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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00205
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 30, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00205

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
et.tgiowing- little city. .. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
R the City of Port St. Joe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY~ FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1938 NUMBER 50
*- -


Voters Seek To


P.-T. A. PRESENTS


Give the Schools MINSTREL SHO W

Share of Funds THIS E VE NIN G


Sign Clements To PROBE HUGE LOSS IN

Work on Details

Of Celebration CITY WATER SUPPLY


Voters Will Be Asked In Novem-
ber To Give Schools An Equal
Claim On Treasury Funds

Members of the Port St. Joe
Parent-Teachers association and
school faculty urge all voters
who have not already done so,
to register immediately in order
to vote on the school amend-
ment. as the registration books
close tomorrow at midnight.

Some two or three years ago,
the state gathering of the Parent-
Teachers' association at Gaines-
-'lile was turned into a sizzling in-
dignation meeting because the
good ladies had. just heard that
the purchase of serum for hogs
came first in the expenditure of
state funds; ahead of money for
education of children, says the
Orange County Chief.
The friends of Florida schools
are attempting at the general
election in November to correct
this fault, and the voters will be
asked to give schools an equal
claim, with other departments, to
funds in the state treasury.
An advance sheet from the Flor-
ida Educational Association jour-
nal for October .states ,that an in-
quiry conducted by the F. E. A.
with the assistance -of the re-
search division of-the University
of Florida. reveals the hardships
caused by a shortage of $2,500,000
in the state teachers salary fund
between 1932 and 1936.
Thousands of teachers received
less than subsistence wages .Some
of them lost their homes, many
had to surrender insurance poli-
.cies, automobiles ana other items
necessary to daily living. They
went without medical care, with
inl 'effects which cannot be rem-
edied.
The Florida Rotary, Florida Ed-
ucation association and other or-
ganizations interested in public
welfare are supporting this amend-
nent.
A. 0. Kanner, author of the pro-
posedz.amendment and chairman of
the senate education committee,
says:
"The proposed amendment, if
adopted, will supply the missing
link in the financial chain of the
public school system of Florida. It
is of the utmost necessity that
adequate and dependable revenues
be provided for the liberal main-
tenance of this system.
"In my humble opinion the
voters of Florida, as well as those
interested in the welfare of the
public schools and. institutions of
(Continued on Page Six)
----- ~--- --
LEGION POST MEETS
MONDAY EVENING

Regular meeting of Gulf County
Post No. 116, American Legion,
will be held Monday night in the
Legion honre adjoining the Port
theater.
Commander T. M. Schneider
urges that all members be present
as a number of important matters
will be brought up for discussion.
4---
SHIP BRINGS SALT CAKE
The S.S. Jean LaFitte tied up
at the local dock Monday to dis-
charge a cargo of salt cake for the
St. Joe Paper company. It left at
3 o'clock Wednesday morning, be-
ing the first vessel to make use of
the recently-installed system of
beacon lights.

Mannie Brash and Robert Ned-
ley of Apalachicola were business
visitors in this city yesterday.


PROCEEDS WILL BE USED
WELFARE WORK OF
ORGANIZATION


FOR


Residents of Port St. Joe and
surrounding communities a g a i n
will be afforded the opportunity
.of seeing an old-time minstrel
show similar to that presented a
short time back by the American
Legion post.
The Port St. Joe Parent-Teacher
association this evening presents
at the high school.auditorium at 8
o'clock "The P.-T. A. Minstrel."
While tonight's entertainment has
practically the same cast taking
part that presented the Legion
minstrel, the jokes, gags and songs
,are all new and many new faces
will be seen on the stage.
B. B. Conklin will again act as
interlocutor, ably assisted by the
following blackface comedians, C.
P. VanHorn, Dan Farmer, Wilbur
Wells, Joe Hauser, Bob Collier, A.
M. Mitchell, Bilf-Turner, Mrs. C.
P. VanHorn, Erie Duke Suttle. La-
neta Davis and Marie Ferrell.
The chorus for this presentation
will be made up of Port St. Joe's
loveliest and most, shapely young
married women, dressed as chil-
dren, namely: Mrs. Buster Owens,
Mrs. Joe Gloekler. Mrs. B. B. Conk-
in. .Mrs. Tom Owens, Mrs. Joe
Mira. Mrs. B. D. Smith and Mrs.
Ed McGowan.
. Specialty- numbers,: all of excep-
tional merit, will consist of songs
by Mrs. B. D. Smith and Paul "Hot
Buddy" Sullivan, novelty tap danc-
ing by Miss Marguerite Byrd, Abe
Sabe and his ukelele, and a num-
ber of other acts.
Price of admission to the. show.
which i.s scheduled to open at 8
o'clock sharp this evening, will be
25c for lults and 10c for children.
Proceeds will be used by the P.-
T. A. in carrying on their welfare
work.
Everyone is urged to put on
their best bib and tucker this eve-
ning and attend this minstrel, not
inly to spend a most enjoyable
evening, but to aid in the good
work being carried on by the Par-
e.nt-Teacher association.


State's Number One Publicity Man
Now In City; Head of Float
Company Looks Over Ground

George H. Clements, who has
been making periodic visits to
Port St. Joe for several months
past for the purpose of sending to
newspapers of the country stories,
regarding celebration of the cen-
tennial of Florida's first state con-
stitution which will be held in this
city December 7 to 10. next, this
week arrived to stay until the big
show is over.
Mr. Clements, whose real job is
to handle publicity for the Florida
exhibit at the New York World's
Fair next summer, has been given
leave of absence by General Man-
ager Earle Brown or Florida Na-
tional Exhibits in order that he
may devote his full time to work-
ing with Chairman J. L, Sharit
and other members .of the com-
mittee having the Centennial ii
charge.
J. F. Gasthoff, president of the
Gasthoff Manufacturing company
of Tampa. the specialty of which
is the building and decorating of
floats for historical and allegorical
parades held in observance of
great occasions, has also been in
Port St. Joe this we-ek, in consul-
tation with Chalrman Sharit and
Mr. Clenments regarding the floats
which may be used during the
Centennial Celebrai:on. Mr. Gast-
hoff. during hIs visit, made a sur-
vey of the streets of the city with
a view toward planning the par-
ade which will feature at least
one day and night of the celebra-
tion in December.
Mr. Clenents has established of-
fices in the city hall and active
work along the line of carrying
out details of the Centennial will
be begun at once.
-----
T. W. WILSON SELECTED
AS C. OF C. SECRETARY

Five Applications Considered By
Board of Directors


---- -Tie board of directors of the
COINS FOUND ON SITE OF OLD Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
ST. JOSEPH TO BE-EXHIBITED mlerce, at a special called meeting
i Wednesday night in the American
The com e in c e te Legion home, selected T. W. Wil-
The committee in charge of the ,son as secretary of the body. Mr.
Centennial Celebration to be held Wilson takes over the reins of the
in this city next December has in secretaryship from R. C. Rector.
its possession two old coins found F ie applications for the posi-
on the site of the ancient city of tion vwee submitted to the direc-
St. Joseph which was born. flour- tors.
'shed and died in the short period! i-
of eight years.
The old c.4ns, a French 5-franc WATSON IS WINNER IN
niece dated 1833 and a Mexican HOUSEKEEPING CONTEST
20-centavo piece, are the treas-
ured possessions of George A.'
Fred possessions of George J. L. Watson of Port St. Joe has
ay of Panama Cty, who dhlas been named as one of the winners
loaned them for exhibition duringe winners
the Centennial Celebration. in a "good housekeeping contest"
-___ conducted over a three-month pe-
riod by the Florida Power corpora-
Judge Alton Dendy and Hamp tion in the various districts.
Linton of Wewahitchka and the fr. Watson was awarded a $10
issues Louise Solomon and Aileen prize for having the best-kept of-
Arnold spent Sunday afternoon in fice and storeroom. It is pointed
Panama City. 'out that while there was but one
c( winner in Port St. Joe, he could
Mrs. J. F. Miller returned Mon- not have won had it not been for
day from 'a month's visit with rel- the active assistance of every em-
atives in West Virginia. ploye of the local office.


Cool Snap False Harbinger

,/ of Arrival of Fall


Fall knocked at the door ahead
of time in Port St. Joe when we
had a cool snap last week which
caused a lot of us to get out our
long-handled underwear and those
extra blankets, and while we do
need a blanket occasionally near
morning. we still have with us
the warm weather.
Our cool spell was attributed by
the weather bureau to the recent
tropical disturbance which drew a
bit of the North's atmosphere to
the South. We can look forward
to a number of warm spells yet
before Old Sol crosses the equator
on his trip to the southtvard.
But we can also look forward to


a fall snap in the atmosphere in
the near future, what with school
under way and the football men-
tors putting their squads through
the paces for the main encounters
of the season.
The sun has already deserted
the northern hemisphere and is on
-its way to regions where it will
give warmth to South America
and South Africa. returning to us
again next June 21, when summer
makes her bow.
From now until December 21,
the days will become shorter un-
til the advent of winter, four days
before Christmas, brings the short-
cst day of the year.


Legion Planning

Armistice Fete

Invitation To Be Extended To All
Posts In Neighboring Cities;
Auxiliary To Co-operate


From Three to Five Million
Gallons More Being Pump-
ed Monthly Than Is Being
Sold To Consumers.

For several months past city of-
ficals have been literally going
over Port St. Joe's water system
with a fine-toothed comb in an en-


In keeping with the spirit of deavor to discover where from
progress that is imbuing Port St. three to five million gallons of
Joe, the American Legion post is
making preparations for an Armis- water go each month.
twice Day celebration to be staged Each of the city's three pumps
in this city on Friday, November are equipped with a meter which
11rst steps were taken Tuesdayregisters the exact gallonage pro-
First steps were taken Tuesday,
night when the post's Ar'mistice duced. These'-fgures, when checked
Day committee met at the Legion with the amount of water actually
home to start the ball rolling. The metered out to customers, indicate
committee is made up of A. M.!
Mitchell, chairman; G. W. White that several millions gallons more
Byrd Parker, C. P. VanHorn and are being pumped each month
A. R. Simmons of the Legion post 'than is being sold.
and Mrs. Ross Coburn, Mrs. G. W. During the month of August ap-
White, Mrs. T. M. Schneider and them of A t
Mrs. Fred Maddox from the Auxili- Proximately 5,000,000 gallons more
ary. were pumped than were sold, and
This committee will contact all during September the excess gal-
posts in neighboring cities and ex- lonage was 3,000,000. It ispointed
tend them a cordial invitation to
take part in the celebration. out that due to the fact that the
It was pointed out that the post apparent leak fluctua,-s tF-ht it is
is not exactly roliing- in wealth not due to leaks in the water
and as a consequence nothing
elaborate should e contemplated mains, for if this were the cause
this year.. A number of entertain- the amount would get larger each
ment features were suggested, in- month, instead of varying.
cluding various games on the City officials have reduced the
streets, an old car race, spe aing problem to two theories: Either
and a grand ball in the evening.
-- the meters on the pumps are not
SIX STATE POS registering accurately or through
S some error of connection while
SIyin tireATi ,e...


ARE TO BE FILLED

Senator Claude Pepper Is Only
Democratic Nominee Having
Republican Opposition

In Florida's general election, to
be held November 8, six state-wide
offices will be filled, but in only
one will there be republican oppo-
sition for the Democratic nomi-
nee. United States Senator Claude
Pepper is opposed by Thomas E.
Swanson of Fort Lauderdale, who
won the Republican nomination
over Al:en E. Walker of Winter
Haven.
Pat Cannon of Miami. Demo-
cratic nominee for representative
in congress from the Fourth Dis-


laying fire mains to the St. Joe
Paper company mill the city's wa-
ter mains were connected with in
take lines of the huge paper mill.
The city has ny accurate means
of checking the 10-inch pump me.
ters and, so they have asked the
manufacturers of the meters to
send a representative to the city
to check the meters.
Superintendent H. A. Kidd of
the St. Joe Paper company has
co-operated to the fullest extent in
the search for the leak and has is-
sued strict orders at the mill that
under no circumstances, except in
case of fire, are the valves on the
city water mains to be opened.
Cost of pumping water comes to
slightly less than two cents per
thousand _. Ill.,'.. according to fig-
ures compiled by City Clerk M. P.


trict, is opposed by Republican J. Tomlinson, and as a consequence
S. G. Gallagher, but this is a dis- of the huge loss it costs the city
trict office and it not filled by considerable each month in the
state-wide vote. shape of excess power bills.
Congressman J. Hardin Peterson Average sale of water monthly
of the First District, R. A. Green in Port St. Joe is approximately
of the Second, Millard Caldwell of 2.000,000 gallons.
the Third and Joe Hendricks of __
the Fifth won Democratic renomi- T R R RS A
nation and have no Republican op-MASPO
position. MANAGER OF PORT
Justice Rivers Buford, incum-
bent, and Elwyn Thomas of Fort Bill Turner, manager of the new
Pierce are unopposed for full six- Port theater, this week sent in his
year terms on the supreme court. resignation to Hugh Martin, owner
Justice Roy H. Chapman, incum- of the theater, to take effect Oc-
bent, is unopposed for election to teber S. When asked as to his fu-
the two years remaining of the ture plans, Mr. Turner stated that
term of the late Justice Fred H. he was contemplating going into
Davis. some business on. his own.
Two state railroad commission-
ers, Jerry W. Carter and Eugene WEWAHITCHKA.PANAMA CITY
S. Matthews, are unopposed for HIGHWAY TO BE RESURFACED
re-election. All Democratic nomi-
nees for the state senate and state A federal PWA grant of $63,315
house of representatives also are for resurfacing of the Panama
unopposed. City-Wewahitchka road from the
B-----ay county line was announced
BUILDING PERMIT ISSUED yesterday. The allotment calls for
A building permit was issued the paving of 12.17 miles of the
this week to B. H. Dickens for con- highway in Gulf county.
Contracts for the paving must
struction of a six-room residence e awarded and construction he-
on Woodward avenue. Cost was gun before January 1, according
set at $1600. to state road department officials,








rAG FOUR T UHESAi P I ) STC. JOE FIOID


SSociety -

ii0


SUSANNAH WESLEY CIRCLE
MEETS WITH MRS. LOVETT


)ersonals

ANEFA DAVIS, Editor


BAPTIST WOMEN IN
ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM


The Susannah Wesley Circle of The Baptist Woman's Mission-
the- Methodist church met Monday! ay Society held its regular Royal
SService program at the church
afternoon at the home of Mrs. Monday afternoon with Mrs. Ham-
Patty Lovett on Sixth street. The mock, program chairman of the
devotional, taken from Matthew Martha Circle. in charge. Subject
6:19-34, was conducted by the for the afternoon was "The
circle chairman. The I States."
circle chairman. The thought was The meeting opened with the
brought out Jesus admonished IHis song, "Bringing In the Sheaves,"
hearers not to worry about tomor- 'followed with prayer by Mrs. J.
O. Baggett. The scripture was
row; He said, "Sufficient unto the Baggerom PsamThe scri wasn
day is the evi: thereof." keeping with the season of the
During the business sesSion the year and the year's work of the
zone meeting at Miliville and the V. M. S.
d iMen-bers of the society gave in-
district meeting to be held at teresting talks on the following
Marianna were discussed. -Dates subjects: "States and the Co-oper-
and plans for attendance will be ative Program," "Co-operation of
brought up at the church Monday States and the Southern Baptist
Convention In a .World-wide Pro-
afternoon. The concluding chapter rmam of Missions," "Christian Ed-
in the Bible .study book, "His Wit- ucation, Hospitals and Orphan-
ness," was given by Mrs. G. A. ages" and "Veterans of Pioneer
Patton in the absence of Mrs. Days."
O ,The week of prayer for state
Overby. missions was announced for. Mon-
Following the business session day and Tuesday afternoons and
the members enjoyed a delightful Wednesday evening, October 3, 4
social hour during whichti and 5. The business meeting will
social hour during which time the be held Monday afternoon at the
hostess served cookies and punch, close of the week of prayer serv-
& '? ices. All meetings-will be held at
SCHOOL FACULTY the church.
ENJOYS FH FY All members are urged to be
ENJOYS FISH FRY present and visitors are cordially
Members of the school faculty invited.
enjoyed a delightful fish fry on a a O'
the Lagoon beach last Friday eve- MRS. C. TAUNTON HOSTESS
ning. Prof. and Mrs. D. G. McPher- TO MARIE JONES CIRCLE
son, Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon The Marie Jones Circle of the
Methodist church held their regu-
and Miss Edna Davis left immedi- lar meeting Monday afternoon at
ately after school, and under the the home of Mrs. C. C. Taunton
skillful supervision .of Mrs. Prid- with 13 members present. The
go the supper was well under -meeting opened with the song,
geon the supper was well under 4 1 i a,onieodve y t Lo
'America," fol!owe'l by the Lord's
way upon ,lth arrival of other Prayer.
members of.the faculty and their A peace- program in charge of
friends, all members inviting a Mrs. J. Bradbury was pre-ented
ofn nllnxc Pnom "T T-"ate War."


friend.
Delicious fish, sa:ad, pickles
"hush puppies" and coffee were
enjoyed by about thirty-five.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Talley ol
Marianna announce tire arrival of
a daughter, September 20, 1938
Mrs. Talley will be remembered as
Miss Leon Balkcom of this city.

Miss Alice! Baggett left Sunday
night for a visit of several days
with relatives in Ozark, Ala.

Carlos Boyle spent Sunday in
Lloyd with his. family.

Milton Bryan of Columbia, Ala.,
arrived in Port St. Joe last Fri-
day and is the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. J. M. Smith.

Earl Rollins of Gordon, Ala.,
spent Sunday in the city visiting
friends.

Mrs. Helen Allen and daughter
returned to Port St. Joe Sunday
after spending the week in Dothan
where Mrs. A:len was undergoing
treatment.

Milton Bryan of Columbia, Ala.,
and Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith vis-
ited friends Sunday in Wewa-
hitchka.

Charles Marks, Sr., of Apalachi-
cola was a business visitor in the
city Tuesday.

Miss Katherine Smith returned
to her home in Marianna Monday
after spending the week-end in'
this city as the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Philip Lovett.

Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Farmer of
Headland, A:a., are guests this
week of their son and daughter-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Farmer.

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Michaud of
Hodge, La., were week-end guests
of Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Kelly.

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Linton of
Chattahoochee and Mr. and Mrs.
Har of Atlanta, Ga., were guests
Tuesday of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
McPhaul.


by Mrs. S. C. Parker; "No Peace
, Without Friendship," by Mrs. J.
e Ankrum; song, "Sweet Peace the
i"ift of God's Love"; poem, "Faith
of Our Fathers," by Mrs. Hender-
son Spence, followed by sentence
prayers, after which a short busi-
Sness session was held at which
Time the minutes were read. Roll
Swas called, dues collected and re-
. ports of various committees heard.
After the business session a so-
cial hour was' enjoyed during
which the hostess served refresh-
'ments of coffee and pie.

BRIDGE CLUB MEETS
WITH- MRS. J. M. SMITH
Mrs. J. M. Smith was hostess
to the Thursday Bridge Club this
week at her home on Monument
avenue. Potted plants and cut
flowers added to the attractive-
,PsS of the living room where two
tables were placed for play. After
the hour of play, scores were tal-
lied and prizes presented.
Delicious refreshments of peach
shortcake, sandwiches and coffee
were served to Mesdames Horace
:oule, B. A. Pridgeon, E. Ramsey,
R. Coburn, George Gore, C. Ed-
wards, E. C. Lewis and J. B. Gloek-
ler.

Mrs. J. W. Smith and little Miss
Winnie Sue Smith of Sumatra,
Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Sheppard and
Mr. and Mrs. M:hnnlng Sheppard
and son of Tallahassee were visit-
ing Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. W.
S. Smith.

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Chapman
and children, Jack and Janie, of

Tallahassee, arrived yesterday to
nrend the week-end with Mr. and
Mrs. Sammy Davis.

Mrs. M. K. Hurlbut is invited to
stop at LeHardy's Pharmacy and
enjoy a free ice cream sundae.

Miss Alma Baggett visited Wed-
nesday with Miss Christine Har-
bin at the Florida State College
or Women at Tallahassee.

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
and family returned to the city
Tuesday after spending the week-
end in Jacksonville with relatives.
*
Miss Alice Baggett will return
today from a week's visit in
Ozark, Ala.

W. C. Pridgeon is invited to par-
take of a free ice cream sundae at
LeHardy's soda fountain.

Dressmaking and Alterations
MRS. L. M. BASS
Call at Costin's Department Store


Cildwell Is Known As
Smoothest Horse-Thief

Columnist Tells of Congressman's
Ability To Get Things

In Columnist Frank Kennedy's
"Washington Treadmill" of recent
date, the following comment rela-
tive to Congressman Millard Cald-
well's ability to get things for his
district appeared:
"Among WPA files here are sev-
eral huge airport projects, spon-
sored by as many Florida com-
munities. Their total costs range
from $1,000,000 to 2$,000,000. It is
doubtful whether these ambitious
plans can be approved in their en-
tirety, as their limits of cost are
set by the number of men need-
ing work in the areas surrounding
the proposed airports.
"Sponsors of the projects well
might borrow a leaf from Con-
gressman Caldwell's book. The
Milton six-footer, enviously known
as the smoothest horse-thief on
the south side of the capitol, ac-
quired such an airfield for his own
bailiwick.
"If the word 'chiseled" hadn't
acquired such an obnoxious mean-
ing recently, it would describe the
Caldwellian operations. With small
sums abstracted from several gov-
ernmental purses, none of them
more than $15,000 or.-20,000, the
congressman amassed total alloca-
tions of $800,000 for the airfield at
Valpariso. The field since has
been acquired by the army air
corps and used extensively as an
aerial gunnery and bombing base."
-----*------*-
From 1880 to 1930 the number
of farm tenants in the United


NUMBER FROM HERE AT
PANAMAA W. M. U. MEET
Several members of the local
'Baptist. Woman's Missionary Union
attended the meeting in Panama
City Monday of the Northwest
Coast Baptist association, which
was held "in the First Baptist
i'hurch of the neighboring city.
AttLnding fron, -orit St. Joe
were Mesdames 0. M. Pinton, E.
A. McCaskey, Fred Maddox, L. R.
Iolliday, J. W. Sisemore, Charles
McClellan, E. B. Dendy, Hattie
Smith, Powell, Ezell, Lambert, W.
J. Daughtry, Halley and J. 0. Bag-
gett.
Among officers of the associa-
tion elected for the coming' year
were Mrs. J. K. Pridgeon, Wewa-
hitchka, personal service; Mrs. L.
R. Holliday, Port St. Joe, steward-
ship; Mrs. Ola Bennett,. Apalachi-
cola, children's home; Mrs. O. T.
Moncrief, Wewahitchka, member-
at large.

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
ELECT OFFICERS
The Lottie Moon Girls' Auxili-
ary of the Baptist church met at
the church last Friday 'afternoon
for their business meeting and ex-
arnination of the first two chap-
ters of mission study.
Election of officers for the new
year was held, with the following
results: Gwendolyn Spencer, pres-
ident; Virginia Pridgeon, vice-
president; Betty Jo Lane, secre-
tary; Dorothy Costin, treasurer.
Chairmen elected were Flora Mae
Cason, bulletin board; Marie Na-
tions, social; Gwendolyn Howell,
personal service. Fifteen members
and the leaders attended the meet-
ing.
Marjorie and Dorothy Costin in-
vited the Auxiliary to meet at
their home this afternoon.

LADIES' AID SOCIETY IN
LAST MEETING OF YEAR
The last meeting for the year
1937-38 of the Ladies' Aid Society
of the Presbyterian church was
held Monday at the home of Mrs.
H. F. Beaty.
During ine meeting a motion
was passed to work as an organ-
ized auxiliary during the coming
year, with meetings held on the
second and fourth Mondays at
3 p. m.
A special meeting, to further
organization, is called for next
Monday afternoon, October 3, at
the home of Mrs. J. E. Taylor on
Seventh street. All members are
urged to be present, and visitors
are cordially invited to the meet-
ing.
-----^----.-


Pasteurized for Your
Protection


of fine wood fibre. Hand

made from a large variety of col-

ors. They remain fresh and bright

for ages merely by keeping in a

cool place.


c M Oan E .^ ...


for the dance or the wed-

ding. They are designed to suit

your pocket-book and are correct

in form and style made by an

EXPERT


JV^. W. S. Smit


The Star


- Phone 51


I I


SLodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
Stors i"ho are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Legion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Woman's Club meeting First
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
Port Inn parlor.

VICE-PRESIDENT OF FLORIDA
FEDERATION TO VISIT HERE
Mrs. J. G. Gainey of lounts-
town, sectional vice-president of
the Florida Federation of Wom-
en's Clubs, will be in Port St. Joe
next Wednesday afternoon at 3:30
o'clock, *hen sht will meet with
the Port St. Joe Woman's club.
The meeting will be held in the
high school auditorium and Mrs.
B. W. Eells, president of the local
organization, urges all members
be in attendance.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown and
children of Apalachicola were the
week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Max Kilbourn.

Mrs. D. C. Smith returned to
the city yesterday after a several
weeks' visit in Dawson and Cor-
nelia, Ga., and St. Louis, Mo.

C. A. Phelps is invited to have a
free ice cream sundae at the Le-
Hardy Pharmacy.
-----+------
"What did the creditors-tell Dr.
Jekyl when he refused to pay his
bills."
"They said they would take it
out of his Hy.de."
*-"----- '*'----------


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR SALE
HOUSE TRAILER, sleeps 4; $400.
Original cost $1440. One mile be-
yond Bay Beach Trailer Camp, 6
miles east Panama City, opposite
side of road. R. A. Stewart. 3*
HOUSES FOR SALE
TWO-STORY dwelling, 7 rooms, 2
baths. Located on 'Eighth street,
Port St. Joe, Fla. For 'further in-
formation write or call Mrs. Mary
L. Smith, 208 North Lena Street,
Dothan, Ala. 9-2 10-7*

ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try it today, tf
The Star is $2, per year-sub-
scribe now!


^ ^. .


PAGE FOUR


FRIDAY. SEPTEM;:R q l. IQaq


3


Mrs. Pat O'Day is asked to stop
at LeHardys Pharmacy and par-,,
take of a free ice cream sundae.

It pays to advertise-try itf











FRESH FLORIDA

Fruits and Vegetables

BANANAS, doz. .......15c
GRAPES, lb. ...-..........10c
Satsuma Oranges-
Doz. 20c; 2 doz. ......35c

We Carry a Varied'Stock
of Fresh Vegetables

Get your Fruits and Vege-
tables where they are-
FRESH DAILY

Your Business Will Be
Appreciated

/ ^--
St. Joe Curb

Market
Mrs. Warren May, Prop.



Best for Purity, Quality
and Taste

PURITY IS

ASSURED!




7ih;


I ested

Use Only

SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK


,


'THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA







FRIDAY,~~~~~~~ SETEBE 3013 THE STAR POTS.JE LR AEFV


Woman (phoning to the room
- clerk): "There's a rat in my
room I"
Clerk: "Make him come down
and register."


Why Not YOU, Too?
Enjoy a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's World-
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean. -. Our
CABINS are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP is
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
B., F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.



Year Round

Comfort
1 '0'

MONEY BAYOU
ON THE GULF
---o----
Completely Furnished
COTTAGES


Cheap Rents
*Gas Heat and- Cooking
Frigidaires
----


MONEY BAYOU

I-- COMPANY
S (10 Miles East)
Box 496 Port St. Joe


OUR GREATEST SALE








S- J







A SUPER VALUE
UAG6C CHEF GAS RANGE






SOUTHERN LIQUID

GAS COMPANY
Your Gas Company Since 1932


HOLDUPWORK ON

NEW WATER LINK

Beginning of Apalachicola Bay-St.
Marks Canal Pending Fulfill-
ment of Guarantees

MILTON, Sept. 30-In response
to repeated efforts of Congress-
man Milland Caldwell to expedite
the commencement of work on the
Apalachicola Bay-St. Marks intra-
roastal waterway, the war depart-
ment engineers wrote the repre-
sentative a letter in which they
said:
"The Seaboard Air Line rail-
road, operating from Tallahassee
to Carrabelle, crosses the Ochlock-
onee river at McIntyre, on the old
Georgia-Florida and Alabama right-
of-way. L. R. Powell, Jr., receiver
for the railroad, oy letter dated
August 31, 1938, has agreed to
provide a temporary opening for
the passage of dredges and attend-
ant plant, but states that the rail-
road is not in a position financi-
ally to guarantee that it will con-
struct a movable span of the re-
quired clearances after completion
of the project.
"As you are aware, the project
requires as local co-operation that
local interests 'undertake all neces-
sary modifications to Dridges over
the waterway, furnish, free of cost
to the United States, necessary
rights-of-way and suitable spoil-
disposal areas for. new work and
for subsequent maintenance as
required, and release the United
States from all claims for damages
incidental to the work of improve
ment.'
"This office is preparing specifi-
cations for the advertisement of
this work and expects ,to com-
mence work on or about Novem-
ber 15. The commencement of this
-work, however, is contingent'upon
the completion of all the local co-
operation requirements and, at
this writing, we have been unable
to get a guarantee from the rail-
road company. Until we get such
a guarantee, this office, under the
project document, will be unable
to proceed with the work."
e-K
NEW HIGHWAY MAPS
TO BE DISTRIBUTED

Many Points of Interest In State
Are Briefly Mentioned

The Star is in receipt of one of
the new official road maps of
Florida, published by the division
of highway planning, and is in-
formed that the state road depart-
ment has the maps on hand for
free distribution.
The new road map is 30 by 30
inches in size and shows first
class through roads in heavy red
lines and main connecting roads
in heavy black lines, which are
easily read. All state roads and U.
S. highways are numbered.
For the convenience of motor-
ists, through routes in the state's
larger cities, a large mileage table
between cities, and an index are
also shown on the side which con-
tains the map of Florida roads.
On the opposite side. is a large
map of the United States showing
the principal through routes in the
U. S. system of highways for the
convenience of motorists planning
tours out of the state.
While limited space made it im-
possible to list but a small part
of the state's numerous attractions
many points of interest on the
east and Gulf coasts, ridge and
lake sections and North Florida
are briefly mentioned. A short de-
scription of Florlda's state parks,
and a summary of state regula-
tions governing fresh and salt wa-
ter fishing, hunting -and. motos
traffic, are also printed on the
map. Copies may be obtained by
writing State Road Department,
Tallahassee, Florida.

In the fifteenth century sugar
sold in London for $2.75 a pound.


NOT SO DUMB Rectal Diseases
Two city boys were kidding a We successfully treat Hemorrhoids (Piles), Fistulae, Pruritus (Itch-
country cousin who was visiting ing Piles), Fissure, Rectal Ulcers and other Rectal Ailments, without
them. One asked: "What is one surgery or loss of time from work or other.activities.


hundred?"
"That's easy," the country boy
replied. "I'm the one and you are
the two nothings."
-----X------
Autoists leaving the main high-
ways in the national forests are
required to carry an ax and shovel
for fire prevention purposes.


Professional Cards



DR. JC. COE
DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


EYES EXAMINED


VARICOSE VEINS, LEG ULCERS
It's no longer necessary for a person to suffer with Varicose Veins,
Leg Ulcers or Leg Swelling. We successfully treat these conditions
without loss of time to the patient. The treatment is mild and does
not cause pain or discomfort. No charge for consultation.
You are invited to call at the Cottondale General Clinic and talk over
your ailments. There will be no charge for consultation, and if treat-
ments are given the cost will not be more than you will gladly pay-for
the services you receive. Terms can be arranged to suit you.
COTTONDALE GENERAL CLINIC
COTTONDALE., FLORIDA
Dr. S. J. Gresko Phone 33 Dr. T. J. Partain
Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Tuesday, Fridays, Saturdays, 9 a. m. to 12.


Glasses fitted when needed See our local agent
Made In Our Own Laboratory or write
Office Hours: 9 a. in. to 6 p. m.

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.
i


OF


01
TI
orl
Ui
L
ki

al

ci
yo


a
*


ST- MINUTE NEWSFLASHES



msmZIfwawmifkllr


r The Greatest Protecton
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How LIFESAVER TREAD
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S AA!NST SK!DSAuD OF A LIFETIME ,
LO i OUS s The next rainy day, come
..,in for a free demonstration ,
ride on the new Goodrich

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ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


PHONE 37


"Bumper To Bumper Service"


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


r, ~a 'IIPI~FP~B~L~L~XI~- -----------------9- ---~ -- ----~U-- ~ I


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30,-1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE








AS. .S M1


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

--< Telephone 51 p.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
Thu spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

THE MAD HATTER
In listening to Hitler's strange speech
over the radio Monday afternoon it struck us
that he somewhat resembles the Mad I-atter
in "Alice In Wonderland" whose next words
or actions no one could predict. Truly, this
German dictator has gone mad and may well
be called the Mad Hatter of Europe, whose
next words or actions none can predict.
One phrase stood out in his talk which
gives a clue to what he has in mind. It was:
"This is the last territorial demand I
will make in Europe-but it must be
met."
This indicates that after he has annexed
the Sudeten areas of Czechoslovakia he will
turn his eyes to the colonies taken from Ger-
many during the World War. If Hitler can
carry through his present bluff it will give
him possession of the Skoda arms and muni-
tions factory, which has long supplied France
and Britain with big guns, and also a rich
mining and manufacturing .district which will
supply him with the sinews of war.
He knows that as soon as he seizes the .Su-
deten areas, Hungary and Poland will also
make similar grabs, and all of Czechoslovakia
will be partitioned among the hungry wolves.
And when this happens, Nazi Germany will
be the ruling power from the Rhine to the
Black Sea and Herr Hitler's head will be so
swollen with power that there is no telling
what his actions will be.
The peaceful submission of the Czechs to
Hitler's demands will not make for the peace
of Europe. It might, temporarily, until Ger-
many has her military might properly mar-
shaled for further demands, but that is all.

LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
Officials and others who have the habit of
signing documents without reading them may
take warning from what recently happened
to Comrade Isakhanoy, director of a Soviet
government shoe factory in Tiflis.
A Russian periodical called "The Crocodile"
was waging a campaign against inefficient of-
ficials, and its editors suspected that Isak-
hanoy was not sufficiently diligent on his job.
By some means it was arranged to have a
fake letter presented to him for signature,
along with routine documents placed on his
desk each day. Isakhanoy fell into the trap,
and this is what he signed without reading:
"Through some misunderstanding I was
promoted to the post of factory director. I
seldom go to the workshops. I do everything
I should not do, and do not what I should. I
am a fool. Everybody knows that, and I in-
form you as well. I am ready to sign any
paper without reading it. I am proving this
to you herewith. Signed, G. Isakhanoy."
The Crocodile published the letter and
razzed the unlucky shoe factory head so un-
mercifully that it is said he was forced out
of his job and kicked out of the Communist
party as well.
Moral: Don't sign anything before reading
it-and seldom sign it afterward.-Exchange.

The editor who selected for his slogan "A
Paper for the People If the People Pays For
It" had the right idea even if he couldn't state
it in grammatical style.


WE'LL STAY AT HOME, THANK YOU
European statesmen and news commenta-
tors are predicting that the United States
will be drawn into the war in Europe within
from three months to a year should another
outbreak similar to the World War occur.
We hardly think so, for, in our opinion,
America learned her lesson in the last con-
flict when billions of dollars were sent over-
seas to finance the warring nations and all
that was received in return was 350,000 Amer-
ican casualties, $20,000,000,000 in repudiated
debts and a first-class depression.
We feel sure that if the urge is made that
America enter the approaching war those
who participated in the late "war to end all
wars" will wield sufficient influence to keep
this country on her own side of the Atlantic.
They do not want to see their sons and
younger brothers sacrificed to the greed and
lust of European dictators.
No,-thanks. We'll stay at home. But should
some of these nations start climbing over our
backyard fence, that would be another mat-
ter, and there would be no hesitancy on the
part of Americans to take up arms in de-
fence of their own land.
Let Europe settle her own affairs. We've
learned our lesson.

BUY HOME PRODUCTS
Campaigns for the encouragement of buy-
ing products manufactured near home have
been carried on in various communities with
varying success for many years. Nearly
everyone agrees that the idea is sound in prin-
ciple, but many fail to put it into practice
when the time comes to buy.
Any small industry which manufactures a
worthy product and sells it at a reasonable
price might be enabled to grow large through
the loyal support of home people. Its growth
would enable it to increase its payrolls, in-
crease its consumption of locally produced
raw materials, build up: increased taxable
wealth, and in every way contribute to the
progress and prosperity of its community.
These are trite and self-evident facts which
have been put forward time and again; yet
many otherwise good citizens deliberately
contribute to the upbuilding of distant cities
at the expense of their own towns and coun-
ties, through failing to patronize home estab-
lishments.
The policy of buying at home would do
more for the average town than can be ac-
complished by all the commercial organiza-
tions and boosters' clubs which may be main-
tained. These organizations are needed, of
course, but their efforts should be aided by
supporting the enterprise already present in
the community.-Titusville Advocate.

HUMAN NATURE
Whenever you find a man finding fault
with his local paper, open it up and ten to
one he hasn't an advertisement in it; five to
one he never gave it a job of work; three to
one he does not take the paper; two to one
that if he is a subscriber he is delinquent;
even odds he never does anything that will
assist a publisher in running a good paper,
and forty to one that if the paper is a good
one and full of life, he is the most eager to
see the paper as soon as it is off the press.

The management of the Florida exhibit at
the New York World's Fair is preparing to
make outstanding displays of several of the
state's newest industries, among them the
conversion of southern pine into paper, the
production of bright'leaf tobacco and Sea Is-
land cotton, and the growth and processing of
tung nuts. These have opened up new ave-
nues leading in the direction of prosperity for
the state, and their importance will be
stressed in the Florida exhibit at New York
next year.

Patronize Port St Joe merchants. They are
the ones who help keep up our city, our
churches and our schools.

Send The Star to a friend-only $2 a year.


THE BAD NEWS


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


In last week's issue of The Star
County School Superintendent C.
L. Codtin, in a safety article, pub-
lished the following plea of a
fat.bg, written by Phil Baniff for
The'Insurance ,Field:-
"Dear Driver-Today my daugh-
ter, Who is seven years old, started
to school. She had on black shoes
and wore blue gloves. Her cocker-
spaniel, whose name is Scoot, sat
on the front porch and whined his
canine belief in the folly of edu-
cation as she waved goodbye and
started off to the halls of learning.
"Tonight we talked about school.
She told me about the girl who
sits in front of her--the girl with
the yellow curls-and the boy
across the aisle who makes funny
faces. She told me about her
teacher who has eyes in the back
of her head-and about the trees
in the school yard-and about the
big girl who doesn't believe in
Santa Claus.
"We talked about a lot of things
-tremendously vital unimportant
things-and then we studied spell-
:ng, rending and arithmetic-and
then to bed. She's back there
now-back in the nursery-sound
asleep with 'Princess Elizalbeth'
(that's a dol!) cuddled in her right
arm.
"You guys wouldn't hurt her.
would you? You see, I'm her daddy,
When her doll is broken or her
finger is cut-or her head gets
bumped, I can fix that-but when
she starts to school-when she


in that decade it will be some-
thing like this: ,
"Dear Pedestrian Today, my
daughter, who is 17 years old, is
out with my car. What she is
hearingg I do not know, but it is
not much, and is designed to catch
the attention of one or more boys
slightly older than she and who
may be in the car with her.
"Before she took the car out,
we talked about several things,
but not about where ghe was go-
ing, with whom, or what they
would be doing. She is reticent
about such matters, and also she
seemed to pay scant attention to
several suggestions of mine about
the. care of tha car, or to her
otherr s adn onition to be careful.
"My daughter is a nice kid, and
not addicted to worry. If I have
taken precautions to have the car
in good mechanical condition,
properly lubricated, the tires safe,
and the gas tank filled, she will
have no trouble, barring accidents.
She knows enough about the car
to start it, steer it and stop it,
and has heard that there are men
who make a business of fixing au-
tomnobiles when things go wrong.
She probably thinks that such per-
sons inhabit filling stations, but
she will be set right when she in-
quires.
"But she knows that when she
steps on a certain knob with her
right foot, the car will whizz along
at 60 to SO miles per hour, and she
believes that the !nob is placed
there to make it do so. That is
the only way she knows how to
drive it, and that s as fast "as it
will go.
"So, please Mr. Pedestrian, do
not let my little girl run over
you. You will know her by her
happy look, her blonde hair and
her red hat. She may be smoking


walks across the street-tlen she a cigaret and the boy beside her
is in your hands. maj y be hugging her. so that she
"She's a nice kid-she can run may not give you her attention if
like a deer and darts about like a you are in her line of driving. You
chipmunk. She likes to ride horses had better wait until she gets by,
and swim and hike with me on or dodge.
Sunday afternoons. But I can't be "If you get in her way and she
with her all the time-I have to runs over you, you may cause her
work to pay for her clothes and to lose control of the car, she may
her education. So please help me go through the windshied and scar
to look out for her. Please drive iher pretty face, or sne may get
carefully-please drive slowly past tangled up in the steering wheel
the schools and intersections- and need to go to the hospital.
and please remember that chil- Even though she escapes and you
dren run from behind parked don't, she will come home and cry.
cars. "So please, Mr. Pedestrian, do
"PlIease don't run over my little not get run over by my little girl.
girl. PHIL." "PHIL."
Ray Lanyan, editor of the Long-,
mont (Colo.) Times-Call, does not Knowing how different soils
propose to wait, breathless, to act in different weather conditions
find out what Phil may write ten is so important in road building.
ears from now if his plea is that the U. S. Bureau of Public
heeded and his little girl keeps Roads gives a course of study on
out of their way. He imagines that soils to highway engineers in pub-
if 'iitle girls do not change much lic service.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JO-E, FLORiDA


PAGE TWO


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1938










, ,_'T'T TTV ... .. .. V T


WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING

WE HAVE' GOOe CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. Wo HORTON


SEES ALL-

KNOWS ALL-

TELLS ALL-

ABOUT HAPPENINGS
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH


THE STAFF Cw,
Society Editor... Dorothy Trawick
Editor-in-Chief ......Edward Hufft
Sports Editor and Assistant
Ed tor-'n-Chief .....Al Schneider
Joke Editors..................
......Dick Stepp, Paul Johnson


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.-


I HAVE PAINS IN I USED TO
MY SCLES AN SUFFER ATI-PAIN PILLS
PAINS It MY HEAD SAME WAY UN- ANTI-PAIN P LLS
INSTEAD OF our 1 TIL, I FOUND BEYOND QUESTION,
SHOPPING QUICK RELIEF RELIEVE BUT
1 SHOUL D BE IN; i14ANANTI- AN- TREIIV --iU
BI SHOuD BE IN' I PAIN PILL. DON'T CAUSE
B---N- \I IL,. -- INDIGESTION


Did you ever take a medicine to stop head-
I -ache and have the headache stop and a stom-
ach ache start?
We'll wager you didn't take an Anti-Pain -
Pill. Anti-Pain Pills do not upset the stom-
ach. They take effect quickly too-and they
taste like wintergreen wafers.
S You can't do good work-you can't have
a good time when you are suffering from
Neuralgia Headache
Muscular or Periodic pains
Why don't you try the Anti-Pain Pill way to
relief? We believe you will be delighted with the
results. Thousands, of others are.
It will not cost much. Anti-Pain Pills sell for
one cent each, (less in Economy Package) and
one pill usually relieves.
Get Anti-Pain Pills at your Drug Store.
Regular pkg. 25 for 25c. Economy pkg. 125 for $1I,0.


BUSINESSS MEN:

Pay By CHECK!


You can facilitate countless
business transactions when /
you pay by check. As for the
''safety" element, that is quite
apparent, for you need not
carry sums of money on your
person. Ask us for all details!


HOUSEWIVES:

= Pay By CHECK!

Keep an accurate record of
itll personal and home expen-
t' \ ures. With the convenience
,ay p of a check book, you need not
keep money about the house.
Enjoy the prestige that goes
with a payment made by
CHECK!


We offer several checking plans ac-
cording to your individual require-
ments. Inquire today. No obligation!

A Complete Banking Institution






Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation

Twelve Years Safe Banking Service w


S EXCELLENT LIST

Annie Mae Boyett, Allah Mae
Darcey, Alice Ruth Gibson, Vir-
ginia Stoutamire, Preston White,
Opal Green, Mary Guertin, Martha
Hinson, Ed Hufft, Paul Johnson,
Margie Kirkland, Al Schneider,
Dorothy Trawick, Johnnie Mae
Balkcom,, Wilie Lee Beard, Emily
Boyette Elaine Gore, Lunnette
Hammock, Elsie Nicholas, Fay
Nell. Gwendolyn Spencer, Vilura
Straus, Margaret Coleman. Alma
Col#ingsworth, Vera Gary.
Eugenia LeHardy, Edna Mceod,
Melba Nedley, Susan Saunders,
Marigene Smith, Talmon Smith,
Arthur Soderberg, Barb-ra Crock-
ett. Julain Hinson, Thomas Smith,
Madeline Soderberg, Carolyn Bag-
gett, Merle Barton, Sue Brown,
Jylette Darcey, Barbara Edwards,
Albert Gagnieux, Amelia Gibson,
Jimmie Guilford, Betty Jo Lane,
Onnie LeHardy, Virginia Pridgeon,
Coleman Sclumeider, Mary C. Skip-
per.
.....- --
AN HEROIC EPISODE

A bird of rare specimen visited
the study hall Tuesday afternoon
and caused quite a disturbance
when Ausley Stoutamire, with the
help of Miss McClellan, Winston
Tones, Brady Nell, Dick Stepp anm
a butterfly net belonging to Miss
O'Quinn, succeeded in capturing
one of the most precious of all
birds-the lovely humming bird.
The time used was approximately
''ve minutes.
This all goes to show the read-
ers how quick some people can
"econle heroes, to be looked upon
by all humanity.
--------------
A JUNIOR HISTORY

Name-Martha Hinson.
Porn--Samson, Alabama.
Date-June 19, 1922.
Nickname-"Lizzy."
Favorite Color-Blue.
A-b ition-Hasn't made up her
mind.
Hobby-Reading.
Weakness Tall, blue-eyed and
h andsomne.
--------
WE WONDER
Why Howard Taunton always
mows the lawn outside Mr. Caw-
b-ol's room the last,period in the
afternoon when Mr. Cawthon is
havingg tenth grade English? Could
t be that certain girl?
Why Murnice nearly cried when
Winston got hurt?
Why Tuppy's face turned red
when Charles Pridgeon told Ed
cle Brock that she was looking at
him?
Why Kathleen Saunders blushed
when a girl called her attention to
a "certain someone" who was
-here?
Why Miss McCipllan (a St. Joe
teacher) always invites Mr. Lin-
'on (a Wewa teacher) to all the
eunrlty parties?
If Lunnette Hammock and Mur-
-'ce Taunton will ever grow up?
They are still playing with kiddie
carts.

EVERY-DAY PHILOSOPHY
Everyone is a moon and has a
dark side, which they never show
to anybody.
Truth is more of a stranger
than fiction.
Name the greatest of all inven-
tors: Accident.
"Pop's down in the sty. You'll
know him from the hogs because
he has his hat on."
You can't depend on your judg-
ment when your imagination Is
out of focus.
------------
FIRE!
She: "Just look at you, your
.9ocks are wrong side out."
He: "Well, my feet got hot, so
I turned the hose on them."

IRISH
He: "I have a friend in Ireland."
She: "Oh! Really?"
He: "No, O'Reilly.'

"Please give we a dime. I've
not tasted food for a month."
"Vo.,'re not missing much. It
'11i tastes the same."


BAND IN CHARGE OF
CHAPEL PROGRAM

Present Both Cla.sical and Mod-
ern Selections In Fine Manner

The band had charge 'of the
chapel program last week and did.
real well. We think MAr. Farmer,
the director, agrees with us that
they are advancing nicely.
'Selections played were both
classical and modern. Some of the
selections were "America," "Regi-
ment Band," "Military Escort,"
"Star Spangled Banner," "Idle
Fancy" and "Normal." Now, going
moJern on us (or should we say
'swingy") ,they offered "Old Mc-
Conald's Farm" and "Let Me Call
You Sweetheart" (we wonder who
each of them were dedicating that
number to?).
The song, "America,' was sung
by the students and teachers.
We would like -for our readers to
know the officers of the band.
They are as follows: Assistant
bandmaster, William Trawick;
president, Ed Lee Brock; vice-
president, Jesse Stone; secretary
.and treasurer, Alice Gibson; busi-
ness manager, Marigene Smith;
property custodian, Harold Wil-
liams.
\ve, "The Staff," have a word.
to say to the band: "Keep going."
----*- --
Rules For Bus Occupants

1. Occupants must obey driver.
2. Occupants must be prompt.
3. Occupants must stay off rbaI.
4. Occupants must wait for bus
'to make complete stop.
5. Occupants must keep head
and hands inside bus.
6. Occupants must occupy any
seat assigned by driveQr
Mr. McPherson also stated that
the drivers have approximately the
.same authority as teachers, and
that occupants would be expected
to conduct themselves as in a
,classroom.
----------


ROUNDER Paul Johnson, recently arrived
from Blountstown, had a total of
"Yot can't kid us, our pa owns 60 honor points to take the honor
a goat farm." of being the one to acquire the
According to our eyesight Kath- most honor points in school.
crine Ferguson anr Howard Taun- May we add that that a total of
ton have broken tp. ;""-lt .Juniors were placed on the
Ausley Stoutamire seemed to be Excellent list. This is over 50 per
having a- good time at Beacon Hill cent, as the class consists of 15
SSaturday night pupils, and is a standing of which
Kathryn Hickey seems to hum a the home-room teacher, Mr. Rus-
ditty to a certain soy In Panama sel Cawthon. is very proud.
City.
RECIPE FOR WINNING A
Edward Hufft seems to think he ECIPFOOTBALL AME A
looks like Robert Taylor (We won- FOOTBALL AM
der why). 1 cup fast center.
Paul Johnson seems to be doing 11 cups of halfback.
all right in St. Joe, lie has two 2 tablespoons brain work.
Junior girls on the string. cup coaching.
The eleventh grade has unani- A dash of good old rk
mousvy decided that Miss McClel- per mixed thoroughly with the
lan has the best figure of any proper equipment and served hot
Le- er in school. on the football field.
What Sophomore girl Went to
church Sunday because she told a SWITCHBOARD
Senior boy to go and why he What did the big rose say to
didn't? the little'rose? "Hi bud!"

SONG OF THE WEEK "Would you mind getting up a
"A Tisket-a-Tasket."--From your .m t Miss?"
Hit Reporter. "I want to hang up this notice,
-'Wet Paint'."
A POEM A smile is like sunshine,
A balky mule has four-wheel It brightens all the day.
brakes, a billy goat has bumpers It tips the peaks of life with light
Camels have balloon tire feet and And drives the clouds away.
S e o w It tints each moment with happi-
carry spares of what they eat, ness,
But still I think that nothing beats Causing the weary to feel at rest;
the kangaroo with the rumble A smile is just like sunshine
seat. In making the world its best.
--- We're called the "Worst Writers-
SMILE of the World."
Dedicated to Howard Taunton. Our efforts keep us in a Whirl.
We make the best of every jest
Try to smile sometime. Howard. That is given from each boy and
It's a lot of fun. girl.

The thing that goes the farthest When a poem Is attempted by one
,arthest ,His efforts are laughed at bv one
towards making life worthwhile, is ef use laughed at by one
That does the most and costs the So try to be kind,
least, is just a pleasant smile. And please do not find
A smile that bubbles from the Much fault, so that others will
make fun of us.
heart, that loves his fellow men ___
Will drive away the clouds of Is it true thit Miss O'Quinn
gloom and coax tne sun again, passes by the office every morn-
Is full of worth and goodness with ing to get a refill of demerit pads?
genial kindness blent,
Tr's worth a million do:]ars, but Mrs. J. O. Baggetts invited to
drop in at LeHardy's Pharmacy
it doesn't cost a cent. for a free ice cream sunrae.


PHONE 70


THE TATTLER


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 301- 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


THE KNOT HOLE
(Pinch hitting for the Knot Hole,
who has closed up and gone,
fishing)
Well, folks, here goes-
As you know, should know, or
will know, this week we bring you
the news and views on Miss
,'Ouinn, the new nistructor and
professor, yeah man, of the Sci-
ence of Sciences.
She is approximately 20 years of,
age, although she would not tell
us the definite number. Here is a
statement she so graciously gave
fis: "A woman's age is the secret
o. hIer success." Some proverb!
Now for a description of her:
She is a brunette with light brown
eyes. Stands 5 feet 6 inches. She
weighs 135 pounds, has natural
wavy hair and wear a 51 shoe..
Miss O'Quinn attended high
school in Perry, F;a., which is in
Taylor county. Ahem, it so hap-
pens that she is a nearly" perfect
Florida girl. She went to college
for four years, and her college des-
tinations were: Florida State Col-
lege for Women, Alabama State
Teachers College and the Florida
southern College. May I also add
'hat this is Tier first year to en-
counter that so-called storm,
"Teaching School."
Her bobby is collecting animals
-f which she seems to have done
a swell job. For her sidekicks she
uses sailing and beach parties, or,
may I quote her again: "I like to
have fun." Now last, but not least,
may I say that she is a very nice
person to know (if you can get to
know her). Last minute flash tells
me that she is not married, but
sh'" hasn't given up hope yet.
So as time is short, may I close
in saying that next week we will
present to you Mr. Cawthon, mne
most honored and best liked Span-.
ish teacher in the whole school.
So keep your eyes and ears tuned
on station N-U-T-S signing off for
,the week.
JUNIOR BOY 'STARS'
JUNIOR BOY 'STARS'








P


DUCK HUNTERS

LOSE FIVE DAYS

Federal Season Opens November
15, But Florida Season Does
Not Open Until November 20

Hunters who may have
chuckled with anticipation when
the federal department of agri-
culture announced a 45-day duck
,-ooting season for the southern
states will find they can't start
outinging in Florida until five days
after other states start.
There is a conflict between the
federal dates and the hunting
season allowed in Florida-and
where the state law imposes
greater restrictions, it is enforced.
The U. S. Department of Agri-
culture fixed Nov. 15 to Dec. 29,
inclusive, for duck shooting in the
southern states. However, the
Florida hunting season does not
open until Nov. 20, and I. N. Ken-
nedy, state game commissioner.
explained that there can be no
duck hunting until the later date.
The result is that Florida will
have 40 days of shooting an
increase of 10 over last year,
when. the season was Nov. 27 to
Dec. 26, inclusive.
Ducks may be shot in the hunt-
ing season between 7 a. m. and 4
p. m. They cannot be shot over or
near baited water, and they can-
sot be hunted with a power-pro-
pelled boat.

IMPROVEMENTS BEING
MADE AT MIDWAY PARK

B. F. Crockett, owner of Midway
Park fishing camp on the Dead
Lakes, was in Port St. Joe the
other day and reports that he is
improving his camp.,
'ilings of the old pier, which
was erected 35 years ago and. for
many years used for the loading
of turpentine and rosin on barges
and boats plying the lakes when
the state farmed out prisoners to
work in the turpentine stills, has
been removed, stumps cutou t at
the landing and a general clean-up
program instigated.
Mr. Crockett recently erected a
number of cabins and a dining
hall-kitchen at his camp and is
endeavoring to make Midway Park
one of 'the outstanding fishing
camps on the Dead Lakes.
Send The Star to a friend.
Send The Star to a friend.


COLORED FOLKS ASK
THAT ORDER BE KEPT

Make Appeal To City Commission
For Abatement of Nuisances

A delegation of colored resi-
dents appeared before the city
commissioners Tuesday night ask-
ing that better order be kept in
the colored, quarter, that more
street lights be provided and that
the alleys be cleaned up.
Their request was presented in
the form of a petition bearing 30
names and it also requested that
all musical instruments be shut
off at 11 o'clock each night and,
that all such public music instru-
"ents be prohibited from use on
Sunday.
"We :desire to co-operate with
the city officials in enforcement
of the laws as far as possible,"
said the spokesman for the group.
The commissioners agreed to is-
sue an edict to close "jooks" in
the quarters at 10 o'clock at night
on week days and 12 o'clock on
Saturday nights, and that all such
places be kept closed Sundays.
SThey also informed the colored
delegation that the city was doing
its best in the way of law enforce-
ment across the tracks, but it was
up to the colored residents them-
selves to aid in law enforcement
by reporting offenders and swear-
ing out warrants for their arrest.
-------X-------
VOTERS SEEK TO GIVE
SCHOOLS SHARE FUNDS

S(Continued from Page 1)
higher learning, should make it a
point to urge the adoption of this
amendment. There is really no
logical reason why there should
be a dissenting vote."
Colin English, state superinten-
dent of public instruction, in com-
menting on the amendment, said:
"The school revenue amendment
which has been proposed by the
legislature to the people 'of the
state for their approval should be
ratified by an overwhelming vote.
It states clearly that it is the ob-
ligation of the legislature to pro-
vide necessary revenue for the
school appropriation. The legisla-
ture has asked for this mandate;
the citizens of this state who are
interested in the school system
should express their wishes by
approving it. It is an essential
step in stabilizing our school situa-
tion."


Loses

No

Time!


BECAUSE


First and last we are Pharmacists-we
have at hand the drugs that all physicians
call for.... No "waiting." No "send-
ing for" some little-used drug. .. Our
drug stocks are complete, always. And
more-the drugs are all full-fresh, full-
effective. You can be sure of full-value
prescriptions at Carver's!

Carver Drug Co.


Port St. Joe, Fla.


Phone 27


Claims Allowed

The following bills were paid by
the city of Port St. Joe for the
'nonth of September:
General Fund
C. W. Horton ............$ 60.00
G. T. Rhames ........... 57.00
J. E. Euford ............... 30.00
C. E. Whitaker .......... 13.00
Troy Jones .............. 95.00
B. A. Pridgeon .......... 23.10
T. W. Davis ............. 6.54
Mrs. P. C. O'D'ay ........ 8.45
St. Joe Texaco Service ... 205.16
F. M. Rowan, agt. ....... 22.50
I. C. Nedley .............. 80.00
(ulf Hardware Company.. 225.00
R. P. Haley ..... ........ 100.00
St. Joe Ice Co. .......... 11.50
W. D. Dare .............. 13.13
J. L. Sharit ............. 56.00
Troy Jones .............. 23.00
M. 0. Freeman .......... 33.00
J. L. Sharit ............. 14.30
St. Joe Telephone Co..... 8.35
Williams Serv.ice Station.. 87.13
St. Joe Motor Co. ........ 9.63
Cook Insurance Co. ..... 10.00
St. Joe Telephone Co. ... 13.67
Gu:l Oil Corporation .... 21.40
City of Port St. Joe .... 11.65
Florida Power Corp. ..... 56.22
H. & 3. W. Drew Co. .... 25.19
City Service Garage ..... 48.99
J. E. Euford ............. 22.50
Willie Lister ............ 52.00
J. A. Hall ............... 52.00
C. W. Horton ........... 25.00
William Brown ........... 7.72
Julius Short ............. 7.72
Sam Hall ................ 45.58
M. 0. Freeman .......... 15.00
August Payroll ........... 491.25
Cash Expenditures ...... 138.75
Total ................. $2,226.43
----aeye-----ngd
-Save by reading the ads!
Save by reading the ads!


FIFTY-FOUR STILLS ARE laws during the month of August.
DESTROYED IN MONTH Thirty-nine cases were tried in
---the courts, 30 resulting in convict
By State Beverage Department; tion and nine in acquittal. Fines
114 Persons Are Arrested totaling $1,333 were collected and
sentences meted out totaled eight
Agents of the state beverage de- months. Eight sentences were sus-
partment destroyed 54 unlicensed, pended.
whiskey stills and arrested 114 ---
persons for violating state liquor It pays to advertise-try it!


FRUITS and VEGETABLES'
We carry at all times a complete
line of fresh fruits and vegetables.
We also stock Bread Cakes, Cook-
ies and Candies
WE REMAIN OPEN SUNDAYS
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE


LEMONS doz. 20c
TWO DOZEN-35c
AVACADO PEARS, each ........10 '
SATSUMA ORANGES, doz. 200
TURNIP GREENS, bundle ......10O
Delicious Apples, Tomatoes, New
Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, White
and Bermuda Onions, Grapes

HINSON FRUIT STORE
Next Costin's Department Store


Self | Every Sack
Rising L U Guaranteed

12 Lbs. 24 Lbs.

35C 69C

Plain or Self-Rising
5 pounds OBELISK .. 25c
10 Founds OBELISK .- 49c

OAT MEAL (with premium) 25c
3-pound Box
MUSTARD, quart' --........--15c
VINEGAR, quart ---------....10c
KETCHUP, 14-ounce ...---------------.. 10c
DOG FOOD, per can 5c
MEA L, peck ---.......27c
QUAKER PUFFED WHEAT .-....------10c
4 STRING BROOM ...---- ------------..19c
WAX PAPER, 125-ft. roll- .19c
Monarch BOSTON BROWN BREAD- ..19c
Dromedary DATE and NUT BREAD....15c

3 5c WASHING POWDER
3 BOXES SPAGHETTI
3 BOXES MACARONI
3 BOXES SALT
3 POTTED MEAT


3 for 1Oc


WHITE MEAT-Per pound ..................15c
SAUSAGE MEAT-Per pound ...........18c


ORANGE JUICE, 47 oz........-..... .
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 47 oz.....
GRAPE JUICE, quart ..29c
GRAPE JUICE, pint 17c
Camrbell's TOMATO JUICE, 2 for....:.15c
PRUNE JUICE, quart 19c
NO. 2 TOMATOES, 3 cans 21c
PORK & BEANS, No. 2V2 can ..............10c
PINK SALMON, 2 for 25c
CHERRIES-Yacht Club red pitted ....15c
Monarch BLACKBERRIES 19c

10

LBS.



COOKIN 011O gallon 90c






PINEAPPLE-No. 2 Sliced 1E c
or Crushed ..............................1
TUPELO HONEY, Gallon ..................$1.00
L E M O N S, dozen ........................... ..15c
PURE COFFEE, pound ..........................15c


Large VANILLA WAFERS
Large GRAHAM Crackers
Pound Box CRACKERS
Large GINGER SNAPS


lOC


PURE CREAM CHEESE-Per lb. .... 19c-
GOOD DRESSED FRYERS


PETT E'S CASH AND
CARRY


Specials for Friday and Saturday

September 30 and October 1


THE STAR,,PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA~


PAGE SIX


FRIDAY. SEP-ft-MBER 30., 1938


PHONE 79


-PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


,CARVERI'S