<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00194
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 15, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00194

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
AR the City of Port St. Joe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 15., 1938 NUMBER 39


CITY DADS PASS Construction of


ORDINANCE T 0

REGULATE MILK

OTHER MATTERS COME UP
AT COMMISSION MEET-
ING TUESDAY NIGHT

An ordinance providing for the
regulation of all dairies and milk
plants distributing milk in Port
St. Joe came up for final reading
at the meeting of the city com-
mission Tuesday night and was
passed to become law.
It provides for all phases of the
production and distribution of
milk and other dairy products and
specifically details how and what
dairymen shall do in order to in-
sure the purity of their product.
It also provides for the appoint-
ment of a city health officer to
see that the provisions of the or-
dinance are adhered to.
The ordinance will go into ef-
fect 30 days from date of passage.
which will be August 12, and all
dairymen and milk distributors
are requested to secure the neces-
sary information provided in the
ordinance at the city hall.
The ordinance providing for a
street tax of $2 to be paid by all
men between the ages of 21 and
45 who have resided in the city
for 30 days or more, was brought
up for its first reading Tuesday
night.
L. W. Owens appeared before
.the commission as a representa-
tive of thte chamber of commerce
port committee to ask about se-
curing a WPA grant for the open-
ing of First street to the caty
dock. Mr. Owens was assureqjy
the commissioners that they. werA
dfer -H '"r t-hi-pswu t- -Openi-.
the street and that probably work
would be started on it in the very
near future.
A public hearing was called by
the commission to be held at the
city hall on July 26 at 8 p. m. on
the proposed change in the official
zoning plan of the map of the'city
of Port St. Joe as established by
the city commission on August 16,
1937. At this time any persons de-
siring to present any matter for
or against thro h .os.nAd chance


Lumber Mill Is

Coming On Fast

Boarding House, Cottages, Mill
Buildings and Kilns Are Being
Rushed To Completion

The editor yesterday visited the
site of the Kenney Lumber com-
pany's new mill near Highland
View and was truly amazed at the
progress. made since announce-
ment was made the latter part of
May by Basil E. Kenney that the
miut would be moved to this city
from Blountstown.
A machine shop of considerable
size has been erected and part of
the machinery installed, the huge
mill building is well under way,
lacking only the siding before in-
stallation of the machinery; a 20-
room boarding house has been
built and is in use; 30 cottages
for colored workmen, the first of
125 such cottages, have been built;
10 four-room cottages are under-
way and 20 cottages for white
workmen .are planned in addition
to office and store buildings.
Two large brick dry kilns, 22 by
104 feet each, are also nearing
completion to be used for turning
out better grades of lumber.
A branch line from the A. N.
railroad runs to the mill site and
Mr. Kenney believes he has an
ideal set-up as far as shipping is
concerned, having noth rail and
water facilities available for handl-
ing lumber from the mill.
Mr. Kenney stated that when
the mill is completed and running
full time, approximately 400 men
will be employed, bringing an-
other large ayr.oll to thij ciY .

LEGION DANCES WILL
BE HELD ON FRIDAYS

H. B. Whitaker, chairman of the
dance committee for the American
Legion post, states that hereafter
the dances being given by the
post at Van's recreation club at
Beacon Hill for the benefit of -the
crippled children's fund will be
held on Friday nights, starting
J,..1. O0 AQ .. ,.m .1 Rl l T 5i n rmr ..* q


CENTENNIAL

COMMITTEES TO

MEET TUESDAY

TO DECIDE UPON DEFINITE
PROGRAM FOR DECEMBER
CELEBRATION

Chairmen of the various com-
mittees appointed for the Centen-
nial Celebration to be held here
December 7 to 10 commemorating
the 100th anniversary of the sign-
ing of Florida's first constitution
are called upon by General Chair-
man J. L. Sharit to lold a meet-
ing among themselves and decide
upon some definite program they
would like to see carried out and
meet next Tuesday, July 19, at
8:30 p. m. with him at the city
hall for the formation of a defi-
nite program in order that the
committees may begin wof.E
A copy of the tentative program
furnished by Earl Brown of Flor-
ida National Exhibits was sent to
all members of the various com-
mittees in order that they might
have the opportunity of discussing
and deciding whether or not this
program should be followed or
what should be eliminated or
added. The program as submitted
follows:
EDUCATION DAY
Wednesday, December 7
Guests of Honor-Boards of pub-
lic education, school faculties
and scholars from Gulf and ad-
joining counties.
10:P0 a. m.--F~ling of aerial sa-
lute, blowing of whistles mark-
ing opening of celebration.
10:30 a. m.-Grand opening of
-amusement zone featuring- rides
and shows of some-nationally-
known amusement organization
to be contracted with.
11:30 a. m.-Speed boat racing
and feats of daring at the wa-
terfront.
2:00 p. m.-Address by Hon. Colin
.English, state superintendent of
public Instruction; concert by
high school bands attending up-
on invitation.
2:30 p. m.-Centennial free circus.
A4:0 n. m -Pprsonallv conducted


City Will Apply For

FEA Hospital Grant
--


JACK GRIFFIN

CRUSHED WHEN

CARS COLLIDE

DIES IN PANAMA HOSPITAL;
WAS RIDING ON RUNNING
BOARD AT TIME

H. G. "Jack" Griffin, 27, of Al-
bany, Ga., died in a Panama City
hospital early Wednesday morning
as the result of injuries sus-
tained about 9:30 Wednesday ev.e-
ning when the roadster on which
he was riding the running board,
sideswiped one of C. W. Horton's
trucks on the highway about five
miles west of this city. The ;ower
part of his body was badly
mangled and he was rushed to a
Panama City hospital immediately
where he passed away about six
ourss later.
The young man was standing on
the running board of a car driven
by Gladys Musgrove of thi* city
when, meeting the truck, driven
by Clyde Balcolm, on a curve,
the Musgrove car raked the side
of the truck, crushing Griffin be-
tween the .two vehicles.
Miss Musgrove, Mrs. A. M. Jones
and Miss Helen Anderson, all of
Port St. Joe, were riding in the
car while Mr. Jones, Henry Brown
and Griffin were riding on the
back of the roadster. Griffin had
stepped to. the running board to
speak to the women when the ac-
cident occurred. None of the oc-
cupants of the car knew exactly
what happened. They had been on
a sailing party and were taking
'Miss Anderson to her home near
Beacon Hill.
An investigation into the death
of the young man is being con-
ducted by Sheriff Byrd Parker.
The body of Griffin was shipped
to the home of his parents,. Mr.
and Mrs. G. L. Griffin, in Albany.
where funeral, services were held
yesterday.


RESOLUTION PASSED BY COM-
MISSIONERS WILL FILL
LONG-FELT WANT IF IT
IS CARRIED THROUGH

The board of city commissioners
of Port St. Joe, at a recent meet-
ing, passed a resolution authoriz-
ing the city to file an application
with the Federal Emergency Ad,
ministration of Public Works for
a loan and grant to aid in financ-
ing construction of a hospital.
The resolution designated Mayor
J. L. Sharit and M. Ross Watson
to gather the necessary informa-
tion and data required by the
FEA in such applications.
Should this action go through,
and there seems no doubt but
what it will, a long-felt want in
this section will at last be filled.
At present, and in the past, any-
one requiring hospitalization has
been forced to go to Panama City,
Apalachicola or Marianna, and In
several instances the lack of hos-
pital facilities here has undoubt-
edly been the cause of death of
seriously ill or injured persons
who have been rushed by car to
adjoining cities to be placed in
hospitals. Had there been a hos-
pital here, precious minutes would
be saved in such cases-and these
extra minutes sometimes make
the difference between a winning
and losing battle with the Grim
Reaper.
If such a loan can be secured
.it will be for a long term of years
and will not place a great burden
on the city. In. the opinion-of
many it will be well worth the
time and trouble to secure $iuh an
institution.
------4-----

Ball Team ToPlay

Apalach Sunday

Sunday Afternoon.; Schedule Not
Yet Arranged To Suit
Local Club


ou aepsi Ene p1e IaVn*ges July U. AS usual, fL B -ail l armer. -- -
will be heard. orchestra will provide the music, tour through St. Joe paper mill. ----
The ordinance will establish a -- 7:30' p. m.-Centennial free circus. NUMBER NECESSARY The Port St. Joe baseball club,
new zone with a $1000 minimum STRUCK BY STINGAREE 8:45 p. m.--Pyrotechnic display
cost of residences in that section S K BY Sfeaturing aerial bombs, flares, FOR JOB INSURANCE which last week took over Talla-
of the city covering the area be- wandworks, set pieces and spe- BENEFITS IN STATE hassee's games in the inter-city
tween residence district A and the M. A.. Chandler, while gathering cial devices, closing with pre- league consistin- of Apalachicola,
park from the alley between crabs in the bay near the munici- sensation of battle of Monitor
Fifth and Sixth streets to Twen- pal dock Monday, stepped on a and lerrimac on the bay. Names Duplicated and Nicknames Carrabelle and Wakulla, will play
tieth street. stingaree and the fish struck his GOVERNOR'S DAY Used On Many Reports it's first game in Apalachicola
tleg just above hi snoe top, driv- Thursday, December 8 next Sunday. They were sched-
ing its barb completely through Thursday, December 8 ruled to play Wakulla here Wed-
CHAMBER COMMERCE his leg and scraping the bone. Mr. 10:00 a. m.-Firing of 19-gun sa- Job insurance benefits, which nesday of this week, but the visit-
WILL IMEET TONIGHT Chandler was treated by Dr. Nor- Iute heralding approach of Gov- will be paid in Florida starting ing team was unable to appear
"- ton. who burned out the wound ernor Fred P.'Cone, members o ext January, ae based upon the due to the short notice given.
With acid. the Centenninal commission and nex ualar ase lhe Manager Tom Owens says that
Members Urged To Be Present To _---- umeinbers of governor's cabinet individual earnings of the worker a new schedule of games is being
Discuss Important Matters BUILDING PERMITS and staff. during 1936, and all wage records drawn up for the league, as under
12:30 p. m.-Luncheon tendered kept by the unemployment com- the original set-up no games could
Te Port St. oe Chamberof governor Cone and guests of have been played on the home
Commerce will meet in regular The following building permits honor; Hon. J. L. Sharit. mayor sensation division are filed under Sundays and hedid
session at 8 o'clock this evening were issued this week by City of P'ort St. Joe. toastmaster the social security account num- not consider this as fair to local
at the Masonic hall. Clerk M. P. Tobilinson: (program to be broadcast if her of the worker, and. not his baseball fans. He anticipates be-
All members are urged to be Tom Parker, permit to remodel arrangements can be made). name ing able to announce the complete
present tonight, as a number of residence at corner of Seventh 1:::0 p. m.-Centennial trap shoot- smechedule next week, which will in-
important matters are fo be dis- street and Long avenue, $450. ing event. The necessity for this is found clude games here on Wednesdays
cussed. Harlow & Miller, permit for con- 2:30 p. m.-Centennial free circus. ,in the duplication of names and and Sundays. Mid-week games
----- struction of 5-room dwelling on 3:30 p. m.--Personally conducted the great number of reports con- away from home will be played on
Mrs. Del Manhon. Mrs. George Seventh street, $3500. tour of St. Joe paper mill. t Thursdays, as the other cities in
Gore and Mrs. Harry Saunders 4:30 p. m.-Speed boat races and airing only one name or a nic- the league have their half-holiday,
spent Tuesday in Panama City. Save by reading the ads! unusual feats at waterfront. name. on that day, while in Port St. Joe
,7:30 p. m.-Centennial free circus. Among the names turned in by the merchants close on Wednes-
S8:45 p. m.-Pyrotechnic display employers on their wage reports day afternoon.
True Story of Fanat .Cult over bay, closing with special -are trawerry, e,-- -
True Story of Fanatic Cult set piece of Florida state flag. are Strawberry, Blue, Red, Flat
SGuest bands to participate in Foot, Bobby the Cook, Dummy, OPEN NEW SUBDIVISION
In 'Lash of the Penitentes day's events. Fish Face, Alexander the Great. IN COLORED QUARTERS
UNITED STATES DAY and any number identified.only ny The Saint Joe Land & Develop-
"The Lash of the Penitentes," tion pictures, cost theliyes of two Guests Friday, December Doc, Bubber, Shorty and Smnoey- ment company this week opened
.ests ,of Honor-General Charles This indicates how important it an addition to the colored section
playing today only .at the Port men; a newspaper reporter, who P. Summerall, former cor- 'i in western part of the city.
:theater, will bring to our verjoined the cult in order to learn mander-in-chief United States is for the employer to Includein tewester number of whichity
Seee itssecrets and who wrote it as an Army, and naval officials from the worker's social security ac- I-hae fal eay been purchased, is
oiee foteistm th iseesnwowtI ncnIthave already been purchased, Is
own eyes, for the time, the eFort Barrancas and naval air count number in his -wage report, in the hands of the Wilson &
on eyes, for the first eye-witness, and a cabin boy who station at Pensacola; also the
tragic love story of a beautiful betrayed him. adjutant general of Forida, Na- for if there is no record of a KerReal Estate company, who
girl 'who, for the sake of the man Startling facts flagellation tional Guard officers and county worker's earnings during 1938 it also are handling all lots of the
she loved, ran the gauntlet of ... crucifixion authentic and officials of Florida. will be difficult, or almost impos- company in and about the city
sheov r t g crucifixion authentic and 11:00 a. m.--Naval parade andsible for him to establish his
shame; was cruelly punished by amazing unbelievable but 11 ial maneuvers psible for hi to establish his. PROTEST CIGARET TAX
being crucified and lashed. It is a true You have read about 12:30 p. m.-Luncheon tendered eligibility for benefits in 1939.
story of love, hate, passion and this cult .in "Time," "Liberty" and honored guests; Hon. Robert A. Protesting a proposed tax of one
intrigue. It is a spellbinding "The Literary Digest" Now you Gray, secretary of state,'speaker -UNION SERVICES AT PARK cent on each package of cigarets.
sce (program to be broadcast if ar- Sunday evening at 8 o'clock St. Petersburg merchants urged
screen exploitation of a bizarre will see the actual scenes taken rangements can be made). uon services. will be held at the city officials to avoid such a nuis
primitive people fantastic and on the spot of practices hidden 2:00 p. m.--Concert by Fort Bar- band starindi'Port Inn park. A since lpvv py placing a flat excise
unreal, but absolutely true. for years. rancas band. special song service, will be a fea- .tax of 10 cents on each utility me-
The actual scenes of the rites The picture is not recommended 2:30 p. m.--Centennia free circus ture. Everyone is urged to attend. ter and on all telephones. poir.Ang
f th f e picture isnod featuring star attractions from In'ase of inclement weather, the out that such a tax would raise
of this cult, photographed for the for children under 17, states Man- the big, circuses and stage. yices will be held in the Meth- an equal amount of money-rand be
first time in ,the history of mo- ager Bill Turner.-,. (Continued on Pagf 3) oZist church. .a burden on no one.








rUP ....
uA~~ i'n TE STR, ORTST.JOEFLOIDAFRIAY, ULY15,193


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......J2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.-~ Telephone 51 )*-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed .word remains.

FINANCING THE CENTENNIAL

The matter of financing the Centennial
Celebration to be held in Port St. Joe Decem-
ber 7 to 10, next, was the principal topic of
discussion at the celebration committee
meeting held Thursday night of last week.
A number of plans were put forward to
raise funds to finance the affair, and one or
two of them should prove of practical worth.
A few of the committeemen are urging that
everything be presented without cost to the
public, but in our opinion, and we have the
support of the majority of those making up
the various committees, such a plan would
not be feasible as cost of the tentative four-
day program as outlined would come to con-
siderably more than could possibly be raised,
and in that case there would be' nothing to
do but appoint a "begging committee" after
the celebration to visit each business man in
the city and ask .for donations.
It would be nice if we COULD present
everything without cost, but, as pointed out
above, it \-ouhld be impossible. Visitors com-
ing to the city will not object to paying small
admission fees to see the horse races, foot-
ball game, boxing exhibitions or any other
events that may be scheduled, and the pro-
gram as tentatively outlined will furnish a
great variety of free attractions that should
more than offset admissions charged for a
few of the events. But regardless of how the
centennial is financed, the residents of Port
St. Joe should not be compelled to bear the
expense of putting it on.
Let us get it through our heads right now
that this is NOT a Port St. Joe celebration,
but one that concerns the entire state of Flor-
ida. It is true that Port St. Joe will be the
focus of all eyes during the four days, and it
is true that the business men of this city
will reap any small profits that may result
from the celebration, but regardless of these
facts, the whole state should join in whole-
heartedly and do anything and everything
possible to make Florida's 100th birthday an
event of nationwide importance.

SOIL ADDING BILLIONS TO INCOME

Wheeler McMillen, president of the na-
tional farm chemurgic council, writing in the
Sunday American;,has this to say in regard
to solving the American farm problem:
By "farming for our factories" the Ameri-
can farm problem can be solved. More, such
a solution, raising agricultural income and
making farmers larger buyers of manufac-
tured goods, should correct our economic un-
balance. This seems our straightest road to-
ward prosperity for all of us.
Acreage reduction reduces jobs both on
farms and in cities.
Regaining fully our former world markets
seems a vain hope. Our Mississippi valley
cannot be, to its former full extent, the world
granary. Driven by "economic nationalism,"
Europe is plowing 50,000,000 more acres,
chiefly for'grain. Moreover, whereas we for-.
merly grew-and sold-three bales of cotton
for each two bales produced elsewhere, the
opening of new cotton lands has about re-
versed that ratio in recent years.
As for increasing our own consumption as


a nation, we can eat only about so much and
use only about so many clothes.
Yet the "way out" lies in producing more,
not less. "Chemurgy"-teamwork between
agriculture, science and industry-seeks to
bring about greater farm production, but not
merely for our tables or our backs.
To produce for new uses is the plan. To
teach farmers how to grow raw materials
for use in manufacturing. To help industry
work out new methods of using farm prod-
ucts-in many instances as substitutes for
materials now imported.
This will mean, literally, that vast new
wealth, running into the billions, can be
grown annually.
Among a number of new sources of income
developed by scientists, Mr. McMillen points
out that one of the greatest boons to the
South along this line is the method of manu-
facturing paper from southern pine.

A POPULATION PROPHECY

Our country's population, according to a
survey and forecast by the national resources
committee, is approaching its peak. Some 40
years hence, or about 1980, it will reach a
maximum of one hundred fifty-eight million,
at which number it will stand fairly stable
for a while, and then slowly decline. The pre-
diction assumes that the trends on which it
reckons are more or less permanent; that
the decrease in both the birth and the death
rate will continue and that there will be no
considerable change in immigration. Certain
factors now at work may bring us to the
crest as early as 1955, with a maximum of
only one hundred thirty-eight million, as
compared with one hundred twenty-seven
million, five hundred thousand estimated as
the total in 1935. In that case, a net loss of
ten million is expected for the ensuing 25
years.
The national resources committee, whose
report has just been transmitted to the presi-
dent, takes no gloomy view of its figures. In
the nature of things economic, the country's
growth in population could not continue the
pace which it kept from colonial days up to
the closing decades of the last century-a
pace almost unparalleled in the history of the
world. Since then the birth rate has steadily
decreased. But, says the committee, by way
of comment on the change from a growing
to a stationary population, "It may be, oi
the whole, beneficial rather than injurious to
the national life." For, "it insures the con-
tinuance of a favorable ratioof population to
natural resources in tile United States. Each
citizen of this country will continue to have,
on the average, a larger amount of arable
land, minerals and other natural resources at
his disposal than the citizen ol any of the
countries, of! the Old World. This supplies.
the material- basis for a high level of living,
if these resources are used wisely and if cul-
tural conditions are stimulating to initiative
and co-operative endeavor."
The concluding phrase is the most signifi-
cant of all. Whether the calculations of the
social scientists are borne out or upset by the
events of the oncoming decades, it is certain
that only a wise use of our natural resources
and a steady improvement of cultural con-
ditions can safeguard America's future.-At-
lanta Journal.

Kidnaping has become a regular "business"
in this country owing to lax law enforcement,
slow courts, appeals and technicalities.-Flor-
ida Times-Union. And the unscrupulous
lawyers who are out to get their share of the
ransom money.

Believe it or not, Florida built more good
roads with a two-cent gas tax than the state
is now building with a seven-cent tax.-Flor-
ida Times-Union. Sure, because all of the
gas tax money went for roads and not to
forty-seven other state departments.

"That Which Helps Port St. Joe Helps
You" is a mighty good slogan for the busi-
ness men of the city to adopt.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


Somehow or other there was a
note of sadness in the news that
'inglig .-Briothers -Barnum and
Bailey Circus-long called "The
Greatest Show. on Earth"-has
folded its big top and, gone to its
winter, quarters in Sarasota.
It is especially sad when we
think of the thousands of children
deprived of a fleeting one-day
thrill of watching the fun-making
clown, or the lien tamer, or the
man on the flying trapeze.
Then, too, there must be a
pretty sad outlook for the fam-
ilies of the 1600 employes who by
.striking put the circus out of busi-
ness and put themselves out of
jobs,

I have long he;d that all wealth
comes from the soil, and a listing
of farm products nsed, by just one
large manufacturer of automobiles
pointedly illustrates this.
For instance, 195,512 people are
required to grow merely the cot-
ton that is used for upholstery by
the company in a prosperous year.
As interesting as this fact is in
itself, it has more than curiosity
value. It is indicative of the way
in which manufacturers are con-
tinually finding uses for farm


and he was telling me of the hard
times.
"Isn't business rotten?" he said
to me.
"No, it's fine," I replied.
We stopped at LeHaidy's Phar-
macy. "Isn't business rotten?" he
asked. Adolph.' "No, business is
keeping up good," answered Mr.
LeHardy.
We .met two more business men
and he asked each one .whether
business wasn't rotten, and each
one .old him they had, nothing to
co ''in of.
Having s.pet most of the mporn-
ing trying to find someone to cry
with him, he finally called it a
day, :ent home and spent the af-
ternoon writing a letter to the edi-
'or showing g just why business
was going to the dogs.

WINCIHELL PREDICTS

It must be admitted that Wal-
ter Winchell, the columnist, gets
a good matnfy inside tips on what
's gong. to happen, particularly
in connec'tIen with increases in
the population. He now makes a
,umber of reductionsns, among
them that the Atlrarican birth rate
decline will reach'serious propor-
tions by 1945. '
He also thinks Iales will be
extinct in another 10 years. That
a WPA scandal in Pennsylvania
will soon make big headlines.
That Attorney General Cummings
will soon leave the cabinet. That
Jackie Coogan will win l is law-
suit against his mother and step-
father That doctors will -on


products, not only providing the insomnia.
farmer with new markets for hisp e n f inso Winchell
crops but with increased purchas- In the feign field in he
sees China fiiaaly winning in the
ing power to buy the products of b n f
war with Japan, but not for a
industry. I
industry couple of years. That if there is
Corn is now used by this auto- another world war, Mussolini and
mobile concern in adhesives, tex- Hitler will not be on the same
ti;e sizings, sand binding oil, side. That Anthony Eden will be
molded plastics, thinners and lac- secretary of the League of Na-
quers and alcohol. tions if the thing doesn't blow up
Sugar cane is used in insulating; altogether.
material and alcohol. Cornstalks Of course, he doesn't omit the
in fiber-board. Hogs for industrial ladies. He says that as a result of
soaps, special greases and oils. all the kidding their hats will be
and upholstery. Flax linseed more conservative next fall. But
oil for paints, soap and. foundry that their skirts will be a couple
core oil. Cotton in plastics, tires, of inches shorter.
upholstery, artificial leather, elec- He sees a lot of other things
'-ical insulation, lacquers, safety ahead, but these are sufficient to
glass and felt. Leather in ham- enable anyone interested, to check
mers, gaskets, belting, upholstery, up on his powers of prophesy.
21 poals and pump valves. -- -----
Truly, all wealth comes from The annual world production of
the soil, and the manufacturer si:ver fox pelts is estimated at
and the farmer are dependent one 800,000, and t he approximate
upon the other neither can value of each is $40.
prosper without the other. ---- ---
The Illinois conservation depart-
I was walking up the street the meant killed 150,000 crows in the
other day with a friend, of mine last year with dynamite bombs.


NE WS ITE M :-U.S.S.R. FACTORIES ORDERED
TO ADOPT AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL METHODS


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1938


PAGE TWO









Y JY 1


SHELDON NOT TO SEEK
HOUSE SPEAKERSHIP

Withdraws From Race. Narrowing
Field Down To Four

Raymond Sheldon, Tampa mem-
ber of the legislature and candi-
date for the speakership of the
next house, announced his inten-
tion this week to withdraw from
the race, narrowing the field to
four, G. Pierce Wood of Port St.
Joe, Liberty county representa-
tive; Robert F. Sikes, Crestview;
Noah B. Butt, Cocoa, and LeRoy
Collins, Tallahassee.
-----+r-----
LEGISLATORS TO MEET
A pre-session meeting of the
Florida legislature will be held
at Moon Lake Dude Ranch, nine
miles north of New Port Richey
in Pasco county, Saturday. July
23. An all-day conference will be
followed by a legislative banquet
that night.

COTTAGE FOR SALE
iOn Apalachicola Beach. All
furnished. Lot 100 ft. wide,
from beach to lagoon.
J. H. COOK, Apalachicola


WHEN YOU

FISH
-- STOP AT -

MIDWAY PARK
5 Miles North Wewahitchka
-o-
On the Famous Dead Lakes,
Center of Florida's Best
Fresh Water Fishing
-------

B. F. CROCKER,. Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.


SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT

The plant that furnishes
you ice the year 'round

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
Max Kilbourn, Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
From Treated Water










CREDIT

PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furnifure Store in
Gulf County



BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe\ Fla.
\14


OLD AGE ROLL IS


'Robin Hood' Most Elaborate


INCREASING A T Film Production of the Year


RATE 2 PER DAY

GROUP BETWEEN 70 AND 71
LEADS NUMERICALLY BY
SMALL MARGIN

Florida's old age assistance roll
of eligibles is increasing at the
rate of 765 per year, if tkie first-
year of the administration of the
state welfare board is to be taken
as a criterion.
According to figures just re-
leased, assistance was granted to
765 persons between the ages of
65 and 66 during the period be-
tween July, 1937, through June,
1938, or the first year of tire ten-
ure of the welfare board, created
by the 1937 legislature.
The statistics reveal also that
the 70-71 age group is in the nu-
merical lead with 1909, although
the 67-68 and 6S-69 .groups are
close up, the former with 1904 and
the latter with 1905.
Forty-eight persons more than
100 were carried over from the
previous administration, the oldest
of these laying claim to 131 years
and a possible All-America public
assistance age title.
The number added during the
year 'and the total now enrolled,
by age groups, follows:
Added Total
Ages Past Yr. Enrolled
65-66 ........ 765 ........ 765
66-67 ........ 1691 .......... 1691
67-68 ........ 1904 ......... 1904
68-69 ........ 1905 ....... 1905
69-70 ..... .. 1843 ......... 1843
70-71 ......... 1909 ........ 2543
71-72 ........ 1744 ........ 3028
72-73 ........ 1401 ........ 2568
73-74 ........ 995 ........ 1951
74-75 ........ 828 ........ 1758
75-76 ........ 814 ........ 1735
76-77 ........ 800 ........ 1732
77-78 ........ 657 .. ... .1412
78-79 ........ 537 ........ 1194
79-80 ........ : 459 ........ 933
80-81 ........ 376 ........ 852
81-82 ........ 336 ....... 730
82-83 ........ 282 ......... 689
83-84 ........ 226 ........ 503
84-85 ........ 209 ........ 487
85-86 ........ 216 ........ 441
86-87 ........ 265 ........ 434
87-88 ........ 312 ........ 473
88-89 ........ 88 ........ 209
89-90 ....... 38 ........ 96
90-95 ........ 92 .... .... 290
95-100 ........ 26 ........ 69
100-131 ...... 20 ........ 68
The exact ages of 65 recipients
more than 65 has not been deter-
mined, although their eligibility
was established.
(---
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.

CENTENNIAL COMMITTEES

(Continued from Page 1)
3:30 p. m.-Hair nour of speed
boat feats and races at water-
front.
4:30 p. m.-Personally conducted
tour of Port St. Joe paper mill
for guests of honor.
7:30 p. m.-Centennial free circus.
8:45 p. m.--Pyrotechnic display,
featuring military and naval set
pieces.
CONSTITUTION DAY
Saturday, December 10
Guests of Honor-State officials
and officials of the Daughters
of the American Revolution.
10:30 a. m.-Firing of aerial sa-
lutes; daylight fireworks.
11:00 a. m.-Aquatic sports, speed
boat races, etc., at waterfront.
12:30 p. m.-.Luncheon tendered
guests of honor by city govern-
ment of Port St. Joe; speakers,
state regent D. A. R. and attor-
ney general of Florida.
2:30 p. m.-Centennial free circus.
4:00 p. m.-Perssonally conducted
tour for guests of honor to Port
St. Joe paper mill.
7:30 p. m.-Centennial free circus.
8:45 p. m.-Pyrotechnic display on
the bay.
9:30 p. m.-Centennial Ball at the
Port Inn (tickets $1.50 couple).
The above program does not
provide for horse races, football
game, boxing or wrestling matches
and a number of other suggestions
put forth by various committee
irembers, but undoubtedly this
schedule will be followed with
minor changes, including the pre-
sentation of the pageant depicting
the history of St. Joe from 1838
to 1938.


Technicolor Film Has Huge Cast Headed By Errol Flynn,
Olivia DeHaviland and Basil Rathbone; Plays
At Port Theater Sunday and Monday


Of all the heroes of fact and fiction, there's none so beloved
or dashing as Robin Hood--the outlaw of Sherwood Forest.
Celebrated in song and story, in opera and in the silent movies,
Robin now appears in brand new guise in Warner Brothers'
Technicolor production, "The Adventures ,of Robin Hood,"
whichh plays Sunday and Monday
ai Ta v at the new Port theater.
BaIley Takes Over Errol Flynn, a veritable reincar-
ination of the legendary Robin,
ty Pressing plays the title role. Sharing hon-
y ors with him is the demurely
lovely Olivia deHaviland portray-
Will Be Managed by E. T. Prid- ing his lady-love, Maid Marian.
geon; Will Specialize In And they prove that medieval ro-
One-Day Service mance was even more thrilling
than the modern variety.
Frank Bailey, Jr., has taken Action and plenty of it is ram-
over the City Pressing Club andpant throughout-from the joust-
will operate it in future. The es- ing tournament at Nottingham
tablishment will be under the di- Castle-to the wedding of Robin
rect management of E. T. Prid- Hood and Maid Marian at the end.
geon. Fighting with bows and arrows,
Mr. Bailey states that he will
Mr. Bailey states that he will quarter staves,, pikes and, broad
specialize in one-day service, and swords, Robin Hood and his
in order to give prompt and effi Merry Men wage a constant war
cient service to the many custo- against the Norman forces. The
mers, new eqltpment of the climatic duel to the death between
latest manufacture will be in- Robin and Sir Guy of Gisbourne
stalled in the shop. (Basil Rathbone) is more thrilling
A telephone will also be in- than the duel these two. had, in
stalled in the very near future to "Captain Blood."
aid customers, "for," said Mr. Sherwood Forest, Nottingham
Bailey, "we call for and deliver, Castle and the countryside of
and a telephone will be a great medieval England are faithfully
aid in giving better and, quicker
service."

297,000 RADIOS IN STATE
TAMPA, July 15 (FNS)-A re- W e Are Now
cent survey made by Variety mag-
azine shows that 297.000 Florida. LI 1. 1


homes have radios today. Figuring
the population of the state at 1,-
670,000, there is -one -radio for
every six persons in' the state.

LIONS TO RAISE FUND
Lions clubs of Florida plan to
raise, a $10,000 agricultural schol-
arship fund, it was announced this
week by Joe Tarantino, Lion dis-
trict governor.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
-__ z __


Mr. and Mrs. Pruitt Tatum of
Abeta Springs, La., were business
callers in the city Friday.


reproduced in vast sets, breath-
taking in their beauty and opu-
lence.
A superb musical score weaves

a magical background of sound for
the gorgeous Technicolor scenes.
'--------r-"--------
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.


KEEP COOL!

You don't have to worry
when the mercury spurts up
-just drop in to


HACK'S SWEET


SHOP
(Next Door to Pete's Cash
and Carry)
FOR SOME


Ice Cream
-o-

SANDWICHES
All Kinds of Ice Cold

SOFT DRINKS
----9--~-

HAROLD WILLIAMS, Prop.
(Local high school boy, bet.
ter' known as "Hack")
KARL L. HALL, Manager





Open at Our
r n .


iew race or Business
DIRECTLY ACROSS FROM BUS STATION
We Are Equipped To Handle Your Wantrs In
GAS APPLIANCES
Metered Gas Through Underground Mains To Your Home
See Us .Before You Build

RANGES AS LOW AS $34.95


ST. JOE GAS COMPANY
A. M. MITCHELL, Manager


VFIII


Electricity works so cheaply and ef- Tuesday afternoon--all for the small sum
ficiently nothing can compete with it or of 5c. It goes to show that what
take its place. You can start your elec-
tric fan at eight-thirty Monday evening you may call pin money, is big money
and not turn it off until twelve-thirty when invested in electric service.



FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1938


I I _1 ---_


PAGE THREE~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA









A


COMPTROLLER'S DRIVE
AGAINST TAX SLACKERS
GATHERS MOMENTUM

Merchant Who Pays Entitled To
See Competitors Pay, Says Lee

TALLAHASSEE, July 15 (FNS)
-With the way cleared in Jack-
sonville by final determination
that Mayor George Blume's Whid-
den Cash Stores are a chain, and
a supreme court victory in the
Hector Supply company case in-
volving sale of crates, Comptroller
Jim Lee's latest drive against re-
tail tax slackei's is gathering mo-
mentum. Several hundred busi-
nesses were waiting on these two
decisions hoping t h e y would
bring exemption while the comp-
troller was stymied by delays in
the courts.
He has opened an office in Jack-
sonville preparatory to "cracking
down" on delinquents there, while
an office opened in Tampa sev-
eral weeks ago has gathered suf-
ficient data to turn the sheriff
loose on Hillsborough delinquents
again.
In the past 18 months the comp-
troller has called on the sheriff to
"get the money" in several hun-
dred cases-drastic action being
necessary in one or more in-
stances in nearly two-thirds of the
counties.
"The merchant who pays is en-
titled to see his competitor re-
quired to pay," Comptroller Lee
says. "Unfair competition cannot
be fostered by the state. On the
other hand, after the public pays
the merchants this tax-and it is
paid by the public at the rate of
one-half of .one per cent on all
sales-the state should see that it
it turned into the state treasury."


The Coolest Spot In Town!


FRIDAY, JULY
A Cult In


15-
Your


"THE LASH OF TI
Recklessly She Ran the
the Man Sh
AUTHENTIC! AMAZI
NOT RECOMMENDED FOF
A


AD


Buck Jones' Life Packed

With Exciting Adventure

Craving for Excitement He Enlisted In the U. S. Army, Drove
Racing Cars, Flew Airplanes and Toured the World
Riding Bucking Bronchos In Wild West Show

Real, red-blooded adventure, rivaling that of fiction's best
known heroes, prepared Buck Jones for the "reel" life adven-
tures that made him Hollywood's No 1 western star. Spend-
ing his boyhood on an Oklahoma ranch, where he learned the
-athree R's of riding, roping and
NATIONAL GUARD UNIT ranching, instilled in Buck's veins
WILL GO TO MISSISSIPPI a craving for excitement with
The 2nd Battalion, 106th Engi- never a thought as to danger or
neers, Florida National Guard, of subsequent results.
Apalachicola, commanded by Lt. Because of his love for horses
Col. J. P. Coombs, together with' and. that unquenchable thirst for
all other units of the guard, will thrills, Buck, while still in his
report on August 1 to Maj. Gen. teens, enlisted in Uncle Sam's
Herbert J. Brees, U. S. Army, cavalry. Soon he found himself
commanding general 31st Division, patroling the arid wastes along the
in the DeSoto National Forest in Mexican border. When Aguinaldo
the vicinity of Blloxi, "Miss. and his rebellious Moros began
Information relative to Florida's creating havoc in the Philippines,
participation in the Third Army Buck's company was sent to the
maneuvers revealed that troops islands to protect American lives
will depart from their home bar- and property.
racks on July 31 by motor truck His enthusiasm for excitement
convoy, the infantry and engineers and his disregard for danger al
being moved by rail. most proved his undoing. He ex-
Florida's total strength of otfi- posed himself during a scouting
cers and men is revaled as 2,177, trip and was seriously wounded
the total concentration at Biloxi by a sniper. But Buck quickly re
being about 50,000. covered. Back in the United States
_______ he turned his attention to air-
CARVER DRUG COMPANY planes and, racing cars in search
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27. of new thrills and adventure.
His daring behind-the wheel of
a racing car was sensational. But
gasoline failed to-satisfy his yearn-
ing for excitement. He had, been
raised on a horse, had spent his
army enlistment astride a horse,
and it was to horses that he
turned when mechanical thrills
palled. He joined Miller's famous
101 Ranch wild west show and
Stored the world riding bucking
broncos and giving roping exhibi-
tions.
Then he decided to settle down
)RVD; and turned ,his footsteps toward
,, r -Hollywood. He joined, the ranks of
extras. His fine appearance and
his ability singled him out-at-
'Ti 11 M tracted the eyes of directors. He
was given better roles with each.'
picture, and in a short time was
-ONE DAY ONLY! one of the screen's top box office
attractions.
Own Country Today he is at the height of his
H PE ITENTE popularity and, prestige as a west-
S P NIT NTEern star and portrayer of he-man
characterizations. His newest star-
Gauntlet of Shame for
ribag vehicle, a virele action drama,
ise Loved!
is "Headin' East," and will be
[NG! TERRIFYING! shown at the Port theater Satur
R CHILDREN UNDER 17 day.
A CARVER DRUG COMPANY


SATURDAY, JULY 16


BUCK JONES
IN

,"HEADIN' EAST"

Also Serial: "PAINTED STALLION"

A A

SUNDAY-MONDAY JULY 17-18


ERROL FLYNN and

OLIVIA DeHAVILAND
IN

"ADVENTURES of

ROBIN HOOD"


A A

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY JULY 19-20
POLLY MORAN and ALLISON SKIPWORTH
IN

"LADIES IN DISTRESS"
** -' I -


If It's Drugs, We Have It.

VEHICLE DEPARTMENT
SHOWS GOOD INCREASE

!-is Passed $.000,000 Mark In
Total Co'.ection First Half '38

TALLAHASSEE, July 15 (FNS)
-At the close of business on June
30 of this year the motor vehicle
dcpartit:i-ent has passed the six mil-
lion dollar mark in total collec-
tions for the first half of 1938,
showing a considerable increase
over 1937 when the six million dol-
lar mark was not reached until
some time in October.
According to the report made
public by D. W. Finnley, commis-
sioner of the department, a com-
parison of the records for 1937
and 1938 shows that a total of
416,421 tags were sold when the
book's were balanced at the close
of June for this year, which repre-
sents an increase of 10,523 over
the 405,898 tags reported sold at
the same time last year.
Total revenue from the sale of
tags for the first half of this year
amounted to $5,823,154.32, an in-
crease of $228,254.87 over the $5,-
534,899.35 received' by the state
from the sale of tags for the first
half of last 'year.
However, revenue from t h e
transfer of titles for the first half
of 1938 was $8,165.80 less than
that received for the first half of
last year, with $159,048.85 being
reported to June 30, 1937, and
only $150,883.05 to June 30, 1938.
According. to Commissioner Fin-
ley, the drop in the title transfers
this year is due to a decrease in


HIGHER NAVAL STORES WILL ENFORCE CLOSED
PRODUCTION LAST YEAR SEASON ON TURTLES
IS REPORTED BY U.S.D.A.
Loggerheads Protected By State
Georgia Leads With 57 Per Cent From May Through August
Of Total; Florida Rates Second


Naval stores producers made
65,811 barrels of turpentine and
230,004 barrels of rosin more dur-
ing the 1937-38 season than they
made the previous season, accord-
ing to the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture's annual re-
port on production, consumption
and stocks of naval stores. The
carry-over of turpentine was less
at the beginning of the new sea-
son on April 1, 1938, than it was
for the corresponding period last
year, whereas rosin carryover
showed a substantial increase.
There was increased production
in all classes, the greatest per-
centage increase being in the sul-
phate wood naval stores products
recovered, from a production of
sulphate wood pulp.
Producers of gum naval stores
increased their production from
482,787 barrels of turpentine and
1,565,,240 barrels of rosin in 1936-
37 to 518,454 barrels of turpentine
and 1,709,157 barrels of rosin in
1937-38.
The total production of all
.classes of naval stores for the
1937-38 season was 700,311 barrels
of turpentine and 2,561,966 barrels
of rosin, compared with 634,520
barrels of turpentine and 2,331,-
962 barrels of roz-n in 1936-37.
Turpentine barrels .hold 50 gal
ions and rosin weighs approxi-
mately 500 gross pounds per bar-
rel.
Georgia continued to produce
more than half of the gum turpen-
tine. The 1937-38 percentage pro-
duction was: Georgia, 57; Florida,
26; Alabama, 10; North and South
Carolina,. 3; Mississippi, 3, and
Louisiana and Texas, 1.
------J-------
Miss Anita Tillman of St.. Au-
gustine -is the attractive house
guest of Miss Kathleen Saunders.


~


the sale- of new cars. He attri- ll 1m S
butes the increase in the number
of tags sold in spite of the de-
crease of new-car sales to better ting ink:
the public in general with the mo- T
tor vehicle department and to a C. C. WILUIAMS, Prop.
more thorough and complete check-
-4
up by department inspect's. I -....--.--.".'. .







Sea Foods
WHOLESALE and RETAIL o
We Carry a Wide Variety of Sea Foods
OYSTERS IN SEASON --

E. L. ANDERSON FISH COMPANY
IV Mile W. Port St. Joe On Panama City Highway




NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready For Every House In

Port St. Joe


COOK I N G WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
0---- .--
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS
-.-3 A full line of gas appliances in stock }'-


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


iRitz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS-CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


i


FRIDAY, JULY 15, M83


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR


TALLAHASSEE. July 15 (FNS)
--A1 agents of the state conser-
vation board have been instructed
by R. L. Dowling, supervisor, to
make special efforts during July
and August to enforce the closed
season on loggerhead, or sea
turtle.
There is a growing desire on the
part of the public for the enforce-
ment of the closed season on sea
turtles, which constitute a valu-
able source of food supply. Many
letters and messages have been
received by Supervisor Dowling
from sportssmen throughout the
state giving information as to vio-
lations of the law. This co-opera-
tion with the department is deep-
ly appreciated.
The sea turtle is an ungainly
fellow, sometimes reaching 800
pounds in weight. Turtles come
ashore only to lay their eggs in
the sand, and at this season is an
easy prey for man. For this rea-
son a closed season extending
from May through August has
been set aside for their protec-
tion.



SKATE---
for Health's Sake!
Skating is one of the most 4
enjoyable and health-giving
exercises- that can be found.


COME OUT TO THE NEW
SKATING RINK IN HIGH-
LAND VIEW AND HAVE A,
MOST ENJOYABLE TIME
4
4
4-- 4
BEGINNERS WELCOME!
We Have Competent Instruc-
tors to Care for Those Just
Learning to Skate
44

Bring the Kiddies Out and
Let Them Have a Good Time
---4


e









LIA J


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
We Specialize In One-Day
SERVICE


In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER

-.1--- -- -- -- -


Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others .
Let your family enjoy
some today.

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON' S

Dairy

Products




GULF VIEW

TAVERN
We Carry the Best Lines of
WINES and BEERS
AL JK?^ ///isz ///s///Fif~ss .W^ '


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE

Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent


MRS. M. P. TOMLINSON
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
An event of Thursday evening
was the bridge party given by
Mrs. Mark Tomlinson when she
entertained the members of her
bridge club at her home.
Arrangements of marigolds and
zinnias decorated the living room
and dining room opened ensuite,
where tables for contract were
placed. At the conclusion of three
progressions, prizes were awarded
the winners.
Accepting Mrs. Tomlinson's hos-
pitality were Mrs. T. A. Owens,
Mrs. Jessie M. Smith, Mrs. Ross
Coburn. Mrs. D. L. Owens, Mrs.
Jos. B. Gloekler, Mrs. Edwin Ram-
sey, Mrs. Horace Soule, Mrs. E.
Clay Lewis, Mrs. George Gore,
Mrs. Charles Brown, Mrs. Chester
Edwards and Mrs. Harry 'Towson
of Gainesville. Fla.
GIRLS' AUXILIARY MEETS
WITH CAROLYN BAGGETT
The Girls' Auxiliary met Friday
afternoon with Miss Carolyn Bag-
gett at her home. The meeting
was opened by singing the Auxili-
ary hymn, which was followed by
an interesting program on "Chil-
ean Indians." Watch word and al-
legiance was given in unison, fol-
lowed with prayer by Mrs. J. 0.
Baggett.
The following papers were pre-
sented: "Segundo Nauhualhual,"
by Flora Mae Cason; "Other South
American Indians," by Betty Jo
Lane; "Explanation 'of Church
Plan of Giving," by Carolyn Bag-
gett; Scripture, Psalm 2, Betty
Parnell.
The meeting was closed by sing-
ing "Jesus Is All the World To
Me."
Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Eells and
son, Edward, have returned from
Morgan, La., where they spent
two weeks.-visiting relatives and
friends. .
Mrs. George A. Patton was the
put-t Friday and Saturday of
Mrl. W. B. Hamilton at her Bea-
con Hill home.
SMrs. T. M. Schneider wi;l re-
ceive a free ice cream sundae if
she will stop at LeHardy's.
Mrs. J. L. Sharit and son, Joe,
left Tuesday for Moultrie, Ga.,
where they will visit relatives for
two weeks.


DAD'S GRILL

Under New

Management


We have reconditioned our
restaurant completely and in-
vite all our old friends as
well as new customers to
drop in and see us
-:-
We Specialize In
WESTERN AND NATIVE
STEAKS


PRICES REASONABLE


Come In and Ask About Our
MEAL TICKETS




DAD'SGRILL
The Home of Cleanliness,
Courtesy and Service


1- - --^ - - -
PHON--- 7----- PORT ST-,JOE,--FL

SWE HAUL ANYTHING--
4

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
", WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


W. HORTON .
PHONE 70- PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
A^'' A < 4, ( A g -t s < .- A A .4 ;4 4 4 44


SUSANNAH WESLEY CIRCLE
IN MEET WITH MRS. BOYER
The Susannah Wesley Circle of
the Methodist church met Monday
afternoon at the home of Mrs.
W. E. 'Boyer with a good attend-
ance. After a short business ses-
sion conducted by the circle chair-
man, Mrs. George A. Patton, chap-
ters four and five of the Bible
study book, "His Witness," were
presented by Mrs. Boyer and Mrs.
Patton. This (interesting study of
the Book of Acts is by Dr. Andrew
Sledd.
During the social hour the hos-
tess served an ice course, after
which the meeting adjourned to
meet next week at the church.
The Marie Jones Circle will be in
charge of next week's program.

SEWING CLUB MEETS
WITH MRS. W. S. SMITH
SThe Wednesday Afternoon Sew-
,ing club met this week with Mrs.
W. S. Smith. Sewing and chatting
-were enjoyed and a number of in-
teresting games and contests were
played, winners being Mrs. Jones,
Mrs. Graves and Mrs. Parmer. De-
licious refreshments were served
'by the hostess at the conclusion
of the afternoon.
Present with Mrs. Smith were
Mrs. Troy Jones, Mrs. Carmichael
.Smith, Mrs. Parmer, Mrs. Spivey,
Mrs. Howell, Mrs. Rutth Graves,
Mrs. A. L. Ford of Tampa and
.Mrs. Hicks of Dothan, Ala.
The club will meet next week
at the home, of Mrs. Spivey.
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gibson of At-
lanta, Ga., spent the week-end
here- visiting Mrs. Gibson's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Costin.
Mr. and Mrs.'R..O. Roberts will
retuiri this week-end -from Miami
and other points in South Florida
after a two weeks' vacation.
W. R. Gault of Panama City
was a business caller in the city
Tuesday.
A free ice cream sundae awaits
Harold Palmer at the LeHardy
Pharmacy.
Mrs. Charles C. Burns returned
Sunday to her home in Auburn,
Ala., after a two weeks' visit here
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.
M. Jones.
Mrs. J. S. Hiles and Miss Ruth
McKown motored to Tallahassee
Tuesday to visit Mrs. George S.
Hiles, Sr.
Mrs. J. A. Mira and Mrs. Jos. B.
Gloek:er motored to Panama City
Tuesday.
Mrs. Walter McLin returned
Monday to her home in Tallahas-
see after a visit here with Mr.
McLin.

Mayor J. L. Sharit spent this
week in Washington, D. C., on city
business.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Wade of
Columbus, Ga., are spending the
week here, guests at Port Inn.
Tom Owens is invited to have a
free ice cream sundae at the Le-
Hardy Pharmacy.
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Crawley and
family of Atlanta, Ga., are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gib-
son at their summer cottage at
Beacon Hill.
H. B. Whitaker will leave today
to spend the week-end in Gaines-
ville with his family.
Mrs. V. K. Buck of Pomono was
the guest last Friday of Mrs. Jos.
B. Gloekler.


Mrs. B. B. Conklin has an ice
cream sundae awaiting her pleas-
ure at LeHardy's Pharmacy,
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.

Miss Dorothy Anderson of Bea-
con Hill spent the past week-end
in Apalachicola, the guest of Miss
Joyce Hinckley.
Miss Bobby Watson will leave
today for Tallahassee to attend
the, Ambassadors dance. While In
the capitol Miss Watson will be
the guest of Clifton VanBrunt-


OPENING SERVICE OF NEW
BAPTIST CHURCH JULY 31
Rev. J. W. Sisemore announces
that the first service in the new
Baptist church being constructed
at the corner of Baltzell avenue
and Third street will be held on
July 31.
The church is rapidly nearing
completion and will be one of the
most imposing church buildings in
this section of the state.

NELSON-STEBEL
John Frederick Nelson of West
Palm Beach and Miss Marie Me-
lissa Stebe; were married Monday
at 5 p. m. at the Presbyterian
manse by Rev. H. F. Beaty.
Following a brief honeymoon
trip they will make their home in
West Palm Beach.
Mrs. Paul Davis of Thomasville,
Ga., is the guest of Miss Lila
Carter this week at her Beacon
Hill home.
Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Anderson
spent Tuesday-iff Apalachicola on
business.
Misses Jean Austin, Nancy Bled-
soe, Eumorfia Fortunas, Nina
Scott and Lois Harrison of Apa-
lachicola spent Wednesday in the
city.
. Mrs. Joe Mira is invited to have
a free ice cream sundae at the
LeHardy fountain.


Society Personals Churches
MRS. JOS. B. GLOEKLER, Editor


Let Us Service YOU Car Todav
For economical and efficient opera-
ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
S= service it with our modern equipment
W WAS HI NG -
S--POLISHING-
-GREASING
Texaco Products

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
Wilbur Wels Jesse Darcey
- -- -- - ----- -





Give YOUR


Family a Home


In Beacon Hill

Subdivision
Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means .



Lots $50 to $600
$10.00 DOWN AND $5.00 PER WEEK
WHY PAY RENT?
Wen- you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. .
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-


CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.


Professional Cards



William A. Young, R. A.
ARCHITECT
and Associates
PANAMA CITY FLA.



DR. J C. COE
DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appoihtment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Tuesday and Fridays

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
Moved Next to Cestin's Store
Panama City Port St. Joe


ing out in rent .

INVESTIGATE!


LET US SHOW YOU!


COTTAGES FOR RENT




Beacon Hill


Development Company

I J. S. PATRICK BEACON HILL, FLA.

-'* v w we ww' -wf w w wr v wom


FRIDAY, JULY 15 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


I







G H T S -A


COURT DECIDES

MARBLE GAMES

MAY BE SEIZED

ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS NOW'
HAVE AUTHORITY TO SEIZE
GAMES, ARREST OWNERS
Enforcement officers now have'
supreme court authority to seize
marble games and pin games in
Port St. Joe if they arrest the op-
erators.
Governor Cone recently ordered
a campaign against the devices,


opinion as between so-called lib- Dr. Gallup, in announcing re-
Teralism and conservatism. They s.ults of the survey, wrote:
W A SHII I N N received their first definite an- "While 'liberalism' and "conser-
swer in the results of a nation- vatisms' are matters of definition,
SSNA PSHO S wide poll.of voters in all income about which many persons dis-
groups and, political affiliates. The agree, nevertheless the one-sided
By JAMES PRESTON poll was conducted by Dr. George vote in the survey seems to indi-
SGallup, director of the American cate a definite tendency toward
Institute of Public Opinion. The the right. If the trend indicated by
The capital is talking about how result showed that 72 per cent of the survey continues, the domi-
Washington officialdom was taken the voters in the United States nant pull of public opinion will be
by surprise by the recent business want a more conservative govern- toward the conservative side."
upturn. Their amazement is typi- ment. The voters answered the
lied Iby one of the inner-circle question: "During the next two CARVER DRUG COMPANY
theorists who read a newspaper years would you like to see the Try Our Fountain Specials.
headline and declared with much government be more liberal or
Thomas and Clarence Brown
arm-waving that: "There must be more conservative?" Only 28 per hae r nd o their h e
some mistake it isn't justi- cent favored a more liberal gov- ariavna after a viit here wit
fed thpMarinanna after a visit here with
field the pump-priming hasn't ernment. Mr anl Mr slav Thwia
M.ad Mrs. E. Clay Lewis.


SHIP DOCKS
The S.S. Dorothy of the Bull
Line tied up Monday at the St.
Joe Paper company dock to take
on a cargo of paper. She sailed
Tuesday for eastern ports.
.-----^---------
Mr. and Mrs. Bryant Patton of
Apalachicola were the Wednesday
guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Ham-
ilton.
Mrs. G. R. Winchester left the
first of the week for a two weeks'
visit in Tallahassee with relatives;
Eighty per cent of tornadoes oc-
cur between the hours of noon
and 6 p. m.


Read the ads-it pays!


which he called "a subterfuge" for started yet .we can't under-
the outlawed slot machines. Op- stand it."
erators went to court for injunc-
tions against threatened, seizure. The economic-planners are filid-
and appealed to the supreme ing more and more that while they
court in Tallahassee when the cir- might control people, they can't
cult courts rejected their pleas. control economic laws. Last year
The supreme court said the ma- the depression slipped up on them.
chines are within the definitions and before they realized its depth
of the anti-slot machine laws. they were caught denying that it
However, the law provides for was anything more than a tempo-
seizure of such machines upon ar- rary recession. Then as more and
rest of the operator. They can be more people were forced from em-
destroyed upon order of the court ployment, they set out to marshal
if the operator 'is convicted, new billions for pump-priming.
Declaring such machines are That was to start the new upward
"adapted" for use in such a way swing. But before the money


tnat they are within the slot ma-
chine law, the court said, "It is
not essential that the machines be
used for gambling or gambling
purposes."
In discussing the arrest and-
seizure features, the court said it
was not deciding whether the de-
vices could be seized under some
other law without arresting the
operators.
----- --_-___-
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
Little Miss Peggy Gann has re-
turned from Panama City, where
Fs visited relatives for several
days. i .


I i3


- -
mob _jg
Ar 4dlLA
Mir 4fi~
4 4


SA MARTIN & MARTIN THEATER


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


could be spent, business began to
improve of its own momentum.
How far the swing upward, will
go few people dare to predict.
Many attribute the beginning of
the climb to the adjournment of
congress. Those who follow po-
litical trends, however, are fear-
ful that the political campaigns
will be used as new arenas to at-
tack industry, with. the so-called
mofiopoly investigation being. used
to spotlight the attack.
Both in Washington and else-
where, observers have been trying
to trace the pendulum of public


PRICES


SLASHED-I


COSTING'S
mu m -.W- -


SALE STARTS SATURDAY MORNING


^' "/ .. .i*/
S. ,






Ladies' Full Fashioned
PURE SILK

HOSE

39c Per
All Colors


MEN'S LACED-TO-TOE

TENNIS SHOES

S49 Sizes

15c QUALITY MEN'S

FANCY SOCKS
Three 25C
Pair 25c

REGULAR 25c GRADE TABLE

OIL CLOTH
R Per
18c Yard


TO THE FIRST 75 PERSONS MAKING PURCHASES
Saturday we will issue coupons; one of these persons
vill be given free a crisp new $10 bill. COME EARLY!
Share in these tremendous value-giving BARGAINS!



COSTING'S DI
COME EARLY!


6. .






I,,, "-.? .i !
2

GROUP LADIES'

Wash Dresses
Fast Colors
Nice Quality

25c Each


Sanitary Napkins
Standard
Pack 10C
Limit 3 Pkgs. to Customer

Full Size Cotton Crinkled

BEDSPREADS
All
49rc U Colors


BARGAINS GALORE!
We do not have the space to
list them here-a visit to our
store will convince you .that
we mean ta sell our surplus
stock of seasonable
merchandise


P ARTMENT
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA.


Fine Grade
UNBLEACHED

MUSLIN


5Cd.
Limit 25 Yds. to Customer


STORE
SEE THESE BARGAINS!


I


---------------- ---------- -~~~---- -- -- -


- - -- - --


I I


THE- STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


F R IDAY, J ULY 15, 1938 -


PAGE EIGHT


. ..1 .