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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00203
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 16, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00203

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
esA growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
Sing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING .THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 164 1938 NUMBER 48


Minstrel Show Brings

Out Much Local Talent


Legion Post To

Elect Officers


American Legion Midnight
Benefit Performance At the
Port Theater Goes Over In
Big Way.


Third District Vice-Commander To The Porter House Sam Minstrel
Act As Installing Officer At Show presented Saturday night at
Wednesday Night Ceremony e Port theater by the American
Legion post following the moving
Annual election of officers for picture show uncovered much hid-
the ensuing term will be held den talent among residents of the
Monday evening by the American city. While the show did not draw
Legion post at the Legion home, the anticipated attendance, due to
-and Command-er T. M. Schneider the fact that it had- to be pre-
asks that all members be preesnt sented following the regular pic-
and extends an invitation to all ture show at 11:30 p. m., the post
ex-service iten in Gulf county to cleared approximately $35, which
attend the meeting and join the',ill be used for establishing a
post. School boy patrol to protect chil-
Installation of officers will be dren at the city's schools.
held Wednesday evening with M. t 'he minstrel opened with the
T. Fountain of Crestview, vice- song, "Down at the Old Minstrel
commander of the Third district, Show," sung by R. C. Rector,
acting as installing officer. which was followed by "Happy
Following the installation cere- Days Are Here Again," by the en-
monies, a chicken pilau supper tire company. L. W. Rice then
wil be served for visiting Legion- rendered "Drifting Back to Dream-
naires and those who participated land."
in the Legion minstrel show, Miss Juliette (Laneta Davis)
then stepped up to the micro-
Roche Moves To Pione and sweety sang "Shine On
New Location Porter House Sam, in the person
Sl of Leonard Earle Campbell, old-
time minstrelman and director of
the show, then put in his appear-
Appliance Deer N ocaed ance and saug "Roll Along Silvery
In Winchester Building Ad-
In Winchester Building Ad- oon" and "My Gal Sal," playing
joining Port Theater
his own accompaniment at the
piano.
Roche's Appliance Store. oper- rs. is Martin sang "Indian
ated by W. C. Roche, Port St. Love Call" and L. W. Rice sang
Joe's only complete appliance y Wild Irish Rose," which was
dealer, is now located in the Win-followed with a parody to the song
hester store building adjoining by Porter House Sa. The Dark-
he Port theater. town Strutter's Ball," by Miss
The move was made yesterday, Viola Barber and Erie Duke Gul-
and Mr. Roche feels that the new edge concluded the first part of
location and the recently comn- te presentation.
pleted building give him a much he above numbers were intr-
greater advantage to display his ersed wh the us minstrel
spersed with the usual minstrel
wares. jokes presented by members of
The store handles Norge re- the company under the able guid
frigerators and gas ranges, West- dance of B. B. Conklin acting as
inghouse appliances of all sorts interlocutor.
and Philco radios, as well as kero- etee rt oe rt
oBetween part onre and part two
isehe ranges and oil heaters a number of specialties were pre-
With winter just around the cor- scented.
ner and in order to push the sale ee from New
Miss Cynthia Green f-om New
of oil circulating heaters, Mr.Orleans (Mrs. C. P. VanHorn)
Roche. for a limited time, is offer- i ang "Carry Me Back to Vir-
ing 50 gallons of fuel oil free with (Cntin ed on Pagf 3)
every oil circulating heater putr- ( d on P
chased from him.
chased from him. SMALLEST TRAILER IN
A cordial invitation is extended SMALLEST TRAILER IN
the public by Mr. Roche to drop in WORLD STOPS IN CITY
and see him in his new location. Tom Herridge, 55 of Tarklo,
-__ Mo., dropped in at The Star office
OUT FOR GOVERNOR Wednesday on his way to Mexico
OR SENATOR IN 1940 as part of a two-year trip hIe is
making in an endeavor to see as
Representative R. A. "Lex" much of the country as possible
Green of Leesburg stated Tuesday in that length of time.
that he would be a candidate for Mr. Herridge travels with the
the Democratic nomination in 1940, world's smallest trailer, two by
either for governor or United two by four feet, in which he lives.
States senator. This trailer and Mr. Herridge have
"I am being urged to run for been featured in Ripley's "Believe
either senator or governor in It or Not" cartoon.
1940," he said. "I haven't decided Herridge had traveled approxi-
which office I will be a candidate mately 26.000 miles when he hit
for, but it will be one of them." Port St. Joe and has covered a
large part of the United States
VOLUNTEER FIREMEN TO BE and been in'.Canada, Nova Scotia,
EXEMPT FROM STREET TAX. Cuba and Nassau. He started his
Strip from Tarkio in May, 1936.
At the meeting of the board of I
city commissioners Tuesday night! BAND CONCERT SUNDAY
it was voted that 12 members of' It is announced by Director Dan
the volunteer fire Cepartment will Farmer that the Port St. Joe band
be exempt from paying the city will give a concert in Port Inn
street tax of $2 per year. Park at 5 o'clock Sunday after-
The line for applicants on the noon. Everyone is urged to turn
fire department roster will please, out and give their support to the
form at the right. boys.


Work On Plans For

Historical Pageant


Barrier Heads

St. Joe C. of C.

For Coming Year As Result of
Election Held Last Week To
Select New Directors,

W. W. Barrier was chosen as


Committee Confers With Na-
tionally Known Promoter;
Will Bring In Publicity Man
And Director.

A really definite step toward
staging of a pageant depicting the
rise and fall of the old city of St.
Joseph and the constitutional con-
vention held in December, 1838,


SAILOR IS AFRAID
TO TELL WHAT HE
THINKS OF HITLER

When a German ship was in
port recently one of the sailors
who could rot speak English
very well, got into conversation
vith one of our local store-
keepers who could understand
and speak German.
During the course of the con-
versation the storekeeper asked
the youth: "Tell me how the
people of Germany feel toward
the rule of Hitler?"
The young sailor looked about
first, as though he did not
know whether he was speaking
to a friend or foe, knowing that
Nazi spies were everywhere,
then he placed his index finger
on his lips. before replying, in
German: "I can't say anything,
for if I did and the captain dis-
covered it-" and he crossed his
forearms in front of his body)
indicating that he would be put
in irons immediately.
---.---~--pr -

BID IS MADE FOR

QUICK-FREEZING

SEAFOOD PLANT

CHAMBER COMMERCE ASKS
THAT PWA UNIT BE LO-
CATED IN ST. JOE

With endorsement by the state
cabinet for an application to PWA
for a loan and grant to finance a
series of quick-freezing and stor-
age plants around the coast for
Florida's salt water fishing indus-
try, the Port St. Joe Chamber of
Commerce, at its last meeting, in-
structed the secretary to get in
touch with proper authorities and
request that one of the units be
located in Port St. Joe.
It is pointed out that this city is
ideally situated for such a plant,
being in the heart of a large fish-
ing district, having a wonderful
landlocked harbor and ample dock
facilities.
The plan is being pushed by
Conservation Commissioner R. L.
Dowling and provides for eight re-
frigeration and storage plants,
each to cost $82,500. He also is
asking the government for $5000
with which to operate each plant
until it becomes self-sustaining.
Plans call for each of the plants
to have a daily freezing capacity
of 500,000 pounds of fish and stor-
age space for 1,000,000 pounds.
Producers would pay one cent a
pound fee for their use. Annual
catch of seafoods available for
them has been set at 144.000.000
pounds.
The commissioner states a 1935
law permits the formation of a
board, which would incorporate to
run the plants. Thus the loan
would not be a debt of the state,
which is prevented by the consti-
tution from issuing bonds for such
a purpose. He further stated that
a private concern already has of-
fered to lease the entire system at
a figure sufficient to pay off the
debt in 25 years.
This would mean an added in-
dustry for Port St. Joe should one


----
PWA-STATE ROAD PROGRAM
INCLUDES 12 MILES IN GULF

A PWA-state road building pro-
gram to cost about $2,500,000 was
mapped out this week by the state
road department. It contains 20
projects, the first of which al-
ready has been advertised for bids.
PWA grants of 45 per cent will
be sought in formal applications.
The remaining 55 per cent will


of these plants be located here, come from funds of the state road
and every effort should -be ex-l department and from county funds
erted by residents of the city and allocated to road building.
city officials to secure one of Included in-the set-up is twelve
these freezing plants. miles of road in Gulf county on
----- oad 52 from the Bay county line
David Gray of Panama City was to Wewahitchka. Cost of the proj-
visiting in this city Wednesday. ect is placed at $140,700.


The track will be located east of
Monument Park and heavy kraft
paper secured from the St. Joe
Paper company will be used to
fence in the site, it is understood.

C. OF C. DIRECTORS TO MEET
The board of directors of the
Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce will hold their regular meet-
ing Tuesday evening at Port Inn.
At this time, it is understood, the
directors will name a secretary
for the organization.
...... -- -------
Mrs. Joe Whitfield, Gulf county
demonstration agent, of Wewa-
hitchka, was in the city Tuesday
holding a demonstration for the
adult education classes.


president of the Port St. Joe in that almost legendary city, was
Chamber of Commerce at a meet- taken Monday afternoon when a
ing of the newly-organized board delegation constisting of Mayor J.
of directors held Monday after- L. Sharit, general chairman of the
noon. Centennial Celebration committee;
New directors of the chamber, B. W. Eells, Sr., chairman of the
named by members as the result special events committee; G. F.
of the election held last week, IKa.ser, rnember of the finance
are W. W. Barrier, J. W. Kerr and committee; W. S. Smith, chairman
Horace Soule. T. M. Schneider of the publicity committee, and R.
was re-elected to the board. C. Rector, met at the Port Inn
At Monday's meeting Kerr and w ith Paul Dupont, nationally
Soule were chosen as vice-presi- known promoter of spectacular
dents and Mr. Kerr was re-elected outdoor pageants and similar
to the office of treasurer, events who is at present working
The position of secretary was on the "Flags Over Pensacola" pa-
left open and the board of direc- geant to be staged in Pensacola in
tors states that it is open to re- October and which has a cast of
ceive applications for the position. 3000 people, and worked on de-
R. C. Rector is at present secre- tails of our Centennial pageant.
tary of the organization. M.r. Dupont's plans call for the
X- erection of a stage 85 by 30 feet
TL 'nnares Meet in front of the community center
Legionnaires Meet building now under construction In
Sioniument Park on which th0 pa-
At WakullaSp rng eant will be presented. The script
At S will start with the founding of St.
Joseph and its rise to ope of the
Gulf County Post Ranks Second most famed cities on the Gulf,
In Size of Delegation the climax will be reached with
Registering the gathering of the delegates ror
the constitutional convention, and
will close with the decline of the
Legionnaires of the Third Dis- old city and the decimation of Its
trict, comprising 16 Northwest population by yellow fever.
Florida counties, gathered 200 Mr. Dupont's idea is to secure
strong at Wakulla Spring Sunday the services of about 100 members
for the mid summer joint confer- of the Pensacola Little Theater
"nuce of t1e American Legion, Le- unit to carry the burden of pre-
gion Auxiliary and Forty and sentation of the pageant, assisted
Eight Society. Gulf county post by two or three hundred local
ranked second in number register- people. He pointed out that that
ing, being outranked only by Tal- organization would gladly co-oper-
lahassee. ate with the city. In addition, he
Honored guests and speakers at stated that the costumes to be
the meeting were U. S. Senator used in the Pensacola pageant
Charl-es O. Andrews of Orlando; could be used here, with slight al-
W. J. Steed of Or:ando, depart- terations, which would be made by
ientt chairman of the civil service the WPA sewing rooms. This will
veterans' preference committee; be a considerable saving in itself
Charles H.olstlaw of Bay Pines. in cost of producing the spectacle.
state service officer; A. D. Har- While no definite contract was
kins of Greenwood, Neal Kirkman (Continued on Page 6)
and R. A. Gray of Tallahassee, al ----
)ast department commanders, and RACE TRACK BEING LAID
a number of other prominent Le- OUT FOR CELEBRATION
gionnaires from various parts of -
the state. B. W. Eells, Jr., with the assist-
M. T. Fountain of Crestview, ance of a number or WPA work-
vice-commander of the Third Dis- ers, this week started work of
trict, presided, and Judge A. L. surveying and laying out a half-
Porter of Wakulla was general mile dirt race track upon which
chairman in charge of all arrange- horse races will be held during
ments. th rCentennial Celebration.








PAG TW TH STR PORT ST. .. JOE, FLOID FID, .....~R16 -P~


THE STAR
W. -. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

SIssued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Puilding

I Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
4 1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

S Sutbscrption Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......6bc

{ Telephone 51 )> -

SThe spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
Th, spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


NEW HOMES DEPRECIATE OLD HOMES
While there were not so many homes in
Port St. Joe before the present expansion
.started, those that were here had been stand-
ing for a number of years and can be classed
as "old." Now, every time a new and modern
home is built-and there are plenty of them
being built-all other houses are greatly de-
preciated in value. But this depreciation can
be offset by the owners if they modernize.
Within the next year or two there will be
many new and attractive homes built in loca-
tions far removed from the present residen-
tial districts. This means that the old houses
will be worth less and less each year until
they are so greatly outmoded that their own-
ers will not be able to rent for sufficient to
pay the taxes.
Many of the old houses in our residential
districts are now so out of date that they are
not worth half what it cost to build them.
Yet these same houses could be. modernized
and kept in tune with the times.
Let us suppose that someone built a house
that cost $5000 fifteen years ago. It wouldn't
bring more than $2500 now. And before any-
body would pay $5000 for it they would take
that sum and build a new and attractive resi-
dence. And suppose the owner were to take
$2500 for it and spend another $2500 to build
himself a modern house-he would then have
,7500 invested in his home, counting the $2500
he lost on the sale of his old home.
But this same home owner could take $1000
or $1500 and modernize his present residence
and, adding in the value of his present loca-
tion, would be much better off.
Money for home modernization can be ob-
tained from a number of firms in Port St.
Joe today under the FHA plan and can be re-
paid over a period ranging from three to five
years. Many home owners of the city are
missing a golden opportunity by not taking
advantage of this government loan plan, and
if they do not take advantage of it soon, it
will be too late, for the opportunity expires
next year.
We would like to see every outmoded home
in Port St. Joe brought up to date through
VI[A loans. It would not only enhance the
value of each individual piece of property, but
Should enhance the value of all adjoining prop-
crty and made Port St. Joe a city of model
homes.
Not only this, but it would also bring in a
large amount of money which would be spent
for material and labor and go a long way to-
ward lifting us out of the temporary depres-
sion we are now experiencing.

You may have your worries, but did you
ever stop to think of the worries of the man
who doesn't know where his next yacht is
oumiing from?

A man trying to run a business without
advertising is like a fellow winking at a girl
in the dark-he may know what he is doing
1)ut no orne else does.

In China they are crying "\e want bread."
Butt they are getting "soup" from the air.--


Florida 'Times-Union.
as it were.


OUR PRICELESS HERITAGE
C'.iJ.i.hrli. all the hell-raising going on
-over in Europe, with eve'iy-body on pins and
needles waiting to see just which way Adolph
Hitler is going to" jump, :-e should 6ook at'
ourselves for a moment.
To us in America our most priceless posses-
sion is taken for granted. It is the right to
freedom of speech, freedom of the press and
freedom of individual action.
But there are those among us who forget
that the greatest privilege in the world today
is to be an American citizen. They overlook
that many people in Europe and other coun-
tries woiull pay real money for this privilege
which we received at birth. And, having over-
looked all this, some people think that the
government in other lands is better than our
government. To them our institutions are
outmoded and they are rarin' to try Fascism,
Coimmunln ismn and other "isms."
Perhaps the best answer ever given to one
of these "ism" groups was given straight
from the shoulder recently from a speaker's
platform. The speaker was defending one of
the greatest organizations in America-the
American Legion-from a scathing attack
which questioned its sincerity of purpose.
In the midst of this defense the audience
hissed. But in a moment the hisses were
turned to ringing applause, for the speaker
said:
"The only right you have to hiss me is be-
cause this is a free and untrammeled democ-
racy. If the principles of some of these pro-
lessors were to be adopted, you could not hiss
me and 1 could not talk like this."
In those two sentences the speaker had re-
moved the foundation from all the "isms" in
the world except the Americanism of freedom
of individual rights.
It is through such freedom that the editor
of The Star and the editors of all other news-
papers are able to point out to their readers
what, in their opinion, is wrong in national,
state and local governmental policies.
All too often in this busy world the few-
really important things are neglected-and
this priceless heritage of freedom is one that
we should ever keep in mind and endeavor to
preserve.


THE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
Turning from the city to the small town
press exchanges that come'to the editor's
desk is like stepping from the slums, full of
vice, into an old-fashioned garden sweet with
lavender and thyme and the scent of peren-
nial flowers. The pages of the big dailies are
so full of murder, thievery, immorality and
selfishness that the better news is obscured
by these glaring shattering of the Deca-
logue. One puts the paper aside with the feel-
ing of depression and heartache that the
\vorld is so full of terrible and unhappy
things. ..-(^
Then picking up the papers that record the
happenings of the little towns around us,
one gains renewed faith in life. Here are set
forth only that which uplifts a community-
the activities of the business men, the church
items, the happy social gatherings of the peo-
ple, the marriages, births and deaths, far-
mers' items, and all the thousand and one
daily occurrences that make up the simple
annals of the great common people, who are
really the foundation of this country of ours.
Scandals are seldom published in the coun-
try newspaper, but if it so happens that de--
cency demands it, the uglier details are
omitted or given a kindly touch that is widely
different from the unfeeling publicity of the
city press. The offenders may be our neigh-
bors, or people we have rubbed elbows with
all our lives. They are real human beings to
their town paper, while to the great city
dailies they are merely grains of a sort that
are ground out hourly in their news mills.
Sometimes people speak lightly of the
country newspaper, but it is one of the most
potent and unlifting factors in our national
existence.-Christian Science Monitor.


Manna from heaven,
I Send The Star to a friend-only M, a year.


.- THREE MEN ON A HORSE


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


For the benefit of those Port
St. Joe people who believe in trad-
ing with the mail order houses,
believing they are getting high
grade merchandise at half the
cost, I print the following:
Mail Order Commandments
1. You shall sell your farm pro-
ducts for cash, whrre you can,
but not to us, for we buy nothing
from you.
2. You shall believe us and buy
all you can from us, for we want
your best, for we do not know you
personally.
3. You shall send your money
to us in advance so we can buy
the goods from the factory with
your money; you may have to
wait a few weeks, but that is our
business method.
4. You shall get help from your
nearest city or village to build
.cod roads, so that you may
easily haul goods from the depot,
but do not ask help from us-
we don't help to build good roads.
5. You shall buy church bells
and altar utensils from us, and
send the money in advance-that
is our rule.
6. You shall get all the help you
ciin for your church from the
nearest village or city, for, al-


mail order house is lost forever.

I hear many complain about
the stupidity and irresponsibility
of people, but I feel just the op-
posite. I never cease to marvel
that people do their work so well
and that matters move so
smoothly.
I admire telephone operators,
elevator attendants, waiters, bar-
bers, policemen, motormen, loco-
motive engineers, mail carriers,
cigar clerks, window cleaners-
even taxicab drivers.
Although I flee from every pro-
spective source of irritation, I do
not seriously object to dis-
courtesy, indifferent service or
downright insult. They stir me up.
I do more and better work and.
am finally grateful. Therefore, if
I frequently encounter ineffici-
ency and shiftlessness I should
surely notice it.
In the last month or so I would
say that I have been directly
served by at least 200 different
people. I do not recall a single
unpleasant experience. Everyone
was kind, courteous, agreeable.
Each did his task well.
This is a belated note of ap-
preciation to thousands of faith-
ful men and women who may
never have hear me utter a
word of thanks. There are mil-
lions like me. We accept good
work and service as a natural
:-ght. I am a victim of the same
unconscious indifference. Seldom
does anyone say "weil done" to
me. They pay me off and that's
rhe, end of it T .ilo others T io


though we have more profits from '" U .1 "W "
Ithe best I can and hope I please
you than they, it is against our the best I can and hope I lease
rules to give to the churches. my customers. As long as they
ignore me, I assume they are
7. You shall convert your neigh- ignore mee they are
satisfied.
bors also to our faith in us, so
that they will buy from us, we
have ioom for more money. The walking stick is the legiti-
have room for more money.
You shall look at the pretty mate outgrowth of the staff so
pictures in our catalogs as often popular as late as 1810 The staff
as you can, so as to strengthen \was the natural successor of the
a club which had such a run during
your desire for things you do not ub which had such a run d
need, but which you may order the stone age. Gorillas and shop-
with other goods to save freight. herds still carry staffs.
Send us all your ready cash, so Draw your own moral
that you may not have any of it
left to buy necessities from your TEARS DOWN WRONG HOUSE
home dealer. It still happens-the contractor
9. You shall believe us rather who tears down the wrong house.
than your home business men, for When Mrs. Emma Otis. of Fair-
we want your trade. We get to 6e mont, Ill., went out to her neat
millionaires on your support. little six-room farm house she
Don't be bluffed. found it two-thirds dismantled. A
10. You shall call on the busi- contractor was hauling away ma-
ness people of your own vicinity trials for use in building a negro
for help and credit, if you meet tabernacle.
with hard luck, trouble or sick- The contractor shook his head,
ness. It's your money we want; looked across the road at the di-
we don't know you unless your lapidated building originally con-
orders are accompanied by cash. tracted for, and said weakly,
Think this over and then con- "yep, looks like I tore down the
sider. Every dollar you spend wrong house. all.right."
at home you get another whack -
at. but every dollar sent to the Send The Star to a friend.


FRIDIAN~, ;EPTENIBER 16, li-M8


THE STAR, FORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO







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CORRECTION$ PLEASE
In last week's Star it was stated
that one of Willard Lee's taxicabs
was involved in an accident at the
intersection of Long avenue andi
Fifth street. This was in error, as
it was a Martin taxi. We are in-


deed sorry that this error was
made,- and glady make this cor-
rection.

Some unemployed men at West
Kilbride. Scotland, have become
cave dwellers.


Exhibiting all the colors of the rainbow.
.he little DONAX or WEDGE SHELLS.
laintiest of all bivalves, greatly resemble
brilliant jewels in the Florida sands where
;hey are found by the millions. They are
an endless joy to the collector who may
make of them many kinds of attractive
articles such as gay shell flowers or ex-
quisite portieres. Both are favorites among
the tourists In Florida, the dcnax has
become famous as the basis of a most
delicious soup.


The most remarkable characteristic o:
the BANYAN TREE, found in various see
tions of Florida, is its amazing method(
of throwing out supports from its branches
which, upon reaching the ground, takt
root and extend other branches in theii
turn. In this manner the tree spreads ovei
a great surface and endures for many ages
One famous banyan has been known t<
cover enough ground to shelter 7,000 men
This tree is of the fig genus.


SBill Turner, as a blackface com-
w Brings O t edian, has few equals, in our pri.
vate opinion equalling the act put

Much Local Talent onby Mr. Campbe i
Par[ two opened with the en-
tire company singing "Alexander's
(Continued from Page 1) itagtime Band," followed by A. M.
ginny," followed by Martha Hin- Mitchell singing a Scotch-Irish-
.son and Katherine Hickey singing Jewish composition which brought
"A Tisket A Tasket." forth roars of laughter from the au-
One of the surprise presenta- diehce. Porter House Sam sang
tions of the show was mandolin "Robinson Crusoe," and Miss Mari-
and harmonica selections by Abe gene Smith sweet rendered "My
Sabe. He first played the mando-iBuddy.'
lin and sang, and for an encore Dan Farmer played a cornet
came back and played a number, solo, "A Dream," from Bartlett, ae-
on the harmonica. He was called companies at the piano by Mr.
rendered another mandolin num- Campbell, Erie Duke Gulledge
her, although the audience was sang "Shine" in a deep, throaty
'back by the heavy applause and contralto, and the show closed
more taken with his harmonica with Porter House Sam singing
playing than with the mandolin. "Down South In Port St. Joe."
Here is a young man we've got to Back-face members of the corn-
work into our civic programs. pany, all of whom put on splendid
Another hidden artist in our performances. were Bill Turner,
midst was brought to light in the Mrs. P. C. VanHorn, Joe Hauser,
person of Frank E. Griffith, a Wilbur Wells, R. C. Rector, Mr.
personable young man, who gave Collier, P. C. VanHorn, Maxie Fer-
a so-called "double-jointed exhibi- rell. A. M. Mitchell, Mrs. Laneta
tion. His was a contortionist act Davis and Dan Farmer.
that would go well on any big-time Members of the picture chorus
vaudeville circuit.
were the Misses Alma Mae. Dor-
Dan Farmer, as "Danny Boy," sey, Marigene Smith, Katherine
gave one of his cornet solos with Hickey, Elaine Gore, Katherine
piano accompaniment by himself Ferguson, Murnice Taunton, Alice
.hat drew down the house, and af- Gibson. Melba Nedley, Martha
.ter he had played an encore, he Hinson, Betty Dorsey, Virginia
and Porter House Sam sat down Stoutemire, Viola Barber, Evie
at the piano and pounded out a Heese and Erie Duke Gulledge.
couple of piano duets, which were Winners in the popularity con-
heavily applauded. Had not "time test in which a number of young
been a-wastin'," the audience ladies participated in the sale of
would have kept the pair at the tickets were Miss Dorothy Crock-
piano for numbers without end. ett, first prize. $5; Miss Sarah
The final specialty was a skit, VanHorn, second, boudoir lamp,
"You Can't Blow My Brains Out," donated by the Chavers-Fowhand
by Steamboat Bill Turner and Por- Furniture company, and Miss Al-
ter House Sam. And, by the way, lah Mae Darcey, third, a beautiful


dresser set, donated by the Dan-
ley Furniture company.
The success of this presentation
in bringing out the fact that Port
L. Joe is literally overrun with
stage talent will undoubtedly lead
to further shows of a like nature
which can be staged in the com-
munity center building now under
construction in Monument Park,
thus doing away with the nec's-
sity of making them fiidnight
shows and allowing for a greater
attendance.
The American Legion- post de-
sires to extend sincere thanks to
those who aided in presenting the
minstrel show and to the general
public for their purchase of admis-
sion tickets which will allow the
Legion to organize a school boy
patrol to protect the lives of chil-
;dren attending our -city schools.


FISSHING--

Spend the week-end in
'West F:orida's bastt fish- "
in3 g pounds.

TROUT
'B ASS

B R EA M '
4
BOATS With or with- i
out -guide-at reasonable
rates. ... Hotel ac-
co'mm'toatons within the
reans sf everyone.
SEE-


J. O. 'Jim' SMT

SUMATRA, ELA.
,''.-.


T ODAY'S high speeds, quick-
action brakes, and slippery oil-
ilmed roads, all spell S-K-I-D. To
fight this dangerous hazard that
killed and injured thousands of mo-
torists last year-to give you a dry,
safe track under your car when the
going gets wet and skiddy-we have
the new Goodrich Safety Silvertown
with the amazing Life-Saver Tread.
Golden Ply Blow-out
Protection, too
You'll never know what the ,wor(.
STOP means until you have felt


the extra security of a "Silvertown
Stop." You'll never have real mo-
toring peace-of-mind until you have
the extra blow-out protection of
the famous Goodrich Golden Ply
between your car and the road..
No Extra Cost:
And just think, you now enjoy this-.
extra safety at no extra cost, be-
cause you pay no price premium for
these super quality tires. So for
safety's sake, come in fcr a set of
l:ng: ..:i.age, extra-safe Goodrich.
Silv- -t.-:as today.


7k Goodri&.:




sr8ETY Sllovertow`..
LIE-SAVER TREAD..... GOLDEN PLY BLOW-0OIT PROTECT




ST. JOE MOTOR CO.,

"Bumper To Bumper Service"


PHONE 37


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FLORIDA HIGHLIGHTS


.s~e~LB~r~slswa~,~~-~a- PI~\Yj~tS~di~J~l[e&~S~~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PRIMAYV' SEPTEMSER 1& 1938O~


""-~-


-. .


,^ I


--
.:.;.., .......
.. ..
.


I~ii TllAN














Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


P.-T, A. PLANS YEAR'S WORK BAPTIST W. M. S. CIRCLE
AND SELECTS CHAIRMEN IS REORGANIZED
The executive committee of the The older group of the Baptist
Parent-Teacher association met Wolrien' Missionary Society met
Thursday afternoon of last weki at t, church Monday afternoon


at the home of thie president, Mrs.
T. A. Owens, on Seventh street,
for the purpose of making plans
for the forthcoming year and the
selection of chairmen and their
committees. The program topic se-
lected for the year is "Safety."
Committee chairmen and com-
mittee members named were: Pro-
gram, Mrs. W. A. Smith, chair-
man, Miss Erline McClellan and
Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon; finance, Mrs.
C. P. VanHorn. chairman, Mrs. G.
W. Wimberly, Mrs. E. H. Horton
and Mrs. C. E. Boyer; member-
ship,, Mrs. R. V. Coburn, chairman,
to select her own members; wel-
fare, Miss Enid Mathison. chair-
man, to select ler committee;
magazine, Mrs. A. D. Lawson,
chairman, Mrs. Patty Lovett and
Mrs. B. R. Gibson; publicity, Miss
Lillian Ferrell, chairman, Mrs. La-
neta Davis and Mrs. Helen Allen;
hospitality. Mrs. George Gore,
chairman, Mrs. Harry Saunders
and Mrs. B. L. Kelly; legislation,
Mrs. J. L. Sharit, chairman, to se-
lect her committee; Founder's
Day, Mrs. G. F. Kaser. chairman,
Mrs. Tapper and Mrs. Lawson.
Mrs. R. F. Miller was named
chairman of the roon' mother comn-
mittee and the following were se-
lected as room motlrers: Miss


and reorganized their circle, which
was nanred the Martha Circle.
Mrs. E. A. McCaskey was elected
chairman; Mrs. Charles McClel-
lan, co-chairman; Mir', E, C. Ca-
son, recording chairman; Mrs.
John White, treasurer; Mrs. W. J.
Daughtry, chairman of personal
service; Mrs. L. R. Holliday,
stewardship chairman, and Mrs.
Hammock, program chairman.
Mrs. McCaskey opened the meet-
ing with scripture, Psalms. 1st
chapter, followed with prayer by
Mrs. E. B. Dendy. The annual W.
M. U. meeting was announced for
September 26 at Panama City.
Completion of collecting the Gol-
den Jubilee pledges filled all
hearts with joy and gratitude.
Fifteen members ane two visitors
were present. Mrs. McCaskey
dismissed the meeting with prayer.
The next meeting will be held
at the home of Mrs. C. G. Costin.

MRS. SWATTS HOSTESS TO
MARIE JONES CIRCLE
Mrs. Ralph Swatts was hostess
to the Marie Jones Circle of the
Methodist Missionary Society at
her home on Seventh street Mon-
day afternoon. Mrs. Temple, the
new chairman, presided at the
meeting.


WOMAN'S CLUB HOLDS
FIRST MEETING OF YEAR
The Port St. Joe Woman's Club
held its first meeting of the year
yesterday afternoon at the Meth-
odist church. Mrs. G. A. Patton,
vice-president, presided in the ab-
sence of the president, Mrs. B. W.
Eells, who is ill in a Montgomery
hncnitall


PAGE FOUR


cir lie i uN o UL L tlapt L L ivs- Clu JI- f1 -
of Mrs. A. M. Jones. The scriptule
sionar, society held their regular After dispensing with regular of Ms. A. M. Jones. The script
lesson, taken from John 15:9-15,
meeting at the church Monday at- routine business, the chair namedlesson, taken from John 15:9-15,
was read by Mrs. Roy Gibson. The
ternoon with Mrs. O. F. Powell the conservation and natural re- was d b y Gbs.
meditation was given by Mrs. G.
acting as chairman, sources committee to take charge atton we wi rayer
The circle went into the busi- of the preservation of the old St. M. O After a short busi-
ness hour with the nomination Joseph cemetery. ness session a continuation of the
and election of tUe following offi- Mrs. Patton gave a fe w Bible study was conducted by
cers: Mrs. O. F. Powell, chairman.; 1 ,1,,htis on the year's work as ex- Mesdames J. L. Sharit and Roy
Mrs. A. L. Ezell, secretary; Mrs. pressed by the national president, Gibson.
W. Wells, treasurer; Mrs. Marion sadie R. Dunbar, and the state At conclusion of the meeting
Grogan, Bible stuey chairman; president, Mrs. J. Ralston Wells. the hostess, assisted by Mrs. A.
Mrs. J. H. Halley, mite box chair-
Mrs. J. H. Valley, e box chair The program then followed, M. Jones, Jr., served delectable
man, with Mrs. E. Clay Lewis, well in- refreshments.
It was voted to name the circle formed on period furniture, mak-
the Mary Circle also to hold all ing a very enlighiening talk on Mrs. Adell Owens of Pensacola
meetings at the church with the "Queen Anne Furniture." Follow- was in Port St. Joe on business
exception of social meetings. irg this talk, Mrs. B. D. Smith, ac- last Friday.

CALLING ALL PRESBYTERIANS companies at the piano by Mrs., :"
W. A. Smith, sang very sweetly Mrs. H, J. Eff of St. Augustine
Last Sunday we held Sunday "Coming Home" and "I Love a was the guest last week of Mr.
school and preaching in the base-, Cottage." and Mrs. T. M. Schneider.
ment of the new church. Again we Hostesses for the afternoon Q r "
will hold services in the basement were Mesdames J. B. Gloekler, J. H. H. Hinson is invited to stop
this Sunday. Sunday school at 10 A. Mira and Fred Curtis, who de- at LeHardy's fountain and have. a
a. m. Preaching at 11 a. m. We lightfully entertained after the free ice cream sundae.
expect you to come and help us. program, serving fruit punch and i. :
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister. tea cakes. i r. and Mrs. P. J. Lovett and
The next meeting, which will be Jimmie Morton spent Monday in
Dressmaking and Alterations held October 5, being an educa- Panama City on business.
MRS. L. M. BASS tion program with Mrs. B. R, Gib- -A
Call at Costin's Department Store son, chairman, the sectional vice- Additional Society on Page 8
k*----~-- -. -- "'


Juanita Gunn's room, Mrs. Rush session
A short business session was
Chism; Mrs. Minnie Howell's held, at which time Mrs. Charles
room, Mrs. Garner; Mrs. Mc- Parker was elected treasurer and
Phaul's room, Mrs. G. W. W publicity manager. Plans for the
berly; Miss Collier's room, Ms. G. Bible study course were discussed
F. Kaser; Mr. May's roam, Mrs. and plans for alternating program
Boyer Mrs. Helen Allen's room, meetings. Dues were collected,
Mrs. A. I. Wooden; Miss Solo- w led the
after which Mrs. Swatts led the
mon's room. Mrs. H. L. Crockett; Bible study.
Mrs. Ferrell's room, Mrs. D. G. Following the regular meeting a
McPherson; Mrs. Jim Perritt's delightful social hour was enjoyed,
room, Mrs. B. L. Kelly: Miss Me- several novel games were played
Clellan's room, Mrs. C. P. Va a nd the hostess served fruit salad
Horn; Miss Eileen Arnold's room, and iced drinks to the ten m -
Mrs. W. H. Howell; Mrs. Gainoun' I s
room, Mrs. R. H. Brinson; Mr. e .e *
Cawthons room, Mrs. Oscar Rob-'
erts; Mr. Owens' room. Mrs. J. L. MISS HOWELL IS HOSTESS
Temple; Mr. Parker's room, Mrs. TO GIRLS' AUXILIARY
J. M. Smith; Miss O'Quinn's room, The Lottie Moon Girls Auxili-
Mrs. C. G. Costin; Mrs. Pridgeon's ay met last Friday afternoon at
room, Mrs. Chester Edwads the home of Miss Gwendolyn How-
room, irs. Chest" Edwa-ds.
The first meeting of the P-T. A. ell with 13 members, the councel-
lor. Mrs. E. C. Cason, W. M. U.
for the present school term willor Mrs C mason, W. M. U.
be held in the new high school au- P .,,-plr SMrs. J. 1. Baggett and
'iro.:brm -'t Thursday afternoon, Mrs. W. H. Howell present
September 22, at 4 o'clock. Plans The meeting opened with the
for a membership drive will be song, "On Jordan's Stormy Banks
made at this meeting and a social I Stand," followed by the devo-
._........... ,, o tional taken from Matthew. 4th


hour will follow, at whicn time rhe
new teachers and new members of
the P.-T. A. will be welcomed.
A special invitation is extended
to anyone interested in P.-T. A.
work to be present, and all n'em-
hers and teachers are urged to at-
tend.
Lillian Ferrell. Pub. Chm.

THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. B. OWENS
Mrs. Buster Owens was hostess
to the Thursday Bridge Club yes-
terday at her home on Seventh
street. Vases of assorted summer
lovers decorated the living room
where two tables were placed for
play. After several progressions
rco"c- were tallied and prizes pre-
sented.
Delicious refreshments of maca-
roon-cherry mousse,, assorted cook-
ies and iced drinks were served to
Mesdaires E. C. Lewis, Ed Ram-
sey, H. Soule, M. Tomlinson, J.
Gloekler, T. Owens, J. M. Smith
ani B. A. Pridgeon.
*,:7 -;; h :
Mr. and D. H. Bynum of Olustee
were the guests Monday of Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Lovett.

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Kelly spent
Sunday and Monday in Thomas-
ville, Ga.


chapter, led by Mrs Baggett.
Prayer was by Mrs. Howell. The
G. A. Allegiance was then re-
peated.
During the business session a
mission study was planned for to-
day at the church. A drill on the
second step of the 'Forward Steps'
was conducted by Mrs. Cason.
Silent prayer for the sick closed
the meeting.
After the meeting, delicious
fruit punch, wafers and mints
were served.

Mrs. Annie Pigott of Fort Myers
arrived Sunday to spend the week
with her brother-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith.

Miss Gladys Musgrove left on
Tuesday for Baskin. La., to be
gone for several: weeks.

Robert Nedley of Apalachicola
was a business visitor in the city
Monday.

SW. E. Baker is invited to have a
free ice cream sundae at Le-
Hardy's Pharmacy.

Mrs. J .D. Buckles of Kissimmee
arrived Suunday for a visit of sev-
eral weeks with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs, Thos. R. L. Carter.


FRIDAY, SATURDAY and MONDAY

SEPTEMBER 16, 17 and 19

White H-ouse No. z2!2 Dessert Peaches--..
APPLE JELLY..... ........ Quart USTARD.................
Sliced or Crushed 2 No. 2 Cn-, T. at'e .....
PINEAPPLE.....-------------------- '2 Vienna S-AUSA.. GE-. .. .
Aunt Jemima GRITS ..... FOR 2 POST TA :; ;:: .
Mayf:eld CORN---- --..- n 2 -Sic.2 S:-
Grapefruit JUICE...-........... PINEAPPLE .... ..
BAKING POWDER. ...... ... 2 Cami- 'lc:',
ORANGE JUICE............... TOMATO JUICE.............




P0 TATOES 10 lbs. 19'1

47 Ounce Orange or GaPon

GRAPEFRUIT JICE a COOKING OIL .




SU GA A10 s.. 4 k ,


Lighthouse CLEANSER...\
Macaroni and Spaghetti....'
Lighthouse
WASHING POWDER......
Kitchen MATCHES-...


3 FOR


10c


GRAPE JUICE, quart .... ................29c
G Large P & G SOAP-............-........ 25c
RICE, 5 pounds --------- --......................... 21c
Fhin or Self-Ris'ng FLOUR, 5 lbs..-..21c


GUARANTEED 24 Q 12
SELF-RISING UL Pounds 0 Pounds 5 C


WHITE BACON-Per pound ..............15c OIL SAUSAGE-Gallon .95c
Pure Creamery CHEESE-Pound........19c Pure PORK PAN SAUSAGE, lb.........18c



P CASH AND


PEITE b CARRY


PHONE 79


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1938

p,'-'drilnt. Mrs. J. G. Gainey of
Blountstown, and the high school
faculty will be asked as guests,
Lilian Ferrell,-Pub. Chin.

SUSANNAH WESLEY CIRCLE
MEETS WITH'MRS. JONES
The Susannah Wesley Circle of
the Methodist Missionary Society
met Monday afternoon at the home


CIRCLE NO. 2 OF BAPTIST
MISSIONARY SOCIETY MEETS
rirC lp. N\ o r2 N flirp th n B TdiTM


r


'~e~i'lli Fill


Ir~-s~ 1__111188~








FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 16, 1938


Best for Purity, Quality
and Taste
l - m n 4


Lodge Notices


if


IV IIJAs


Pasteurized for Your
S Protection


The industrial chemist cooperat-
ing with the medical profession
has produced glass boots that are
helpful in some common diseases
of the blood vessels, usually af-
fecting older people.


Opening of

St. Je urb arket


FIRST STREET, BETWEEN MONUMENT AND REID


WARREN AY, Owner and Manager


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY. SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHERE BUSINESS IS BRISK YOU WiLL ALWAYS FIND
FRESH GROCERIES

MILK-6 Small or 25C Ice Cream Powder- 24c
3 Tail -...... ...- 3 Boxes for ..........


j Irish

pPotatoes10 Ilbs. 190!

TOMATOES c25 FLOUR-Good grade 45C
6 Small for .............. 12 pounds .........-....
MAXWELL HOUSE 25c SUPER SUDS, 1 26
COFFEE Lb.. .. I la'ge, 1 small ........ .
COOKING OIL, gal. ....95c MATCHES, 3 boxes ......10c
Post Toasties, 3 for ......25c Del Monte Tiny Peas....18c
SARDINES, 3 cans ......10c Sc Macaroni, 3 boxes....10c

Morrell Roly-Poly Picnic VEAL CHOPS and ROUND
BONED ROLLED 35c STEAK-Wilson or Q
HAM-Per lb. ...... Swift's, per lb........ --v

WHITE BOILING 2 OIL SAUSAGE-
MEAT-Per lb ......Per -lb. an

We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT


BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


SEES ALL-


KNOWS ALL-
TELLS ALL-

ABOUT HAPPENINGS
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH


THE
Society Editor..
Editor-in-Chief...
Sports Editor an
Editor-in-Chief.
Joke Editors....
...... Dick Ste


ER

STAFF &.
.Dorothy Trawick
...Edward Hufft
nd Assistant
....Al Schneider

pp, Paul Johnson


P U RITY 1 Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
A SSU R E D)! 1uesdays-of each month in the
I Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
ol's who are members are cor-
Sdially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
SLgion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Wornan's Club meeting First
San d third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
1 Port Inn parlor.

i' ven the Minds Absent in Postoffice
3. | Cows Are ,I Everything from coconuts to
T el woested women's nightgowns have been
left in the postoffice lobby at
Use Only Chelenne, Wyo., by absentminded
persons. Roast beef, insurance
SO LO M O N pV' policies, blankets, school report
cards, a safety razor and a sack
Pasteurized ( o" flour ate included among the
forgotten articles.
IBTT T ----- -


I


__


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


ANNOUNCE SCHEDULE The New School Year STUDENTS TAKE PART
OF FOOTBALL GAMES By Edward Hufft IN MINSTREL SHOW
School opened for the Port St. I
SPrctice Enters Second Week Jo, students on August 29, and Ten Girls Ai In Raising Legion.
W.t.i 25 Out for Squad the doors were thrown open to Fund For School Boy Patrol
I great the greatest aggregation of
SFootball has already entered its reet te e a o o The Porter House Sam Minstrel
brains ever to enter a Port St.
second week of practice or the St. school. As this paper goes to presented by the American Legion
Joe High gridders. About 25 boys ress ere ae app imately 521 at the Port theater Saturday night
turned out for the imntial practice sLdnts rolled in the grammar s a bowlingg success, as was ex-
::aled by Coach Tonm Owens on and high schools, and new ones pressed by the numerous laughs
Tuesday, September 5. The coach re (n ering every week. New t brought from the audience. It
sent his squad through limbering- desks had to be rushed out to the was a mixture of blackface com-
p exercises the first week, and school right away, as an en- edy, music and brain talent put
passing and punting have been rolment as large as this was not over cleverly by local actors and
inly stressed during the past icipated actresses. Leonard Earle Camp-
anticipated.
week. Next week the boys will periodsbell, old minstrelman and director
begin on the heavy work-and I e as o las r of the show, stated that he was
then the fun starts. instead o seen s o lst a well satisfied with the perform-
Principal D. G. McPherson of thre i the afternoon. Those in ance, considering the fact that
the St. Joe High, journeyed to o they had but a few nights in
the morning are on.e hour long.
falahassee last Saurday and up- thoe in e aernoon are 45- which to practice.
and those in the afternoon are 4o-
on his return announced the fol- rcinute periods. School takes in at Those taking part in the min-
lowing football schedule: :0 in the morning, but students strel from the high school were
8h0 in the morning, but studentsS
October 7-Carrabelle-there. are not counted as late unless they Martha Hinson, Marigene Smith,
October 14-Flo:vda H--ghe-here. arrive after the last bell, which Katherine Ferguson, Melba N.3d-
October 21-Bristol-hei. rings at 9 o'clock. Students ;ey, Alla Mae Darcey, Betty Dor-
October 28-Flor. la Higeh--there. r h period sey, Betty Jo Temple, Edna Mc-
ovember -Op. which is from 12 to 1 o'cloc. Cloud, Murnice Taunn and Kath-
November 11-Br stol-there. School lets out at 3:30 in the af-erire Hickey.
November 18 Wwahitchka ternoo. And last, but not least, we must
ternoont
there. Athletics are taking a big part say that it was for a good cause,
N:v. 23-Carrabelle-here. in scholastic work this year, both and that was helping to organize
Nov. 30-Wewahitchka-here. f e boys and girls. As yet the proposed school boy patrol.
girls have not entered upon any
NEWS AND VIEWS OF OUR! sports program but are expected WELCOME NEW STUDENTS
NEW TEACHERS to do so shortly. AND TEACHERS
As S:en Thiough a Knot Hle The boys will have a football We, the staff of the leading
Ste;'nm !his year, as wel as baslet-i high school newspaper, "The
.I aies an.: gent;imen, meet Mr. ball and' baseball teams. Football Tattler," wish to welcome whole-
Charles Parker, our new math has entered its second week of heartedly the new members of
teacher. He was born in Ozark, practice, and latest indications the faculty to our school and
Ala., in April, 1913, and stands six are that the players have been city, and the new students as
_,t o ie inc; in his stocking feet. rounding into shape nicely, con- well. -Dot Trawick.
a,; r as we have been able to sidering the fact that many of -
discover, Mr. Parker comes the them have never played a game of EVE,Y DAY PHILOSOPHY
.I'arcsL to William Trawick in the football in their lives. What a good thing Adam !a;.l -
i'-e of his feet. As everybody is Many new teachers have been when he said a good thing. ie
ware, William wears a size 12, added to the faculty this year, and new nobody had said it before.
ui1d Mr. Parker wears a size 10. you may meet them in our "Get| If you shoot at your wife in the'
Keep growing, Mr. Parker, and Acquainted" column. This week dark, mistaking her for a burglar.
some day your feet will be as we take Mr. Parker as our teachers you always kill her---but you cal't
large as William's. Who knows?,for you to meet, and next week hit a burglar.
I forgot to mention that Mr. we will introduce another new A man should not be without
'arker has blue eyes, brown hair teacher, going around like this morals it is better to have bad
and weighs 170 pounds. Whew'! until we have introduced all the morals than none at all.
Vhat a man! new instructors. (If any of our If you tell the truth you con't
If any of youse ladies have tried readers would like to hear about have to remember anything.
your charms on Mr. Parker you any of the teachers from last year :?.
will find that it doesn't work, be -e will be glad to write you an I WONDER
Ias on see, lie already has a',ticle about him or her.) Who that so"t-soap senior is lik-
a wife-and boy, I mean a wife I "-n" ''mine ot our readers do ing in the tenth grade? Quit reck-
And what a :ooker! Don't get me rol. know it yet. we have a new ing the cradle' Scrupe.
wrong about this, Mr. Parker, this high school of which we are very If that certain blonde girl in the
is just to warn those members of proud. It contains eight c:ass- senior class has a life-time pass
the gentler sex about Port. St. Joe rooms, two lavatories, an exquis- to rie with that certain ii:niior
that they just haven't a chance. ite auditorium, an equipment ilby on his bicycle every day?
Mr. Parker is also a graduate orroom and last, but not least. thli Why the senior home room
Alabama Polytechnic Institute principal's office. All rooms are teacher wears shades during home
(Auburn to us folks). He attended w el 1 windowed and screene, room period?
S Pile "-ounty high school, which means a lot to the pupils Why Mr. Cawthon swings h;s
(where he spent the four best as well as to the teachers. pencil when the band is rehears..
i-ar of b!i life. )iit doesn't know I W' a"e ve.v proud of this new ing? Maybe he's a musician.
it), four years in Alabama Poly school, and we hope that this
and, yep, he has even been mar- school year will be more succes-e THE STAFF OF OUR RIVAL
ried four years. ful than in years gone by. Members of the staff of our ri-
Now that you have Mr. Parker's !- val high school newspaper, "The
life history, if there is anything GUESS WHO? IBuzz," are as follows: Winston
more you would like to know about What slick-headed junior boy, Jones, Toupie Gibson. Kathleen
him you had better ask 'him. keep his mouth shut long' 7 "nders. Ausley Stoutemire, Vir-
I don't want to forget to men- enough ie catch his breath an. ginia Stoutemire, Alla Mac Dar-
'on that Mr. Parker is a grand has gone batty over football cey and Lelia Swith.
yelloww (I ought to get A in geom- What junior boy is lost and
etry for that, shouldn't I? I will can't seem to find his way round9 LAST MINUTE FLASH
'v satisfied with a B, Mr. Parker). What teacher in the high school What senior girl had a chance to
Tsk, tsk, and all that. But next resembles a swing band? get married but wouldn't go 'hru
week you will be treated to the What little girl is it that ds lo- vwit: it because she couldn't havo
fo historyy of another of our new ing all the picking? a big church w'ddding?
teachers-Miss Thompson. Tune What junior boy is beating the --..-- -- --
'-. folks, for the news and views senior boy's time with that cute TRANSPOSED
is seen through a knot hole--next freshman girl? The visitor paid his bill at the
week. same time, same newspaper. Why is that tenth grade girl do- fashionable hotel and, as he went
-Al Schneider. ing all that weeping? I heard her out, he noticed a sign near the
------ boy friend left her and went r.ff door: "Have you left anything?"
SEVEN FEET OF BUNK to school. Turning, he went back and said
"This big fighter has to have a What eighth grade student has:to the manager: "That sign is
bed over seven feet long." a new rain coat and wishes it wrong. It should read: 'Have you
"Say, that's a lot of bunk!" would rain so she can wear it? anything left?'"


THE TATTI










SSIX THE S PEI


THE POCKETBOOK

o KNOWLEDGE E 4


Window Box r
Subjects for Summer


Constant exposure to moisture
and air makes it necessary to
build window boxes of durable ma-
terials. Cypress is most satisfac-
tory, and red cedar and white pine
are suitable. Six inches deep, 8
inches wide and 3 feet in length is
a convenient size.
The color of the box should be the
same as the house, or a harmoniz-
ing shade. Green usually looks
well. Several holes can be bored in
the bottom for drainage, and be
covered with broken pieces of pot-
tery to keep soil intact. Good flor-
ist's potting soil, or a loam with
sand and a leaf mold added, is best
for most window box subjects.
A list of plants suitable for win-
dow boxes in sunny situations fol-
lows: Ageratum, begonia semper-
florens, dwarf cannas, cuphea,
geraniums, heliotrope, lobelia, mig-
nonette, nasturtiums, nierember-
gia, petunias,. achyranthus, acaly-
pha, aspidistra, dracaena indivisa,
crotons, aspimiller, grevillea, gold-
en feather, phoenix and sweet alys-
sum.
MIost satisfactory of all window
bo:. subjects is the trailing or
balcony type of petunia and next
comes the nasturtium.

SAFETY FIRST
Customer (getting a shave):
"Barber. will you please give me a
glass of water."
Barber: "What's the matter?
Something in your throat?"
Customer: "No, I want to see if
my neck leaks.''
-------^------
Mother: "Are you spitting in
thi fish bowl, Willie?"
Willie: "No, ma, but I've been
coin' mighty close."


Work on Plans

For Pageant

(Continued from Page 1)
signed with Mr. Dupont, it was
generally agreed by those present
that he would be the man for this
particular job and that his ideas
and past experience were ideally
suited for the work in hand. It
will b'e definitely known within
the next two weeks whether or
not he will be in charge of this
part of the celebration.
Other details of the Centennial
were talked over. but not in de-
tail, which included securing of
the Royal American Shows, con-
struction of a race track for the
holding of horse races, bringing to
Port St. Joe of two or more battle-
ships. securing of the Fort Bar-
rancas and Pensacola Naval Sta-
tion bands and military units from
both, staging of boat races, pyro-
technic displays for the four days,
a possible style show depicting
the changes in women' dress
from 1838 to 1938, and a number
of other minor matters pertaining
to the celebration.
It was also the general thought
that someone must be secured to
devote their entire time to promo-
tion of the four-day celebration,
and steps will be taRien immedi-
ately to secure the services of a
nationally-known publicity direc-
tor and promoter to handle that
end of the Centennial and see to
it that it is put over in such a
manner that there will be no
deficit to be paid off and possibly
a small sum realized for further
improvements in the community
center in Monument Park.
With such a man in charge of
our celebration we may definitely
expect things to start humming
and the various events to begin
shaping up under his direction.
4-k-
CHOOSY
Bricklayer (new on the job):
"There's no place to park my car.
Guess I can't work here."
Boss: (sarcastically): "No, you
won't do. We hire only bricklayers
who have their own chauffeurs."
------- ---
Efficiency of the newly devel-
oped Diesel locomotives is 32 to
38 per cent, compared to 6 to 8
per cent of the ordinary steam
locomotive.


I


KNOW FLORIDA

WEEK FIXED BY

PROCLAMATION

ANNUAL OBSERVANCE WILL
BE HELD SEPTEMBER
24 TO 30

An official proclamation setting
asile the last wesk in this month
for observance for the annual
I:iw-iis "Know Your Florida'"
campaign was issued by Governor
Fred P. Cone.
Staged at Kiwanis meetings the,
wc'e of September 24-30, the ob-
servances are being directed by
Harold Colee, president of the
Florida. State Chamber of Con-
m'erce, is chairman of the Ki-
wanis Florida committee.
'T, Governor's proclamation
reads
"Whereas, Florida. perhaps more
so than any state of these forty-
eight states, has been bountifully
blessed in many diverse ways by
our Creator, and,.
"Whereas, Florida has many'at-
tractions, benefits of sun, sea and
climate that have only to be bet-
ter known to bring even greater
progress and prosperity to our
great state, and,
"Whereas, each year it is the
cus;o::i of the membership of the
Kiwanis International Clubs of
Florida to stage an annual observ-
ance to better acquaint them-
s'elves. their zrotier-Kiwauians
and the public generally with the
wide range of Florida's products,
the fruits and yields of Florida's
groves and fields, the climatic
advantages of our state and its
glorious part in New World his-
tory, and,
"Whereas, the Florida District
of Kiwanis International plans an-
other of these annual observances,
and we feel such proposed ob-
servances to be of great import
and worthy of the consideration
of all good and true Floridians,
both native and adopted;
"Now. therefore, I, Fred P.
Cone, by virtue of the power vest-
ed in me as Governor of the Sov-
ereign State of Florida, do here-
by proclaim the period from Sep-
tember 24 to Septenmber 30, in-
clusive, Nineteen Hundred and
Thirty-Eight, as time of observ-
ance of the Kiwa-is Know Your
Florida campaign, and urge all
Kiwanians and all Floridians to
use this period for the study, con-
sideration and contemplation o1f
Florida, her many fruits and
crops, her natural and man-made
attractions and the wide, range of
her manufactures and' industries."

Th'e average price paid for sub-
marginal land by the Resettlement
Administration in 1936 was $4.50
per acre.


Professional Cards



DR. J, C. COE
--D.E NT I S T--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED






Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


W ewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation

'.4 Twelve Years Safe Banking Service


ONCE RATED AS WEED, .Flowers begin to appear when,
DAHLBORG DAISY NOW S the plants reach a height of three
GRACES MANY YARDSI or four inches and, from then
until the plants die in summer
there are myriads of tiny golden
A tiny wilding ignored for daisies that contribute in no small
years by gardeners or even con- way toward a colorful spring gar-
sidered as a weed has been trans- den. The plants rarely exceed 14
planted into Florida gardens and inches and are never out of bloom
through sheer merit has reached or unattractive. When set about
a high crest of public favor, says eight inches apart in single rows
John V. Watkins, assistant horti- the plants overlap and give a can-
culturist with the University of tinuous, unbroken ribbon of gold
Florida College of' Agriculture. It above the lacy green of the foli-
is the little blossoming annual age.
called Dahlborg daisy in honor of They are especially adapted to
the Miamian who saw its value use as edging plants for walks
and introduced it into city plant- and turf, Watkins concludes.
ings. ---A--
Called by the scientists "Thy- DISTRICT PWA HEAD LOOKS
mophylla tenuiloba," it is a native OVER COMMUNITY CENTER
of Texas and adjacent Mexico,
and has been naturalized in parts H. B. Foster of Pensacola, dis-
of Florida. trict WPA head, was in Port St.
Watkins says the seeds are Joe last Monday looking over the
stored over summer and 'are plant- community center building now in
ed in September. Germination is course of erection in Monument
rather slow, requiring about 15 Park. He was well pleased with
days for the first seedlings to ap- the work as far as it has gone and
pear, but growth is gratifying stated that he would do all in his
after the plants emerge from the power to see that the project was
soil. The foliage is extremely fine completed in time for the Centei(-
and feathery, and is aromatic nial Celebration to be he'd here
when crushed. next Decembr 7 to 10.


September 17



On September 17th, 1778, the Consti-
tution of these United States was
signed. Flexible enough to meet all
emergencies, yet firm enough to
bind forty-eight states and outlying
territories into one unit-it stands
today, strong and virtually un-
changed.


The \Vewahitchka State Bank, too,
is able to meet any emergency or
offer helpful counsel-remaining un-
swerving in its policies of service
anl reliability.


----- -


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


bu


PAGE SIX








~~RIPAY.~~~~ SETME 16 98TESA, OTST OFO1APG EE


NDIAN ENGRAVING TOOL
1,500 YEARS OLD SHOWN
The finest horn engraving tool
of pro-historic indians yet di,-
covered in New York-state is in-
cluded in the new exhibit at Fort
Ticonderoga museum. Experts of
the Champlain Valley Archeolog-
ical Society, which has its head-
quarters at the fort, says that tihe
engraving and other tools in the
exhibit belong to the Second Pc-
riod Algonkin people, who liv-'
in the region 1,500 years, or moi-
ago.
--K--
Automobile models begin in the-
form of artists' sketches of pi.)
posed new cars and are then i.
produced in clay models.


Why Not YOU, Too?
Enjoy a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's World-
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean. ... Our
.__CABINS are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This PRIENDLY CAMP is
-Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.


DR. MILES ANTI PAIN
PILLS were made for just one
purpose-to relieve pain. Users
write that they "work like
magic". They contain an ef-
fective, quick-acting, analgesic
-pain reliever.
Try Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills
before you lose a day's work-
and pay-or break a social en-
gagement because of HEAD-
-ACHE, MUSCULAR, PERIOD-
IC, OR NEURALGIC PAINS.
'They may be just what you
need to relieve your pain and


FIELD


REPRESENTATIVE EXECT SUPREME
EXPECT SUPREME

0U COURT DECISION


S' ON GAS TAX LAWS


FRED W. ERHARD, southern
field representative of the fed-
eral committee on apprentice
training, who is contacting lead-
ers in various industries of the
state to discuss plans for a state
council on apprenticeship.
-k
NATURE TAKES ITS COURSE
Summer Boarder: "How do you
tell the geese from the ganders?"
Farmer: "We don't worry about
that. We just turn 'em all out to-
gether and let 'em figure it out
for themselves."


A detour is the roughest
tance between two points.


WILL DISPOSE OF $1,000,000
NOW TIED UP IN STATE
TREASURY

An early decision by the state
supreme court is expected soon on
'tile appeal of Dade county on the
much-mooted special gasoline tax
'aws. This decision will dispose of
more than $1.000,000 now tied up
in the state treasury and is ex-
pected to have considerable effect
on the action of the 1939 legisla-
ture on gasoline taxation and road
building.
The conflict in the distribution
of gasoline taxes arose out of an
apparent conflict between numer-
ous special acts passed by the
legislature and the general act of
1931. The special acts give various
counties the right to use their
share of the gasoline tax, while
the 1931 act provided that the
state road department shall use
the money for the construction of
roads in the counties.
Refuses To Distribute Monies
Comptroller J. M. Lee refused
to distribute the gasoline tax
monies to the various counties in
the spring of 1937, basing his ac-
int on the opinion that the ren


eral act of 1931 could not be
changed by special acts. His ac-
tion stopped payments to 33 coun-
ties affected by special acts of the
legislature.
In a taxpayer's suit in the cir-
cuit court of Leon county, Judge
J. B. Johnson held the special
acts were unconstitutional. The
supreme court split three to three
on the question, leaving Judge
Johnson's decision standing as a
bar to the distribution of the gaso-
line tax monies under the special
acts. In order to secure the bene-
fits of the gasoline tax monies, 27
counties waived their rights under
the special acts and agreed to the
disposition of the monies under
the general act of 1931. Eight
counties refused to waive the spe-
cial acts and are still contesting
Judge Johnson's decision.
Dade Has Largest Stake
Dade county has the largest
stake in the million-dollar pot,
having $560,686 impounded in the
treasury. The other counties have
a total of $488.757 to their credit.
While the. early decision of the
supreme court is expected in the
Dade county case alone, all coun-
ties are eagerly awaiting the
opinion.
Gas tax distribution is certain
to be a major battle field in the
1939 legislature, and it is quite
possible that the supreme court's
decision in the Dade county case
will determine the lines on which
it will be fought.


Save by reading the ads!

.I ; -. .. 1 ,, i-. *..0- _
IF ANYBODY HAS-

Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS

TELL THE EDITOR


Phone 51-The Star

S" I ,i ii li 1' I -' Il -.


put you back on your feet
again "rarin' to go".
DR. MILES ANTI- PAIN
PILLS act quickly. You don't
have to wait forty minutes to
an hour for them to take effect
as is the case with many anal-
gesics. You'll get action in from
ten to twenty minutes.
DR. MILES ANTI PAIN
PILLS are pleasant to take,
handy to carry, prompt and ef-
fective in action, and do not
upset the stomach. Their cost
is small. One, or at most, two,
is usually sufficient to relieve.


Plan Apprentice


System for State

Purpose Is To Give Young People
Training That Will Equip Them
For Profitable Employment

Plans for setting up a state-wide
apprentice system are being de-
veloped with the aid of Fred W.
Erhard, southern field representa-
tive of the federal committee on
apprentice training, it is an-
nounced by Wendell C. Heaton,
chairman of the Florida Industrial
Commission and president of the
Florida Federation of Laboir.
A state-wide meeting was held
in Jackolnnvillo on nct,-hn- 9 19 '7


and citizenship; to set up agree-
ments providing for facilities for
their training and guidance in the
arts and crafts of industry with
parallel instruction in related and
supplementary education; to pro-
mote employment opportunities
for young people under conditions
which will provide adequate train-
ing and' reasonable standards for
apprentice training and to provide
skilled workers in relation to em-
ployment demands.
"To provide for our future re-
quirements, sound apprenticeship
programs in industry are essen-
tial," Heaton explained, "and it is
the aim and purpose of the fed-
eral committee on apprentice
training to promote well-rounded,
comprehensive tra;n:ng where the
needs in particular trades are ap-
niarent "


IoI iiL l: I)Ie o tco er:,, .UIV
and a group of representatives of Mr. Erhard is aiso contacting
the various industries in the state leaders in the various industries
in attendance recommended that of the state to discuss future
plans be laid for the future de- plans for a state council on ap-
velopment of apprenticeship in prenticeship. ,f
Florida. ---------
"Following this meeting several SPARROWS AROUSE FIREMEN
local apprenticeship systems were
formed," Heaton said, "and the A school of sparrows fled from
success of these local committees a flaming neon sign over a drug.
has convinced us of the advantage store chirping and chattering past
to be derived from a state-wide a fire alarm box which they could
system as now being developed." not operate. While they couldn't
The purposes of the program, turn in the alarm, their twitters
according to Heaton, are to open brought out the fire department,
to young people tae opportunity ----- -----
to obtain training tmat will equip At this time of year the line of
them for profitable employment least resistance is the fishingline,


QUAIL HUNTING


PAYS DIVIDENDS

The late Dr. Charles H. Herty, while quail
shooting in the piney woods, made the far reach-
Sing discovery that slash pine saplings would be
suitable for the manufacture of white paper. A
great new industry is planning to move South.

This great discovery, coupled with the boom-
ing Kraft industry already prominent in the
South, brings our forests into the national lime-
light. Already one mill produces from Southern
pine 220 paper bags for each tick of your watch.
Rayon is being made from pine fibers. Soon a
newsprint mill will be producing paper for the
Nation's presses from our Southern pine.

With 12-month growing season, the prospects
of prosperity with pine are bright. To encourage
this growing utilization of our pine resources, we
must protect and rebuild our forests.

As a public utility we aim at furnishing a
type of electric service which cannot be dupli-
cated-as a local citizen, we aim at assisting in
sound community development which will
benefit all.



"As grows the Pine Tree tall and
straight, so shapes the future of our
State."


FLORIDA POWER

CORPORATION


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready for Every House In

Port St. Joe

COOK ING- WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
o----- ---
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

-4- A full line of gas appliances in stock j-
Inquire Ritz Theater Building
Gulf Hardware Co. Phone 168
PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


Why Suffer Longer Than Necessary?
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills Relieve Quickly


At your Drug Store. 2 for 25c. 125 for $1.00.


MAwEssa


1


~B~sl~a~sP~e=a~i~as~sr~


FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 168, 1938 -


THE STAR, -PORT ST. JOE, FL~ORIDA_- --


PAGE SEVEN


(








P~ACE ~IG.HT THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FRD\Y, SEFTMBER 16, 1q38


SOCIETY

P.-T. A. SCHOOL OF
CONSTRUCTION NEXT WEEK
Mrs. T. A. Owens, president of
t:he Parent-Teachers association,
announced yesterday that next
Wednesday, September 21, from


10 a. m. to
instruction
be held in


2:30 p. m. a school of
in P.-T. A. work will
the auditorium of the


Methodist church in Panama City.
The state president, Mrs. C. F.
Parvin; the state treasurer. Mrs.
A. G. Wagner, who has served in
this capacity for th'e past four
years, and Mrs. G. A. Hanford,
third vice-president, department of
extension, will lead discussions in
various phases of P.-T. A. work.
All teachers and interested par-
ents are urged to attend this
meeting.
A E
T. M. Schneider made a busi-
ness trip to Panama City yester-
day.

Mrs. Rosen of Marianna was the
guest Tuesday of Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Hauser

Patty Lovett left Wednesday for
the veterans' hospital in Lake
City.


CLASSIFIED ADS


FOR SALE
HOUSE TRAILER, sleeps 4; $400.
Original cost $1440. One mile be-
Tond Bay Beach Trailer Camp, 6
miles east Panama City, opposite
side of road. R. A. Stewart. 3*
FOR RENT
NICE HOUSES for rent at St. Joe
Beach. Also good houses for
sale in city. Address Box 495,
,Port St. Joe, Fla. It
FIVE-ROOM HOUSE for rent, on
Beacon Hill highway; furnished
,or unfurnished. See M. P. Spear,
Costin Building, or phone 52. Port
,St. Joe. It
HOUSES FOR SALE

TWO-STORY dwelling, 7 rooms, 2
baths. Located on Eighth street,
Port St. Joe, F:a. For further in-
formation write or call Mrs. Mary
L. Smith, 208 North Lena Street,
Dothan, Ala. 9-2 10-7*
LOST
GLASSES. horn-rimmed, on beach
near Beacon Hill Please return
,to The Star office. Reward. tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
v hy not place a classified adver-
tisenment in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try it today. tf
'The Star is $2 per year-sub-
scribe now!


Year Round

Comfort



MONEY BAYOU
ON THE GULF

Completely Furnished
COTTAGES


Cheap Rents
Gas Heat and Cooking
Frigidaires
--'--


MONEY BAYOU


COMPANY
(10 WMiles East)
Box 496 Port St. Joe


M
P.

P.

so

an
th
ar


ISS MARY SMITH AND Mr. and Mrs. Victor Anderson Mrs. H. A. Kidd is invited to Mrs. Helen Alien and daughter,
D. PROWS ARE MARRIED and Richard Mahon attended the 'drop in at LeHardy's Pharmacy Peggy. spent Sunday in Panama
Miss Mary Elizabeth Smith and Anderson-Rocco wedding in Apa- and get a free ice cream sundae. City with friends.
D. Prows were married Friday, lachocola Monday.
eptember 9, at the Methodist par- *
nage in Winsboro, La. Miss Jewel Presnell, field super-
Miss Smith is rrom Baskin, La., visor of music, Federal Music a gOOd
id Mr. Prows is connected with Project, was visiting in the city
e St. Joe Paper company. They last Thursday and Friday.
e making their home with 5Ir. & D O


and Mrs. C. A. LeHardy at present.

EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
MEETS WITH MRS. LOVETT
The regular meeting of the
Episcopal Auxiliary was held on
':cRs:.y afternoon at the home of
Mrs. Philip Lovett with 11 mem-
')ers present. The service was led
by Rev. Glion Benson. Visiting
'"v-. members was discussed at
this time.
The next meeting will be held
at the home of Mrs. Nick Com-
forter. -

EPISCOPAL SERVICES
SUNDAY EVENING
Episcopal services will be held
next Sunday evening at 7:30 at
the Methodist church, Rev. Glion
Benson preaching. Everyone is in-
vited.

Mrs. Charles Brown and chil-
dren of Apalachicola were week-
end guests of Mr. and Mrs. Max
Kilbourn.

Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bernal left
last Saturday for a two week's
visit in Nashville, Tenn.

Miss Barbara Edwards was a
veek-end visitor in Apalachicola.

Mrs. Ralph Carter is invited to
have a free ice cream sundae at
LeHardy's Pharmacy.

Mrs. Charles Doyle and Miss
Eva Doyle of Apalachicola spent
Sunday in this city, guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Chester Edwards.

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Lovett, Mr
and Mrs. Fred Maddox, Mrs.
Philip Lovett and Arthur Lupton
spent last Friday in Burbanks,
Ala.


At the Churches

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
eightt as 7:30 o'clock.
-w-
CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gallin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Sunday night.
Tadies' Council meeting Tius-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday. 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning worship 11 a. m.
B. T. U. 7 p. m.
Evening worship S p. m.
W. M. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
S p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
4 p. in.
--i
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Sunday School, 10 a. m. every
Sunday.
Preaching services 11:00 a. m.
every Sunday.


The Misses Opal Carter, Sadie
Bennett and Dorothy Williams of
Wewahitchka were in Port St. Joe
visiting friends Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Troy Jones and
little daughter spent Monday in'
Dothan, Ala.

Mrs. C. C. Williams is invited to
stop at LeHardy's Pharmacy and:
enjoy a free ice cream sundae.

Mrs. Ed Fain of Atlanta, Ga.,
and Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper of Apa-
lachicola were visiting in the city
Tuesday.
-*-----4- --
CANNY
Scotch Customer: "I want to
buy a spur, please."
Saddler: "You mean a pair of
spurs, don't you?"
Scotchman: "One will be suf-
ficient. If I make half of the
horse go, the other ha:f will have
to go with it."

Chemical engineers have de-
vised a method of converting coal
into crude oil by reduction of the
finely divided coal by hydrogen at
raised temperatures and pres-
sures.

Save by reading the ads!


The re


st depend


PRESCRII
To get the full benefit of
nosis and advice, have yo
filled at Carver's. We
exactly as your doctor or
the best and purest drug
pharmacist is in charge a


Carver Dr

Port St. Joe, Fla.


Is only

Half

the Cure






s on his


OPTION
a doctor's diag-
'ur prescriptions
compound them
ders, using only
Is. A registered
at all times.


ug Co.
Phone 27


Removal of Our Store to the



Winchester Store Build-



ing Adjoining the



Port Theater

We will carry a larger and more complete line than in the
past, and invite the public to visit us in our new location



50 GALLONS OF OIL FREE
With Every

OIL CIRCULATING HEATER

For a Limited Time Only!


Philco Radios


Norge Refrigerators


Norge Gas Ranges


BUY YOUR HEATER OIL FROM US
We deliver to our customers at the lowest price





ROCHE'S


APPLIANCE STORE


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


1 - -


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, --EPTZ:MBFR 16, 1938


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