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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00197
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 5, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00197

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500.000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
i the heart of the pine belt.


SAThe Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
ATR the City of Port St. Joe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE 10DTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1938 NUMBER 42
AL *


Many Are Collecting



'Lucky Bucks' To Be



Used At Auction Sale


Only Seven and Half Day aptist Church
Remain In Which "Lucky ptC
Bucks" Will Be Issued By TBe Dedicated
Participating Merchants. T B cte


"Please give me my 'Lucky
Bucks'," is heard in fifteen busi-
ness establishments a hundred
times a day as customers make
cash purchases or pay on back ac-
counts and add to their collection.
of "Bucks" which will be the only
money used at the big "Lucky
Buck Auction Sale" to be held on
Saturday, August 13, on the stage
of the Port theater, at which time
the following articles will be auc-


On August 14th

REVIVAL SERVICES TO OPEN
ON SAME DATE WITH TEXAS
EVANGELIST PREACHING

Port St. Joe's new First Baptist
church will be dedicated Sunday,
August 14, according to an an-
nouncement yesterday by the pas-
tor, Rev. J. W. Sisemore.
A revival service will be opened


tioned off by Auctioneer Bill Tur- on the same day with J. C. Si.se-
ner to the highest bidders: Imore of Amarilo. Texas, father of
One fine tempered steel casting the local minister, in charge.
rod for white bidders and a 29- First services in the new edifice
piece set of Vitrock chinaware for were held last Sunday, July 31,
colored bidders, put up for sale by though the building was not com-
the. Gulf Hardware & Supply Co.m- pleted at that time, and the
pany.. church was crowded almost to ca-
,A box of Coty's face powder for pacity. Services will be held again
white bidders ani a jar of face this Sunday in the new church
cream for colored bidders, put up and will be more formal, accord-
by LeHardy's Pharmacy. ing to Rev. Sisemore.
A $10 basket of choice groceries, The new building will be comn-
given by the Port Tneaur. plecely screened ukne finished
A $2 basket of groceries for and will be one of the most im-
white bidders and a 24-pound sack posing church structures in this
of flour for colored bidders, of- section of Florida. C. Neidig is
fered by Pete's Cash & Carry. i the contractor.


Handsome card table for white
bidders and a porch rocker for col-
ored bidders, put up by the Bar-
gain Furniture Company.
Two $5 repair work orders, pre-
sented by the City Service Gar-
age.
One high grade fountain pen
set, put up by J. L. Kerr, jeweler.
A beautiful bridge set consisting
of dinner plates, cups and saucers,
sugar bowl and creamer for white


------C-- -

New Presbyterian

Church Underway

Presbytery Sends Trained Worker
To City To Aid In Raising
Building Fund

PD^F. TT V Tlpn+ir trfv n .. f* th


bidders and a fancy table lamp for Rev.-. "-.- ~*a D-L-' a'L u" L"~'-
colored bidders, offered for auc- Presbyterian church, states that
tion by the St. Joe Hardware Comn- the new building on Sixth street,
pany. :;s just east of Long avenue, is being
One $2.50 trade coupon and one rushed to completion and probably
one $1.00 trade coupon, put up by will be ready for the first services
Frank's Sandwich Shop. on the third Sunday, August 21.
Groceries to the value of $1.50 The project, as planned by the
for white bidders and $1 in gro- members of the church for the
series for colored bidders, offered summer, are being carried out ac-
for auction by the Union Mercan- cording to schedule. In June the
tile Company. church lot was cleared and a very
Twn o 1 trade coupons, nut up pleasant general social was en-


by the Carver Drug Company.
A fine trunk for white bidders
and a fancy suitcase for colored
bidders, offered by Hauser's De-
partment Store.
Two $1 trade coupons, offered
for auction by the Bayshore Gro-
cery and Market.
A beautiful electric floor lamp,
offered by Chavers-Fowhand Fur-
niture Company.
A fine suitcase for white bid-
ders and a fancy dress for colored
bidders, put up by Schneider's.
Order for 500 letterheads and
500 envelopes for white bidders,
and 100 visiting cards for colored
bidders, offered for auction by
The Star.
But seven and one-half days re-
main in which the participating
business houses will pass out the
"Lucky Bucks," and everyone is
urged to ask for their "Bucks"
when making a purchase or pay-
ing on back accounts in order that
they may have sufficient with
(Continued on page 8)


joyed by members and their
friends on the grounds. In July
plans were completed and the
foundation laid for the church
building. And now, in August, con-
structionn has begun in earnest
with expectation of having the
building completed in record time.
The Presbytery has granted the
Port St. Joe congregation the
services of their trained worker,
Miss Jennie Savage of Piedmont,
Ala., for the month of August to
direct the work of raising funds
for completion of the new house
of worship.
Rev. Beaty announces that Sun-
day services will be held in the
Masonic hall, with Sunday school
at 10 a. m. and preaching services
at 11 a. m.
---
Mr. and Mrs. Ed McGowan have
as their guest Miss Lillian Sykes
of New Orleans.
---------4-------
O. M. Morton spent Sunday in
Carrabelle visiting friends.


PROVIDE FUNDS

FOR HEALTH UNIT

IN GULF COUNTY

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS PRO-
VIDE FUNDS TO CONTINUE
FOR ANOTHER YEAR

At a meeting of the Gulf county
commissioners Tuesday at Wewa-
hitchka, sufficient funds to con-
tinue the county health unit for
another year were provided for.
Opposition to the commissioners
appropriating money for this pur-
pose by some taxpayers was an-
ticipated, and resulted in a large
delegation appearing before the
board asking that the unit be con-
tinued by assessing a mileage or
an appropriation from some fund
sufficient to pay the county's
share.
Among those appearing in favor
of the unit were the clergy of the
county, representatives of all civic
clubs, including the Port St. Joe
Chamber of Commerce, doctors
and a number of large taxpayers,
ithler in person or by letter. En-
thusiasm favoring continuance of
the work is only an expression of
appreciation for the splendid work
accomplished by the health unit
during the past two years.
It was shown by one of the
county's outstanding physicians
that there is no way to estimate
in dollars and cent' the value of
its accomplishments, because it
not only provides for the treat-
ment and care of the underpriv-
iligect, but is working for the up-
buumlding of mankind in prevent-
ing the spread of diseases and the
stamping out of such cases as are
often found in the rura' areas
where it is impossible for physi-
cians to reach except at consider-
able expense to the physician -or
patients.
The commission deserves much
jir!a:e for their step itprward in
behalf of the betterment of iu-
Ianity. As expressed by many.
money spent for the promotion of
health in one's county accom-
plishes more good than monies ap-
propriated for any other cause.

BASEBALL GAME TO BE
PLAYED HERE SUNDAY
Manager Tom Owens of the
Port St. Joe baseball team states
that his club will meet the Apa-
lachicola nine at the local ball
park Sunday afternoon at 3:30.
The local boys won from Carra-
belle last Sunday by a score of 9
to 5, "Lefty" Wadsworth pitching
the entire nine innings.
Sopchoppy played here yester-
day, but due to the late starting
time. details of tie game were
not available for this issue.
.. ---
Ask for your "Lucky Bucks"
when you make a purchase.
-

READ RUSSELL KAY'S
COLUMN FOR UNBIASED
REPORT ON CAUCUS

All of our readers are
urged to turn to page five of
this issue of The Star and
read Russell Kay's column,
"Too Late to Classify," for
an unbiased report on the re-
cent caucus held at Moon
Lake Gardens at which G.
Pierce Wood of this city was
selected as the next speaker
of the house of representa-
tives.


American Legion Post



Passes Resolution



Against Nazi Camps


C. of C.To Sponsor

Drive For Lacking

Civic Center Fund

Seek To Raise $3500 By Asking
Every Man In City To Donate
Equivalent of One Day's Wage

At a director's meeting of the
Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce held Tuesday it was de-
cided that the organization would
take over the job of raising the
$3500 still lacking for the city's
new $73,000 community center in
Monument Park, work on which is
already underway.
It is the plan of the chamber to
name a committee, of which G. F.
Kaser.was made chairman, to con-
tact every man in the city who is
employed and ask that he donate
one day's wages toward the fund.
Employes of all business houses
in the city, of- the St. Joe Paper
company, tire St. Joe Lumber &
Export company and other large
concerns hereabouts, w1il be con-
tacted by the committee in their
endeavor to raise the $3500.


No More Concerts

Until September

Sunday's Concert In Park Was
Last Until School Opens; New


Call On Governor Fred Cone
To Do All In His Power To
Halt Such Activities In the
State of Florida.

Gulf County Post No. 116,
American Legion, meeting in
their new club house in this city
Monday evening, passed a resolu-
tion condemning establishment of
Nazi camps in Florida and request-
ing Governor Fred P. Cone to do
all in his power to prevent the es-
tablishment of such camps and
other un-American organizations
in this state.
The resolution reads:
We are informed there has
been an alarming growth of
German-American b un ds and
similar organizations and so-
cieties within the United States
and we understand that an ef-
fort is being made to introduce
such un-American organizations
into our own state of Florida.
We believe such organizations
or societies are subversive and
detrimental to unity among our
peoples and the highest prin-
ciples and ideals of American-
ism. -<
We ask that you announce
to all and sundry that all un-
American organizations and sub-
versive forces of such character
are unwelcome within the boun-
darier of Florida and that you
use your best efforts to discour-
age and prevent their establish.
ment.
The meeting was well attended,


Numbers Are Presested 25 members being present, includ-
ing former Post Commander W. R.
The band concert in the park Galt, who is now located in Pan-
last Sunday was one long to be ama City. and all gave their un-
remembered, for several new num- qualified endorsement of the reso-
bers were played, two of them for lution.
the first time in public. (Editor's Note: On the editorial
"Cyrene Overture' Indicated how page of-this issue of The Star we
far our high school band has call upon the local American Le-
progressed' under the leadership gion post to pass such a resolu-
Director Dan Farmer. Though this tion. This editorial was printed be-
score had been practiced but a fore we learned of the action
Pew times, it was played without iaken. We heartily commend the
any apparent difficulty. and was post on their resolution and hope
well received -by the audience..that their lead will be followed by
The "Soldiers March," f rom! other American Legion posts in
Faust, was another new one for this section of the state.)
our band. Many people have re- Following th'e business meeting
marked at the steady improve- of the post a chicken purlough
meant shown by the players, most and beer supper was enjoyed.
of whom have learned to play in
but a few months. INVITATION EXTENDED
With this concert the band has PUBLIC TO VISIT NEW
suspended operation until after METHODIST PARSONAGE
school begins August 29, as many The ladies of the Woman's Mis-
of the members are going on de- sionary society of the Methodist
played vacations during the next church extend a cordial invitation
few weeks. However, when school to the men and women of Port St.
opens and the entire band is again Joe to visit the new Methodist
assembled, the concerts will be re- parsonage next Thursday, August
sumed and will continue as long 11, between the hours of 4 to 6 p.
as weather permits. m. and S to 10 p. m.
It is the aim of the band conm- During these hours the mission-
mittee to complete the shell and ary society is tendering a recep-
seating arrangements in the mean- tion welcoming Rev. D. E. Mari-
time, so that everything will be in etta to the new ministerial resi-
readiness for resumption of the dence. The occasion will be in the
programs. nature of a silver tea and the pro-
Sceeds will apply on the new house
A. J. Navarre of this city is re- furnishings.
covering from an appendectomy -- -----
in a Pensacola hospital. The Misses Geraldine and Lou-
----ise Smith of Tampa arrived in the
Mr. and Mrs. Miles Hurlbut re- city last Friday and are guests of
turned Saturday from a two their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs.
weeks' vacation trip. W. S. Smith.







T O T
-,


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued -every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-. Telephone 51 )-*.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Tire spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


THOSE DELINQUENT TAXES
The city commissioners at their last meet-
ing decided that something must be done to
collect back taxes, as approximately 45 per
cent of the taxpayers had failed to pay their
assessments. It was suggested that about the
only thing to do was to 'issue tax deeds
against the property.
This would place an undue burden upon
the taxpayers to have their property sold for
taxes, but at the same time it is impossible
to run the city without funds.
The city is in dire need of the money and
every citizen and taxpayer should co-operate
to the fullest extent.
We would like to suggest that an install-
ment payment plan for delinquent city taxes
be worked out, with the chief of police or
some other officer as collector, to visit each
property owner regularly once a month. Re-
ceipts for the monthly payments could be is-
sued and when final payment is made, a regu-
lar tax receipt for the entire amount could
be issued.
Under such a plan the burden would not
be too heavy upon any individual, and the
city would be assured of a regular monthly
income with which to meet current bills.

RUN THE RATS OUT
Maybe we can't get action in Florida to
prevent the establishment of a Nazi camp in
the state, but perhaps it won't be necessary
since Judge L. Barron Hill of Nassau county,
New York, who last week presided at a trial
that brought verdicts of guilty against six
leaders of Nazi-controlled Camp Siegfried at
Yaphank, L. I., announced that, as a result
of disclosures made during the trial, he would
call on federal authorities for a thorough in-
vestigation of all Nazi activities in this coun-
tr\.
It is time that the federal government took
a hand in activities of the German-American
bund which is organizing camps all over the
country primarily for the purpose of creating
semi-military organizations pledged to Hitler-
ism and indirectly to undermine the present
system of democratic government.
Anv true American would not join an out-
fit that requires this oath: "I pledge faith to
my leader, Adolf Hitler. 1 promise Adolf Hit-
ler and those put in charge by him and well
known to me, or my means of insignias to
be recognized as superiors, loyalty and obedi-
ence and oblige myself to execute all com-
mands carefully and without personal regard.'
Organizers of these Hitler societies and
their cohorts should be run out of America
for the low, stinking rats they are.
The publisher of The Star would like to
see every American Legion post in Florida
pass resolutions to that effect, and strongly
urges the Gulf County Post to take such
action.

A Port St. Joe girl tells us confidently that
the reason members of her sex smoke is be-
cause the men don't want them to do it. It
evidently doesn't occur to her that the clever
advertising done by cigaret manufacturers
caused them to use the weed. Shrewd use, in
advertisements, of man's influence with wo-
men has more than doubled cigaret sales.


MODESTY, TIMIDITY,. ADVERTISING
Becoming modesty is a virtue. We admire
the modesty of this Corrigan fellow who
flew alone across three thousand miles of a
vast watery expanse in a "crate" and success-
fully reached the shores of Ireland. He avers
that he thought he was headed for California
-but nobody believes that. It evokes the
highest esteem.
When the faint flush of bashfulness tinges
the cheeks of a love-smitten swain we may
smile, but we understand. In fact, we are
somewhat envious. Blushing is almost a lost
art these days. We can even appreciate the
timidity of the young maiden wno, after be-
ing properly approached, sufficiently urged
and adequately coaxed, will sit down at the
organ and play "Oh, Where Is My Wander-
ing Ikoy," until the ears of that prodigal must
sizzle with contrite penitence at the thought
of his unpardonable hookey from the home
plate.
Yes, we can understand these, things. But
there is one thing that is absolutely beyond
our humble ken. That is, why merchants,
upon whose shelves rests the most sterling
quality of merchandise that can be obtained,
foodstuffs that are offered at the lowest
prices consistent with such high quality, re-
frain from giving prospective buyers the op-
portunity of knowing about their wares?
It is an axiom among concerns of national
prominence that, aside from news and edi-
torials, the most potent molder of opinion is
newspaper advertising. Just recently a well-
known tobacco firm subsscribeci for advertis-
ing in 1900 newspapers. They admitted that
newspaper advertising was producing favor-
able results or they should hardly have un-
dertaken such a financial outlay at this time.
Automobile manufacturers are spending
millions of dollars for advertising. And so it
goes, on down the line. The automotive, tire
and gas industries are keeping in the van in
newspaper advertising. They must find a
market for their wares, or they certainly
would not continue to expend vast sums for
newspaper advertising.
Newspaper advertising is reasonably priced.
Though a firm spends thousands of dollars
this way, the returns well merit the expendi-
ture. The Star is willing at all times to assist
Port St. Joe merchants with their advertising
problems and has a morgue of cuts that will
fit all merchandise and special sales.
A light hidden under a lshel never guided
a wayfarer to the threshold of his native
hearth.

MAGIC OF PAYROLLS
''his is an expression of magical power and
a favorite slogan for a newspaper on which
to build a city. The expression means a great
deal for the community when coupled with
the aspiration to be a home newspaper.
-lmow can a citizen or even a modest local
newspaper like The Star do more than to
aspire to this ideal on which to build the conm-
munity? It means a great deal to help build
a city on payroll or industrial lines.
A regular weekly salary brings cheer and
stability to the family and the individual
drawing it regularly. Nothing brings that
little touch of pride to man, woman or young
person that goes with the regular pay check.
The Star desires to help build Port St. Joe
on these lines of consistent encouragement
of payrolls.
What gives a greater sense of pleasure to
a city and its population than consistent en-
couragement of payrolls?

The observance of the 100th anniversary
of the adoption of Florida's first state consti-
tution in old St. Joseph, which will be held
in this city-December 7 to 10 next, will af-
ford an opportunity for a "get-together" of
descendants of the planters of northern Flor-
ida, southwestern Georgia and southeastern
Alabama, who made the old city of St. Joe
the largest and gayest resort on the Gulf
coast and one of the chief ports on the Amer-
ican waterfront a century ago.


Stardust and

Moonshine


By The Other Fellow


"Who dares most, learns most,
is true and is not to be modified
by regrets," writes a reader, ap-
parently in resentment at some-
thing I put into this column. .
"Strong people do not regret; they
learn and move forward. They
know that regret for what has al-
ready happened is time lost. They
may regret what- they have NOT
done, but they seldom regret what
they HAVE done. And that is rea-
sonable, for what has not been
accomplished may still be possible
in tre future." The let-
ter was unsigned .. I do not
usually print unsigned communni-
cations, but after reading this mis-
sive it revived a waning hope
within my humble soul-I have
always wanted to play the bas-
soon in a minstrel parade.

While attending the new Port
theater the other evening, the en-
tire feature picture was ruined by
a couple sitting back of me who
kept up a steady line of chatter
throughout the show.
There may be a worser pest in
Ihd world than the man, woman
or child who persists in talking
1loiid in the iheaiter, but it has
not yet been discovered.
"What's he going to do now.
mother?" is the typical nerve-
getter of the infant .. and this
Sba;d enough. But the adult, or
semi-adult, who persists in chat-
tering behind your back or one
row in front, is worse than the


listen to the voices emanating
from the screen, rather than those
coming from peanut- munching
gabblers in the rear.

And while on the subject of
movies a young woman
once told me of a picture she had
seen. "It was positively
thrilling," she. gurgled. "It was
all about polo, you know, and in
the ninth inning the hero got the
ba'l, ran 95 yards straight down
'the diamond-hitting it all the
time with his caddy-and drove it
straight through the chukker into
the cup for a birdie before the bell
ended the round."

SPECIAL TRAIN FOR
LEGION CONVENTION

State Commander Has Arranged
Transportation To California

William T. Comer, department
commander, Amerrcan Legion, fol-
lowing a conference in Jackson-
ville with A. Rice King, transpor-
tation officer for the department,
has announced plans for a special
train for Florida members of the
American Legion and its Auxiliary
to the 20th national, convention at
Los Angeles, Calif., September 18
to 22 next.
The train, operated annually for
the Florida delegation to national
conventions and known as the "Or-
ange Horse Special," will start
froln Jacksonville at 7 p. m., Sep-
tenmber 13.
The trip to the coast will be
made via tile scenic central route.
with stopovers at St. Louis, Den-
ver, Salt Lake City, San Francisco
Iild San ta Barbara, with arrival
at Los Angeles 4:40 p. in., Sunday,
September 18.
The special will leave Los An-


-uperlative of bad. geles at 5 p. m., September 22, ar-
"So I told him he couldn't come driving in Jacksonville September
around tonight, Grace. And what 26. A stopover will be made at the
do you think he said ." and so Grand Canyon on September 23,
on, until the comedy is finished and the following morning will be
and the feature picture half spent at El Paso, Texas, with
shown. Then, if IucK is with one, members availing themselves of
the chattering, giggling, unthink- the opportunity for a short trip
ing, selfish and assinine pair arise into Mexico.
and pursue the uneven tenor of It is expected the Florida dele-
their useless ways. gation will exceed 150, including
True, one can excuse the theater- three musical organizations. The
talker in a way, by remembering trip will be open to non-members
that he or she has probably been who are vouched for by members
reared in an atmosphere where of the Legion.
the niceties of thinking about an- i:'
other's pleasure rather than our The French monarchy began to
own, are not present. I give way to the first French re-
admit that the talker is ignorant, public in 1791.
thoughtless and has an insane de- -
sire to talk for the benefit of lis- Botanists of Baden, Germany,
telers who do not want to listen have succeeded in growing to-
but have to. bacco that is devoid of nicotine.
However, in spite of these ex-
cuses, I would like to muzzle the i A good junk man can pick up a
movie-talker annd settle down to living most anywhere.


THE HORNETS' NEST


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1928


PAGE TWO







PAGE THREE


DA ~ AUGUST 1938 THE STAR PORT ST JOE, L


,,~ i.Ir
PROGHE$SII'E --;i"P M"I--N
S~~~ 1~~d
~ ~ >e
~~ '~ -.


- -- -au~sr~ -. ~8rai --- -


saturday, Aug. 13

2:00 P. M.

ON THE STAGE
of the


New Port Tileater

ILL TURNER, Auctoneer













THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
One Suitcase for White Bidders
Ladies' Dress for Colored Bidders
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store

SBayshore Grocery & Market
AND MARKET
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ONE $1.00 TRADE COUPON
ONE $1.00 TRADE COUPON
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store

C TVER [L k 'A.'s:.'- ilANY
TH-ESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ONE $l0O TRADE COUPON
C,..i $109 TRADE COUPON
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store

,BARGAIN "IRNITURE CO.
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ONE NICE CARD TABLE
ONE PORCH ROCKER
Come in and Pay Your Past Due Accounts
and Get Your "Lucky Bucks"
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store

Gulf Hardware & Supply Co.
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
One Tempered Steel Casting Rod
29-Piece Set Vitrock China for Colored
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store


ow7


:l ~ K


THEY ARE WORTH
"BUCKS" 'TO YOU!


S C


Srr IP"FF IIV7 T f
ST, J~E HARD, W ARE CO.
F';hig Taide -- Guns Ammunition
.ARE. OUR AUCTION ITEMS
One $3.00 Bridge Set
One Electric Table Lamp for: Colored
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store


CITY SE'1V- E GARAGE
G. H. Wimberly, Prop.
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ONE (' C : "ER FOR REPAIR WORK
ONE $5 ORDER FOR REPAIR WORK
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store


S J. L ER'
Jewelry -- Watch Repairing
T7 r.:: -., l OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ONE FOUN,'TAIN "-N SET
Persons over 1C years of age can exchange
th- rd for 5 "Bncks;" at this store



THESE-. ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS

A BEAUTIFUL FLOOR LAMP

Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store 1

UNION MERCANTILE CO.
C. W. WILLIAMS. Prop.
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
$1.50 In Groceries
$1.00 In Groceries for Colored Bidders
TRADE HERE AND GET YOUR "BUCKS"
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store


PLAN NOW TO PARTICIPATE
o Tell everyone you meet of the big community
event and start today to save your "Port St. Joe
Lucky Bucks." The merchants whose ad-
vertising appears below are joining to make this
a real profitable event for all customers in this
trading area.
G Ask for your "Bucks" at each store and then
on the day of the big auction at the Port Theater
you can use them to bid upon the merchandise
each n-;iehaniit ofics. Ti vi te-- S!-be
just like any olterb auction sale except that all
you cci; asf Ior money is your "Lucky Bucks."
All merchandise is new and seasonable-
irticles you want and can use.


i '277
,;,, AL 8 e


HAUrp'SE EPT STORE

THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ONE EXTRA FINE TRUNK
ONE SUITCASE for Colored Bidders
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
thief ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store


SFRAN'S SANDWICH SHOP
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
COUPON GOOD FOR $2.50 IN TRADE
COUPON GOOD FOR $1.CO IN TRADE
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store


k:'S iCASHi & CARRY
.-..-. ARE CUR AUCTION ITEMS
$2.00 Basket of Groceries
24-1b. Sack cf Flour for Celored Bidders
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store

L-2I R IADY'S PHARMACY

THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
Box Ccty's Face Powder
Jar Face Cream for Colored Bidders
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at this store

THE STAR *
"Your Home-Town Newspaper"
THESE ARE OUR AUCTION ITEMS
ORDER FOR 500 LETTERHEADS
ORDER FOR 500 ENVELOPES
100 VISITING CARDS for Colored Bidders
Persons over 18 years of age can exchange
this ad for 5 "Bucks" at The Star office


I G 1-. -.. --- -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORMAA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1938


'--^S"^--"^?!^;~ k~


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FF


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MRS. FARMER ENTERTAINS Mr. and Mrs. H. Hauser and Mr.
WEDNESDAY CLUB and Mrs. S. Sternberg of Chicago
Mrs. P. J. Farmer was hostess returned to their home last Friday
to members of the Wednesday "f'ri a several weeks' visit in
club at her home in Oak Ridge Marianna, Panama City and Port


METHODIST MISSIONARY
AUXILIARIES MEET
The Susannah Wesley Circle
and the -larie Jones Circle of the
Methodist Missionary Society held
their regular meeting of the month
at the church .Mo;cay atternooin,
with Mrs. \V. E. Boyd :.. ii,,
Teln men:lcbers of the tusannah
We'sley Circle and eighiL members
of the AMarie Joness Circle were
present.
Farnishiing of the new parson-
age was the business of thre meet-
ing. Detailed accoiints were given
of purchases made, articles do-
nated and money given. A pantry
shower was planned. donations
from the Marie Jones Circle to be
carried to the home of Mrs. Chas.
Brown, and donations for the Su-
sannah Wesley Circle to be car-
ried to thire home of 'Mrs. R. R.
Hodges for delivery at the parson-
age Tuesday morning.
Date for the silver tea-reception
was set for the afternoon and eve-
ning of Thursday, august 11. The
secretary was instructed to send
invitations to the ministers and
congregations of all churches of
the city and to sile Methodi,st
church in Wewahitchka.
Program for the afternoon was
as -follows: -"T'ihe -Old Lugged
Cross," duet by Mrs. C.-E. Boyer
and Mrs. Roy Gibson; poems by
Mrs. Boyd; interesting and inspir-
ing talks were given by Mrs. Boyd
on "Landscaping and Investments
In the Terms of Hearts and


Souls" and Mrs. G. A. Patton on
"Appreciation of the Chinese for
the Christian Missionary Efforts."
On Monday, August 8. the Su-
sannah Wesley Circle will meet
with Mrs. George Patton and the
Marie Jones Circle will meet with
iMrs. B. H. Smith.

ATTEND ASSOCIATIONAL
MEETING IN WEWAHITCHKA
Mesdames C. G. Costin, W. C.
Pridgeon, L. W. Owens, Lupo, W.
J. Daughtry, H. Smith, Dukes, J.
O, Baggett, E. C. Cason, A. Mont-
gomery, D. Lewis, J. W. Sisemore,
W. E. Grogan and visitors. Mrs.
East and Miss East of New Or-
leans, attended the Baptist Sum-
ner Associational meeting held
in Wewahitchka Monday after-
noonl,

Votie Gibson is invited to have
a free ice cream sundae at the
LeHardy Pharmacy.

Mrs. Nora Howard returned
home Saturday, having spent the
past three weeks visiting points
in North Carolina.

'. _. ...* 1... .. .. .... .


WOOD FIBER


FLOWERS

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS,
FOR CORSAGES
They Look Natural and Last
for Months
Priced at 25c, 50c, $75c and $1.00


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Services are held in ithe Ma-
sonic hall, over the pDotofficie.
Snnldayi: School, 10 a. il. every
Sunday.
Preaclhing services 11:00 a. m.
every Sunday.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Sunday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting.. W'ednPsda eve-
'iii'g at 7:30 o'clock.
--r-;--
FIRST METHODIST
lerv. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Suniidys. 11 a. in. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:-13 a. m. each


Sunday.
W.. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
nm.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning 'worship 11 a. im.
B. T. U. 7 p. im.
E "eninlg worship S' p. m.
W. AM. U.. Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
S p. n:.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
,i p. m.

MISS MOLLY JEAN KELLY
HONORS MISS TINA MARKS
Honoring Miss Tina Marks of
Apalachicola last Friday night.
Miss Mol;y Jean Kelly entertained
a number of friends at a "Bingo"
party at th6 home of her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Kelly, on
Seventh street.
A color scheme of pink and
green was carried out in the dec-
n' jions and favors for the guests.
Games were enjoyed and prizes
were presented to Miss Margaret
Crockett. first prize, low to Miss
Onnie Lou LeHardy, and a dainty
pin to Miss Marks as guest prize.
Delicious refreshments w ere
served to the Misses Margaret
Crockett, Onnie Lou LeHardy,
BaRiiara Crockett, Lenora Johnson
and Tina Marks.

Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon is invited to
drop in at LeHardy's fountain for
a free ice cream sundae.

Mrs. Helen Alien and daughter
Peggy, Ear; Rollins and John
Espy of Gordon, Ala., were visit-
ing friends in the city Saturday.

Mrs. Charles Brown spent last
Thursday and Friday in Apalachi-
cola. While there Mrs .Brown was
co-hostess at a shower for Mrs.
Joseph Johnson. a recent bride.
*i f Sr
Mr. and Mrs. James Long and
daughter, Janice, have returned to
their home in Montgomery. Ala.
While in the city they were guests
of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Pinton.
Mrs. R. A. Costing is invite t
Mrs. R. A. Costin is invited to


have a free ice cream sundae at
MRS. W. S. SMITH LeHardy's Pharmacy.
Star Building Port St. Joe
Mr. and Mrs. J. Darcey and fam-
|IM lJlllllllIONIlllllll II|,i I ily motored, to Tuscaloosa Monday.


MRS. C. G. COSTIN HOSTESS
TO BAPTIST W. M. S.
Mrs. C. G. Costin was hostess
Monday afternoon at her home to
thie circles of the Baptist Mission-
nry Society. with Mrs.. J. O. Bag-
getl presiding.


The meeting was opeleud witii
the reading of Matilhew 5, followed
with prayer by Mrs. I)aughtry. Ite-
ports were given by the various
committees as follows: Treasury
repoort, Galden Jubilee. Bible chap-
ter, stewardship, young people.
missionary study. A short busi-
ness session followed, disposing of
old business and taking up new
matters. A nonitnaiinig committee
was appointed for election of new
officers. Motion was made ana
carried that the social hour be
omitted from the circle hour. Mrs.
Hattie Smith gave an interesting
report on the sumlner a.ssocia-
tional meeting held August 1 in
Wewahitchka. after which the
meeting was dismissed with the
"Mizpah."
Circle 1 will meet next Monday
with Mrs. 0. M. Pow'eli, and Circle
2 with Mrs. E. C. Cason.

BAPTIST GIRLS'
AUXILIARY MEETS
The regular meeting of the
Girls' Auxiliary to the Baptist
church was held last Friday after-
noon at the home of Mrs. J. 0.
Baggett with the following pro-
gram.:
Song. "I Gave My Life for
Thee." followed by reading of the
scripture, Matthew 5:1-12, by Mrs.
E. C. Cason: prayer by Mrs. Bag-
gett. A short business session was
held, after which verses of scrip-
ture were repeated in unison. Re-
ports of comrmittee.s were then
given. Roll was called and the
iumin.ess meeting dismissed with
sentence prayers.
A delightful social hour was en-
joyed after which the hostess
served refreshments of iced lem-
onade and doughnuts to members
and visitors present.

LEGION AUXILIARY TO
MEET IN NEW HOME
A meeting of the American Le-
gion Auxi'iary with Mrs. C. Asbell
of Blountstown, vice-president of
the Third District presiding, will
be held in the new Legion hone
this afternoon at 3 o'clock. Al
members are urged to be present.
The meeting will be a business
and social session combined.

MISS JULIETTE DARCEY
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Miss Juliette Darcey celebrated
her twelfth birthday Monday with
a party at the home of her par-
ents on Hunter 'Circle. A number
of her friends enjoyed a delightful
hour of games with rher, after
which dainty refreshments were
served.

Mris. Philip Lovett is invited to
have a free ice cream sundae at
Le.Hardy's Pharmacy.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. II. P. Money an-
nounce th'e arrival of twin daugh-
ters at Lisenby hospital, Panama
City.

Mr. and Mrs. George Winchester
and little son were week-end visi-
tors in Tallahassee.

Mrs. Susan Taunton has re-
turned to her home in Panama
City after spending the past week
in Port St. Joe, the guest of her
sons, C. C. and W. C. Taunton.

Miss Jennie Savage of Pied-
mont, Ala., arrived Monday from
St. Andrews and is staying at
the home of Rev. and Mrs. H, F.
Beaty.


this week. Vases of zinnias at-
tractively decorated the living
room where games and contests
were enjoyed, after which prizes
were presented to Mrs. D. C.
Smith, Mrs. Erie Hickey and Mrs.
W. Al. Howell.
Refreshments of cake, cookies
:aUl iluich were served to Mes-


(daini s Erie Hickey, D. C. Smith,l
W. M. Howell, J. Spivey and B.
Bragg.
The club was entertained last
,weeke by Mirs. D. C. Smith. Camres
and contests and sewing was en-
joyed. Prizes were presented to
Mrs. Graves. Mrs. Howell and
Mrs. Hickey. Refreshments were
served to Mesdanies Robert aley,
W. S. Smith, B. il. Graves, Erie
IHickey, J. Spivey, W. M. Howell
and Miss Katherine Hickey.

J. Beloglovsky of Monterey,
Mexico, is the guest this week of
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider.

Miss Kathleen Saunders left
last Sunday for St. Augustine to
visit friends and relatives for sev-
eral weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. D. G. McPherson
and children, Hugh and Bobbie
Lou, spent Wednesday in Quincy.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nedley,
Miss Madeline Rocco and "Red"
Anderson of Apalachicola were
visiting in the city yesterday.

Miss Betty Wright and mother,
of Apalachicola. were in the city
yesterday on business.

Miss Malzie Waters left Mon-
day for a two weeks' visit with
her brothers in Midland City, Ala.


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
I'uresdays of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
ors vwho are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.

American Legion Meets first
\Ionday in month at club house.

Legion Auxiliary Ne'ets first
\Monday in month at club house.

Woman's Club meeting First
Ind third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
I'ort Inn parlor.
---- :-k- -
Mayor J. L. Sharit, Mr. and Mrs.
B. W. Eells, Dr. Bell, Mrs. Robert
Tapper, Dr. Gonzafes, Miss Enid
Mathison, Mr. ana Mrs. T. Owens.
Rev. D'. E. Marietta. Rev. H. F.
Beaty, E. C. Lewis, P. C. VanHorn
and Prof. D. G. McPherson at-
tended the meeting held in Wewa-
hitchka Tuesday on behalf of the
continuation of the health unit in
Gulf county.

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Delhigh of
Cleverand. Ohio, have returned to
their home after' spending thie win-
t'er in Port St. Joe.

Miss Maude Mahan of Whitville,
WV. Va., will arrive today to be the
guest of Mrs. Del Mahon for sev-
eral days.

Fred Maddox has a free ice
cream sundae awaiting him at Le-
Hardy's Pharmacy.

Mrs. Sammie Davis and son.
Carlyle, and O. M. Morton spent
Tuesday in Panama City on busi-
ness.

Mr. and Mrs. Y. Wages and Mrs.
Philip Lovett spent Tuesday in
Panama City on business.

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith, Ger-
aldine and Louise Smith were vis,
iting Saturday in Apalachico:a.


St. Joe.

Mr. and Mrs. Elgin Bayless and
ronsi, Elgin, Jr., and Tommie, of
Tallahassee arrived in this .city
Saturday. Mr. Bay:l'es returned to
the capital Sunday, and Mrs. Bay-
loss and sons will remain for a
visit of several weeks with her
mother. Mrs. Nora Howard.



THE NEW
THE NEW


- A Martin and Martin -



T HATE
BILL TURNER, Mgr.

SATURDAY ONLY

August 6


GENE AUTRY

"The Singing Cowboy" in








In The Sky"




SUNDAY-MONDAY

August 7 and 8

DIRECT TO YOU
FROM ITS es.O0
[ TWO-A-D AY RU".S!
i '- G':'eca if-e'ican
-. 20 ,,C .- .
20Ct Century-F'o% cressents
DA-R I.YL F. ZANUCK'S
superb production of
f K.


: .
:h
7 '-'7." 7:POWER
S ALICE FA YE
DON AMECHE
-* LICE BRADY
i ,and cast oj tho,,.sama',
S* ':. *


'C
(5 "


"SEE IT!"

says

Bill Turner .


TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY

August 9 and 10




-- with


LEO CARRILLO




THURSDAY-August 11



"Good-Bye



Broadway"

-- with -


ALICE BRADY

Tl^ ^h'W pi'i'i'^ iis ^ ,,!!ii; ii


PAGE FOUR



THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1938








FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


c.Three Girls and Three Hats


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NEW YORK-Three little girls in three new hats inspired by the New York Worlds Fair 1931
Left to right: Babs Beckwith.in a yellow straw hat inspired by the Textile Building, Dana Jenny in
yellow straw hat inspired in its trimming by the gargoyles on the Mlines and M1etallnaurgy Buildin
and Celeste Gheen in a blue straw hat with the red ribbon in back inspired by the roof of the Te:.-
rile Building. The yellow is Aqualon yellow, one of the pastels launched by the Fair's fashion e
- rtment.
",rtment.


Q a


Schools Here To
Schos Here To Too Lateto Classify

Open August 29 By RUSSELL KAY


All Teachers Signed For Ensuing I want to tell you a little bit
Term; Expect Increase In about the legislative caucus held
Enrollment last week at Moon Lake (ardi.ns.
near Port Richey. in Pasco county.


Along with' other schools in the Legislators began p'ourni'g into
county, the Port St. Joe schools Tam pat on Friday ald were enter-
will open on August 29 for the. fall Lained by the Hillbhorough dele-
term. It is expected that there gation with a dinner in Ybor Cily.
will be a considerable increase in i e I,."L day tLb., gani .noluoed
enrollment this year due to the to Dade City where Pasco's Jo.n
steadily increasing population of Burks did a magnificent job of
the city and the fact that children main' folks feel at home. pro-
om the Overstreet and Beacon vided a delightful luncheon at the
Hill sections will be brought here hotel foltil-wnlg xhich tile pavty
by bus, the Overslreet scnoolhav-yovled on to Moon Lake for the
ing been consolidated with the lo- caucus and an evening dinner
cal school, lpa'y which closed the enjoyable
Teachers; signed for this term and interesting pre-session.
fn t'rvnrogrDr-ssson


for a sales tax at the last session.
and since he is a DuPont man.
many felt his entry in thie speak-
er's race was aimed at bettering
his position in lie malter of forc-
ing a sales tax it, tle coming ses-
sion.
At the caucus, however, Wood
openly pledged himself as opposed
o1 a sales tax and assured house
members that lie could be de-
pended upon to use his influence
against, rather than for it. during
the coming session, since the Mur-
phy Act has completely changed
the situation and the only answer
now seemed to ie a return to the
constitution and a complete re-
vision of the state's tax set-up.
I had a lot of fun with my can-
jid camera, geiling some good
shots of the legislators and their
ladies during the meeting-a f'ew
Shat are not !or publication and
decidedly "off the record"-but


D. M Pherson. principal; T. If the harmony, fellowship and nevertheless interesting and ad-
A. Owens. coach; Miss Erline Mc- good will shown at this meeting vantageous to have in one's pocket
Clellan. English; Miss Ruth Mer- is any indication, we can look for on a visit to Tallahassee during
ritt, commercial; Russell Cawthon, one of the most constructive. in- the session. Several: of the boys
language ; Mrs. Eula Pridgeon, V!ignit and busiinesss-like legis- have offered to buy them-but
home economics, Miss Julia I;tive sessions i1 lre tate's his- they're not for sale!
O'Qninn, science; ,'. J. O'Connell, tory when this group settles down, ,
sixth grade; Mrs. LeRoy Gainous, to business in Taliahassee next
fifth grade; Mrs. Hazel Ferrell spring.
and Iiss Louise Solomon, fourth The' selection of G. Pierce Wood Ij -,. ~ ie
grade; Mrs. Calla Perrit and as speaker of the next house, fol- (
Mrs. Helen A'len, third grade; lowing a spirited campaign with I
Miss Avaryee Collier and Miss several. able men see-ing the post, Seedbeds of perenn:ials w-hicch got
Juanita Gunn, second grade; Mrs. did not come as a surprise, since sh direct rays ovided ith sonm:
sun should be provid-ed witll sn:.=
Fena McPhaul and Mrs. Minnie one after another of his opponents neans ,. temnor:ary shade. A
-Iowsell, first grai;e: Dan Farmer, had withdrawn uiitii the actual cheese cloth. hun; 2 feet onver the
music. caucus found only LeRoy Collins bed by eancs ot poies and stlrmg,
Collin i:3 satisfactcry.
Mr. Farmer has been named as left in the race when the ballots _
band instructor foi; Gulf county were cast. Best way to assure a conltiiuous
and will teach three days each Both able mwen, both strongly sheet of bloom in your annual
week in Port St. Joe and two days supported, the opportunity was af- beds and ibrders, is to keep flow-
ers picked. "'(ost io-,crs will run
each week in Wewahiecnka. forded for a split in legislative ;e se ed. oan c 1n b o ni,iu, if
S. M. Overby has been named ranks with bitterness on one side iadsd blcssarn s ar neit snipped.
as janitor for the Port St. Joe or the other, regardless of who
schools. won. But to the everlasting credit Grass should not be cut shorter
-----t-------' of all, victors and losers alike, than 1l inches during 1he midsum-
mer heat--the tall blades shade ihe
OPERATORS OF MARBLE when the vote was announced all sor andkeep eaporaton's o ois
BOARDS LOSE AGAIN joined as one in pledging their Lure at a miniimunm.
Operators of marble games lost loyalty and support to the new
their third attempt in. the supreme speaker, and the humblentcas and Delphiniums will do better in a
court Monday to prevent, seizure appreciation of Wood's acceptance c, eedo d of their own. 'ine like a
of their boards on order of Gover- speech, coupled with the good
nor Fred P. Cone. sportsmanship and sincere con- Cu bears. cabbage cali
ni tCucumbers. cabbage, caulhnowor
Without comment, the court de- gratulations from Collins with a atdi marrows are particularly us-
nied an extraordinary petition for motion to make the choice unani- ceptible to insects. Keep the spray-
a rehearing of its decision holding i mous. gave an exhibition of har- kr handy to be rid of them.
the games night be operated con- money and good will that was
trary to the state's anti-slot ma- creditable indeed. If the window box becomes dull,
tiansp]ant into it a bloom or Lwo
chine law and thus -ould become Liberty county's Pierce Wood (rom the garden.
subject to seizure. !should make a splendid speaker. --
The court on July 8 held that He possesses all the necessary Mrs. L. H. Bartee and son, Ron-
sheriffs could seize the marble 'qualifications and is a square- aid Childers, were cal:'ed to Or-
boards if an operator was arrested shooting, level-headed chap, who land this week by the death of
at the same time for violating the is sincere in his desire to render Mrs. Bartee's sister.
statute against slot machines. A his state a real an. lasting serv- ------
first petition for rehearing was de- ice. Advertise that Special Sale. The
nied shortly afterwards. Because h'e worked and fought Star prints dodgers'and circulars.


jY MAEAD-ACHuE'5 MUST BE YOUR
)G OA M E A,,iD-A A .KEHE EL3 E1
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PAGE FIVE




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M-"


S There is a modern pleasant way to got relief from
StHearIdachei. Gas o! Stomach, ColIds, Iear:-
b burn, "I'oERniiiin ASfi'r" and Musculear Pains.
Just drop one or two ALKA-SELTZER tablets in-
to a glass of water. Watch it bubble-listen to it fizz.
As woon as tablet is dissolved, drink the tangy solution.




(Analgesic Alkalizing Effervescent Tablets)
You will really enjoy the taste-more like spring
water than like medicine.
S ALKA-SELTZER, when dissolved in water, con-
tains an analgesic. (Sodium Acetyl-Salicylate), which
relieves pain, while its alkalizing agents help to cor-
rect everyday ailments associated with hyperacidityo
Your druggist has ALKA-SELTZER. Get a 30c
or 60c package on our "satisfaction-or-money-back"
guarantee.


i zfs- L :--')": :'- :;'--i- -: .'2_= = t--. ,






THE PR0 PlET


Roger \V I )ahson, well-known buti-
ne-< :and economic forecaster, stated in an
1trticlc published at the beginning of this
year:


""We are not entering a major de-
pression; 1938 will see a resumption of
the upward trend which began in 1933.
The first quarter may be poor-much
worse than the early months of 1937;
but later in the year I look for a substan-
tial revival. Do not confuse this current
sharp recession with a major depression!
Payrolls, prices, stocks, real estate and
jobs should all be on their way up to new
highs by the end cf 1938."


To those of us who were looking
S backl on the last fe\\ months of last year, and
looking ahead to this year, those words
stunddcl at that time to be a super-abundance
o opitilnisll.
I lt n)\\w they sound like the words of
a prophet.
So more than orldinariy force is c()n-
tained in his syndicated column released this
\wee. -e suminmarizes:


'We may not, perhaps, reach new
highs this year, but readers can count
u i on a tremendous upsurge in coming
rronths. Merchants, manufacturers, bank-
ers, salesmen, workers a'ci investors
should capitalize on the huge upturn
which lies ahead. This is the time to get
started. Do not wait until after Labor
Day and miss five full weeks of real ac-
tivity. PLAN YOUR ADVERTISING
CAMPAIGNS NOW. Get your employes
and sales forces in shape. Forget hand-to-
mouth buying. Stock your shelves thor-
oughly. We are facing four or five
months of rushing business.
"Cash in on it!"



THE STAR

"Your Home-Town Newspaper" Port St. Joe, Fla.


I :


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E, A i d IO
L


"In Old Chicago" Is Vital


and Spectacular Film Epic

New Port Theater Brings Darryl Alice Brady is magnificent, giv-
Zanuck's Great Masterpiece To ing the finest performance of her
Screen In Absorbing Love Story brilliant dramaticc career as the
Hardworking and outspoken Molly
Framed By Historic Holocaust es fr x t
S()' Leary. Credits for excellent per-
formances could go oil through"
A superb screen spectacle. vwillh o
A sterb screen s tace wth the entire cast, even down to hlie
all the elements that go into the extras a
ia!'ingi of great e rinlent. ravaged streets.
wvil' Ire seen at tie Port theater Oire-ag it he t)'Leas. ys i
O ening with the O'Learys ii
Sunday and Mondayv when Darryll covered wago bound for C'i-
F. Zanuck's awesome "IIn Old
ChicF. Zan s sawe. cago. Pa O'Leary typifies the grinm
Chicago" is shown. i '
S' ohrov lyit of existence itn hose days
Up to now, Hollywood seemed
when he tries to outrace a new-
to have made the most of all of : n
f angled locomotive. Molly O'Leary
the classic struggles between man juries on te p ie, only a
buries him on the prairie, only a
annd the elements, but not since fm te c
the "Birth of a Nation" has such
longed so to see.
completely overwhelming grandeur longed so to see.
'iThe next morning Ma O'leary
graced a motion picture screen. Thris ext morning e sos i th
t e g u in t brings her three sons into this
That the grandeur in this pro- brawling, dy city of 154-
brawling, bawdy city of 1S54-
duction is derived from the relent- .
,a:nd }yI dint of a fancy ladly s mud-
less fury of an unrestrained holo- atted gwn, launches here
spattered gown, launches herself
caust which wiped out a Middle
upon a career as a laundress.
Western metropolis of a rougher T a crr as a lundr
S The boys grow up and Boh
and tougher era in our history, is T
S(Tom Brown) is married to a Ger-
only part of the film. The true ma grant girl (Jui Sto
man immigrant girl (Jun'e Storey).
beauty lies in the carefully manip- Jack O'Leary is a struggling at-
lte love soyJack O'Leary is a struggling at-
ulated love story.
he story lea t t tourney and Dion is making his
The story leacing up to the
Te s y i t f tirst inroads into politics.
burning of the city on the night firt inoa i to politics.
A political plot elects Jack
of October 9, 1871, is lusty, au- A polcal pot
thentic and powerful. O'Leary as reform mayor of Chi-
cago. The strange O'Leary tribe
Alice Faye takes the role in the
picture f te saurette iin alil fights tooth and nai: at times,and
picture of the soubrette ill a glit- I
tery. gaudy saloon of 171. She is the climax comes when Dion has
tery. gaudy saloon ol: 181. She is


the tempestuous sweetheart of the
saloon's owner.
Tyrone Power literally taker the
role oa Dion O'T.eary in his teeth
and runs away with it. Don
Ameche, as Jack O'Leary, the di-
rect antithesis of Dion, gives a
sincere performance as the re-
former and envisioner of a clean,
orderly, civic-minced Chicago.


ISHING--

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.

TROUT
BASS
BREAM


his ]bro:her, !)'erl'orlm the marriage
ceremony w h i c h makes Belle
Fawcett (hliss Faye) the ride of
Dionl. Mayor Jack learns that the
marriage was engineered by Dion
-:o i;lla B l]ie could not testify to
Dion's political chicanery.
A fight beginA here,' and, far
away in The Patch the cow kicks
over the :antern in th'e burn.
i en the screen flowers forth ill
the most terrifying beauty. Chi-
cago is wiped out before your
eyes to the accompaninient of
the most furious sounds and
scenes ever captured on celluloid.
The .final moment which shows
the indomitable O'Learys reunited
in the spirit of a regenerated Chi-
cago to come, is a scene that beg-
gars description.
"In Old Chicago" will be for
many years the standard by which
future screen dramas must be


measured.
BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable AUTOMOBILE TAGS
rates. Hotel ac-
commolations within the TO BE RED AND WHITE
me3ns of everyone.
SEE- All Counties To Retain Same
SDesignating Number

J 0. JI' S I loridas 1939 automobile license
tags will break away from the
SUMATRA, FLA. ,color motif which has been the
rule during the past few years.
S,~T, la.he new color design will be red
i SK A T Efi gSes o0 a white background. D.
C 5 1 A TE(0 lJ. Fi inle', motor vehicle conimis-
T sioner, announces.
for Health's Sake! Another change in the design of
the license tags will be placing
SSkat'ng is one o, the most
St and size of the letters used to
enjoyable and health-giving ,
enjoyable an healthgiving' identify tihe type o!' iotor vehicl'c
exercises that can be found. e 1 t o m vi
exercises that can be found for which the tag is issued. These
-- et ters will he considerably larger
COME OUT TO THE NEW than those previously usell and
SKATING RINK IN HIGH. will be placed between the desig-
SLAND VIEW AND HAVE A nation number and the license
MOST ENJOYABLE TIME! number, instead of before the
designating number, as has been
S--- tthe rule in past years.
BEGINNERS WELCOME! The designating numbers used
Son the 1939 tags will be th'e same
We Have Competent Instruc- ^; y ;
tors to Care for Those Just ,as used in 1938; that is, Dade
tots to Care for Those Just
county will have designating num-
Learning to Skate
ber 1, Duval county will have nunm-
bher 2, Hillsborough county. numn-
Ser 3, and all the remaining coun-
Bring the Kiddies Out and
ties wil: have the same numbers
Let Them Have a Good Time
as before.
SGulf county's designating num-
ber is 66, there being on'e county
W* y a min the state having less popula-
W illt am s' tion-but watch Gulf come up in
the scale when new numbers are

Skating R ink issued on population basis.
SC. WILLIA government is the only thing
C. C. WILLAMS, Prp.. nothat can get rich y y sticking its
..... ... .. nose into everybody's business.


I







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N

D(
it
pli

h(
P'

In
hil

id


SI


THE POCKETBOOK

o/ KNOWLEDGE pSs


', / .
-.


lHE SMALLEST
81RD IN CAPTIVIT, AN EMERALD HUMMING BIRP
MEASURES BUT ONE INCH IN LENGTH AND WEIGHS
LE5S TAN HALF AN OUNCE !....A..ASNERSON, OF
PUNFERMLINE, SCOTLAN,. OWNER, HAS TO FEEP THE
SIRP AMOST CONS ANTLy TO KEEP IT ALIVE!


New Series of Ads
117 i b t'.1i t. F
Qea~s ith Forest

Resources of Area

sponsored by Florida Power Cor-
por'ation; Theme Will Be In-
creasing Use As Against
Diminishing Supply

R. G. Porter. Jir., locall represen-
xiive of the Florida Power cor-
;)ration. yesterday explained the
purposes of an advertising pro-
ram begun by his company in
newspapers in this area. This se--
es of advertisements. which will
I'iear i Tile Star. deals with
orth Florida's forest resources.
When asked why the power cor-
oration plans to talk forestry in
s advertisements, Mr. Porter re-
lied: "We're a local company,
ringg this area and living' right
ere. Our future progress de-
ends on the future of this area.
today. signs point to there increas-
ng value of our forests as evi-
'nced lby the pull mills. 1-ous-
g programs are gonig to need a
i of tlimber-pairtic larly in Port
Joe. Science is producing .1",w
1--^^.. f"..,.. h ,r4th p Aodrl 1ni iis


GEOGRAPHICALLY
THE UNITEIP tATES
HAS ONLY 6% OF THE WORLD'S ACREAGE
ANP ONLY 7% OF ITS POPULATION,BUT.....
/THASMALF THE WORLD'f COMWM/NI/CAT/7V
FACILITIES ANPZ ECTRIC EERGY-A/P MORE
THAN A THIRD OF THE WORLOS' R4ILWAYS


SHARK MAY BE USEFUL
TO POULTRY PRODUCER
IN THE NEAR FUTURE

Oil From Liver Has Been Found
To Be Rich In Vitamin A

A pest of the briny deep may
prove to be useful to farriers and
poiltrymen of Florlda and other
states in the near future.
Oil from the liver of the shark,
the bane of commercial fishermen
who ply the waters off the coasts
of this state, has been found to be
a potent source of vitamin A, the
growth-promoting and anti-infec-
tive vitamin. Using several lots of
white leghorn chicks. L. L. Rusoff
annd Norman R. Mehrhof, state
experiment station workers at
Gainesville. have conducted 'ex-
periments which recently proved
that shark liver oil Is a very defi-
nie and powerful source of the
vitamin.
One lot of the chicks was fed a
basal ration deficient in vitamin
A; other lots were given rations
containing varying amounts of
shark liver oil, and another lot
was given a ration containing a
good grade of commercial cod
liver oil concentrate having at
least 3000 units of vitamin A per
gram.


uStes fo C uti uC lle. I rl "' 1
lL.f the res is only Chicks in the lot. fed the vita-
o01 th(e forests is only beginnin-.
Sin-deficient ration died before
ul( newspriti iiiti 1 rut the end of six weeks. At the end
south-they're even naiinlg ralyont
., O eight weeks, results as shown
stockings out of pine. Ihis in-weeks,resultsassh
creasing i the condition of the chicks fed
creasing use oa tihllerir is jnst
starling, and her'o in Norllthwestl '
Florida we have million of nclrs r;
of pines."
Mr. Porter sail ITN aIdvtert i'e- A L.
monts w.oulld erry interesting
iti"es about the utilization of for- '. Now Ready For
pI( resources Iby large concerns U-
as well as give salient facts relat- Port S
'i g lo greatll needed fire protec-
tion, disease control and stand im'- '; C OO IN G -
m'ovement. Th'e main theme of the ,' REFRIGERATION -
errieR will be the increasing use'
of timber as against a diminishing -----
spplly. He stated that "nmosi for- NO- Q EUIPME
-s't aiuliorities are daily sounding NO DEPOSIT
warnings against the dang-er from NO EP
fire. Look at those big fires in (lie JU-ST PAY FO
Pacific Northwest. Something like
that is happening right here in our g, a
forests all the time-and we let Inquire
it happen." Gulf Hardware Co.
In short, Mr. Porter summarized i PORT ST. JOE
the advertisements, saying that
they are going to point out that
the pines which were fuel yester- N OU L
day will, tomorrow, be working OUR GAS COMP
capital on which North Floridai
can grow
1:E~~lbsz~~i:


AS IVC E


Every House in

tL Joe

WATER HEATING
- HOUSE HEATING


ENT TO BUY
REQUIRED
R YOUR CAS

appliances ill stock ;3-
Ritz Theater Build
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


QUID GAS CO.
'ANY SINCE 1932


ing


:ii


-. ..i. ,. *
S. !
.'. . '
., .



or
Z4 n :.. l


", ..1 ;. '


I .IA ': NEVEP HAS
l HiS HEAP COMPLETELy
'SHAVEDo...
S. A LOCK, (CALLEPTHE "HOLYQUEuE")IWHICH
| CONSISTS OF EXACTLY /3 HA/RS IS LEFT
SON TOP OF THE HEA AS A "HANDLE"SO
THEY CAN BE EASILY AND QUICKLY
PULLED INTO HEAVEN WHEN -THEIR LIFE ON
THE OVERNMENT- THIS EARTH IS FINISHED/
VEST PER CAPITAL
WA5 $O 190 I900. ,
TRE GOVERNMENT
DEBT PER CAPITAL

IAv FS
/Vsy 08 :zy-/
I'S.4%' RO


shark liver oil and the chicks fed
cod liver oil rations indicated that
shark liver oil contained several
times the vitamin A potency of
the commercial cod liver oil.
These findings demonstrated
that shark liver o;; is a more eco-
nomical source of vitamin A than
commercial cod liver oil concen-
trates.
Experiments to test the value
of shark liver oil in the nutrition
*f dogs, swine and cattle are now
Ireing carried on by Rusoff and
other experiment station workers.
Few" people know it, but shark-
liver oil is being produced right.
here in Port St. Joe by 0. E. Hol
;ey, a local resident, who has been
averaging about two sharks daily.
In addition to tne oil secured
from the livers, Mr. Holley salts
down there skins and ships them to
a tanning company. There is also
a demand for the fins and teeth.



Why Not YOU, Too?
Enjoy a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's World-
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean. Our
CABINS are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP is
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated

B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA. FLA.





DA1'S GRILL

Under New

oManagcement'


We have reconditioned our
restaurant completely and in-
vite all our old friends as
well as new customers to
drop in and see us
--*-
We Specialize In
WESTERN AND NATIVE
STEAKS

Good Old-Fashioned
PIT BARBECUE
We Give Curb Service


PRICES REASONABLE

SCome In and Ask About Our
MEAL TICKETS



DAD'S GRILL
The Home of Cleanliness,
Courtesy and Service


wwomm~la"Monow


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY AUGUST 5 198


ts


- .






rI A TTOEP


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
We Specialize In One-Day
SERVICE


In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER



44














ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON' S

Dairy

Products


SOLOMON'S ICE CREAM
Richer Smoother
44




















Chocolate Milk

Greenspot Orangeade
Buttermilk

~---------- -- -

GULF VIEW

TAVERN
We Carry the Best Lines of
4 4
WINES and BEERS















Please Use No Profanity

W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent
Buttefor ilk
~GUI~ VIE
TAVERN
4 WeCarr th Bea Lins o




















Rooms or Ren


TO OPEN BRIDGE

ATBLOUNTSTOWN

ON LABOR DAY

LIONS CLUB IS PLANNING TO
SPONSOR EVENT; OPEN TO
TRAFFIC SEPTEMBER 1

The million-dollar bridge over
the Apalachicola river at Blounts-
town, now in its last stages of
construction, will be ready for
travel on September 1, says the
Blountstown Record, and if pres-
ent plans materialize, will be of-
ficially opened with pomp and
ceremony on Labor Day, Septem-
ber 5.
The Wisconsin Bridge & Iron
company, contractors f or the
structure, has notified the Calhoun
board of county commissioners
that the bridge will be completed
by September 1 and will be ready
for travel at that time. During
the next few weeks the state road
department will enter into an
agreement to take over operation
of the bridge as of September 1.
While the actual structure will
be ready for travel, the road from
the bridge to Blountstown will not
be ready for several months, de-
spite earlier assurances of the
state road department that the
highway would be completed to
Erbo by the time the bridge was
completed. Traffic, however, can
be routed over the old road being
used to reach the bridge from the
west side if the structure is
opened at the appointed time.
The B:ountstown Lions club has
tendered its services to the county
commissioners to handle all de-
tails incident to the bridge open-
ing ceremony on Labor Day. In
all probability, plans for the open-
ing will include a barbecue, a,
notable gathering of .state and na-
tional political leaders and other
features.
As this event occurs on a holi-
day, undoubtedly there will be a
considerable number of Port St.
Joe citizens participating in the
festivities.
-----^<------

Roosevelt Will

Visit Pensacola

Elaborate Welcome Planned; To
Arrive August 10 On De-
stroyer Houston

Elaborate plans are being made
by officials and citizens of Pensa-
cola to welcome President .Frank-
:in D. Roosevelt when he arrives
in that city August 10 aboard the
navy destroyer IHonuson.
The Houston will bring the
president directly to Pensacola
from his fishing trip in tie Soutn
Pacific, through the Panama Canal
and up the Gulf.
Although the president's stay in
Pensacola will be short, only an
hour or so, a parade will carry
him through the city and digni-
taries from all sections of the
state will be on hand to greet him.
A number of Port St. Joe resi-
dents are planning to be in the
neighboring city on that day.

As to what is going to happen
over in 1ETrope, your guess is as
good as the next one.
Send The Star to a friend.
Send The Star to a friend.


--------------- --------- -------

WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. WoHORTON
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


TUNG OIL IS Quincy To Stage

BOND BETWEEN Tobacco Festival

CHINA-FLORIDA under Auspices Junior Chamber


WAR CREATES INTEREST IN
STATE'S COMPARATIVELY
NEW INDUSTRY

It is a long cry from the blood-
drenched battle fields of China to
peace-blessed Florida, but there is
a bond between them which at the
moment is of vital interest-both
China and Florida are producers
of tung oil. now in such great de-
mand by American manufacturers
of paints, varnishes, linoleums
and other things In common use.
Hitherto China has been the
sole producer of tung oil in quan-
tity, and while Florida has been
interested and experimenting for
several years, the devastating war
now being waged in China, by
Japan, with a very probable cut-
ting down of China's tung oil pro-
duction and consequent widening
of the market for Florida's output
has caused an intensifying of Flor-
ida's interest in the compara-
tively new industry.
The Florida exhibits at Chicago.
Rockefeller Center and at Cleve-
land, during the past five years,
always have included displays of
tung trees, tung nuts, tung oil and
machinery for extracting the oil
from the nuts. Much literature on
the subject of tung culture has
been distributed to those inter-
ested in the development of what
it is hoped and believed by many
to be another great and profitable
industry for the state.
Steps are being taken by Gen-
eral Manager Brown, of Florida
National Exhibits, to have a dis-
play of tung oil processes at the
exhibit of Florida's resoumes and
attractions at the world's fair to
be held in New York next year.
In this Mr. Brown is having the
co-operation of the tung growers
and processors throughout those
sections of the state where tung
culture is being given particular
attention.
"It is our aim to give the widest
publicity to anything which may
be made to redound to the best
interests of the state," said Mr.
Brown. "The United States con-
sumes millions of gallons of tung
oil every year. If Florida can be
placed in position to supply that


demand rather than
from China, and the
hibit can be a factor
that condition about,


import it
Florida ex-
in bringing
we believe


we will have accomplished one of
our objects."

RELIEF ORGANIZATION IS
BEING FORMED IN STATE

State's Resources For Disaster
Relief Being Tabulated

Preparations are under way to
give Florida tire most efficient re-
lief organization in time of major
disaster the state has ever had.
A short time ago Governor Cone
was requested by the National
Red Cross headquarters in Wash-
ington to appoint a state co-ordi-
nator of Red Cross disaster relief.
Complying with this request, Gov-
ernor Cone appointed Arthur B.
Hale, chairman of the state road
department, to this position.
Under Hale's direction, a com-
plete inventory of all the state's
resources for disaster relief are
being tabulated and filed so that
they can be brougl0t into minmedi-
ate service in the event of an
emergency.
The first object of the new or-
ganization is to have the neces-
sary means immediately available
to prevent the great loss of life
which has attended seme of our
past disasters; the second is to
have a complete listing of all re-
sources at hand to prevent con-
fusion and duplication of efforts
when an emergency arises.


Of Commerce, August 24 to
27, Inclusive

Not content to sit back and per-
mit other Florida communities to
do all the entertaining, Quincy
plans to step into the limelight
this month with a gay Tobacco
Festival, conducted under the aus-
picess of the junior chamber of
commerce and the dates set for
the event are August 24 to 27, in-
clusive.
The new dioramas to be used in
the Florida exhibit at the New
York Word's Fair will be on dis-
play, and 100 booths will present
interesting exhibits of horticul-
tural, agricultural and industrial
resources.
A festival queen will be chosen
and a grand coronation ball will
be staged on the opening night,
which will be attended by Gover-
nor Cone and other officials. Golf
and tennis tournaments are to be
features, and negotiations are un-
der way to bring a unit of the
Ringling Barnum and Bailey cir-
cus to the city. Carnival rides and
shows are also being arranged for.
Quincy's new aviation field will
be dedicated during the festival,


- - T -- -- -

Let Us Service YOUR Car Today

For economical and efficient opera-
ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
service it with our modern equipment
WASHING--
--POLISHING-
-GREASING
~Texaco Products

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
Wilbur Wells Jesse Darcey






Give YOUR


Family a Home



In Beacon Hill

Subdivision
Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means. .


Lots $50 to $600

$10.00 DOWN AND $5.00 PER WEEK
WHY PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. .
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent.


LET US SHOW YOU!


INVESTIGATE!


COTTAGES FOR RENT




Beacon Hill


Development Company


BEACON HILL, FLA.


J. S. PATRICK


with naval planes from Pensacola
participating.


Professional Cards



William A. Young, R. A.
ARCHITECT
and Associates
PANAMA CITY FLA.



DR. I C. COE
DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Tuesday and Fridays

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
Moved Next to Costin's Store
Panama City Port St. Joe


- - - ---- -L 1 I l~e ~ ~~1


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN


FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1938


r


I


r


I


r. ;v-v --


61







A,


:"LUCKY BUCKS"

(Continued from Page 1)
which to bid for articles at the
auction sale Saturday, August 13.
It is expected that bidding will
run sky-high at the auction, and
nobody should be surprised if
they are forced to pay $10,000 for
the basket of groceries being of-
tered by the Port theater, a like
amount for the handsome floor
lamp being offered by the Cha-


Seek Persons Who W at I Most
anWhat Is Most

May Have Been In Practical Annual?


St. Joseph In 1838


Committee In Charge of Centen-
nial Celebration To Get In
Touch With Centenarians


vers-Fownand Furniture company, It has been recommended to
$5000 for the St. Joe Hardware's Chairman J. L. Sharit of the Cen-
beautiful bridge set, $5000 for the tennial celebration committee, who
card table offered by the Bargain has been conducting a search for
Furniture company, and similar authentic history of old St. Joe as
exorbitant sums for the other ar- a basis for historical pageants to
ticles listed above. be shown in connection with the
Preceding the auction sale, a observance of the 100th anniver-
free motion pictureshow will be sary of the adoption of the state's
presented in the theater, and first constitution, that he take
a cordial invitation is extended to steps to get in touch with some
everyone to be present, whether of the approximately 75 centen-
or not you plan to take part in arians now on the state's old age
the bidding. Attend the show and pension roll. some of whom are
stay for the fun that will result past 120 years and one who is
when Bill Turner begins auction- listed at 131 years of age.
ing off the articles. It is thought to be among the
It's not too la-te to begin collect- possibilities that some of them
ing "Lucky Bucks" for the big may have lived or visited in old
auction. Ask for them when you SIt. Joseph or be descendants of
make a purchase. Turn to page men who either had taken part in
three of this issue of The Star, the convention which met away
grab your scissors and get away back in 1838, or who were inter-
to a healthy start by clipping the ested in the politics of that day
ads and taking them around to the and had discussed the outstanding
stores participating in the event. happenings of that time with mem-
Do it now! Start collecting the bers of their families,,as well as
"Bucks" and add to the festivities friends and nrelgnbors, leaving
by participating in the auction and vivid impressions which might be
bidding against your neighbors of value to Mr. Sharit and his fe;-
and friends, low committeemen.
If some individual is discovered
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE who had lived in old St. Joseph
TO MEET THIS EVENING at the height of its fame, it is
suggested that he or she be
The regular meeting of the Port the
St. Joe Chamber of Conunmerce will durn t
celebration as an honored guest.
be held this evening in the Ma- satewde pu
In spite of the statewide pub-
sonic hall above tne postoffice. licity given the fact thatthe cen
All members, particularly com-tennial of the adoption of the
mittee chairmen, are urged to beon is to be
state's first constitution is to be
present. The entertainment com-
mittee aso hasentea surprise in store held in Port St. Joe next Decem-
mittee aso has a surprise in store r 7 to 10, only one descendant
fbe 7 to 10, only one descendant
for members..


CLASSIFIED ADS

LOTS and HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES AND VACANT LOTS
FOR SALE
TERMS-Small payment down for
both ready-built Houses or Lots
The small down payment will sur-
prise you-and your rent money
will pay for your Home

Buy where you get the breeze
from the Bay
Good Water Fine View
W. C. FOREHAND
"Highland View"
Postoffice Address: Box 182, Port
St. Joe, Fla. 8-12*
FOR RENT
'FOUROTTR 1OM COTTAGE at Can(


or the many delegates wno parltci-
pated in that epoch-marking event
has thus far made himself known.
Unfortunately, he has not been
able to furnish any facts which
might be added to the meager
store of firsthand knowledge of
either the convention or the fabu-
lous city in which it was held. His
great grandfather had been a dele-
gate to the constitutional conven-
tion and passed out of the picture
before the descendant in question
was born.
So far as can be learned, any
papers, letters. or other matters
relating to the convention were
either destroyed or so carefully
put away that they can't be found.

DESOTO IS POPULAR

The name Hernando DeSoto
takes on a new significance as all


vvukjuriv-nuuiv kjkji aL upe
San Bias. Reasonable. Address Florida plans to celebrate the
Box 22, Apalachicola, Fla. 19* 400th anniversary of the landing
of that famed explorer and Tampa
TYPEWRITERS will stage a Pan-American exposi-
FOR SLIGHTLY USED Royal tion in his honor. An enterprising
Typewriters and other office cocktail parlor has announced "De
supplies write E. H. WILKERSON, Soto Sling," while novelty manu-
Panama City, Fla. 9-19' facturers are getting out a!! ma_-
LOST ner of "DeSoto" trinkets to be of-
T' cc c, 1 .......;..... ,,,,, fered visitors during the exposi-
'3tJtOO hC, ouli ihi1JCII, U" Ca'1i


A UL-AS t.O, orn-r Lmme llllUo UonII IeaclI
near Beacon Hill Please return
to The Star office. Reward. tf


ROOMS FOR RENT


tion.
-----------MOST WOUNDED HERO DIES
MOST WOUNDED HERO DIES


IF YOU have a room for rent, Flanked by honor guards of his
why not place a classified adver- comrades in the Harvey Seeds
tisem'ent in The Star. The cost is drum corps of Miami, Wallace H.
low and returns are gratifying. Smith World War hero who held
Try it today. tf .mith, World War hero who he'd
-the record as the most wounded
MISCELLANEOUS American soldier in the war, was
laid to rest this week. Smith was
ASK for your "Lucky Bucks" when wounded 132 times. He died in
making your purcliases at any wounded 132 times. He died in
*of the stores whose advertisements Miami.
appear on page 3. --- -
IF Miss Kathleen Nedley will call Mr. and Mrs. G. Ortenbach of
at LeHardy's Pharmacy she will Memphis, Tenn., will arrive today
receive a free ice cream sundae, to spend some time with Mrs.
50 COPIES of the Progress Edi- Ortenbach's brother-in-law and sis-
tion are still available. The Star ter, Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Eells.
will mail them out at the rate of ----- --
two copies for 25c or one copy Cherubs of Assyria and the Old
for 1c. Send one to your rela- Testament were figures of winged
tives or friends-it will save you
writing a letter. The Star. bulls.


t
S, i


f j




Petunia
If the most practical annual is
the one which gives the most bloom
over the longest period of time, the
petunia must be given the laurel,
for it blooms from early summer
to killing frost.
Combining the three qualities,
display, cutting and season of
bloom, the zinnia is a winner, with
the marigold a close second. For
cutting alone, the aster wins. For
delicate colors, it is hard to beat
the poppy.
All gardens should have these an-
nuals, but there are others, too,
which should be included, and the
selection should result in a well-bal-
anced color scheme of flowers
which bloom throughout the-whole
season, with provision made for a
supply of cutting material.
Annual larkspurs are highly
recommended for cutting, but their
season is none too long; they are
also highly decorative. Other an-
nuals for cutting are salpiglossis
and the scabiosa or mourning bride.
Try a row of cultivated mustard
for greens; it is worth growing
even if it sounds like a weed. Lots
of leaf to it.

FLORIDA FARM INCOME
FOR JANUARY THROUGH
MAY SHOWS REDUCTION

Florida's farm income from the
sale of principal products and gov-
ernment payments for the first
five months of 1938 totalled $63,
510,000, according to a report by
the bureau of agricultural eco-
nomics in Washington to the state
agricultural extension service.
Farm income for the same pe-
riod, January through May. in
1937 was $83,452,000, or $20,000,-
000 higher than that for the 1938
period.
Of the 1938 total for the period,
$817,000 consisted of government
payments to farmers co-operating
in the agricultural conservation
program. Government payments
for the same period in 1937 came
to $1,070,000.
While total farm income for the
first five months of this year was
smaller than that for the same pe-
rIod in 1937, returns from Florida
livestock were greater, the bureau
report shows. Income from Flor-
ida livestock and livestock prod-
ucts totaled $7,484,000 in 1938, as
compared with a total of $6,509,-
000 during the first five months
of 1937.
Income from the sale of Flor-
ida crops in the first five months
of this year showed a drop of 820,-
000,000 from that of the corre-
sponding period in 1937. however.
The 1938 crops income was $55,-
209,000, while the 1937 income for
the period was $75,873,000. Most
of the 27 per cent decrease in crop
sales resulted from reduced in-
come from citrus, truck and pota-
toes.
For the nation as a whole, re-
ceipts from farm marketing' dur-
ing the first five months of 1938
were 11 per cent below receipts
for the same period in 1937. Gov-
ernment payments for the nation
during the first five months of
this year were $90,000,000 below
payments for the same period in
1937, totals for the respective
years being $212,000,000 and $302,-
000,000.
Receipts from crop sales in the
South Atlantic states from Janu-


ary through May this year were
20 per cent below those of the
same period last year.
-----*--C---
WASHINGTON SENATORS GET
APALACHICOLA BALL PLAYER

Jim Bloodworth, an Apalachi-
cola boy who broke into profes-
sional baseball with the Panama
City club, has been returned by
the C('h i t I,,,... Lookouts to the
Washington Senators. He is a sec-
ond baseman.

SINGERS CONVENTION
TO MEET AT BONIFAY
The West Florida Singers' Con-
vention will meet at Bonifay in
the court house tomorrow night
and Sunday, according to Brown
Carter, president of the organiza-
tion. Everyone interested is ex-
tended an invitation to attend.
--- -4- ~---
SEMINOLES TO DANCE
A public exhibition or the famed
Seminole Indian "Green Corn
Dance" will be scagea at the Or-
ange Bowl stadium at Miami Sep-
tember 15, it was announced this
week by Miami officials who have
arranged with t he Seminoles'
tribal chiefs for the event.

Mrs. D. Michaels of Chicago is
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Hauser.


It was not unti: 1840 that the
distance of a star, Alpha Centauri,
w.as first measured.


KEEP COOL!

You don't have to worr
when the mercury spurts u
-just drop in to


y
p


HACK'S SWEET


SHOP

(Next Dogr to Pete's Cash
and Carry)
FOR SOME


Ice Cream
0---

SANDWICHES
All Kinds of Ice Cold

SOFT DRINKS
---0--

HAROLD WILLIAMS, Prop.
(Lo-al high school boy, bet-
ter known as "Hack")
KARL L. HALL, Manager


-.-------------------







Sea Foods "S
WHOLESALE and RETAIL

We Carry a Wide Variety of Sea Foods

-- OYSTERS IN SEASON ---. .


E. L. ANDERSON FISH COMPANY
S12 Mile W. Port St. Joe On Panama City Highway





OLD SOL HAS HAD


HIS EYE ON US


What have we done that Old Sol should
eye us so mercilessly? They say sinners
will be burned with fire and brimstone, but
we have been taught punishment is to be
after death. Maybe we are being scorched
so we will avoid the fire.

OLD) SOL CAN SURELY \MAKE US




But Suppose He Should


Never Look Our Way

\\e can cool off, but we never could thaw
out. Which is better: To be hot part of
the time or be frozen solid all of the time?
While you figure that out we want to tell
you that for almost 12 years Old Sol has
been circling roundl this bank and has
never burned it out yet.

AND SAY, HI IS 'THE. SOURCE OF ALL
WEAL',H' IH




W ewahitch a State- Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation

4 Twelve Years Safe Banking Service (W
i3


- d .


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY.. AJLICST 5, 19--S