey Lee Costin
Walter G. Watson
Rliley O'Berry
Willie Clyde Begeman
Zekle Francis Dowling
Thomas Howell McDaniel
Lowell Mason Chandler
Sammle Cyron Dorsey ]
Chesley Batson ]
James {Lawrence Bateman ]
Ottis Benjamin Smith
Robert Benjamin "Britt
William Jennings Davis ]


1274 Heury Martin McClamma
1280 Harland Ottley Priageun
1285 William James Boynton, Jr.
1287 Ivey Adkins
1296 Woodrow S. Smith
1297 Elijah Bethea Tillman
1298 Robert Lee Tucker
1299 Jarrett Carlos Daniels
1301 William Otto Lister
1303 Elzie Vaughn Chumney
1304 Percy Franklin Lisk, Jr.
1306 Sylvester King
1312 Signel Cecil Gortman
1320 Roy Dalton Lister
1332 Aubrey Sebring Hughes
1352 Joe Greenlaw Bateman
1356 Mallie C. Sellars
1410 Samuel Lee Britt
1411 James Edward Roberts
1412 Roy Redd
1413 Selwyn Thomas Chalker
1414 Marvin Oscar Freeman
1415 Roy Preston Holliday
1416 James Gordon Alford
1417 Raymond Baker Martin
1419 Harold, Bryan Smith
1420 Alton Everett Jones
1421 Paul Sherwood Fenson
1425 John Roy Helm'if

OVERSTREET (White)
15 Raymond Hardy
30 Rowan Beard Hardy
52 Ellis Burriel Roberts
101 Quincy Lee Hardy
299 James Edward Tucker
305 William George Hardy, Jr.
453 Dan Summerlin
455 Albert James Melvin
476 John A. Pitts
608 James Robert Guilford
766 General Jackson Kinard
767 Johnie Melvin Morris
1022 Lewis Albert Collins
1035 James Maxwell Hardy
1149 Roy Benjamin Whitfield,
1205 Charley Augustus Gaskin

INDIAN BAYOU (White)
756 Oscar W. Morris
927 Buel Cecil Melvin
1168 Adell Gray
1295 Geo. Washington Laurimore

PORT ST. JOE (Colored)


16
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
18'
18
19
19
19:
20
20!
21(
211
21:
214
21!
216
21'
22.
223
224
221
23:
23'
235
231
24'
245
246
24'
248
249
25(
251
252
253
254
255
256
264
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
286
289
290
291
292
293
296
298
312
336
350
351
352
365
366
367
376
377
378
403
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
457
458
463
464
466
467
468
469
471
472
473
478
479
482
483
487
488
489
490


1
2
3
8
9
0
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
1
2
3
6


Douglas Richard
L. D. Black
Clarence Nathaniel Hawkins
Eugene West
SWillie Forman
Curtis Mack
Emanuel Moses
George Myrick
James Peter
Howard Morgan
Pierce Ivy, Jr.
Jonnie Hansen Mincey
Dan Holden
Dempsey Hewitt
Nathaniel Trawick
Isaac Robinson
. Sampson Gibson
Otis Stallworth
Pythias McNair
Pete McElvy
Arthur Harris,
Walter Sledge
Felix James Williams
Shelby Hutcherson
James Manning
Willie Johnson
Cliff Reed
Charlie Willie Childs
Arthur McClain
Sam Brown
Elie Blount
T. A. McGhee
Lawrence Dawson
Jack Brown
Arthur Leonard Williams
Arnett Morris Johnson
Charlie Wawson
Emanuel Spires
Ed'die Cherry
Luther Lee Brown
Nathan Gainer
Roosevelt Giposn
Eranest Bowden
Marvin Stallworth
John J. Floyd
Call Wynn
Stradom Batsen
Boswell Bryant
James Brown, Jr.
Sherman Ware
Claude Johnson
Daniel Sims
Roy Lee Young
Leoy McPherson
Andrew Johnson
iRobert Nathaniel Jones
Samuel Brown
Charlie Allen Washington
Henry Taylor Copeland
Willie Eston White
Kane Kennedy
Lamb Williams
Howard B. Brown
Joe Hawkins
Caesar Maldon


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940


Jim Andres Curry
Bural Clemons
Henry Sylvester Hollis
Jack Fleming
Howard Garlanl
Thomas Hari.s Hamilton
K. C. Young
Eddie Bee Copeland
Here Poew
Allen Deek
Isam Reed
John Henry Lewis
Shellie Harris
Sam Owens
Bennie McNeil
David Samuel Gray
Otis Hayes
Cary Lefton
Elijah William Dawson


9 Cleve Johnson
0 Willie Lee Bordens
1 Octavus Russ
3 Sam Spatee
4 Ralph Brown
5 Clem Davis
6' Royal Daniel
7 Callister Lee Sylvester
1 Nathaniel Williams,
3 Clarence Dodson, Jr.
4 Roosevelt Curry
6 Governor Staton
1 Ernest Jones
4 Henry Bell
5 John D. Franklin Lewis
6 Jonnie B. Allen
i Roscoe Field
5 Lamarenes Evans
5 Ellis Andrews
7 Quinnice Williams
8 Jerry Gainer, Jr.
Eddie Moore
0 Willie Morgan
SRay Lee Barnwell
SJohn Benson Clack
SIvy Henderson
SCarthon Johnson
HenryBlackshire
Flem Barber
Jerome Whittington Major
Clarence William Pearson
Andrew White
Willie Black
SJohn Henry Grhmpley
SNero Moppa
David Harris
Daniel Columbds oCnley
'James Corbett, Sr.
Fred Lee Gnlley
Dock Staton
Lester Snell
Philip Fudge
Pahl Chambwre
Arthur Wilbur Hill
Henry B. Davia
Mary D. Yon
Clthbert Chainois Farmer, Jr.
Ben Chester
James C. Towne
Frank Blunt
Alphbns Mason
Robert Hayward Whigum
Louis Lorenza Jarkson
Eddie William Reed
Ed Lee
Henry Whitfield'
Spirey Smith
A. D. Farmer
Samuel Junior Blackshear
George Timothy Wright
J. C. Jones
Claud Leegreen Hamilton
Lee Haliburton
George Jackson
James White
Robert Bernard Blackmon
George Finch
George Washington
Neal Simmons
Leroy Smith
James White
Lester Mathis
Sylvester Graham
L. D. Richberg
Harvey I'ee Campbell
William Scott, Jr.
Zeke Thompson
Robert Parish
John Henry orter
Abell Sims'
Robert Kincy
Ed Harris
Willie Johnson
Jerry Gant
Enoch Shepherd
Rutherford Catts
John Henry Fountain

Phelma Oats
Robert Hill
Jeff Junior Butler
Guss Hurst
Andrew Buddy Hooks
Willie Barnes Spires
John Brooks, Jr.
(Continued on Page 7)







FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940


Draft Numbers


(Continued from Page 6)
PORT ST. JOE (Colored)
491 P. C. Cull
492 McKinley Sheffield
493 John Pittman
494 Emmit Grace
495 Ellis Lee
496 Willie Daniel
497 Earvin Turnie Smith
499 Ferd Hagans
500 George William Archie, Jr.
505 Wallace Rebarry Cognman
506 Lewis J. Flowers
507 Charlie Cannon
508 Jerome Ramsy
510 George Mosely
511 M. C. Hagood
512 James Love
513 Willie James Riley
514 David Ownes
515 Abraham Nun Lewis
517 Dunbar Austin
518 Ernest Ervin
519 Howard Manning
520 Willie James Davis
521 Jack MoCary
525 Bradley Thomas Lowery
526 Cleo Scott Washington
527 Townsie Davis
528 Damon McNair
530 Walter Leslie
531 Leroy Butler
533 John Henry Coachman
534 John Berry Godwin
535 Alfonza Foster
541 Hodge Davis
542 Floyd Britt
543 Charlie Castleberry
544 J. D. Jones
545 Plat Andrews
546 Sam McQueen
547 Willie Fitch
548 Clifford Massey
549 Albert Cornelius Snell
550 Hayes Miller
551 James Clide Arterbery
552 T. J. Floyd
553 Dewey Son Brown
554 Earnest Pounsel
555 Amos Ransom
556 Walter Junior Brooks
557 Adam Flowers
558 Jim Cheney
559 Hirly Hunt
560 Johnnie Best
561 George Davis
562 Frank Thomas Lewis
563 Gadeson Junior Jenkins
564 James Dee
570 James Oliver Martin
573 Claud Mancus Mills
587 Ru.be Douglass
588 Buchanan Clayton
589 Sterling Thomas Buiett
590 Jesse Bell
' 593 Nathaniel Hearns
594 Rubin Alexander Robinson
595 Charles James Parrott
601 Mathew Jones
602 Luvern Cooper Williams
603 Ervin Barnwell
604. Joshua Smith
605 Early Sheffield
606 Sylvester Brown
607 Aram Pharam
613 Eddie Rouse
616 Jim Suggs
622 Leroy Smith
639 Emmett Stallworth
640 Tommie Smith
642 George Washington Dickens
644 Hezekiah McMillian
645 Ollie Duney Washington
647 Max Williams
659 Emiet Otis Nickson
673 Boisie Baker
684 Freeman Hortense Bryant
685 Tonie Kynes
686 Capers Allen
687 Robert Sanders
688 Lamar C. Clay
689 Ainor Folder Rodgers
704 Sherman Leggett
705 Elizah Freeman
711 Alexander Williams
736 Whorle Kendrick
742 Aron Reece
743 Lindsey Eugene Haddock
744 Annias'e Smith
745 Abraham White
746 Major Hall
752 /Robert Peterson
771 Jessie Henry Dawson
772 John Wesley Whitley, Jr.
776 Willie King
777 Willie Battles
778 James Thomas Hunter
7S2 H'enry Thomas
783 Willie Aron Pittman
784 Eugene Harris
,787 Robert Bounds
788 Willie James McNair
796 Milliard Wilson
797 James Hill
798 John Howard Black
800 P. J. Anderson
811 Henry Gray
819 P. 'E. Helms,
829 Henry Brown
831 Otto Thomas
835 Walter McTire
839 Wesley Rutledge
841 Mel McColough
842 Odis C. Donald
843 Leroy English
S44 Ed Farmer
4K. Robert Williams
i4 Jameg Sapp
863 Earnest Wright
866 Tom Smith
'i879 Willie Wynn
cr Pred Dismuke
Willie Henry Bowie
90 Colon Mathews


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE SEVEN


894
895
896
897
898
913
914
916
917
926
928
940
943
954
955
956
960
961
962
964
965
966
967
968
969
970
971
972
973
974
975
976
977
978
979
980
981
982
988
989
990
995
1021
1031
1032
1033
1039
1043
1044
1045
1046
1048
1049
1050
1051
1052
1064
10G68
1070
1071
1072
1073
1074
1075
1076
1079
1080
1084
1085
1086
loss1088
1094
1096
1097
1098
1101
1102
1103
1104
1105
1107
1109
1111
1112
1115
1116
1117
1118
1127
1129
1134
1136
1146
1150
1151
1175
1176
1177
1178
1179
1180
1181
1182
1183
1194
1200
1201
1213
1214
1217
1220
1227
1228
1232
1233
1236
1237
1238
1249
1270
1271
1283
1286
1310
1311
1313
1317
1318
1324
1325
1329
1330
1331
1336
1347
1348
1355
1408
1409
1418


Laska Hess
Alphonso Moore
Henry Lee Young
Dee Mayfield
Sullen Britt
Riley Holmes
Clyde Jones
Sullivan Bender
Robert L'ee Bewey
Jessie Davis
Sol Jones
May Be Starks
Zema Alexander English
Lee Davis
Wesley Galveston Allen
T. Y. Hend'erson
Mansfield Gainer
Sam Baker
Jeremiah Davis
Willie U. Blackshire
Willie l). Newmons
Walter Brinson
Willie Fred Smith
Willie Junior Watson
John D. Patton
Grant Murry Bennett
John Hason Abney
Ira Lee Mount
Lilton Long
Moses Barnes
Sam Williams
Rayfieldt Saffold
Charlie Terry
John Lee Jackson
Robt. Henry Harmon Turner
Robert B. Bullard
Robert Jack Griffin
Mckinley Debuan
James Timothy White
Wallace Alven McNair
William Franklin Godwin
Alvin Hagens
Isaac Tripp
Eairl Sanders
Ossie Lee Thomas
Werley James
Spirlen Creer
Britt Jackson
Sam Bronson
Nathaniel Bennett
Sylvester Wilson
Jessie Gaines
Nathaniel Davis
James Cerar
Otis Dixon
Richard Moore
Josephus Jones
Arthur Reed
Jessie Heusley
Mack F. B. Binion
Alfonzie Maldon
Jethro Russ
Richard Raymond Owens
Sylvester Junior Shaw
Clarence Haygood
Henry Brazley
Patterson Reed
Willie James Barnett
James Carthon
Fred Sheffield
John D. Royster
Junior Welcomer
James Mathews
John Pounsel
Lelen Mathis
Marvin Chambers
Dewitt Boon
Abraham Evans
Earnest Washington
Marvin Daniel Moore
German Flowers
John Peter
James Tolbert
James Arthur Wiggins
Herbert Munn
Joe Frank McQueen
Samuel James Williams
Eugene. Copeland
Raymond Pope
Junius Davis
Eligh B. Pittiman
Jacob Lett
Homer Sepp
George Gray
J. B. Baker
Robert Stanley
Ike Calloway
Will Dixon
Joseph Clayton
Lewis Samuel Barnes
Wymon Franklin Everette
Edd Brown
Henry Jackson
Mallie Langston
Clarence Rivers
Sammie Manning
Agee Barnett, Jr.
Gentle Floyd
Lambert Nichols Paul
Nathan Peters
Crawford Ben Bailey
Tampa Cobb
David Roberts
George Davis
Willie Wright
Jeff Mack Miller Mener
Elder Lee Fleming
William Davis
Ellis Dunning
John Knights
Raymond Jay Jackson
Emanuel Jackson
Ferd Thomas
Joseph Badger
Jim Paul Dismukes
Arthur Robert Williams
Willie Lee Curry
Nathaniel McCathan
Tob Jackson
Johnnie Henderson
Marion Rogers
Elmo Thomas
Homer Scott
William Henry Butler
Archie Bethea
R. C. Henderson
Isaac Thomas
Isiah Williams
Ernest Staton
M. B.. McClendon


1422 Alto Blackshire
1423 Albert Willis
1424 Alto Lee
1426 Thanyous Tyrus

WEWAHITCHKA (Colored)
32 Rufus Smith
42 Benjamin James Wilson '
117 Joseph Meriweather
119 Willie D. Christen
120 Roy A. Myers
123 Mexico McNeily
285 Wilmer Sneed
287 Samuel Porter
288 Willie Le-o Robinson '
375 Francis Isaac Long
459 Jim Brooks
461 Fletcher Freemen
462 Neel Freeman
470 Raywood McRoy Dens
474 Andrew S. Ash
477 Reuben Bryant
485 Isac Martin
486 Charlie Lee Hunter
498 Alfonza Baker
523 Albert Jenkins
524 Roy Over Faisonn
532 Oscar Baker
536 Allen Tanner Tyson
537 Donie Martin
591 Shep Freeman
592 Rickey Freeman
646 Fate Girags
677 Square Oliver
683 Freeman Hortense Bryant
706 Henry Lee Addison
733 Lee Roy Stonom
735 Tommy Anderson
755 Eugene Rouse
760 Willie Lee Williams
761 Ollie Pace
813 Henry Thomas Van
899 Zemmie Ferrell
900 Tommie Rouse
906 Robert Scott
907 Claude Lee JacKison
911 Ardies Keenee
918 Silicuest Huntley
924 Hilton Williams
1001 David Faison
1082 Lee Thaniel Kittrell
1087 David Goodman
1095 Lennie Martin
1105 Virgiel Scott
1128 Mose Junior Jackson
1135 Cleve Sanford
1137 Lucious A. Wilson
1169 Leroy Russ
1215 George Robert Faicon
1307 Roosevelt Scott
1308 John Davis
1309 Horace, Jackson
1350 Jeff Willie Dixon
1353 James Roscoe Johnson
1358 Johnnie Lee Hamilton
1359 Alexander Hamons
1360 Francis Hogan
1361 Jonnie Lee Hooks
1362 Nathan Hall
1363 Iva Lee. Gray
1364 James Gamble
1365 William Fagen
1366 Leroy Cobb
1367 Edward Carter
1368 Nolan Presette Rodgers
1369 Pat Junior Richardson
1370 Rolliee Lee Price
1371 Jack Phillips
1372 David Payne
1373 Lawrence Parker
1374 Nathaniel Oliver
1375 Dennis McMillian
1376 Watts Morgan
'377 Fred Miller
1378 James Monroe Mason
1379 Herley Campbell
1380 Charlie Campbell
1381 Aubry Bush
1382 John Daniel McNeal
1383 Roosevelt Johnson
1384 Wiley Joseph
1385 James Lee Martin
1386 David Semmons
1387 Willie Carson Black
1388 Bernice Smith
1389 Huber Lee Smith
1390 Wendell L. Stapels
1391 James Sunday
1392 Willie Swalls
1393 Arthur Lee Tanner
1394 Frank Griffin Thomas
1395 Robert Thompson
1396 Gulla Watkins
1397 Ernest Eddie Watson
1398 Eidsel Ford White
1399 Jimmie Junior Williams
1400 Leroy Williams
1401 Theodore Bocker
1402 Jack Bryant
1403 Willie Benjamin Billingtoll
1404 Tommy Banks
1405 Moore Anderson
1406 Cooney Lee Allison
1407 Joseph Arams
1427 Sherman Tatum

OVERSTREET (Colored)
116 Buster Burry
294 Joseph Mitchell Powell
460 Rubin Fredriclk
465 Willie Richard Reed
522 Eddie Hambrick
908 Willie Arthur Den
910 Joe Sheffield
1212 Emmanuel As-h
1269 Jessie, Davenport

INDIAN BAYOU (Colored)
1173 John Howard
1239 Carlie Deans
1300 Earl Ebeneezer Williams
1305 Leroy Stevens

Send The Star to a friend.


Lodge Notices


Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Puesdays of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
lirst and third Mondays of each
month at the Legion Hut.
America-n Legion Auxiliary meets
fourth Friday of month, 8 o'clock,
at Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.
-4

A 455-mile parkway from Nash-
ville, Tenn., to Natchez, Miss.,
will memorialize an Indian trail
which ended in Toltec country ij
Mexico.



QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"

Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
WE DELIVER -



NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY



BAYSHORE
GROCERY AND MARKET
Highland View
We Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts

STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS

We Keep Open Until Noon
Every Sunday


DR. J. C. COE
- DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



ART l

PROJECT .-

MAKES COLOR

PORTRAITS .

OF CHILD PICTURES

FREE
This offer is one of the most remark-
able ever made. We'll send you a
beautifully hand-colored-in-oil-paint
enlargement of any picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any snapshot, any fa-
vorite picture you'd like enlarged and
hand-colored. These enlargements will
be size 5x7. They will be mounted on
high quality, double-white mat mount-
ings size 7x9. To duplicate such an
enlargement, hand-colored-in-oil-
paint, would cost you f;om $1.25 to
$3.00 in any photographic store. To
get this enlargement you pay only 50c
for the enlargement and the hand-
painting will'be done without charge.
Simply send a print or negative of
your favorite picture and fifty cents
in coin. That's all ycu do, and promptly
by mail you'll receive your hand-col-
ored-n-oll enlargement. Send today to
ART EDITOR
COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC.
S60 N.. Michigan Ave., Chicao, Ili.




Purity Assured


The, Gulf County Dairy's
quest for perfection empha-
sizes purity. In every detail
of production our milk re-
ceives the benefit of scie-tific
methods and discoveries.


Gulf County Dairy
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager
Leave or Phone Your Orders
to J. Lamar Miller's Standard
Station, Phone 98, ro Bus
Station Cafe, Phone 12


M ItLIONS suffer less from Headache, Acid Indigestion, Distress
of Colds "Morning After" and Muscular Fatigue because fley
have heard-and believed-AIka-Seltzer radio announcements.
To these millions, the relief obtained by the use of Alka-Seltzer
is worth far more than the genuine enjoyment they get from the
broadcasts.
The most important parts of our radio program, both to you and
to us, are the commercial announcements. Once you have tried
AIka-Seltzer we believe you will agree with us.
But try Alka-Seltzer because it is an unusually effective medi-
cine not because you enjoy the radio programs.
WHY ALKA-SELTZER IS SO EFFECTIVE
The pain-relieving analgesic in Alka-Seltzer is in complete solu-
tion, ready to ease the distress as soon as you swallow it. The
painrelieving action is made more effective by alkaline buffers.
The alkalizing elements in Alka-Seltzer reduce excess stomax
..;. acidity.
Get Alka-Seltzer the next time y49
pms a drug store.


Ty a glass of Alka-Seer tat y
-Dm Store Soda Fountain.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN








PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940


INDORSES WILLKIE


John L. Lewis, p ident of the C.
1. 0., is shown i.oadcasting his
plea for Wendell Willkie over a
362-station radio hookup in his of-
fice of the United Mine Workers
of America in Washington, D. C.

CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our friends for
their kindness and beautiful floral
offerings during the illness and
death of our loved on e.
Mrs. Annie Keeney.
Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Lawson.
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Boyer
and Family.
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon
and Family.










Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager


SATURDAY ONLY
2 B I G
FEATURES





HIDDEN GOLD

HIT NO. 2







"DRUMS OF FU MANCHU"


SUNDAY and MONDAY
NOVEMBER 3 and 4
THRILLING ACTION!!



FRED MacMURRAY
PATRICIA MORISON i


Comedy


News


TUESDAY ONLY ***, NOV. 5*
TUESDAY ONLY, NOV. 5


ALSO -. .

"CAN LONDON

TAKE IT"
Actual scenes of the bombing
of London!
^y~j~i~n^^miiHTion


First 350 Numbers

Drawn May Suffice

Local Draft Board Will Start Mail-
ing Out Questionnaires
November 7

MTen whose numbers are among
the first 650 drawn in the draft
lottery stand, a good chance of be-
ing among the first 800.000 going
into army training before July.
Those whose numbers are in the
first 350 drawn are even more
likely prospects, as it is estimated
that this number will supply all
the men needed until next sumn-

It is expected that the Gulfl
county draft board will receive,
from Washington a copy of the
national master list of serial num-
bers early next week and that the
mailing of questionnaires to men
in the order in which they appear
on the list will start at least by
November 7. It is estimated that
the first 50 men classified should
produce enough to fill the first
quota of 30,000.
The board will post its mailings
ind each draft registrant should
make sure he receices his ques-
tionnaire, which he must return in
five days. On the basis of the
questionnaire, he is -tentatively
classified according to his fitness
and availability for service. The
board will notify him by mail of
his classification.
Those placed in Class 1 (fit and
available) will be called for physi-
cal examination in the order their
numbers were drawn. Wherever
possible, five day's notice will be.
given before examination. In ad-
dition, men found acceptable after
examination will be given five
days' ontice to settle their affairs
before reporting for induction into
the army.

DRAFT NUMBERS

(Continued from Page 1)
2332- 130 2341- 124 2389- 104
2406-1349 2417- 370 2439-,- 225
2457- 642 2459- 703 2486- 656
2491- 128 2508- 150 2510- 270
2511- 716 2521- 883 2528- 346
2531- 692 2532- 341 2543-1354
2554-1000 2557-1187 2576-1314
2578- 412 2579- 436 2581- 175
2585- 904 2597- 226 2602-1285
2614-1064 2615-1241 2616- 809
2623- 282 2629-1116 2631- 859
2634-1074 2635- 584 2636-1163
2637-1411 2638- 309 2641-1152
264,5- 536 2646-1252 2650-1611
2651- 771 2653- 434 2663- 251
2669-1367 2674-1417 2678- 659
2691- 698 2692- 863 2695-1089
2704-1286 2715- 617 2717- 893
2718- 55 2725- 206 2728-1325
2738- 317 2754- 683 2762- 100
2763- 262 2772-1189 2776- 399
2782- 217 2791- 103 2797- 220
2801-1364 2804- 561 2805-1133
2808- 753 2835-1071 2838- 755
2845- 724 2856- 694 2867-183-7
2883-1371 2884-1219 2887- 784
2890- 693 2901- 129 2903- 279
2904-1195 2908-1291 2913- 157
2919- 275 2936- 270 2941- 799
2945-1377 2953-1406 2962- 362
2963-1043 2975-1358 2978- 245
2982-1,348 2999-1153 3006-1271
Number 713 Is, 200th


3017- 803
3020-1310
3032- 900
3062- 709
3082- 811
3104-1381
3138- 638
3177- 47
3210-1413
3224- 164
3267- 732
3275- 301
3284- 634
3304- 967


3018- 713
3024-.- ZO
3035-1382
306,5-1063
3085- 635
3122-1381
3151- 649
3195-1420
3217- 115
3254-1091
3268- 822
3276-1343
3286-1239
3307- 82



3019- 177
3025- 728
3054- 227
3078- 474
3099- 92
3122- 688
3156- 711
3207- 44
3219-1021
3264- 695
3273- 144
3282- 123
3297-1182
3309- 305


The Star does not have the time
nor the space to publish all num-
bers this week, and they will be
continued next week.
Save tlis copy of The Star, as
well as last week's copy and next
week's issue, containing the num-
bers allotted and the numbers in
the order they were drawn and


you will have a complete list. service users and to commercial
A few extra copies of last week's lighting consumers.
issuee and this issue are still avail- In announcing the, reduction ir.
able at The Star office. Higgins stated: "Rate reductions
--- ---- are normally based on increased
RATE REDUCTION e o: electricity and anticipation
-by the company of a continuance
(Continued from Page 1) of this trend. New efficiencies and
cial lighting rates are shown be- economies developed by the com-
low for comparison: pany also are important factors,
New Rate-Net Per Month Under today's conditions the in-
12 k.w.h. or less......... $1.00 creasing cost of materials, labor
Next 88 k.w.h........7c per k.w.h- and, other operating expenses re-
Next 400 k.w.h.......6c p'er k.w.h. quired in the manufacture and
Next 2500 k.w.h...... 5c per k.w.h. distribution of electricity, make it
Next 7000 k.w.h..... 3c per k.w.t. ,more difficult than ever to find
All over 10,000.......2c per k.w.h. new ways to economize without
Old Rate-Net Per Month sacrificing the quality of our ser-
Minimum charge $1.00 per month. vice.
Tirst 50 k.w.h.........Sc p'er k.w.h. "The present reduction in elec-
Next 350 k.w.h.....7/c per k.w.h. trick rates, therefore, is evidence of
Next 1100 k.w.h...... 6c per k.w.h. our faith in Florida's future, par-
Next 2500 k.w.h...... 5c per k.w.h. ticularly in the Port St. Joe sec-
Next 3000 k.w.h...... 3c per k.w.h. tor a faith shared by our
X11 Over 7000........ 2c per k.w.h employees."
The power company also made -
,t substantial reduction in its rates Every ads carries a message-
last year, applying to domestic a message that will save money.


Wewahitchkan

Drowns In River

Body of Jesse Thomasson Is Re-
covered Wednesday Arter
Three-Day Search

The body of Jesse Thomasson,
unmarried., Wewahitchka fisher-
man, was recovered Wednesday
afternoon in the Apalachicola
river by Sheriff Byrd Parker aftei
a three-day search.
Thomasosn was last seen Satur-
day night when he went out in
his boat to tend his lines. When
he failed to return Sheriff Parker
was notified and while searching
Monday found Thomasson's empty
boat.
The body was brought to Jehu
landing. It is surmised that the
drowned man fell from his boat
while tending his lines.

Advertising doesi-t cost-it pays!


COMMERCIAL LIGHTING RATE







Oi"f, OF




A5 ESTIMATED ANNUAL SAVING OF MORE THAN

S85,000.00onouarS
( LO ER COMMERCIAL LIGHTING RATES
--~c


Another Big Voluntary Rate Reduction


FOLLOWING a long established
clicy to reduce electric rates as eco-
nomic conditions permit, we are
pleased to announce that Commercial
Lirgting plates will be reduced again
on December 1, 1940. This reduction
represents an estimated annual saving
of more than $85,000.00 to business
firms served by this Company. A year
ago. an $80,000.00 reduction was made
in the Domestic Service Rate and ad-
instments in the Commercial Lighting
Rates amounted to an additional sav-
ing to t-his class of consumer of about
.26.0,nd oo.
The new and old Ceommercial Light-
inc' Rates are shown below for com-
parison. Full information on the new
rates is available at all Company of-
fi,'es.
These lower rates will now offer"
Business firms a greater opportun'--
to utilize modern electric service iP
!heir business operations.


THE NEW RATE
NET PER MONTH
To Commercial Customers using
service for lighting and incidental
purposes for a period of not less
than 12 consecutive months.
12 kwh or less $1.00
Next 88 kwh........@7c per kwh
Next 400 kwh-.....@6c per kwh
Next 2,500 kwh....@5c per kwh
Next 7,000 kwh....@3c per kwh
All over 10,000
kwh -------......-...-.......@ 2c per kwh
Minimum Charge-$1.00 per month


is now. mw,. emu
re7w m=04

fthWZbL


Rate reductions are normally based
on the increased use of electricity and
the anticipation by the Company of a
continuance of this trend following the
reduction. New efficiencies and econ-
omies in operation developed by the
Company also are important factors.
Under today's conditions, the increas-
ing cost of materials, labor and other
operating expenses required in the
manufacture and distribution of elec-
tricity, make it more difficult than
ever to find new ways to economize
without sacrificing the quality of our
service.
The present reduction in electric.
rates, therefore, is evidence of our
f"ith in Florida's futu-e a faith
shared by our five -hundred emplon--evs
A. W. HlGGINS.
President.


THE OLD RATE
NET PER MONTH
To Commercial Customers using
service for lighting and incidental
purposes for a period of not less
than 12 consecutive months.
First 50 kwh-........@ 8c per kwh
Next 350 kwh....@ 7c per kwh
Next 1,100 kwh..@ 6c per kwh
Next 2,500 kwh..@ 5c per kwh
Next 3,000 kwh..@ 3c per kwh
All over 7,000
kwh ..................@ 2c per kwh
Minimum Charge-$1.01 per,month


FLORIDA


POWER

CORPORATION


i u-mmm m- I."


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1940