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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00202
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 9, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00202

Full Text




'-t. St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
" D' Porit Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. JOe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1938 NUMBER 47


ST. JOE CHAMBER WORK PROGRESSING ON
COMMUNITY BUILDING

OF COMMERCE TO Work is progressing rapidly on
the $75,000 community center
ELECT DIRECTORS building in Monument Park. and
present indications point to its
completion well in advance of the
BODY HEARS TALK BY M. P. Centennial Celebration.
UPDIKE AT REGULAR Forms for the huge concrete
MEETING columns to support the steel roof
beams are practically' complete on
Balloting for directors of the the west side of the building, and
Port St. Joe Chamber of Com- it is expected that pouring of con-
crete will start shortly.
merce for the ensuing year is be-l s t
--4-----
ing carried on this week by mem-
bers of the organization, the bal- STREET PAVING
lots having been mailed out yes-


terday by the secretary to all
members in good standing.
A primary ballot was sent out
>scently containing names of all
paid t u members, the ten names
receiving the. highest vote to ap-
pear on the final ballot. Results
-of this voting placed the following
names on the last-ballot, in order
of the number of votes received:
T. M. Schneider, W. W. Barrier,
Robert Bellows, J. L. Kerr, B. W.
Eells, Dwight Marshall, L. D.
Owens, B. D. Smith, Horace Soule
and Ross Watson. Fiv' of these
will be chosen as directors.
Ballots will be counted tomor-
iow by a committee consisting of
George Tapper, W. W. Barrier and
A. M. Mitchell, and the five mem-
bers from the list of ten selected
will be designated as members of
,heboard of directors.
11 i _;members receiving ballots
are irged to have them in the
hands: of the secretary of the
chamber of conmmE.it by tomor-
row noon.
Updike Is Speaker
At the regular meeting of the
chamber held Friday night at the
American Legion home, Manily B.
Updike, founder and press agent
of the Old Spanish Trail associa-
tion, spoke to the members, giv-
ing them some pertinent facts on
,the business and tourist trade of
the state, as well as other inter-
'esting information.
Mr. Updike was greatly en-
thused over the Centennial Cele-
bration to be held here next De-
cember, and stated that the peo-
ple of Port St. Joe did not seem
to realize the possibilities of the
occasion, not only for this year,
but for years to come.
"Gentlemen," said Mr. Updike,
"you have something here that
can be developed into one of the
biggest things in the state of Flor-
ida if it is handled properly. The
possibilities are beyond compre-
hension. If you get the proper
man, or men, behind this thing to
push it you will have something
that will put Port St. Joe in the
public eye and keep it there."
Other Business
Several matters of importance'
were discussed' previous to Mr.
Updike's talk, and President G. F.
Kaser delivered a brief speech
thanking the members for their
co-operation during his tenure of
office and asking that they give
the same whole-hearted .support to
the incoming president, whoever
he may be. Mr. Kaser was given
a rising round of applause by the
members present.
----


reaved families.
This data will be given Rep-
resentative Dan McCarty, who led
the fight for a no-fence law in the
1937-38 legislature, and other pro-
ponents of a Jaycee bill for the
protection of motorists from roam-
ing cattle on the highways. Mc-
Carty is vice-president of district
six and reappointed chairman of
the legislative committee of the


FIRE DRILL Florida Junior Chamber of Com-
merce.
The volunteer fire company was W. R. Herndon, president of
called out at 10:30 Wednesday the Northwest Miami Junior
night in answer to the siren. But Chamber of Commerce, has been
s-ven .members of 14 on the roster appointed chairman of the "am-
put in an appearance, and Fire munition" committee.
Chief Bill Turner says- a bigger Florida Jaycees marshaled 38
turnout than this will be neces- votes in the 1937 house of repre-
sary if the city is to get a reduc- sentatives in support of their bill'
tion in fire insurance rates. and despite its defeat aroused


LABOR DAY IS

OBSERVED IN

PORT ST. JOE

PAPERMAKERS' UNION IS IN
CHARGE OF ALL-DAY
CELEBRATION

Labor Day was observed in Port
St. Joe last Monday with the first
annual Labor Day celebration
staged by the International Broth-
erhood of Papermakers' Local No.
379.
The celebration was opened at
10:30 with a parade starting at
the Port Inn and nroceedine down


Grading Started On Seventh and Reid avenue to First street,
Eighth Streets; Long Avenue thence down First to Monument
Open To Sixteenth Street avenue and back to the point of
beginning. The parade was headed
The city-wide street paving by a flag-bearer carrying the na-
program is making rapid progress. tional colors, followed by the city
Seventh and Eighth streets are fire truck, the high school band,
being graded preparatory to plac- marching units from the various
ing of surfacing and Monument labor unions and a number of au-
avenue is closed from the highway tomobiles.
intersection to Monument Park Following the parade, speakers
as workmen grade and work the were heard from the band stand in
road bed into shape for paving, the park, and during the after-
Long avenue, which has been noon a baseball game and athletic
open only to the school buildings, contests were held in the ball
was thrown open to Sixteenth park.
street this week, and work of plac- The day was climaxed with a
ing the balance of surfacing on benefit ball held in the evening at
this avenue to Monument Park is Van's Recreation Hall at Beacon
now in progress. It is anticipated Hill.
that this work will be completed'
within the next two weeks if EMPLOYMENT HEAD HERE
weather conditions pC 'n'Tt. I. S. Coon of Tallahassee, rep-


resenting the National Employ-
ment Service, was in this city yes-
terday in connection with begin-
ning of work on the bridge across
the canal at Highland View.

SHIP TAKES LOAD OF PAPER


jured two weeks ago when struck The S.S. Dorothy of the Bull
by an automobile, and who is in Line docked Monday at the St. Joe
a Panama City hospital, was re- Paper Company and left Wednes-
ported yesterday as resting well day for Newark, N. J., with a
and getting along fine. cargo of paper.


War Planned To Dethrone

Cow As Queen of Highway


"Ammunition" will be amassed public interest against antiquated
by the Florid'a Junior Chamber cattle legislation.
SThe bill would make the cattle
or' Commerce for a rapid-fire at- o
tack upon antiquated laws, which erliabl r pretty d e
and' personal injury resulting fromr
make the cow queen of Florida's ic collision
highways. In most counties cattle owners
The "shells" will be loaded with now may escape such liability. A
information consisting of the few counties, however, are regu-
names of victims of automobile- lated by special no-fence laws en-
cattle collisions, extent of their acted by the legislature.
injurieri. dates, and locations: of The Florida supreme court re-
the accidents and an account of cently ruled that the roaming
hlp ha.dshis inflicted on be- -... .. ,.a y ...ed^i h ,e + th


cattle may be impolunlucu e y L ,e
sheriff in Duval county, despite
the failure of the- county commis-
sion to fence the county limits,
as required' by the special no-
fence law enacted by the legis-
lature for that county.
Three Jacksclville Jaycees, E.
K. McIlrath, 1937-38 state public
welfare and safety chairman;
Harold Wahl, member of the 1937
legislative committee, and Willie
DeHoff, defended that law as
friend's of the court at the re-
auest of the local junior chamber


TAX COLLECTIONS
COMING IN SLOW

City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson yes-
terday stated that but approxi-
mately $1000 had been turned in
on delinquent taxes since the
drive was instigated three weeks!
ago by the board of city commis-
sioners to collect these taxes.
This leaves a balance of about
$4300 yet outstanding.,


CURWOOD NOVEL

THRILLING FILM

"Call of the Yukon," Playing At
Port Theater Thursday, Stars.
Richard Arlen, Lyle Talbot

The new Republic picture, "Call
of the Yukon," playing Thursday
at the Port theater, promises to be
one of the outstanding adventure
films of the season. Based on one
of James Oliver Curwood's most
popular stories, "Swift Lightning,"
the picture stars Richard Arlen
and co-features Lyle Talbot and
Beverly Roberts.
The plot of "Call of the Yukon"
deals with the stirring adventures
of a beautiful young lady (Beverly
Roberts) who, through her own
stubborness, becomes stranded in
the wastelands of snow and ice in
northern Alaska. She is forced to
turn to a cold-blooded, half-civil-
ized trapper for protection (Rich-


ard Arlen). Complications arise Miss Betty Dorsey, Miss Virginia
when a northwoods trader, Hugo Stoutemire, Miss Viola Barber,
(Lyle Talbot) puts na an appear- Miss Evie Heese and Miss Lillian
ance and tries to .take the girl Ferrel:.
back to civilization. In addition there will be a num-
Several animal actors--dogs, ber of others presenting specialty
cub bears, pet ravens-are intro- numbers.
duced during the course of the Popular Young Lady Contest
picture. Swift Lightning, a huge Proceeds of the minstrel will be
German police dog, plays an- im- used by the Legion post for es
portant role throughout the pic- tablishing a school boy patrol at
ture and is instrumental in bring- the city's schools, and in order to
ing the picture to a powerful cli- stimulate ticket sales a "Popular
max. Background scenes for the Young Lady Contest" is being con-
film are authentic Alaska settings. ducted, with the young lady re-
---ceiving the highest number of
COINE'IS HAPPY TO BE votes being proclaimed the most
HOME IN TALLAHSHASEE popular young lady in Port St. Joe
HOME IN TALLAHSASEEand being presented to the audi-
.. ence from the stage.
Stand Trip Well From Jackson- Entries in the contest are Miss
ville To Executive Mansion Virginia Stoutemire, Miss Mari-
gene Smith, Miss Alice Gibson,
After 39 days in a Jacksonville Miss Dorothy Crockett. Miss Ala
hospital, Governor Fred P. Cone Mae Dorsey, Miss Kathleen Saun-
was brought to the executive ders, Miss Sara VanHorn, Miss
mansion in Tallahassee Wednes- Elaine Gore, Miss Opal Green,
day and placed in an air-condi- Miss Lunnette Hammock and Miss
tioned room on the ground' floor Billie Strickland.
prepared especially for his con- Tickets Carry Votes
valescence. Each of these young ladies is
"You don't know how happy the out to win the title of the most
governor is to be home," Mrs. Cone popular young lady and the prize
said. "He's been wanting to come that goes with it, and they are all
back. It feels good to be home blusy seeing tickets to the benefit
again." performance. The tickets sell for
Dr. Dan Cone, second cousin of 50c for adults, with 500 votes, and
the governor, rode in the ambu- 25 cents for children, with 250
lance from Jacksonville with the votes. Pick your young lady from
governor and reported that Cone the galaxy of beauty listed above
"made the trip very nicely." and buy at least two tickets from
Governor Cone was stricken with her, thus helping her not only to
coronary thrombosis July 29 and win the contest, but helping out
placed in a hospital. While he was in a worthy cause that may save
recovering from this attack he the life of some school child.
contracted influence and for sev- Campbell Pleased
eral days was in a serious condi- Mr. Campbell is well pleased
tion. with the cast he has to work with
The "no visitors" rule is in ef- (Continued on Page 5)
fect at the executive mansion and
only members of the immediate CRASH AT CROSSING
family are permitted to see the


of commerce. They also defended. governor. Dr. Cone would not pre-
the law in a previous appeal to'dict when Cone wouid be allowed
the supreme court. to return to his office.
Would Protect Landowners ----
The proposed state-wide no- Miss Marguerite Byrd of Wewa-
fence law would protect land- hitchka was visiting Tuesday at
owners from roaming cattle with- Beacon Hill with Miss Pebble
(Continued on Page 6). VanHorx.


One of Willard Lee's taxicabs
and a car driven by a Panama
City man collided Tuesday night
at the intersection of Long ave-
nue and Fifth street. Both cars
were damaged somewhat, but no
one was injured. A stop-sign should
be placed at this intersection.


IS PROGRESSING


The city paving program at pres-
ent includes paving all cross
streets from First to Eighth.
--- ---
MRS. OWENS REPORTED
RESTING COMFORTABLY
Mrs. L. W. Owens. who was in-


I


MINSTREL SHOW

PROMISES TO BE

TREAT OF YEAR

LEGION BENEFIT HAS AN ALL-.
STAR CAST OF STERLING
PERFORMERS

What promises to be the biggest
hit ever to lye presented in Port
St. Joe will be seen on the stage
of the Port theater tomorrow
night at 11:30 o'clock when the
American Legion post presents
their black and white minstrel
show, "Porter House Sam's Min-
strels," under the personal direc-
tion of Leonard -Earle Campbell,
the original Porter House Sam.
-Assisting Mr. Campbell will be
an all-star cast of 30 performers,
as follows:
Interlocutor, B. B. Conklin. Black
face-Bill Turner, Joe Hauser, P.
C. VanHorn, Wilbur Wells. Mr.
Collier, A. M. Mitchell, Mrs. P. C.
VanHorn, Maxie Ferrell, Mrs.' La.
neta Davis, Mrs. Peggy Lovett and
Dan Farmer.
Chorus Singers-R. W. Rice. T.
M. Schneider, Dick Rector, Miss
Alma Mae Dorsey, Miss Marigene
Smith, Miss Katherine Hickey,
Miss Katherine Ferguson, Miss
Elaine Gore, Miss Murnice Taun
ton, Miss Melba Nedley, Miss Al-
ice Gibson, Miss Martha Hinson,









PAETOTESAPR T OFLRD RDY ETME ,13


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


BAPTIST W. M. S. ELECTS
OFFICERS FOR YEAR
The regular business meeting of
the Woman's Missionary Society'
of the Baptist church was held at
the church Tuesday afternoon
with 16 members present. There
president, Mrs. J. O. Baggett. was
in charge and conducted the de-
votional, which was taken from
Psalms, 65th chapter, followed in
prayer by Mrs. T. F. Johnson. The
business session, during which the
minutes were read, roll called and
reports given, was held after
which the young people's leader,
Mrs. Cason, and the stewardship
chairman gave interesting talks,
on their work.
Report of the nominating com-


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Services are held in the Ma-
sonic hall, over the p-stoffice.
Sunday School, 10 a. m. every
Sunday.
Preaching services 11b00 a. m.
every Sunday.
-A-
EPISCOPAL
G. T. B:-nson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.
CATHOLIC
CATHOLIC


Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays


mittee was given by mte chairman, -. ..*-...- .. -
Mrs. W. H. Howell, and the offi- 10:15 a. m.
cers selected were accepted. Of- --*
ficers for the coming year were ASSEMBLY OF GOD


elected as follows: Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett, president; Mrs. W. H. How-
ell, vice-president; Mrs. C. G.. Cos-
tin, treasurer; Mrs. W. C. Prid-
geon, recording secretary; Mrs. E.
A. McCaskey, corresponding sec-
retary.
The circle names were divided
for a young matrons' circle, with
Mrs. O. F.. Powell appointed as
chairman, and Mrs. E. A. McCas-
key appointed as chairman of the
older group.
Both circles will hold their
meetings at: the church next Mon-
day, Septemhber 12.

BEACH PARTY ENJOYED
AT BEACON HILL
Miss Dorothy Crockett cele-
brated her fifteenth birthday Wed-
nesday by treating several friends
to a delightful beach party at Bea-
con Hill.
SImmediately after school those
invited met at the home of the
hostess and motored to the beach
where, after a refreshing swim in
the Gulf, a delicious picnic supper
was served to the Misses Mar-
garet Hinson, Iatherine Hickey,
Dorothy Trawick, Barbara and
Margaret Crockett.

- Mrs. Harvey Childs and daugh-
ters of Tallahassee are the guests
this week of Mrs. Childs' mother,
Mrs. Sally Montgomery.


H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Sunday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marretta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning worship 11 a.m.
B. T. U. 7 p. m.
Evening worship 8 p. m.
W. Mi. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
S p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
4 p. m.

Joe Hickey left Tuesday. to at-
tend school in St. Augustine. He
was accompanied as far as Talla-
hassee by his mother, Mrs. Erie
Hickey, his brother Jean, and Mrs.
P. J. Farmer and daughter, Ruby
Lee.


a good


-r DOCTOR


The re


est depends


PRESCRI1

To get the full benefit of
nosis and advice, have yo
filled at Carver's. We (
exactly as your doctor ore
the best and purest drug
pharmacist is in charge a


Carver Dr

Port St. Joe, Fla.


Is only

Half

the Cure






s on his


OPTION

a doctor's diag-
ur prescriptions ,
compoundd them
ders., using only
Is. A registered
It all times.


ug Co.

Phone 27


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS'
AUXILIARY MEETS
Tire Lottie Moon Girls' Auxili.
ary of the Baptist church held
their mission program at the
church last Friday afternoon with
Mrs. 0. Baggett in charge in the
absence of Mrs. Cason, counceilor.
Topic for the afternoon was "Dear
Teacher Comes to G. A."
The meeting opened with song,
"WThat a Friend We Have In
Jesus." The Girls' Auxiliary Al-
legiance and Star Ideals weie re-
peated in unison. The Bible study,
"A Harvest Song," Psalms 65:9-15,
was led by Betty Jo Lane. fol-
lowed by sentence prayers. A
"Hurdle Race," consisting of ques-
tions on Baptist work, was led by
Mrs. Baggett, and Betty Jo Lane
led with the largest number of
correct answers, with Carolyn
Baggett second. Song, "Stand Up
for Jesus," closed the meeting.
Thirteen members were present.
Gwendolyn Howell will act as
hostess to the auxiliary this after-
noon.

MISS MAXIE BROWN IS
HONORED ON BIRTHDAY
Little Miss Maxie Gem Brown
was the guest of honor on her
eighth birthday last Friday at a
party given by her mother, Mrs.
Charles Brown, at the home of
Mrs. Max Kilbourn on Sixth street.
The living room and dining
room of the Kilbourne home were
beautifully decorated, carrying out
a yellow and white color scheme.
Dressed in a yellow organdie
dress, made colonial style, the
honor guest received her guests in
the living room, after which games
were played on the lawn.
Later all were invited to the
dining room where a beautiful
white cake, lighted with yellow
candles, was the centerpiece for
the table, which was covered with
a lovely lace cloth. Ice cream
carrying out the chosen colors
was served to the honor guest
and about 20 little friends.

LITTLE MISS GLOEKLER
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Mrs. J. B. Gloekler entertained
Tuesday afternoon in honor of her
daughter, little M i s s Virginia
Gloekler, who celebrated her fifth
birthday.
A color scheme of pink and
white was carried out in decora-
ting the dining and living rooms
where the guests were entertained.
Games were enjoyed, after which
the guests were invited into the
dining room. where a beautiful
heart-shaped cake formed the cen-
terpiece for the table. Favors of
dolls, parasols and balloons carry-
ing out the color scheme were
placed for each little guest. De-
licious refreshments were served
nineteen little friends and the
guest of honor.

YEAR BOOK FOR WOMAN'S
CLUB IS ISSUED
The Port St. Joe Woman's Club
this week received their 1938-39
Year Book from the Star job de-
partment. It is a handsome 12-
page brochure printed on eggshell
book paper. The cover is of green
printed with gold ink, the club
colors being green and gold.

Mrs. J. F. Miller is invited to
have a free ice cream sundae at
LeHardy's Pharmacy.

Sheriff and Mrs. B. E. Parker
of Wewahitchka visited relatives
in the city Sunday.

Mrs. Dewitt Marks and Miss
Cronin Marks of Apalachicola
were the guests Saturday of Mrs.
Joe, Mira. Miss Marks will leave
this week for Marjorie Webster


SNOW WHITE AND SEVEN
DWARFS CLUB ENTERTAINS
Honoring Miss Margie Stepp,
Roy Gibson and Doyle Smith, who
left this week for college, the
Snow White and Seven Dwarfs
club entertained last Friday eve-
ning at the home of Mrs. Erie
Hickey with a "prom." Decora-
tions were carried out in a color
scheme of pink and green.
"Proms" and dancing were en-
joyev. after which soft drinks and
cookies were served to the Misses
Margie Stepp, Marigene Smith,
Alice Gibson, Elaine Gore, Doro-
thy Trawick, Lunnette Hammocck,
Dorothy Crockett, Murnice Taun-
ton, Florine Johnson, Katherine
H.ickey and Betty Jo Temple, and
Messrs. Roy Gibson. Doyle Smith,
William Trawick, Bobby Coburn,
Carlyle Matthews, Lanell Rowan,
R. H. Smith, Cy Williams, Win-
ston Jones. Ausley Stoutemire,
David Maddox, Dick Stepp and
Harold Williams.
Sft
LEGION AUXILIARY IN
MEETING LAST FRIDAY
The American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 116 met in regular session at
the Legion home last Friday after-
noon with President Mrs. Lois
VanHorn presiding.
The meeting was called to order
and a short business session held:
at which time a nominating com-
mittee consisting of Mrs. Connell,
Mrs. Schneider and Mrs. Gibson
was, appointed to select nominees
for election at the third Friday
meeting. All members were urged
to attend the Legion conference
at Wakulla Springs next Sunday.
Hostesses Mesdames Gibson and
Connell served iced drinks and
cookies to members present.

METHODIST W. M. S. IN
BUSINESS MEETING
T'hI regular monthly business
meeting of both circles of the
Methodist Missionary Society was
lield at the church Monday, with
the president presiding.
Opening song, "Blessed Assur-
ance," was followed with prayer
Sv- Ms. G. A. Patton. Regular rou-
tine business was dispensed with
and a report was given by the
parsonage committee, reporting in
full al; monies expended and re-
ceived. Mrs. R. R. Hodges, social
service chairman, reported $5.60
expended on her work. She also
asked that members bring their
ia".:on to-tp cow)ons to the next
meeting, if possible, in order to
secure the quota for the quarter.
A rising vote of thanks was ten-
dered Mrs. W. E. Boyer for her
untiring efforts while a member
of the society. She has been a
valued member and will be greatly
missed by the whole church. Th'
Boyers are leaving this week for
'hei- old home in Arkansas.
Mrs. Roy Gibson very sweetly
sang "Crossing the Bar," after
which Mrs. Hodges cisnmissed the
meeting with prayer.

Miss Juanita Parker, Miss Ger-
trude Chafin and Miss Bernice
Montgomery of Wewahitchka were
the week-end guests of Mrs. Sally
Montgomery.

Mrs. B. W. Eel's is invited to
have a free ice cream sundae at
LeHardy's fountain.

The Misses Idell and Mercedes
Murphy of Madison spent Sunday
in the city, guests of their mother,
Mrs. Clara Murphy.

Mrs. Ed Pridgeon, Sr., Miss Min-
nie Ola Pridgeon and Mr. and Mrs.
Harlan Pridgeon of Wewahitchka
were visiting friends in this city
Sunday.

Sheriff and Mrs. Charles Rob-
bins of Apalachicola were visiting
in this city Monday.

Mrs. Edith Stone Daffin of Pan-
ama City spent Sunday in Port St.
Joe, the guest of Mr. and Mrs. T.


l J tA COLUMBIA PICTUR .

Chapter 3 'Treasque.wland'


A SUNDAY and MONDAY A
September 11 and 12

DANIELLE DARRIEUX




71. .-

I In






Co-Starred With

DOUGLAS-FAIRBANKS, Jr.

in -


'The RAGE OF PARIS'

with
Mischa Auer, Helen Broderick
and Louis Hayward


A TUESDAY A
September 13

KEN MAYNARD

in -


'Six Shootin' Sheriff'



A WEDNESDAY A
September 14


A THURSDAY A
September 15


SELECTED SHORTS 'w
EACH PROGRAM
li^^'lIrMl iT-^? ^TrT^ "


School in Washington, D. C. H. Stone.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


I


l;1111~II~!lll.jlll lllu.'l LL~UI~I~ .*^III I'i"fvi
THE NEW





PORT

- A Martin and Martin -





BILL TURNER, Mgr.

SHOWS DAILY 3 'Til 11 p. m.
SUNDAYS 2:00, 4:00 and 9:00
ADMISSIONS 10c, 15c., 25c

A SATURDAY A
September 10

SONG-STREAKED THRILLER
.ias~4








F~~iDAY,._ SETEBE 9,_~ 198TESAPOTS.JE LOIAPG HE


STRANGE!
Lady (meeting tramp on street):
'Poor fellow! You've lost a leg!"
Tramp (looking down): "Well,
doggoned if I haven't! What do
you know about that!"

44













ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S,

Dairy

Products


,SOLOMON'S ICE CREAM
Riche~ Smoother

^'Chocolate Milk
Greenspot Orangeade
Buttermilk


0, CALM THOSE BY USING
NE RV-ES, DOCTOR
BE SWEET- A MILES'
SERENE! NERVINE
4 4


Can you afford to be
NERVOUS?
Perhaps you could afford
those attacks of Nerves if you
were the only one affected.
Tense nerves make you a nui-
sance to everyone with whom
you come in contact. No one
likes you when you are jumpy,
irritable and nervous.

N DR.ILES' '
ERVINF


Drive for Health

Ordinances To

Protect Public

Hotel Commission Would- Have
All Restaurant Employes Se-
cure Health Certificates

W. M. Taylor, state hotel com-
missioner, announced the inaugu-
ration of a drive over the state
toward the enactment of munici-
pal health ordinances for restau-
rant employes.
"These ordinances will be oper-
ated similarly to the regulation of
the state hotel commission and in
conjunction with tie state hotel
law," Taylor said.
"The city of Tallahassee re-
cently passed the first of these or-
dinances, placing upon the shoul-
ders of restaurant proprietors the
responsibility of having all em-
ployes certified' as to their health,
and it is the purpose of the hotel
commission to have similar ordin-
ances adopted in as many Florida
cities as possible."
The Tallahassee ordinance, Com-
missioner Taylor explained, hold's
proprietors in violation of munici-
pal law if all employes have not
had health examinations by quali-
fied physicians, and are in posses-
sion of health certificates.
"This act places no greater bur-
den on the employer, but it does
assure enforcement of state and
city laws, and the whole thing
works together to assure greater
protection for the public in this
respect," Commissioner Taylor ex-
plained.
He added that requests will be
made of cities throughout the
state that they adopt similar or-
dinances at the e-ili'est possible
date.

THERE'LL BE NO LIARS THERE
"Folkses," said the colored min-
ister, "the subje( of my sermon
this evening am 'Liars.' Now, first
te'l me how many in the congrega-
tion has read the 29th Chapter of
Matthew?"
Nearly every hand in the con-
gregation was raised.
"Dat's right!" cried the minis-
ter. "You is jus' de folks I want
to preach to. Dere am no 29th
Chapter of Matthew!"

WHAT WE CALLS RESTRAINT


A woman wrote to the St. Joe
DR. MILES NERVINE has
been recognized as effective for Telephone & Telegraph company
more than 60 years by sufferers recently that she was shocked by
from Sleeplessness, Nervous Ir-
itability, Nervous Headache. the language used by workmen re-
Nervous Indigestion, Travel -i. hiring the lines near her home.
;Sickness. The foreman of the line crew was
LIQUID NERVINE
Large b 00 Small btl. 25 asked to send in a report on the
EFFERVESCENT TABLETS matter, which was as follows:
Large pkg. 754, Small pkg. 350 "Me and Joe was on the job. I
At your drug store was up on ilre poLe and happened
to let some hot lead fall on Joe.

said: 'You really must be more
careful, Bill'."



NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready For Every House In

Port St. Joe

C OO K I NG WATER HEATING
-. REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING


A miles east of Ma-lanna. Neighbors falling at the time prevented its
A S WO Inheard a car drive away, but a rain being traced.
WeserSta in ---------------------------------------------
Wester Slaying
Wester Slaying Let Us Service YOUR Car Todav

Affidavits Charging Murder Are For economical and efficient opera-
Signed By Special State In-
Signed By Special State n- ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
vestigator At Marlanna
vstiatA service it with our modern equipment
Sheriff Walter L. Watford of WA S H I N G -
Marianna. sheriff of Jackson coun- P r POL S I NG -
ty, states that two men have been R E A S I N G
arrested in connection with the
night-time slaying of W. W. Wes- Texaco Products
ter, Jackson, county naval stores
operator and former member of ST JOE TEXACO STATION
the state legislature. Wilbur Wells Jesse Darcey
The sheriff named the prisoners
as 1 ..R 00 u vfO-1-


as alpll WVester, 2'S, Ltand Wood-
row Wester, 25. The former, he
said, is a second cousin of the
slain man, and the latter is a
nephew.
Ralph Wester was arrested' In
Grand Ridge and Woodrow Wes-
ter was arrested in Bay county,
where he is engaged in the naval
stores business. Both have denied
any connection with the slaying.
Sheriff Watford said affidavits
charging the two men with mur-
der were signed by W. H. Gasque,
a special state Investigator as-
signed to the case by Governor
Cone. He declined to reveal the
information on which they were
arrested.
Wester was killed June 21 by a
shotgun charge fired through the
window of his. home about 10


WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W. HORTON
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


A small amount each
Why Not YOU, Too? week invested in
Enjoy a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at our Retirement Plan
MIDWAY PARK will enable you to

On Gulf County's World- obtain a regular in-
Famous DEAD LAKES come per week at
Our BOATS are New, Dry the age of 60 or 65.
and Kept Clean. Our
CABINS are New, with New See our local agent
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP is or. write....
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA. FLA.


"IMMS


BOARD FEET

BY THE MILLIONS


Southeastern pine forests are playing an increasingly im-
portant part in the National Economic Pattern. The past
century has witnessed a 400% increase in the timber output
from this region. In 1929, 1 billion, 386 million board-feet
were produced. More than 10,000 Southeastern sawmills
process the pine logs. Much of the lumber thus produced is
used for the interior finish in new American homes.

The stability of North Florida's lumbering interests de-
pends wholly on an adequate supply of timber for future
years. Denudation of forest tracts threatens this industry
which, today, plays an important role in North Florida's
economy. To guarantee pine timber for this and other forest
industries, we must protect our woodlands so that they will
continue to yield boardfeet by the million. We must build
for the future by planting today!

As a public utility, we aim at furnishing a type of
electric service which cannot be duplicated-as a local
Citizen, we aim at assisting in sound community de- .. ,-
7 velopment which will benefit all.


0O-----
V NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
SNO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR'CAS
--.. A full line of gas appliances in stock J*-


Inquire
43ulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


FLORIDA POWER


CORPORATION
_s W I I


B SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


THE- STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 91 1938


PAGE THREE


~


pa"
1 r

~~a"Y,


L










WHAT ABOUT TUNG OIL?
T E STA R What are consumers in the United States
THE A going to do about the tung oil supplies that
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher have been disrupted by the war in China?
American paint and varnish manufacturers
Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida, and others employing tung oil in their pro-
from The Star Building and others oying tung oil in their pro-
cesses have been buying $20,000,000 worth of
Entered as Second-class matter, December 10, the oil from China annually for several years.
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida, According to the United States Bureau of
under Act of March 3, 1879.
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, American
Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance manufacturers now use more than 100,000,000
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25 pounds of tung oil yearly, and with the ex-
Three Months ......6bc caption of some 2,000,000 pounds produced in
-{ TelepFhone 51 lorida and other states bordering on the
Gulf of Mexico, all of this oil comes from
The spoken word is given scant attention; China., ;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. It has been demonstrated that tung trees
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed r a n er o
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word grow well in lorida, and a number of plots
is lost; the printed word remains, have been planted in Gulf county, which have
Shown remarkable growth, some of the trees
LABOR HAS ITS DAY reaching a height of six and seven feet the
Labor had its day Monday, and the labor- first year, demonstrating beyond a doubt
ing people of Port St. Joe had good reason to that the soil of Gulf county is well adapted
celebrate. Labor conditions in this city are to the culture of tung trees.
definitely good. There are very few differ- liere is a golden opportunity for land
ences between employers and employes and owners of this county who have idle lands
the union scale of wages is being paid. they would like to put on an income-produc-
The day also should have given employers ing basis. The trees will bear nuts in from
cause to rejoice, for when there is such a two to three years after planting from the
favorable condition as exists in this city, it is seed, and as cows, hogs and sheep will not
to the advantage of all concerned. Disagree- eat the foliage of the trees, they may be
ments and strikes cause losses on each side, raised on unfenced land.
to say nothing of the loss the public also suf- Under conditions as they now exist, indi-
fers, so, as a general rile, when labor can re- cations are that the crop produced in Florida
joice, as it can in Port St. Joe this year, the and other parts of the producing territory
entire community can rejoice, too. should bring fancy prices. Here is an oppor-
Labor Day was instituted at the behest of tunity to establish another income crop for
organized labor in the United States and in Gulf county. Let's not pass it up.
effect is recognized as dedicated to the men How about getting our portion of that
and women who by their organization effort $20,000,000 being spent annually for tung oil?
have raised the scale of living, perfected the
trades and brought about a condition for HAVE WE PASSED DARK AGES?
wage earners that not only redounds to their In recent years Florida and the South has J
benefit but also to that of their employers, had some very unpleasant publicity over al- t
Stgndards of work havy been increased and leged cruelties iu southern prison camps. We i
standards (f apprentice requirement raised in have bowed our heads in shame that such
the various crafts, through operation of the conditions could exist, and in humiliation at w
unions. the widespread unpleasant discussion that re- a
For many years looked upon by many as suited. L
selfish organizations, the unions have in later But, after reading of the prison outrage
years become recognized as of as great value in P'ennsylvania where four men were cooked h
to the employer as to the employee. Through to death and others barely survived, we hold s
thei- own self-discipline, they have given the up our hands in horror at the terrible inhu-
employer better service, while at the saml mian punishment that was meted out to these
time bettering the hours and working condi- prisoners, and again we bow our heads in hu- t
tions of their own members. The union con- miliation that in this, our country, such con- v
tract is today recognized as of great value to editions could exist. i
the employer. The arbitration clause that is it is fully realized that in dealing with the 1
now a part of most union contracts, prevents criminal population of the world, that dras- a
strikes and lockouts, and provides the em- tic measures must be taken at times. We
ployer with a methlpd of dealing with those know that sentiment has little place in hand- s
he employs that is much superior to the old ling desperate gangsters and murderers. But :o
manner of hiring individually and settling '.We cannot help but wonder just how short of n
differences in the same lmanier. being gangsters and murderers those who
are responsible for this latest exhibition of in-
THE TAXPAYER'S FUTURE human use of authority are. a
Economists have concluded tiat ithe popu- There may be a remote possibility that e
lation of the United States will reach a peak conditions were such that the horrible death
of 158,000,000 within 50 years. At our cur- 1E these men was unavoidable. But there o
rent population level, that will mean an av- vould still be some person or persons respon-
erage increase of about half a million each sible that such a condition could exist.
year between now and 1988. The dark ages had nothing on this e-ilighh- ,]
Now, let's do a little figuring, cned age if men in authority over those with b
Today each man, womnlan d child in the warped and criminal minds and tendencies tl
United States is paying, roughly figuring, can resort to the methods of punishment ap- o
about $70 per year as their share of govern- parently used in this Pennsylvania prison.-
ment upkeep. Fifty years ago it was only $5. Florida Advocate. e
Thus, in the past 50 years the cost of govern- b
ment has increased about 14 times. In the Hats off to the Knights of Pythias lodge ci
past 100 years it has increased 27 times, of Apopka. The members of that organization
Think, then, what the cost of running the last week passed a resolution condemning c
government may be 50 years hence if the ante Communism and Fascism and pledging its w
goes up at the same rate it has in the past members to work against any form of un- th
50 years. Maybe it won't increase at that ra- American activity. The resolution was au- p,
tio, but even if it increases only half as fast, thorized by unanimous vote after consider- it
the per capital cost in 1988 will be about $490 able discussion of dissemination of Commun- ti
every year. A family of three, which is about ist propaganda in and near Apopka. P.
the average family today-, would owe in taxes
as its share about $1,470 annually. And these The Star does not use so-called "ready- us
figures don't take into account the nearly print" nor "boiler plate." It is an all-home- "n
$40,000,000,000 which has been spent in re- print newspaper--and we're proud of the fact. h1
cent years and will have to be paid by this i a
and rising generations. Mail order houses contribute nothing to it
We may well say-unto our children and the welfare of Port St. Joe. Buy from home ve
our children's children: "Woe is you." Imerchants who pay their taxes here. to


PRIDAVY ,SPTFMBER 9. 0193


THE BUNGLING HUNTER EXPLAINS

A O RUINED Y'or COW? NONSENSE! ,
SHE'S IN 1 BETER SHAPE RIC7ETr
Now HAN, EVER / -


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


STEVE, Guest Contributor
The celebration of the. 100th an-
liversary of the constitution of
Florida, which is to be held in St.
foe in December, is of interest to
he entire state. This interest is
increased by the romantic touch
caused by the mystery of the rise
and fall of this ill-fated little city
ehich began its career just a little
after Napoleon Bonaparte died on
he lonely Isle of St. Helena.
The long years of silence which
iave brooded over this lonely
pot, at least from 1855 until 1909,
touches the imagination.
The change in conditions of now
nd that time is in such sharp con-
rast. Science and invention have
broughtt more change in the liv-
ng contttions of man in this past
00 years than had come about in
11 the 3000 preceding years.
The emancipation of man began
vhen, with the invention of the
team locomotive, he was no
longer bound to earth, at the
iercy of propulsion by animal
strength annd, speed. It was tlren
hat he began to believe that all
things are i.... ,~.. and through
accidentt arid design he has suc-
eeded beyond his wildest dreams.


and other commodities from the
Old World.
Back in the business part of the
town were the general stores
where cloth of the plainest kind,
powder and shot, brown sugar, to-
bacco and cigars (but no cigarets)
were sold. Candles were used f
illuminating purposes, but were
not so bad if one were able to
have chandeliers that burned sev-
eral candles at one time.
There isn't the remotest possi-
bility that anyone living in St.
Joseph in 1840 is yet living today.
With all their hopes and fears,
their ambition to build a city by
the sea, they have gone the way
of all flesh. Gone to "make their
beds with patriarchs of the an-
cient world," back to that noth-
ingness from whence they came.
It is interesting to note that
Martin Van Buren was president
of the United States during the
heyday of old St. Joseph. They
had their financial troubles then
as well as now, the great panic of
1837 being the worst in the his-
tory of our country.
Julian Hawthorn says in his
"History of the United States,"
published in 1898, that "the condi-
tion of finance in 1837 was such
that the mind shudders to contem-
plate it; not a bank in the country
paid hullion. There seemed to be
no money left in the world."
That there is nothing new under
the sun is shown by the fact that
there was political patronage in
that day also. 'President Jackson
10 years earlier began his career


\When I first visited the site of as a vetoer with some bills for ap-
ld St. Joseph it was in the fail propriations for roads (highways).
f 1909. We were building the He saw jobbery in them, and that
resent railroad to Port St. Joe the pickings and stealing of the
-I
nd pilss'ed near the old town. At promoters vould exceed tie ex-
hat tinie the only eves that ever penditures for the public good. If
held this illli.'sting spot were the states were once encouraged
hose of an occasional fihei'man to lay the cost of internal im-
r cattle man. The form of the provements on the national gov-
treets could be distinctly seen, ernment there would ensue a car-
nd brick or pieces of brick were 'nival of political thimblerigging
verywhere--nost of the whole all over the land." This all goes
rick had been removed to other to prove that history repeats it-
ities. .self and the people of 1838 had
I remember that in about the their troubles, too.
enter of the old town I found a No wonder the little city of St.
heart pine post still solid, but Joseph went under with the fi.
eather-worn, and in the side of !nancial conditions being such,
ie post was a hole and a wooden 'added to all her other troubles-
eg still in the hole. In those day but a new star has arisen which
was common to fasten gates in we hope and trust will never go
Mis manner-c:ose the gate and down or grow dimmer.
ut a peg in the hole-making the
ite secure. EASY
It would be very interesting to Johnnie: "Mother. I killed five-
Sif we could se'e a movie of it flies today-three male and two
ow. Each prosperous citizen must female."
ave had his own stable instead of Mother: "Why. Johnnie, how
garage. Down by the waterfront can you tell a male fly from a fe-
must have looked so very dif- male fly?"
rent to what it now is-the little Johnnie: "Well, three were sit.
vessels at the docks loading cot- ting on a boer bottle and two on
n and lumber or unloading brick the mirror."


V M MT FO -r I rl rjlr. tF I tf,5


- q


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


3P







THE S'IAR, PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA PAGE FIVE


AMATEUR RADIO OPS the nation in the event regular
ORGANIZE FOR WORK commercial systems fail. PE R N A
DURING EMERGENCY The emergency set-up includes r i O A
D G EMERGENCY the army, national guard, naval re-
serve, coast guard and more than
Form Communication System To 100 amateur stations in Florida, Miss Amelia Schneider willleave
Be Put; Into Us On Short Notice all co ordinated into an efficient Sunday to enter the college of
system on the same fines as that arts and science at Florida State
Florida amateur radio operators being used in similar organiza- College for Women, Tallahassee.
have organized a emergency tions throughout ne nation by
communication system which can ti arp signal cor-. Miss Margaret Smith, grand-
be put into service at a moment's In order to assure efficient daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. S.
notice should other forms of com-, working of the sys prepared- Gibson. Sr., left Wednesday to en-
munication be disrupted. ness drills will be he l every Mon- ter school in Atlanta, Ga.
The organization was made un- .. ,,- A
der he a ganization wacors and e n- day night with the national guard
Floridar national Guard d th cncontrol station at Lake Worth (:all- David Gray of Panama City was
Florisda national Guaord. It co-ing the roll of numbers by wire- a business visitor in the city Wed-
priises four networks for both tele- iesday.
i less. nesday.
graphic and radiophone service, less.s a
which will be able to maintain Mrs. Horace Soule is invited to
communication with the rest of: TAYLOR TO PRESIDE have a free ice cream sundae at
AT LEGION MEETING ..cFlar:iy's Pharmacy.


Professional Cards



DR. J. C. COE
DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED





Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.



FISHING--
Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.
TROUT
BASS

BREAM

BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.
SEE-

SJ. 0.'Jim' SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.


To Be Held at Wakul'a Springs;
Expect Big St. Joe Delegation

Phil S. Taylor of Taflahassee
will preside as toastmaster at the
American Legion district confer-
euce to be held Sunday at Wa-
kulla Springs.
The meeting is expected to draw
an attendance of more than 200
men and women from all parts of
the district, and Commander T.
M. Schneider of the Gulf County
American Legion post states that
he expects quite a large delega-
tion to be on hand from this post.
A registration f?e of $1 will be
charged which will entitle each
visitor to dinner, use of the hote'
for meetings and trips over the
famous spring in glass-bottomed
boats.

MINSTREL SHOW

(Continued from Page 1)
and stated yesterday: "It has
been many a year since I have
found such wonderful co-operation
as I have found in Port St. Joe,
and to prove that, I intend to put
on a special song at the minstrel
entitled, 'Down South In Port St.
Joe'." Mr. Campbell has composed,
featured and introduced the fol-
lowing songs with such outstand-
ing ininstrlemen as Al G. Fields
and Lew Dockstader: "Mammy's
Cabin," "The Voice of the South,"
"Roll Along Silvery Moon," "The
Needle In the Haystack," "Robin-
son Crusoe" and many others.
It is expected that the "Stand-
ing Poom Only" sign will be hung
out for this midnight show tomor-
low night, and everyone purchas-
ing a ticket is urged to be on
a"n.:! when the doors are opened
or they may be forced to stand in
the aisles.

Mrs. Joe Hiles spent Tuesday in
Tallahassee visiting relatives.


GET PAID FOR HAVING FUN!

YOU CAN SHARE IN
$1 0,000 Cash Pr zes




And Enjoy.

10 BIG NEW FEATURES

Beginning in the September 11 Issue of



THE CO MI WCEE LY


ORDER YOUR COPY NOW!
From Your Local Dealer or Write Directly to

THE ATLANTA



SUNDAY AMERICAN


Miss Florence Wynn leaves Sun-
day to enter college in Tallahas-
see.

Ben Dickens, Jr., will leave Sun-
day for Gainesville to enter col-
lege for the fall term.

Mrs. Joe Mira and Mrs. J. B.
Gloekler spent yesterday in Apa-
lachicola.

Mrs. Horace SouIe and little
son returned this week from a
visit of several weeks in Atlanta
with her sister, Mrs. T. S. Gib-
son, Jr.

SMiss Bernice Beaty left last
Friday for Apalachicola, where
she has accepted a position in the
city school.

Mrs. Tomn' Owens spent last
Thursday and Friday in Panama
City.

Mrs. T. H. Stone is invited Lo
partake of a free ice cream sun-
dae at LeHardy's Pharmacy.

Mayor and Mrs. J. L. Sharit
made a business trip Wednesday
to Pensacola.

\lrs. R. C. Rector was the week-
end guest of Irer parents in Bain-
bridge.

Mrs. W. M. Howell spent Tues-
day in Thomasville. Ga., visiting
friends.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown
and family moved Tuesday to
Apalachicola, their former home.

Henry Brown of Panama City is,
the guest this week of Mr. and
Mrs. Pete Bernal.

Miss Cronin Marks of Apalachi-
cola was the guest Monday of her
father Dewitt Marks.


Cecil Costin, Jr., left Tuesday
for Gulfport, Miss., to attend the
Gulf Coast Military Academy.

Chester Forsyth, who has spent
the past few months in the city
with his brother-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. John White. eft
Monday for Mobile, Ala., where lie
has accepted a position.


SMr. and Mrs. Hubert Hodges H. C. Fain was a business visi-
and little son of Marianna were tor in the city yesterday.
the guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. "r 4 ,
R. R. Hodges of this city. Business isn't going to pick up
Sby itself-folks have just natur-
Doyle Smith left Monday to at- ally got to get together and PICK
tend Louisiana Tech this term. it up!





,.*' .' ..
A 4

A'' -



i-l-~.Rt


A NEW KIND OF
TIRE THAT GIVES YOU

THE'TWIN" SAFETY OF THE
LIFE-SAVER TREAD AND

F FAMOUS GOLDEN PLY



( y' THE GREATEST PROTECTION
i + I YOU'VE EVE HAD AGAINST
l BOTH SKIDS AND BLOW-
\- ,/ OUTS-See it Today I
S Yes! It's a new kind of tire safety
-INSIDE AND OUT.! On the outside this new Life-
Saver Tread will give you the quickest, safest stops you've
ever had on wet roads. And inside it gives you the real
blow-out protection of the famous Golden Ply.
SYou owe it to the safety of yourself and your family
to see the new Goodrich Safety Silvertown before'you
buy. Just take one ride on this new Silvertovn-on a
wet day-and you'll never feel as safe on any other tire.
Even though many tires cost more, no other tire-at
any price-can give you this two-way
protection against skids and blow-outs. ---
Play safe. Come in for a free demon-
stration.


HOW THE U FE-SAVER
TREAD GIVES YOU A

WET R0ADS
i Its never-ending spiral bars
ner act like a bat E
tery of wind-
51,,e _,t r ,
3 s"rd. '. ep, t ,

L t. r'lb-'

th ru.
.il rF ,-


BREAK{
RECORD
In a car equ
Safety Silver
TREAD, Bot
drove from L
hours and 58R


Mrs. B. B. Conklin spent several roads,edryeroa
I to average b,
days this week in Panama City breaking his f
with her mother, by 2 hours a
7, tire safety!
Mrs. Helen Allen and daughter,
Peggy, spent the week-end at their
home in Gorfon, Ala., with th'air s
family.

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Bragg of
Wildwood and Mr. and Mrs. Moore
of Quincy were guests one day
last week of Mr. and Mrs. W. S.
Smith. tIFE-SAVER

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Watson and
daughter, Miss Bobby, attended
the wedding of Miss Winona Wil-
liamson and Linden K. Cannon, Jr.,
in Tallahassee last Saturday.

A. E. Harrelso- has a free ice
cream sundae awaiting him if he PHONE 37
!will stop at LeHardy's Pharmacy. 1 ,-,-


EXTRA
COST


W,'I


S COAST-TO-COAST SPEED
RD ON NEW SILVERTOWNS
lipped with the new Goodrich
towns with the LIFE-SAVER
b cKenzie, famous race driver,
os Angeles to New York in 51
minutes. Although he hit wet
ads, hairpin curves, he was able I\
better than 60 miles an hour,
ormer trans-continental record
nd 42 minutes That's real
BOB McKENZIE
Famous Race Driver


lGoodrich


1I Silvertown
TREAD.....GOLDEN PLY BLOW-OUT PROTECTION



JOE MOTOR CO.

"Bumper To Bumper Service"
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
m.iesraisai~v*vZi4fWsS'ns1eafvvss ^Ssacilw;wwiSviS S


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1938
_~


------ -------~-.1.~1-. ~


THE SYiAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


I








PAGESIXTHE TAR POT ST JO, FLRID FRDAYSEPEMBE 9,193


MAJOR LeHARDY

TAKES LIFE ON

VISIT TO ST JOE

IS FOUND BY NIECE AT BEACH
COTTAGE; WAS NATIVE
'OF GEORGIA

Major Julius C. LeHardy, 67. re-
tired army physician of Decatur,
Ga., was found dead Saturday af-
ternoon in a beach cottage at Bea-
con Hill by his niece, Mrs. Frank
LeHardy and her mother-in-law,
IMrs. Charles 'LeHardy.
Sheriff Byrd Parker, who was
called from Wewahitchka on the
case, stated that he believed the
death to be a suicide.
Major LeHardy, who had been
in Port St. Joe for two weeks on
a visit to his brother, Charles A.
LeHardy, who had been ill, had
gone to the beach cottage earlier
in the day and his body was dis-
covered by Mrs. LeHardy lying on
the floor with a rifle bullet wound
in the temple.
The body was sent to Atlanta
Sunday night where burial was
made in the Marietta National
Cemetery.
Major LeHardy, a native of Lib-
erty county, Georgia, had a long
career with the army medical
crops and saw service in several
wars.
He volunteered for the Spanish-
American War and after its close
enlisted in the regular army and
was transferred to the Philippines.
For many years he was with tbhe
Manila board of health and he had
also been stationed at Tientsin.
China; Fort Lawton. Seattle, and
Washington, D. C. Ten years ago
he retired and entered private
,practice of medicine in Atlanta.
.Hie was fond of big game hunt-
ing and during his stay in the
Philippines went on several expe-
ditions after tamaro, a species of
deer, on the island of Mindanao.
Besides his brother, Charles A.
LeHardy of this city, he leaves a
wife, a daughter, Miss Eugenia
LeHardy of Atlanta, and two sons,
'Clement D. of Hartsville, S. C.,
and Julius C. LeHardy IV, a stu-
dent at the University of Georgia.

AN OLD MAID'S PRAYER
Lord, I'm not asking anything
for myself-but please send my
mother a' son-in-law.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR SALE
HOUSE TRAILER, sleeps 4; $400.
Oriiginal cost $1440. One mile be-
yond Bay Beach Trailer Camp, 6
miles east Panama City, opposite
side of road. R. A. Stewart. 3*
FOR RENT
FIVE-ROOM HOUSE for rent, on
Beacon Hill highway; furnished
-or unfurnished. See M. P. Spear,
Costing Building, or phone 52, Port
:St. Joe. it
HOUSES FOR SALE
TWO-STORY dwelling, 7 rooms, 2
baths. Located on Eighth street,
Port St. Joe, Fla. For further in-
formation write or call Mrs. Mary
L. Smith, 208 North Lena Street,
Dothan, Ala. 9-2 9-16
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.
LOST
GLASSES, horn-rimmed, on beach'
near Beacon Hill Please return
'to The Star office. Reward. tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU 'have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
'tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. ..
'Try it today, tf
The Star is .2 per year--sub-
scribe now-


WAR PLANNED ON COWS Ithat counties of a certain popu-
Ilation may fence the county, and
(Continued from Page 1) prohibits cattle from running at
out requiring them to fence their large.
property. Now property owners A local act, applicable to a
in most counties must fence county (as' the Duval no-fence
against wandering cattle or suf- law), prohibits grazing animals
fer the consequences. The cattle from running at large and makes
owner is not responsible in dam- their owner criminally responsible


ages for injuries which his cattle
may do to other people's property
if they have failed to fence.
A special no-fence law, enact-
ed for a few counties prohibits
a cattle owner from allowing his
livestock to run at large and
places responsibility for damages
on him. It requires cattle owners
'o fence cattle instead of requir-
inr landowners to fence cattle


and civilly liable for injuries and
property damage.
Mcllrath Gives Report
In his report to the 1938 con-
vention of the Florida Junior
Chamber of Commerce, Mcllrath
emphasized t he importance of
''placing the responsibility for
controlling wandering! live stock
squarely on the shoulders of the


the initial cost of sucn a project.
"But the additional burden of
maintenance o thousands o f
miles of fences, gates and car.lTe
gaps, plus the burden of innum-
erable political jobs for fence and
gate inspection, repair crews and
what not. a:so should' be con-
sidered."-Florida Jaycee News.

TUNG OIL RESEARCH
FIELD HEADQUARTERS
BE IN GAINESVILLE

Selected Because It Is Located In
Growing Area of Some Size

One of the field headquarters
fnr tunp nil r search in the S uth


""1 -. .- -.... owners. M ... .. .. ... ... .. .. .
out. "That is the only sound solution by the bureau of plant industry of
In the absence of no-fence laws, at s he only soud souton the United States Department of
a landowner must eject roaming of the problem," he said. "Fenc- A.riculture will be set up in
cattle from premises 'with care ing the highways at the expense ainesville in co-operation with
If he injures them, he will be of the general public would be di- e state agricultural experiment
rectlythe state agricultural experiment
liable to their owner in damages rectly subsidizing the livestockstation
n. may be fined up to $100 or industry, and is without justifi- s
amlid e may b indup to 00or "^ 'l o Use of office rooms in one of
imprisoned for six months. cation. the buildings of the University of
If the landowner uses poison to "Fencing the highways would Florida has been arranged for
eject the 'trespassers,' he is sub- be impracticable from the stand- and the Gainesville Chamber of
ject to a $1,000 fine and: impris- point of improving public safety, Commerce has agreed to supply
onment of five years, because it is absurd to believe laboratory space. Field experi-
There are three kinds of no- gates would be kept closed or ments will be conducted on lands
fence. One, a general law, pro- properly maintained. This would owned' by the experiment station
'vides that cities may prohibit result in livestock being fenced or private growers. or both.
livestock from running at large. onto the highway right or way Gainesville was selected because
Under this law the animal may in many cases. it is located in a growing area of
be impounded. The owner, if a "Fencing the highways would considerable magnitude, and the
resident of the city, may be fined result in an enormous burden on office and laboratory space was
or be liable for InJuries, the taxpayer, for the proposed offered to the bureau. The bureau
Another general law provides benefit of a few, on account or and experiment station have sign-


ed an agreement covering co-oper-
ation in all phases of the investi-
gational work.
-------S---4 -
FIRE IN QUARTERS

The fire truck was called out
Monday afternoon to extinguish a
fire in the colored quarter. A
house belonging to Damon Peters
was Ilightly damaged by fire.


Year R

Corn



MONEY
ON THE
-o
Completely
COTT

* Cheap Rent
* Gas Heat a
* Frigidaires
0-
-----o-


MONEY


COMP
(10 Miles
Box 496 I


found

fort



BAYOU
GULF

Furnished
AGES

ts
3nd Cooking




B JUJU


'ANY
s East)
Port St. Joe


I ~ i


YOUR


HOUSE
1. Flua & Chimney Repairs
2. New Roofs
- -C 3. New Attic Rooms
4. Attic Insulated
5. Guttering
6. New Screens
7. New Siding
8. New Bath Room Fixtures
9. Wall Tite in Bathroom
10. Storm Sash & Weatherstripping
S11. Side Wall Insulation
~' 12. New Electric Fixtures
13. New Closets
14. New Sunrooms & Porch
15. Wall tile in Kitchen
16. New Hardware
17. Papering
18. New Garage
19. Grading & Sodding
20. New Floors & Refinishing
21. New Entrance
22. New Heating Plants & Repairs
23. Foundation (Stokers,e c.
(O 0il Burners, etc.)
-24. DL;i;.woy
25. F.'nce
26. Walks
----- 27. Pa2ni2nt Playroom
28. P pointing / '


v. .
A--.- -" LU~ ei



This is the easiest plan ever developed for financing home modernization and repair, and it
expires nextiyear, so act now.


* *


* You may borrow any amount, from $100 to $10,000.
* No down payment required.
* Money may be used to pay for all materials and labor.
* 5% yearly discount is the only charge.
* Repayment is in easy monthly installments, and may run up to
3, and sometimes 5 years.
* No collateral, mortgage, comakers or other security required on
the ordinary loan under $2500. Just your signature.


You can get $400, for instance, spend it for repairs now, and repay $15.01 a month over 30
months. $300 costs $9.59 a month for 3 years. It's the easy way to fix up the house. Come in;
and take advantage of it or call us for more information.




St. Joe Lumber Company


Phone 69


Port St. Joe, Florida


F, ,qq~'I-~a --4 d -hr~


------------~------ --


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1938


CHECKg~