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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00208
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 11, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00208

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fattest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


VOLUME IV


i port St. Joe-SSie cf the $7,500,000
'i 1 ,' "* DuPont Paper Miill- Florida's fast-
1 i '- et growing little city. In
S... :- --- =' -- .' the h.ar of t!h. pine belt.

The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Fnture Indu;trir Centcr ..'
/_, v


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FF;DAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940


NUMBER 1


Go Ahead Signal


To Be Given Soon


On City Hospita


County WPA Supervisor Exs
pects Work Orders To
Arrive Next Week

Construction of Port St. Joe'
$57,118 municipal hospital was au
thorized Tuesday by Florida WPA
Administrator Roy Schro'eder a
Jacksonville following approval o
the project last week by Presiden
Roosevelt, announcement of whicl
was carried in The Star.
Structure To Be of Brick
The Florida Times-Union and
the two other Gulf county papers
have stated that the hospital wil
be of reinforced concrete and con
crete blocks. This was true of th(
original plans, but a change was
made several months back, and
the building will be of brick, with
fireproof shingles and asphalt tile
flooring.
The. hospital, which will serve
the needs of Gulf county and vi-
cinity, will be most modern with
operating, X-ray and delivery
rooms, nurses' quarters, kitchen,
dining room, office and waiting
rooms.
Sponsor's Share $21,363
The WPA allocation for the
project is $35,755 and the city of
Port St. Joe, as the sponsor, will
contribute $21,363 toward the to-
tal cost. The project will employ
an average of 90 workmen for a
period of eight months.
WPA County Supervisor Ander
son. states that he expects work
orders to arrive next week and
that the "go ahead" signal should
be given at least by October 21.


Draft Lottery

Date To Be Set

From Oct. 21-26

Drawing of "Capsules" Will Deter-
mine Order in Which Mar'
Are to Be Called

The. draft lottery to determine
the order for calling.conscripts 'into
military service, officials said, will
be held sometime between October
21 and 26, at Washington, D. C.
The exact date will depend on
the time requhied for local draft
boards to report through their state
headquarters to Washington on the
results of registration October 16.
Major Ben Howell, director of
the manpower 'division of the
army-navy selective service com-
mittee, explained that after the
drawing, at least another five days
would be required to print and
distribute the "master list" of se-
rial numbers.
The place at which a registered
man's serial number appears on
this list will determine the order
in which the local boards will send
him a questionnaire for informa-
tion on his eligibility for service
and also the order in which, if he
is eligible, he will be called up for
a year's military service.
Urges Utmost Care
Thus with registration on Octo-
ber 16 it will be the end) of this
month or early November before
the questionnaires are mailed.
Disclosing all this at a press
conference, Major Howell a l
Issued several "reminders" to per.
(Contlnued on Piag 1)


AXIS STATESMEN MEET AT THE BR3EN- NE' PASS


,1 i -- J'..''u;r-snr 3fwalr astn u v.rTSB't- -,ji inr' IaU

Meeting at Brenner Pass, between Italy and Germany, last Friday were (left to right) Joachim von
Ribbentrop, German foreign minister; Premier Mussolini of Italy, and Chancellor Adolf Hitler of Ger-
many, for their conference at which the axis statesmen are reported to have discussed means of bring-
ing an early end to the war and of curbing United States aid to Great Britain.


e Sharks Win From
s
Strong Leon High


First Game of Season Results Ir
e 32-12 Score for Locals; Play
Frink Here Today

Getting off to a good start in the
1940 grid season, the Port St. Joe
High Sharks downed the strong
Leon High team at Tallahassee
last Friday by a 32 to 12 score.
The local boys stepped to the
front in the first quarter with two
touchdowns, but the opposing line
stiffened then and held the Sharks
scoreless until the half, meanwhile
chalking up one touchdown for
themselves.
The Tallahassee lads came back
fighting in the third quarter to tie
the score at 12-all. But in the final
period the Sharks started "giving
their best" and, put over three
touchdowns to put the game in
the bag and bring home the laurel
wreath.
Play Frink Here Today
This afternoon the Sharks will
play their first home game when
they meet Frink High on the local
field. The boys anticipate chalk-
ing up number two win in this tilt.
Everybody is urged to turn out
for this game and root for the
team. Let's get behind the Sharks
and root them on to the confer-
ence championship.
Schedule for the season follows:
October 18-Grand Ridge, here.
October 25-Sopchoppy, there.
Nov. 1-Chattahoochee, here.
Nov. 8-Open.
Nov. 15-Wewahitchka, there.
Nov. 22-Sopchoppy, here.
Nov. 27-Grand Ridge, there.
Junior Team
October 30-Panama City, here.
Nov. 7-Panama City, there.
.----- $c------
ALL-COLORED CAST IN
FILM AT PORT TONITE

The Port theater tonight is pre-
senting a special midnight show
beginning at 10 o'clock with an all-
colored comedy cast. The film is
"Mr. Washington Goes to Town."
starring Miller ani Lamont.
It is a full-length feature, the
first of its kind with an all-colored
cast, and Manager Williams as-
sures theater patrons they will
"bust their sides a-laffin'."
The feature picture showing at
the Port today is "When the Dal-
tons Rode."

Mars may be the god of war,
but Ananias is running him a
close second.-Key West Citizen.


LABORITE IN CABINET Demo Executive

-' IConm ittee Meets
me.4.-F, 21.


Ernest Bevin, former dock work-
er, whom Prime Minister Wins-
ton Churchill elevated to the war
cabinet of Great Britain. Bevin en-
tered the government only last
May as minister of labor.



Legion Post to


Organize Home


Guard Outfit


Company Will Be Composed
Of Men Between Ages of
18-20 and 36 Up

At the regular meeting of Gulf
County Post 116, American Legion,
held at the Hut Monday night,
plans were announced by Conm-
'ander T. M. Schneider for for-
mation of a home guard unit for
Gulf county. The idea had been
under consideration for some time
and was brought to a head after
Commander Schneider had con-
ferred with officials at Tallahas-
see last week.
The, unit will be open to men
between the ages of 18 and 20 and
from 36 to 100. Members will fur-
nish their own equipment.
Selection of commissioned and
non-commissioned officers will he
made, from the Legion membership
at the next meeting, October 21,
and all members of the post are
urged to be present at that time.

PORT NEWS
The S. S. Dorothy of the Bull
Steamship Company sailed Mon-
day with a cargo of paper for Port
Newark and Baltimore.


Conference Held At City Hall to
Map November Election Plans;
Rally Dates Are Announced

li,- I 1;,I toli y. Democratic Ex-
..: I -..11, .i tre met at the city
tlil li re Wednesday afternoon
for the purpose of mapping out
Plans for the -coqnilog November
general iectif-;.i:
T t awaan ioted 'td sd $50 lo tlih
state women's Democratic corn
mitt-e aud $1'l t n the state Demo-
i:r'-ir- ex,-curlie committee at Jack-.
s:nt ill. e A. .- ,ii ent for the Gulf
courny ....itinillt.:. was $150 and it
ii .In r i.',il.-- that the entire
amo i nt' r will raised. Mrs. A. H.
Cook reported contributions of ap-
proximately $50 and Floyd Hunter
$20. The committee still has $40
to raise and it is expected this
amount will be secured within the
next few days.
Rallies To Be Held
Arrangements have been made
by state headquarters for a series
of rallies in this section as fol-
lows: Tallahassee, October 29;
Marianna, October 30, and Pensa-
cola, October 31. Mrs. Basil Ken-
ney, Gulf county Democratic corm-
mitteewoman, urges every loyal
Democrat to attend at least one of
these rallies. Expected to be pres-
ent arc oGvernor Cone, Governor-
elect Holland, and the U. S. sena-
tors and congressmen from Flor-
ida if possible. Hon. T. T. Turn-
bull. Mrs. Iouise McGregor and
other prominent Deqocrats.
State headquarters' shortly will
send buttons and canipaign liter-
...-..n In t'. l',nl nn'mmit'tne which
will he ristrillute', u on arrival.
.Aftendlid tth mpetieg here -ere
J. W. Seal, F. L. Hunt T. P.
ranTn. Mrs. Kate Lanier, MTrs. M.
L,. Fuller. Mrs. W. C. Whaley, Mrs.
Cook. Mrs. A. D. Lawson, Mrs.
Kenney, Sammie Patrick, secre-
tary-treasurer, and .ake Belin,
state Democratic committeeman.
__-__
BAND BOOSTER'S CLUB
IS SPONSORING FILM

The Band Booster's club will
sponsor a picture at the Port the-
itnr in TuesPay. October 22, the
film being "Yesterday's Heroes."
a rip-roaring football epic which is
quite timely at this season of the
year. Tickets are now on sale by
members of the club and the pub-
lic is urged to buy, as proceeds
can only be realized from tickets
sold by the club.


Draft Registration


Sep For Coun*ty


I Near C l 'tion.l


Chairran Huanter .' -, s As-
sistants to Aid In
One-Day Drive

J. R. Hunter of Wewahitchka,
appointed by Governor Cone as
chairman of the conscription se-
lective registration committee for
Gulf county, states that plans are
near completion for registration of
all men in the county between the
ages of 21 and 35 next Wednesday.
Names Committee Members
Chairman Hunter has named as
a committee to assist him B. B.
Conklin and T. M. Schneider of
Port St. Joe. and E. F. Singleton,
C. L. Costin, Larry Evans and C.
G. Rish of Wewahjtchka. Chief
registrars will be Jon Stapleton of
this city and H. A. Whitton of We-
wahitchka. Assisting in the regis-
tration will be all teachers of the
county. _d the school buildings
will be used as registration places,
Governor Cone having proclaimed
a school holiday for Wednesday.
Lieutenant E. F. Singleton of
the CCC camp near Wewahitchka
will bh in charge of registration of
all colored men injthe county and
they are asked in'regaser at the
colored school nTeV f t;eif' houle.-'
Reeistration places .will be open
between the hours of 7 a. m. and
9 p. m.. In case'of illness, anyone
in the 21-35 kge bracket who is
required, to register must inform-
the chief registrar who will send
a registrar to the sick person and
secure the necessary data. All
men registered will be given a
card which they will be required
to carry on their persons at all
times. Citizens and aliens alike
are required to register.
Who Must Register
Volume 2 of the selective service
regulations reads: "Except as
otherwise provided in this act, it
shall be the duty of every male
citizen of the United'States and of
every male alien residing in the
United States who, is between
the ages of 21 and 36, to present
himself for and submit to regis-
tration at such time and place or
places, as shall be determined by
elective service act are specified
hereunder."
Those not required to register
and reliever from liability for
training and service under the se-
lective service act are specified
(Continued on Page 2)


Paper Makers

Dance Tonight


Centennial Auditorium to Be Scene
Of Festivities; Curtis David-
son's Orchestra to Play

Another of the Paper Makers
dances will be held this evening
In the Centennial auditorium with
music furnished by Curtis David-
son and his orchestra from Quincy.
The affair Is being sponsored by
Paper Makers Local No. 379, and
the proceeds will be used in pro-
moting civic activities of the or-
ganization.
The dance begins at 10 p.'m. and
will continue until the wee sma'
hours of the morning. Everybody
will have a good time--as usual-
and the public Is cordially Invited
to attend the affair.


""c"~~"'^'


II
--LU









AO


DRAFT REGISTRATION


THE TATTLER
Editor-in-Chief.......Buck Walters
Assistant Editor.... Royce Goforth
Society Editor....."The Snooper"
Sports Editor..........John Lane


SENIOR II'S ELECT OFFICERS
A meeting of the Senior II class
was held recently to elect class of-
ficers for the year, with the fol-
lowing results: President, Talmon
Smith; vice-president, Margaret
Coleman; secretary-treasurer, Su-
san Saunders.
We hope the junior class will
co-operate with these officers and
that we have a very successful
year.

WELCOME, FACULTY!
The year of 1940-41 finds our
school with nine members of the
faculty and our principal. The
faculty includes three new teach-
ers and seven hold-overs. There is
always a soft spot in our hearts
for the old teachers, but we are
also glad to welcome the new ones
and we will work hard for them.
Sometimes we think too much
about our teachers and forget our
books, but we do our best.
Here's to a wonderful and pros-
perous school year-and again
"'welcome teachers" from the stu-
dents.

WONDER WHY-
One junior boy is so sad thesV
days? Could it be that "Annie
doesn't live here any more"?
Two girls too M. T. to the
graveyard? Help! Help. Morris, be
careful!

Seems as if all the girls like
history, or could it be the teacher?
What two "cute" senior girls
are taking the'bo.-s a-ay from ail
the other girs.? Could it be "Did-
die" .and'.T '" ."?io'7 ThoB-glam.or
giiWt f
Tt seems ai though Buck- has
started thinking .Io R. G Iastead
of Sarasota.
Marianne L. and Gordon I. have
been seeing so much of each other
lately that they are beginning to
look alike. Could it be love? (Could
be!)
When you see long faces on all
the junior girls, you can be as-
sured R. Ij has left.
Wilbur seems to be losing inter-
est in the eleventh grade girls. I
wonder why, Joyce M.?
The school was really startled
the other day when Buck and Gor-


SETUP FOR COUNTY
NEAR COMPLETION

(Continued from Page 1)
as:
Who Will Be Exempt
"Commissioned officers, warrant
officers, pay clerks and enlisted
men of the regular army, the
navy, the marine corps, the coast
guard, the coast and geodetic sur-
vey, the public health service, the
federal national guard, the officers
reserve corps, the regular army
reserve, the enlisted reserve corps.
the naval reserve and the marine
corps reserve; men who have
been accepted for admittance to
the U. S. Military Academy and to
the U. S. Coast Guard Academy as
cadets, .... and diplomatic repre-
sentatives of foreign countries
. residing in the United States
who are not citizens of the United
States, who have not declared
their intention to become citizens
of the United States."
Chairman Huntfr urges that all
those within the specified age
limits endeavor to register early
in the day, to assist the registrars.
and urges the co-operation of
everyone in the county in this
registration.
-----
DRAFT LOTTERY DATE TO BE
SET FROM OCTOBER 21 TO 26

(Continued from Page 1)
sons subjected to the draft.
When a man registers, the offi-
cer said, he should use "utmost
care" in giving his correct address.
Failure to receive mailed draft
orders will not be. an excuse for
not complying with the orders, hl-
declared.
National guardsmen who resign
when their units are called up for
service, he said, become subject to
registration and oou scripli'ou. j.-'
as.other citizens, if they are in bth
21:35 age lItt., hh law .perlm.al.
,guardsmen, to reslgn.Wpp.R are- be-
low the rank of captaid,and who
tiive drica ,mdl
Order 10,000 Capsules
In preparation for the lottery
the government has ordered 10.000
capsules.
The capsules-the same kind a
druggist uses for prescriptions-

don came to school wearing ties!
Seems as though our football
boys had a pretty good time in
Tallahassee! !
We wonder what happe:eee c--r
ing home from Tallahassee? P. S.
-Ask Margaret and Fov.


are for the "conscription lottery"' Fig
that will determine the order in


which men are to be called fo
their year's service in the army.
Before the "lottery" is held, se-
-ial numbers will be inserted in
the capsules corresponding to the
serial numbers given to draft el:-
gibles when they register. The
order in which the numbers are
drawn will determine the se-
quence in which eligibles are li-
able to service.
The capsules, about an inch in
length, differ from the drug store
variety in that they have a bright
blue inner coating to conceal the
number they contain.
The famous "goldfish bowl," a
picture of which was published in
The Star a short time back, from
which World War draft numbers
were drawn, will be used for the
forthcoming lottery. Now in Phil-
adelphia's Independence Hall, it
will be brought to Washington a
few days before the drawing.

Mrs. R. R. Minus and son Bobby
are visiting in Jacksonville with
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Horton.
Send The Star to a friend.---
Send The Star to a friend.


SI


I
4


ht Film Has Randall in the star role. In addi-
tion there will be an all-colored
med D ama "battle royal" on the stage with
omedy. Drama local negroes participating.


"The Leather Pushers," Co-star-
ring Richard Arlen and Andy
Devine at Port Saturday

Combining thrills, action and
comedy, Universal's fast-moving
drama, "The Leather Pushers," is
playing tomorrow at the Port the-
ater.
Co-starring Richard Arlen and
Andy Devine, with Astrid Allwyn
in the leading feminine role, the
film traces the exciting career of
a boxer, played by, Arlen, from his
accidental "discovery" to his sen-
sational championship bout.
Taking its title from Universal's
previous series of successful prize
ring action pictures, a majority of
the fast action scenes in the new
"Leather Pushers" include actual
ringside views of fighting, with
Arlen and Devine enacting genu-
ine pugilistic roles.
As usual, there will be two fea-
tures Saturday, the second being
"Covered Wagon Trails," with Jack


ART 1

PROJECT -

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PORTRAITS .

OF CHILD PICTURES

FREE
This offer is one of the most remark-
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beautifully hand-colored-in-oil-paint
enlargement of any picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any snapshot, nny fa-
vorite picture you'd like enlarged and
hand-colored. These enlargements will
be size 5x7. They will be mounted on
high quality, double-white mat mount-
ing. size 7x9. To duplicate such an
enlargement, hand-colored-in-oil-
paint, would cost you from $1.25 to
$3.00 in any photographic store. To
get this enlargement you pay only 50c
for the enlargement and the hand-
painting will be done without charge.
Simply send a print or negative of
your favorite picture and fifty cents
in coin. That's all you do, and promptly
by mail you'll receive your hand-col-
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ART EDITOR
COOPERATIVE FEATURES,,INC.
360 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 1i.


s 6 89 e w 9 e 4 B* ** We * g S Q t 6 d O 9O0) s O 4h
*












S oss tradin' tiL e's here

Now Is the Time to Buy!


Bring in your old nag and swap for one of these Registered Thoroughbreds!
We've b4n pasturing 'em long enough! One of the finest corrals of Hoss-
flesh in iulf County. More in pasture. Also some good harness-broke
drafters, some a bit windy but will do a good day's work.
A


Three-Year-Old

Named V-8


Slicker than paw's buggy when he
courted maw. Good shoes. Pad-
ding in top shape. Excellent car.

TQlkibm Ml me M


Fast Pacing

Four-Year-Old
1936 Plymouth Sedan strain. No
spavin., curb or wire cuts. Full
of pep and easy to handle.

",' '.0 0


Fine Draft

Hoss

1939 Chevvy 11/-Ton
Pickup with Cab

158-inch Wheel Base
Good internal condition.
Fine set of shoes. Ready
to work with anything you
got on the farm. Only


< Ia'


Another Fast

Stepper
1937 Ford Tudor. Innards recon-
ditioned. Ready to give years of
service. Somebody's got a bar-
gain coming at

$29s5.00


Slick 4-Year-Old
1936 Ford Coupe stock. Good shoes
and coat in fine shape. Plenty of
room for the right people. Some-
body's got a bargain at

AM6 .0


l I 1/ /" -/


N O ONE likes to lie awake; yet every night thousands
toss and tumble, count sheep, worry and fret, be-
cause they can't get to sleep. Next day many feel
dull, logy, headache and irritable.
Has this ever happened to you? When it does, why
don't you do as many other people do when Nerves
threaten to spoil their rest, work, enjoyment, and good
temper try

Dr. Miles Effervescent Nervine Tablets
Dr. Miles Effervescent Nervine Tablets are a combina-
tion of mild sedatives proven useful for generations as an
aid in quieting jumpy, over-strained nerves.
Bead full directions Your druggist will be glad to sell you Dr. Miles
In package. Effervescent Nervine Tablets in convenient small or
Economical large packages. Why not get a package
and be prepared when over-taxed nerves threaten to
interfere with your work or spoil your pleasure.
'Large Package 75* Small Package 35*


Old Reliable 8-Year-Old Good Hoss

Dobbin 1935 Chevrolet Standard Coach
'32 Chevrolet Coupe
'32 Chevrolet Coupe breed. Thoroughly reconditioned
1935 Chevrolet Master Sedan. Will Still plenty of pep and go
tote double. 4 doors and fly net. in this old hoss. A bar- and harness-broke. Should give
New block assembly. Good shoes. years of service.
Slick as a whistle and going at ain at

-^,. ..-_-.,-: *' r A



`7 'T- V T FO DOFR SEDAN.......... ................$79
- -- - -

Bring in what you have. We've got some brand new stock and plenty of
cheaper critters and are a "rays okin' for a good trade.







St. Joe Mot'or Co,


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

YOUR LOCAL FORD DEALER


PHONE 37


* ma..... .. ..... ... W E W U 53W WUWU E U .. W1T


FRIDAY, OCTOBER li, 19407


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


r




FR-IAY OTBE --T STARs P-ORIT T OGLONY FLRD PG THE


... Entering its fourth year in

serving the needs of Port St. Joe

and Gulf County, THE STAR,

through the installation of up-

to-date equipment, offers its ad-

vertisers







in presenting their merchandis-

ing messages to the public!



THE STAR
IYer Hnw r h To" Iewaprue
Prrghwsively Srwvi tMh Needs d Port St. Joe and Glf County

FINE COMMERCIAL PRINTING
Letterheads Ruled Forms Calling Cards Personal Stationery
Statements Salesbooks Shipping Tags Weddinng Announcements
Bill Heads Form Letters Meal Tickets Prescription Blanks
Envelopes Business Cards Menus Broadsides
We Specialize In Color Printing


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE








PAGE FOUR THE STAR,' PORTT' ST. JE GULF COUNTY, FLD F O C tE -,1


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........ $2.00 Six Months...... $.O
Three Months......... 65c

--'f Telephone 51 ~-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

WE DON'T SCARE; EASILY
The new Japanese-Italian-German axis
agreement didn't come as a complete surprise
to this country..And, by the same token, the.
"president's embargo.' against. shipments of,
::scrap iron to Nippon was hardly unexpected.
The vast weight of American., public opinion
is known to favor'a-strongly pro-Chinese and
anti-Japanese policy. The embargo would.
..probably have been effected some time ago,
but a few Jap-lovers in the .state department
delayed matters. .
It was apparently. a' coincidence that these
two events should have taken place within
the same week. In one way it's a good thing
they did-coming together, they served, to
clear the air and put -Japanese-American re-
lations on a more realistic basis. There is no
more pretense here of regarding Japan as a
friendly power. Instead, we regard her.as a
potential enemy of American interests. And
now the question is: What are likely to be
the results of the scrap iron embargo and
the axis military pact?
The embargo is without doubt a hard blow
Sto Japan's militarists. We have provided her
in the past with some 90 per cent of the
metals she must have to keep her vast mili-
tary establishment going and growing and
perhaps in the near future we may have
some of this same scrap metal returned to us
in the form of shells. Japan has no other
possible source of an adequate supply-her
totalitarian friends, Germany and Italy,
haven't etsough for their own needs, to say
nothing of exports. It is our hope that, to-
.tally lacking as she will be from now on in
Essential scrap, her military activity will
gradually bog down. .;'And ..there 'are other
steps we can take if' this one 'does' notprove.
Sufficiently effective. We could, for instance,
Refuse to admit Japanese silk into this coun-
try, and by that single act deprive Nippon of.
her biggest and most profitable foreign mar-
.' ket.
The new axis agreement does not mention
the United States by name. But it is ob-
"viously aimed at us-as fascist spokesmen
:' have exultantly observed. The meaning of the
* agreement is crystal clear. If we should join
England in war against Germany and Italy,
SJapan is pledged to immediately attack us,
Sthus making it necessary for us to keep our
fleet in the Pacific and away from European
waters. And, on the other side, if we should
go to war with Japan, the other axis parthei~g
are'bound to help the Land of the Rising Sun
with "a11 political, economic and military
powers" at their command.
These are strong words, but we feel that
there is considerable bluff behind them. If
the axis friends thought the new agreement
would throw a scare into this country, result-
ing in our reverting to a more neutral atti-
tude, they were greatly mistaken, for we
don't scare easily.

The Southern Pulpwood Conservation as-
sociation urges landowners throughout the
South to "Cut Conservatively, Prevent Fires,
and Grow More Timber."

Best simile of the week: She looks like a
typographical error.


ADVERTISING, THE BUILDER
Of recent years it has been the fashion
among radical reformers to question the value
of advertising. The question is easily an-
swered.
Nothing in the world sells until it is known.
No successful commodity blunders its own
way into a store and waits until somebody
by some strange chance blunders into buying
it, says Nation's Business. If merchants and
factory managers had not hired salesmen,
and had not placed advertising, our America
would still be what it was in 1740, a handful
of poor villages and penniless farmers, dotted
on the edges of enormous forests.
National distribution, in its simplest terms,
means that you can get your favorite foods,
beverages, clothes, shoes, cigarets, cosmetics,
soaps, books, magazines and all other manu-
factured articles, wherever in the. country
you- are. .'Bringing 'this about, in.-a country
3000 miles wide, and once apparently divided
forever by the Rocky Mounttains, has been
no child's .play. It would never have,taken
place without inat.ipnal' and local advertising.
Railroads and steamship lines and high-
ways provided the means of transport. But
what is the use of transporting'goods ftomi a
factory in ,Delaware .to a,.. sore near a famiily.
in Oregon if the goods are not known and,
therefore, are not bought?
Advertising -is the dissemination of news'
about' better. an'd'les costly goods than peo-
ple could make for themselves at home.

All three highways,leading, into Port St.
Joe are, half-covered with' piles of sand for
resurfacing, and have been for weeks. What
we can't understand is why this sand should
be piled up weeks in advance of resurfacing
operations-a lot of it was hauled on Sun-
days, giving the impression that a speedy job
would be done-and then left as a hazard to
the driving public. Perhaps the highway de-
partment doesn't realize it, but with every
highway partially blocked, practically all out-
of-town business has been cut off, which
statement can be vouched for by every busi-
ness house in the city.

The United States mints report they are
having trouble keeping up with the demand
for small coins, particularly pennies. Mint
officials say the reason for this is the new
national defense tax and' better business. But
the trouble probably is that nobody has any-
thing to spend of a higher denomination than
a nickel or a penny.

The new census figures' show that the U.
S. as a whole gained 7 per cent in population
and that the population of the District of
Columbia' increased 36 per cent.-.'; Kiida funny,
isn't it. We e gained 7 per cent'in "population
in the whole U. S. A. in 10 years, but it now
takes 36 per cent more people in Washing-
ton to watch us.

Steadily increasing are the number of bill-
boards along Florida's highways, which
causes the editor of the Florida Advocate to
mutter thusly: "I think that I shall never see,
a billboard lovely as a tree; perhaps, unless
the billboards-:,fall,. I'l-l never, see a, tree.at
all.".

"The morale of a people is an essential sup-
plement to their guns and planes there
is nothing in our present emergency to jus-
tify a retreat from any of our social objec.
tives."-President Roosevelt.

Hotels report they lose thousands of dol-
lars annually through articles carried off by
patrons. Honesty, it seems, is not the guest
policy.-Albany Herald.

'Astronomers have about decided that life
on any of the other planets is practically im-
possible.. It seems to be getting impossible
on this planet also.

America's educational 'facilities are now at
the highest level in the nation's history.


THE RAMPARTS WE WATCH


Toi ate tO classify
By RUSSELL KAY

My little black dog' is a very
gentle and peaceful creature. He
is well behaved and extremely
friendly, but with one word. I can
transform him from a serene and
happy caniin into a raving, scratch-
ing, yelping maniac.
All I have to do is say "rats,"
in a more or less sinister tone and
he'll jump from a sound sleep into
a ball of furry fury. Although the
nearest rat may be ten miles
away, I can point under the dav-
enport or back of a door, or most
anywhere, and he'll start to sniff
and claw and bark and whine him-i
self into a perfect frenzy.
"A dumb animal," you say. Yes,
but not much dumber than a lot
of so-called humans we meet
every day. During the past few
weeks in this country a lot of
otherwise sane and normal human
beings are acting pretty much
like thie little dog I've been talk-
ing about.
Vivid tales of "fifth column" ac-
tivitie, in. connection with the
':Eulopean conflict have suddenly
awakened us to the fact tlat
similar operations are in progress
in America. Thousands of folks
.who.;for,,months paid ,no attention
to the findings of the Dies com-
mittee, who have looked with no
alarm on "bunds" or numerous
other subversive activities, have
suddenly come out of their slum-
ber to start a "witch hunt" that
if not curbed and intelligently di-
rected can prove as cruel and in-
human as anything a Nazi Ges-
tapo might devise.
America has rightfully been
termed the "melting pot" of the
world, for our 130,000,000 people
are made up of a conglomerate
mass of descendants of every na-
tionality. They represent every
creed and color, and they have
come to us from the ends of the
earth.
Among them are mxiany born in
Germany, France, Italy, Belgium,
Russia, or some other country.
Additional millions are only one
generation removed from the "old
country," but if they were born
In America or have become na-.
turalized, they are just as much
Americans and just as much en-
titled to enjoy its blessings and
protection as you or I. Likewise,
as good Americans they are just
as loyal and ready to defend this
country against its enemies, who-
soever they may be.
From the days of the American
Revolution up to the present, the
blood of every nationality, every
creed and every color has mingled


on the battlefield that America
and all it stands or mignt live.
During the past few weeks I
have encountered hysterial rumors
and wild talk about this or that
citizen suspected of being a ."fifth
columnist." Ugly rumors, abso-
lutely unfounded as to fact, based
only on a German name, an Ital-
ian accent or some other nonsen-
sical triviality.
This loose talk and these silly
rumors are picked up by thought-
less fanatical people, to be. en-
larged upon and passed along un-
til they are magnified into hideous
indictments that can work untold
harm and injustice upon honest,
upright, loyal American citizens.
But there is a sane and intelli-
gent way to do it, and the govern-
ment has set up a special depart-
ment of the F. B. I., charged with
the job. It is not your job or mine
to pass judgement on any fellow
citizen. If we have any basis for
suspecting either individuals or
groups, our duty is to report.with
full and complete details to, the
nearest FBI agent and we can rest
assured that the matter will be
investigated promptly. And. ince
you and. I are untrained and ih-
clined to employ snap judgement
or go off half-cocked, it behooves
us to refrain from expressing our
own suspicions or starting ugly
rumors and better that we await
the findings of the FBI.
Let us keep our feet on the
ground, our heads clear, aid let
our actions and our tongues be
guided by tolerance, justice and
fair play. It is possible to-be firm
and yet not fanatical.
~-K
LARGEST MOTH
Specimens captured attest 'to' the
fact that the Thysania moth of
Guatamela attains the phenom-
enal wingspreadi of more than 12
inches.


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR
PmlHne 5l-TM Star
inmwweHHMUKn~UtmuI mmiuHn tmntimwmimN


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, Fq-ORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940


PAGE FOUR









RS


Society


RED CROSS CHAPTER
PLANS FOR ROLL CALL
Plans were outlined for the an-
nual Roll Call to begin Novemger
11 and end Thanksgiving, at a
meeting of Gulf County Chapter,
American Red Cross, held at the
Legion Hut last Friday night.
Cahirman Robert Bellows was in
charge of the meeting and a talk
was given byl Mrs. Thelma Hall
A nominating committee consist-
ing of T. M. Schenider, Mrs. C. G.
Costin and Mrs. Madeline Whit-
aker, was appointed to nominate
officers for the 140-41 year and
the election will be held on Octo-
ber 25.


DR. J C. COE
-DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


FALL IS HERE!
October heralds opening of the
fall social season. We are pre-
pared to complete your fall en-
semble with a new hairdress
that will give you that chic
appearance so necessary for
social success.
For Appointment 55
PHONE J

PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOPPE



BAYSHORE
GROCERY AND MARKET
Highland View
We Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts

STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS

We Keep Open Until Noon
Every Sunday


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY




QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"

Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
-WE DELIVER -



ROOM ANDI

BOARD
BY THE 78
WEEK S 7w00

Dining Room

Open to the Public

Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner,. 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
t, Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
S Griffin Grocery Building
" 4


- Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


METHODIST WOMAN'S
SOCIETY IN MEETING
The Woman's Society for Chris-
tian Service of the Methodist
Church held its first business
meeting for the new organization
at the church Monday afternoon
with Mrs. A. M. Jones presiding.
Following the business routine it
was announced by Mrs. R. W.
Smith, secretary of missionary ed-
ucation, that the mission study,
"Uprooted Americans,'' will be
given at the next meeting. Five
pamphlets will be given on this
subject, being "The Genesis of the
Exodus," "The Family Pulls Up
Stakes," "Youth on the Highways,'
"The Church Serving the Mi-
grant" and "Ministering to Shift-
ing Populations." All members
are urged to attend this meeting.
*


MISS MARTHA BELIN
HOSTESS AT BRIDGE
Miss Martha Belin entertained
with four tables of bridge Tuesday
evening at the home of her par-
ents on Monument avenue. An at-
tractive arrangement of gentian
and. goldenrod decorated the living
room where the guests were enter-
tained. At the conclusion of play
pizes were awarded to Miss Kath-
erine Corbin, high, and Miss Nell
Connell, cut.
The hostess, assisted by her sis-
ters, the Misses Emeline and Mar-
garet Belin, served delicious re-
freshments to the Misses Kather-
ine Dearing, Margaret Conant, Er-
line McClellan, Nell Connell, Es-
telle Dickens, Louise Wilson, Kath-
erine Corbin, Louise Solomon and
Juanita Gunn and Mesdames L. T.
Davis and J. M. Smith.


MISS NELL MORGAN AND r r i
JAMES MORTON ARE WED BAPTIST W. M. U. IN FIRST
Miss Nell Morgan and James MEETING OF NEW YEAR
Morton were ,quietly married last The Baptist Missionary Union
Saturday evening at S o'clock in held its first business'meeting of
the Baptist parsonage at Chipley, the new year Monday afternoon at
the Rev. F. C. Hawke officiating the church, with the new presi-
in the presence of, a few relatives dent, Mrs. W. H. Howell, in the
and close friends of the couple. chair.
The bride, formerly of Cotton- The regular business routine
dale, has made her home here for was carried out, after which new
the past several months. She wore circles were organized and mem-
as her wedclfng outfit a teal blue bears selected for each. The circles
model with wine accessories, will be numbered, for the present
The groom is the son of Mrs. until names can be chosen for
Patty Lovett of this city, a gradu- them.
ate of the local high school, and Chairmen were named for the
is employed by the St. Joe Paper Union and circle chairmen will be
company. named at the next meeting. The
This young couple has many circles will meet as follows: Circle
friends here who will join The 1 with Mrs. Patterson; Circle 2
Star in wishing them much happi- with Mrs. William Quarles, and
ness. Circle 3 with Mrs. W. J. Daughtry,
ia r nc nt


The Misses Blanche Saul and
Mimi Schneider, students at Flor-
ida State College for Women, Tal-
lahassee, will spend the week-end
with Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
andl family.

Joe Mira visited 'his daughter
Sunday in Pensacola. Little Miss
Dolores is in a hospital in that
city recovering from a recent ill-
ness.

Mr. and Mrs. Asa Montgomery
and two sons and Mrs. Sallie
Montgomery enjoyed an outing
Sunday at Wakulla Springs.


MRS. SMITH ENTERTAINS
SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS
Mrs. R. W. Smith entertained
the members of her Sunday school
class Tuesday evening at her
home on Eighth street. The class
spent the evening in studying and
discussing the lesson for the fol-
lowing Sunday after which plans
were made to increase the mem-
bership. The hostess served hot
chocolate and crackers to the ten
members present.

Mrs. H. L. Logan of Pensacola is
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Basil E.
Kenney, Jr.


Quick Coffee Cake Fils M-.y a Eil


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Yt 'iih~ A .
Iki

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F IT'S company that drops in for
overnight, or a case of wanting to
"treat" the family, a quick coffee
cake dresses up almost any break-
fast.
When inspired to bake extra, but
time limits you, then the new self-
rising flour is a good friend. Baking
powder and salt are ready-mixed
into it and evenly, too, so your pre-
cious time is saved. Just mix in fat,
sugar, egg and liquid, and the coffee
cake is ready for the oven.
But here is the exact recipe:
Quick Coffee Cake.
Cut or rub 2 tablespoons fat into


2 cups self-rising flour. Beat 1 egg
with 3 tablespoons sugar, and add
to % cup milk. Add liquid to flour
mixture, and spread batter in
greased pan (layer should be M
inch thick). Cover with top mixture
and bake in hot oven (400 degrees
F.) about 15 minutes.
Top Mixture for Coffee Cake.
Rub 4 tablespoons butter into 1
tablespoon self-rising flour, % cup
sugar (confectioner's or granulated).
and 1 teaspoon.cinnamon. Prcss 2
doze raisins into batter at regular
intervals, and sprinkle sugar mix-
ture over top.


PARACHUTE TROOPS


P.-T. A. ELECTS OFFICERS
TO FILL VACANCIES
The first meeting of the Parent-
Teachers association of the new
year was held at the high school
auditorium Thursday evening of
last week and Mrs. W. H. Welling-
ton was elected president and
Mrs. A. I. Gangneiux vice-president
for the ensuing term to fill vacan-
cies left by Mrs. E. H. Horton and
Mrs. John Lane. Discussion was
held regarding a Hallowe'en car-
nival, with definite plans to be
made later.
After the meeting a reception
was held for the teachers, the hos-
tesses for the occasion serving
cake and fruit punch.

MRS. TAPPER HOSTESS
TO ALTAR SOCIETY
The St. Joseph's Altar society
of the Episcopal church held its
regular meeting Monday afternoon
at the home of Mrs. Robert Tap-
per, with Mrs. Tapper as leader.
The meeting was called to or-
der and followed with prayer by
the leader. The regular business
routine was carried out, after
which plans were made to raise
funds for the organization. After
the meeting the hostess served ice
cream, cake and iced ddrinks.

MRS. M. C. EDWARDS IS
HOSTESS TO BRIDGE CLUB
The members of the Thursday
Bridge club were entertained yes-
terday at the home of Mrs. M. C.
Edwards. Fall flowers were used
in decorating the living room
where two tables were in play.
Following the hour of play, high
and cut prizes were awarded and
delectable refreshments served by
the hostess to her guests.

SUPPER CLUB MEMBERS
ARE ENTERTAINED
Mr. and Mrs. Marc Fleishchel.
Jr., entertained members of the
Saturday Night Supper club last
week at their hiome on Sixteenth
street. A colorful arrangement of
fall flowers decorated the home
for the occasion. The affair was a
farewell party for Mr. and Mrs. L.
E. Robertson who have left for
New York to make their home.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Holland an-
nounce the arrival of a son Octo-
ber 2 at their home at Kenney's
Mill.
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Tryon are
announcing the arrival of a daugh-
ter on Friday, October 4. The
young lady has been named Jane
Eleanor.

AUXILIARY MEMBERS TO
A--TEND DINNER TOMORROW
Members of the American Le-
sion Auxiliary have been invited
to attend an Auxiliary luncheon
'mo.o'row Pt Apalachicola, and
??rs. M. L. Fuller. president of the
local unit, asks that all those who
plan to make the trip meet in
front of Schneider's store at 11
o'clock sharp.

The Misses Virginia and Joan
Hickey of Oklahoma, nieces of
Mrs. B. E. Kenne.y, Jr.. will spend
the winter in Port St. Joe with
tleir aunt. .
Mr. and Mrs. John Sowers and
dau"cter Jerry of Mobile were
week-end visitors in this city.
Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Ward spent
Saturday and Sunday in Pensacola.
Cornelins VanHorn and Carlvle
Matthews spent tle week-end in
Pensacola as guests of Mr. and
Mrs. CfP. VanHorn, and family.
Charle-s Creech of Dothan. Ala..
was the week-end guest of his
brothers, Gus and Kenneth Creech.
Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Hurlbhrt
l, Ve returned to their home in Or-
Iando after spending a week here
as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Miles
HF'-Thut.
Mrs. Jesse Larkin of Bristol
was the. gpest last Friday and
Saturday of her sons, Monte, Hoke
and Bowen Larkin.


J-4
.:.\ 4..,



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.


\ ,





I i
ii

r .
Wi .. ;


EVEN THE

COWS ARE

TESTED .


The Gulf County Dairy's
quest for perfection empha-
sizes purity. In every detail
of production our milk re-
ceives the benefit of scientific
methods and discoveries.


'Gulf County Dairy
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager
Leave or Phone Your Orders
to J. Lamar Miller's Standard
Station, Phone 98, ro Bus
Station Cafe, Phone 12


A member of the volunteer para-
chute unit of the United States.
Army is shown reaching ground
during maneuvers at Fort Benn-
ing, Ga. The unit was formed for
experimental purposes and the
public demonstration last week
was the first held.

Mrs. Sallie Montgomery had as
her guest over the week-end her
grandson, Edward Montgomery of.
Tallahassee.

Mr. and Mrs. John Kramer were
visiting Sunday in Apalachicola.


.. and

Keep HEALTHY

Don't let yourself be-
come soft during the
winter months! Bowl
and be healthy'
FUN FOR LADIES
AS WELL AS MEN

You'll ENJOY It!


ST. JOEBOWLING

ALLEYS



Purity Assured


~---~---------------


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


"'







PAGE- SIX- TH STAR,L---r~sl-1Bi~B-- PORT~il----I ST..-- JOE, GULF- COUNTY,- FLOIDAFRIAYOCTBER1,104


\lr. and Mrs. Charleos rown had
as their guesl.s Sunday Mr. and
S ow] ( aS t',amht M r-
i of V alaclithicoia.










Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager

LAST TIMES TODAY



: 7 <
,7.J .- UniV nI Pfuure


Swing Social


News


TONIGHT 10:00 P. M.

Special Midnite

Show -
ALL-COLORED CAST
COMEDY
You'll Bust Your Sides
A-laffing!!
MILLER and MANTAN


'R. WASHINGTON


GOES TO TOWN'

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12
2 I G
FEATURES

Jack Randall



THRILLER NO. 2 -
ANDY DEVINE and
RICHARD ARLEN in
in
"The LEATHER

PUSHERS"


"DRUMS of FU MANCHU"


ON THE STAGE
ALL-COLORED

'BATTLE ROYAL'

SUNDAY MONDAY
OCTOBER 13 14





Donald Duck News

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15


OUR DE.LCRACY--by a



.id^ i--





h _- A I I. ---, L S '.'. -- 'J
-RE THEN DECIDED (1,EC OF US- '
.o ... .. AS i r -1 .'
TI F i





4_ 4
1 Pi,"i,. THE S'ECL' ftITh EH "",






w ANT 64 OOO-.0 AMERICANS AR.E
WORKING TOGETHER, THROUGH .~
LIFE INSURANCE. IN 1935 POLICY- UCATION IS A
OWNERS AND BENEFICIARIES BULWARK OF
RECEI VED $2,600, oo IN DEMOCRACY, AND IN
PROTECTION. A
PAID 92,252,000,00()
,,h \ ,,"' 7 ,. !,- :*,'.: --. -_-:











FOR FREE 5CHOO LS.


LACI G A

FABOR, IN OUR
DEMOCRACY, IS NOT
CONSCRIPTED AND
WORKING TOGETHER THROUGH
.PA. 2,252,000,000









S ORK, BUT CHOOL
CHOOSES ITS OWN
1/08s.;,Y, '" ,-


'War Never Like

This,' Says Actor

Too Much Realism In "Mystery
Sea Raider" to Suit Henry
Wilcoxon

Henry Wilcoxon, co-starred with
Carole Landis in "Mystery Sea
Raider," playing Tuesday, only at
the Port theater, believes that ir
they put as .much realism into ac-
tual warfare as Hollywood puts
into its graphic accounts of it, it
would be a lot tougher on the boys
on either side.
Groping his way through thick,
black smoke during the final
scenes of the picture, his throat
parched and his eyes watering,
Wilcoxon was, heard to mutter,
"war was never like this," and he
ought to know, having been part
of the last one.
"Mystery Sea Raider" is based
on three important incidents in
World War II, the sinking of the
Athenia, the rescue of 300 British
soldiers from the Nazi ship Alt-
mark, and the scuttling of the
Graf Spee in Montevideo harbo-.
In many ways the scuttling of
ships, in real war is comparatively
simple, Wilcoxon believes, having
lived through what he says was
the blackest period in his life.
"When a commander decides to
abandon and, fire his vessel," he
said, "all he has to do is set it
ablaze and then jump with his
crew into lifeboats. But in filming
a motion picture, we had to go
back to the smoke every day for
weeks- It took 20 days to film a
20-mifiute scene such as this."

THEY ALL ARE
A deaf man walked into a
church and Inquired of a friend:
"Who is the new member in the
front pew?"
"He's the new deaconn" said the
friend.
"Did you say New Dealer?"
asked the deaf one.
"No, he's the son of a bishop."
"Well," replied the deaf guy,
"they all are."

Mrs. H. H. Saunders and Miss
Kathleen Saunders have returned
from a visit inn Nashville, Tenn.


VOTERS MAY REGISTER
UP UNTIL OCTOBER 15

Supervisor of Registration C. G.
Rish states that although the Gulf
county registration books have
been called in a day early due to
the draft registration, all voters in
the county who have not yet regis-
tered for the November general
election have until Tuesday, Oc-
tober 15, in which to register.
The registration books will be
at Mr. Rish's office' in the court
house at Wewahitchka.

REMODELING STORE

Zim's Men's Wear store is be-
ing remodeled from stem to stern
this week and modern showcases,
lighting fixtures and racks are be-
ing installed to make it one of the
most modern stores in the city.
Mr. Zimmerman extends a cordial
invitation to the public to drop in
and see the new setup.


FOR BETTER
HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easJly digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Juices

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representatlve


at Legion Hut.
S.- Masonic Lodge
j. .Il-. St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
_..... and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.
Order of Eastern Star __
---------~pv---------
leters on second a'd fourth Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Wood were
'n.:::-'h.s of each month in the week-end visitors in Columbus, Ga.
: n'sonaic hall, over npo.toffice. Vis-i
tors who are memCrs ar corD ADS
dtially invited to be present. CLASSIFi .iAD
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the CANARIES
tirst and third Mondays of each
onth at the Legion ut. HARTZ MOUNTAIN CANARIES
FOR SALE-Singers, $4 and $5;
American Legion Auxillary meets hens, $1. See Mrs. W. S. Smith,
fourth Friday of month, S o'clock, Star Office, phone 51.


"A 1 g a m" ^ i
j .,, ..>. I. ,. '.i ,:
r



Those voters of Gulf County who have not yet regis-
tered for the November General Election and who
desire to cast their ballots, may register at the of-
fice of the Supervisor of Registration in the Court
House at Wewahitchka up to and including Tues-
day, October 15.
C. G. RISH,
Supervisor of Registration,
2t Gulf County.




WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100 *

-DAY. OR NIGHT-
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION
S.-.- .-- ...---- .----. -.-.--- -- -- --






Advertisers Live in














W HAT they promise in their advertisements,
and what they deliver in their merchandise, are
right there for all to see.
If they deliver what they promise, they make
friends and steady customers. If not they make
enemies, lose patronage and finally go out of
business.
Those are the cold, hard reasons why honesty
is the best policy--especially in advertising.
But the real fact is that advertisers as a class
are humanly jealous of their good names. The
S trade-marks of manufacturers and the published
recommendations of merchants are only ac-
corded to products which they can offer you
with confidence and pride.
You can trust the ads to lead you to sound
values.

I


i


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 19400