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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00193
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 8, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00193

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
ct growing little city. .. In
the hart of the pina belt.


THE


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGN ING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938

VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1937 NUMBER 38


CITY ASKSRFC Fourth Celebration
LOAN FORPAVING,

SOFTENING PLANT oes Over n Big ay;


MpurphyAct Puts


Buri'dw n Those



Keeping Up Taxes


Sumner Round-Up

Rv HPolh 6)f f i c Po


Gulf County Realizes But $176
From Tax Liens Amount-
ing To $3,441; State Gets


JJ Aumulra *V I I In %d % $181,816 From $8,l2,720.

To Be Held Tuesday For Children The Murphy Act has cost the
Between Ages of Six Months state of Florida and its 67 coun-
And Six Years ties more than $8,000,000, accord-
ing to incomplete reports from 56
A "Summer Round-up Clinic" of the 67 counties filed in the of-
will be held at the health office fice of State Comptroller Jim Lee.
in Port St. Joe next Tuesday, July Tax liens totaling $8,123,720 have
'12, from 9:30 a. m. until 3 p. m. netted the state, the counties, the
Physical examinations will be school boards and other taxing
given to any child between the units $181,816.
ages of six months and six years. No reports have been compiled
Immunizations for diphtheria and for Calhoun, Hernando, Liberty,
smallpox will also be given to Dixie, Putnam, St. Johns, Taylor,
children who have not had these, Santa Rosa and Wakulla, while
if the parents request them. only very incomplete figures are
It is especially urged that all available from Citrus and Duval
children who expect to enter counties.
school this fall attend this- clinic. ,
_______ ___ Tax liens amounting to $3,441.14
sold in Gulf county under the Mur-
Unin Services phy act brought in $176.66 to the
county coffers. The tax assessor
To B Hel ach received a commission of $17.79;
To10 Be eld Ea the tax collector, $3.05; county.
Sk clerk $157.80; advertising costs'
Sunday I Par came to $37.25, and expense of
sale amounted to $12.45.
All De.omination To Gather At Franklin county, out of $14,.
Band Stand For Sinin 473.59 of tax liens, received
Band Stand For Singing $703.41, while Bay county, with
AndPreaching $199,119.07 of liens collected $2,-
Si m t 450.61, with commissions and costs
Announcement is made that be- coming to $11,19036.
ginning next Sunday evening at coming to $11190.36.
!7:30 o'clock, and continuing each One of the counties showing
Sunday thereafter when weather the greatest loss was Lake, where
permits, a union service of the $594,718 in tax liens netted the
churches of Port St. Joe will be taxing units only $2,060. Escambia
held at the band stand in the Port county netted only $2,006 from tax
Inn park. liens totaling $499.487. In Volusia
The people are asked to as- county, $369,485 netted; the taxing
seinble early and join in the sing- units only $2,729. Down in big old
ing of hymns for a half hour be- Dade, the Murphy Act cost the
fore the preaching. No matter guys who paid the taxes four-
what denomination' you may be- fifths of a million dollars, as
long to. you are invited to be pres- .884,736 in tax liens were wiped
ert and help. off the books for $6,652. the dif-
iRev. H. F. Beaty announces ference between the two figures
(Continued on page 8) (Continued on page 6)



ama mmitt $


aCentenmial


To Celebrate Signing of Flor- Mlarls, Jr., chairman; D. C. Ma-
ids F rsht C itio on, T. H. Stone, R. L. Miller, W.
it W. Barrier, H. H. Saunders. W. T.
Meeting Held Last Evening Edwards, G. Pierce Wood, T. W..
mi .-. _* A T) v Tn R T (Inr_


J. L. Sharit. general chairman
of the Centennial Celebration to
he held in Port St. Joe next De-
cen-ber 7 to 10, this week an-
nounced final committee appoint-
nlents to work out details of the
event which will mark the 100th
anniversary of the signing of Flor-
ida's first state constitution.
Committees named are as fol-
lows:
.Finance Committee-W. T. Ed-
wards, chairman; E. C. Lewis, Jr.,
R. E. Bellows, T. M. Schneider, B.
W. Eells, R. R. Hodges, L. L. Mor-
gan, B. A. Pridgeon, Dave Gaskin,
.J. R. Hunter, G. F. Kaser, N. Com-
forter, C. G, Costin, George Tap-
per and Sam Husnand.
Reception Committee H. D.


vvWilsonu R. aDendy, iR. U Al-
ter, W. E. Murdock, J. 0. Baggett,
M. Ross Watson, George Tapper
and Roy Connell.
Special Events Committee B.
W. Eells, Sr., chairman; Horace
Sou;e. R. C. Rector, W. O. Ander-
son, M. K. Hurlbut, R. O. Roberts,
T. M. Schneider, I. C. Nedley, H.
D Marks, Jr., L. G. Bernol, D. C.
Mahon, W. L. Gatlin, M. C. Edr
wards, Mercer Spear and Tom
Owens.
Invitations Committee G. P.
Wood, chairman; J. H., Kelly, C.
L. Morgan, W. Shelby Smith, J.
L. Kerr, H. A. Drake, H. H. Saun-
ders, L. W. Owens, G. A. Patton,
T. G. Alsobrook, M. Ross Watson,
Joe Hauser, George Gore, S. C.
(Continued on page 8)


$228,000 Applied For Would
Be City's Share On $477,-
217 of WPA Projects

Application was filed by the city
of Port St. Joe last Saturday for
an RFC loan amounting to $228,-
000, according to M. Ross Watson
of the Florida Housing corpora.
tion.
If the loan meets with approval
the funds will be used as the city's
share on a $477,217 paving project
and construction of a water soft-
ening plant, the remaining funds
to come from the WPA.
Streets to be paved under the
terms of the loan will be Long
avenue from First street to the
Constitutional Monument; Monu-
ment avenue from Highway 19 to
the Monument; Palm boulevard in
Bayview Heights; paving and
widening Fifth street from High-
way 19 to the city limits; paving
Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth,
Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth,
Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets,
Garrison avenue, Woodward ave-
nue, Marvin avenue and McClel-
lan avenue.
Mr. Watson stated that the en-
tire paving project will come to
approximately seven miles and
will give the city paving on prac-
tically every main thoroughfare.

POSTOFFICE SHOWS
118% INCREASE OVER
SAME PERIOD IN 1937

One of the best barometers to
the growth of any city is its pos-
tal receipts, and Postmaster H. A.
Drake states that receipts of the
Port St. Joe office show an in-
crease of 118 per cent for the first
six months of 1938 over the same
period last year.
Receipts from January 1 to June
30 of this year were $4,812.70, as
compared to $2,206.40 for the same
period in 1937, and $1,077.42 in
1936. Receipts for the entire year
in 1937 were $6,581.87, and for
1936 came to $2,432.72.

TWO BEING HELD FOR
ROBBING COSTIN STORE

A tip given by a hitch-hiker
who stated, the two men had asked
him to join them in burglarizing
other stores, resulted in the ar-
rest in Pensacola of Phil Burnett
and Alphonso Lewis for the rob-
bery of Costin's store in this city
on June 20.
Entry into the Costin store was
gained through a skylight and
goods valued at around $500 were
removed through the back door.
C. G. Costin, owner of the store,
made a trip to Pensacola this
week to identify stolen articles.
-------
BAND CONCERT NEXT
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
A band concert will be held
next Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock
at the band stana in Port Inn
park, when a number of new se-
lections which the band has been
practicing will be rendered.
The Thursday evening concert
was postponed this week due to
meeting of the Centennial com-
mittees last evening.
-----
Advertise that Special Sale. The
Star prints dodgers and circulars.


Large Crowd In City


Legion Will Meet

In Wewahitchka

Commander Schneider Asks That
All Members of Post Be
In Attendance

Commander T. M. Schneider an-
nounces that there will be a meet-
ing of Gulf County Post No. 161,
American Legion, in Wewahitchka
next Monday evening, July 11, at
which matters of considerable im-
portance will be discussed.
All members are urgently re-
quested by the commander to be
present. Those having no means
of transportation are asked to get
in touch with him and means will'
be provided.


Radio Compass

Station For San

Bias Lighthouse

Expected To Be In Operation By
September; To Change Light
From Carbide to Electricity


Ball Games and Other Events
Enjoyed By Many; Pyro-
technic Display Is Voted
Outstanding Feature of Day

The glorious Fourth was cele-
brated in Port St. Joe in a really
glorious manner. The day was ob-
served by large crowds at all
events, and those who have said
that our city could not get to-
gether and have a good time are
put to rout by the results. Every
number on the program that had
been arranged by the committee
was fully carried out in good form.
Opening the day's events was
the ball game between the Port
St. Joe and Wewahitchka Ameri-
can Legion Junior teams. The lo-
cal boys were beaten by a 9 to 5
score, but put up a gallant battle.
Preceding the afternoon ball
game between the Blountstown
and Port St. Joe town teams, the
high school band, under the direc-
tion of Dan Farmer, played before
the Martin theater and the office
of Wilson & Kerr and theni;parr-
aded to the park, where they
played several selections for the
water fight and during the ball
game.


SI Water Fight
B. B. Sorenson, assistant keeper! The water fight was staged
at the San Bias lighthouse, this with two fire hoses supplied by
week informed. The Star that work the fire department, each hose be,
of clearing trees on the point for ing held by two negro lads. They
erection of a radio compass, sta- were placed about 150 feet apart
tion had been started and that the and when the water was turned
installation was expected to be on they were to advance to a cen-
placed in operation by September. tral stake, the team passing it
The radio station will be used. to first to be declared the winner.
give ships at sea their exact ;o- One boy was put out almost at
cation, working in conjunction once by having his mouth open in
with similar stations un other sec- a broad grin, the water taking
tions of the Gulf coast, him squarely in the mouth, and it
The present light, which is op- Is supposed he swallowed quite a
erated by carbide, will also be few gallons before dropping the
changed to use electricity with the hose, which became unmanageable
installation of a power plant to for the remaining negro, who
furnish electric current for the could not turn it away from the
radio station. (Continued on Page 5)



Port St. Joe Enitirs


Team In Ball League


Takes Place of Tallahassee In
Inter City Circuit; First
Game To Be Wednesday.

Port St. Joe ball fans will now
have an opportunity to get out and
root for the home team, for Tom
Owens, manager of the local base-
ball aggregation announces that
this city is taking the place of
Tallahassee in the inter-city league
made up of Apalachicola, Carra-
belle and Wakulla.
The first game will be played
next Wednesday, though Manager
Owens does not know where nor
whom his boys will play, as he
has not yet received the schedule
of games.
The present list of talent is
made up of Henry Hiles, Fletcher
Johnson, Tomn Pridgeon, Richard
Rector, George Beck, Joe Hiles,


James Player, Jimmie Morton,
Tom Owens. Buster Owens, Jim-
mie Player, Harold Williams,
Speedy Quinn, Chalker McKeithen,
Lefty Wadsworth, George Tapper,
Ralph Swatts and Dick Porter.
Anyone having ambitions to be
a ball player are asked to get in
touch with Manager (lwens, as he
believes there is a lot of undis-
covered talent hereabouts and he
needs it in the worst way.
Business men of the city are
being solicited for donations to
secure uniforms and equipment
for the team.
------- --
M. P. Updike of Mobile, Ala.,
publicity man for the Old Spanish
Trail association, has been invited
by the entertainment committee
of the Port St. Joe Chamber of
Commerce to make an address to
that body at a future meeting.







WOF


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

SIssued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1S79.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.CO Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-~{ Telephone 51 fr---

The s;ioken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoulihtiully weighed.
Th, spoken word barely asserts; the printed
wora thoroughly convinces. 'Tire spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

TRADE AT HOME
Did )ou ever stop to think that by read-
ing the advertisements in The Star you can
save considerable real cash?
Business concerns who have the best that
can be procured are steady advertisers and
are continually offering special bargains to
induce you to come into their store.
In the advertising columns you can always
find the names of the concerns who appreci-
ate your business, who render good service
and carry the kind of merchandise that is
worthy of your consideration and your con-
fidence.
Standard goods for everyday use-nation-
ally advertised goods-goods whose quality
does not change, and at moderate prices, are
always advertised.
.You do not have to go to Panama City or
Apalachicola to do your shopping. Your lo-
cal merchants sell the kind of merchandise
that will make you go back for more.
It will pay you to visit the stores of Port
St. Joe often. Their stocks have been care-
fully chosen and are the best at the price.
At local stores you see what you buy be-
fore you buy it, which is not the case when
you buy from mail order houses. Everything
is displayed for your inspection. You will find
that in the long run the home merchants of-
fer you the best in quality, workmanship and
value.
Port St. Joe merchants have merchandise
,of superior quality-the better kind-the kind
you want and the kind you should buy.

THE SPINNING WORLD SLOWS
-A British astronomer, Harold Spencer
Jones (one of the Jones boys), makes the
headlines with the finding that "somewhere
an unknown gigantic brake has been clamped
down on the spinning world, slowing it
down."
Why, 'Mr. Jones, we've known that Ifor
umpsteen years. We see it almost every day
as politicians in nations throughout the
world gather more and more power over the
people in a powerful central government.
There, Mr. Jones, is your "gigantic brake"
that has slowed down the spinning world.
One hundred and fifty years ago American
patriots fought a great war to make men the
master of government instead of its servants.
But in the last two decades since the war
the procedure has been reversed, and nation
after nation has reverted to the autocratic
theory under which government becomes the
master again. -
We have seen that "gigantic brake"
clamped on Russia, Germany, Italy and other
countries. We find forces in America trying
to fit the brake on our own spinning world.
And who doubts that the spinning economic
world has been slowed down as a result.

The introduction of music teaching began
in American public schools about 100 years
ago. It has taken all that time to teach the
modernn pupil the elements of swing.--Hart-
ford Courant.

Nowadays a fellow never asks a girl if he
is the first one she ever kissed. He knows
better.


WE FIGHT FOR OUR FOOD
Port St. Joe may be progressing indus-
trially, houses are springing up like mush-
rooms overnight, streets are being paved and
sewer and water lines being laid, but in spite
of all these indications of modern civilization
sometimes, like our pioneer ancestors, we
have to fight for what we get.
A couple of mornings ago the editor was
awakened by what he thought was a stray
dog endeavoring to open the bottle of milk
setting on the front step. He arose ivith mut-
tered maledictions at being so rudely awak-
ened from his slumbers and opened the door
to drive away the supposed dog and rescue
the lacteal fluid.
Imagine his surprise when lie found a burly
raccoon sitting on the step with the bottle of
milk in his lap and using one paw to pry off
the cap. Ye ed grabbed a small cushion from
a chair near t-he door and made a pass at the
coon, but Mr. Coon merely backed away and
held onto the bottle of milk.
And then the battle began. The editor
swatted the 'coon, which dropped the bottle
and made a pass right back. Ye scribe then
reached for the milk and the 'coon snapped at
his hand. Another blow with the pillow failed
to rout the brigand-he merely ducked and
pounced on the bottle with all the vigor of a
stalwart halfback recovering a fumble.
It looked like a losing battle for our pa-
jama-clad hero as he vainly tried to hold off
the villain and retrieve the milk. And then
the lady of the house came to the rescue
with the broom and saved the editor from a
disorderly retreat under fire.

THE HIGHWAY PATROLMAN
There may have been some reason in years
past to consider the motorcycle "cop" in an
unfriendly light, but theA modern highway
traffic officer is the safe drivers' best friend.
The old-time "cop" was gruff and un-
friendly. His principal job was to bring in
revenue from fines; He would lie in wait
for the unwary motorist and make an arrest
for the slightest infraction.
The modern officer is courteous and
friendly toward the safe driver. He is more
interested in keeping you from breaking the
law, than in catching you in the act. His
chief job is to make. the highways safe; not
to produce revenue.
He gets after the reckless and dangerous
drivers and makes the highways safer for
law-abiding motorists.: He is the only means
by which reckless driving and over-speeding
can be controlled,
Most highway traffic officers now carry
first-aid equipment with them and are trained
in its use. They arrive quickly at the scene
of an accident and are often instrumental in
saving lives that would otherwise be lost.
Remember that automobiles killed nearly
800 people in Florida during 1937. Let's stop
it. Florida needs a highway patrol.

HOW IT WORKS
Some person with an unusual capacity for
statistics has gone into this subject of unem-
ploymenit in the nation and attained surpris-
ing results. He finds the table to run out
thus:
Population of the U. S. --------124,000,000
Eligible for old age pension --. 30,000,000
Left to do the work ..........---- 94,000,000
IEmployed by government and
its various subdivisions ...-. 20,000,000
Left to work 74,000,000
Ineligible under child labor
laws -..---....... -----..... .. ---- 60,000,000
Left to work 14,000,000
Unemployed 13,999,998
Left to do the work ......- 2
And so the editor of the .Wilmington, N.
C., Star reasons that unless jobs are found
for these 13,999,998 unemployed, you and the
president must perform all the labor required
to keep the ordinary every-day activities pro-
ceeding, and since the president has no time
for it, it is up to you.
At any rate, there are the figgers--


Bradenton Herald.


JUST ANOTHER SCRAP O' PAPER!


FISHING ATTRACTS

Stardust and MANY TO FLORIDA

M oonshine Estimated That Disciples of Izaak
Walton Spend $75,000,000 Yearly
By The Other Fellow
Hotel Commissioner W. M. Tay-
lor estimates 250,000 persons are
It was perfectly proper for attracted to Florida from other
father and grandfather to crumble states every year solely because
their crackers or break their bread of this state's recreational fishing.
into their soup and how "I believe one out of every ten
they did enjoy this combination. tourists comes to Florida because
e s h h of the opportunity afforded for
Some stylist, however, has is-
sed an edict that cracker crumbs fishing in both the fresh waters
and, the coastal waters," he said.
must not-be allowed to fall into R. Dowli, servso
-R. L. Dowling, supervisor of
soup of any kind and we ,
oor earthworms, who allow these conservation, has estimated Flor-
poor earthworms, who allow these
stylists to take away dozens of idea's recreational fishing repre
liberties each season, smile anu sents an expenditure of $75,000,000
forego a pleasure that our family a year Salt water fishing, both
has enjoyed for years. commercial and sports, Is super-
has enjoyed for years.
vised by Dowling.
Now what difference does it The hotel commissioner recently
make whether I crumble a cracker said he estimated Florida's num-
and deposit it n my dish of soup, ber of tourists annually totals
jr hold that cracker in the about 2,350,000 and the amount
'proper manner" between thumb these visitors spend here is about
ind foreginger and nibble at it at- $700,500,000 a year.
ter each spoonful of soup .____
doing the mixing in my mouth NEW AIR LINE TO OPEN
rather than in my dish? That's
what I would like to know. The state aviation commission
They have put a stiff collar announced this we-ek that the
arounct my neck, stuck buttons on Mlemphis-Tampa extension of the
my coat sleeve without cause, Eastern Air Lines would begin op-
!orced long trousers upon me be- ration October 1, .which will give
cause of a bow-legged English the west coast a fast direct s-erv-
king, and inflicted many other in- ice to Chicago and points west
lignities upon my person, through convenient connections
But when it comes to crackers with major lines.
ind soup well, I' going--
o crumble 'emn an sip 'em in the TIME TO FILE RETURNS
manner employed by good old Internal revenue officials an-
grand dad. nounce that July is the month for
filling returns on capital stock,
And speaking of buttons on our filing forms for the second period
coat sleeves. That custom social security tax, and the pur-
)riginated in the English navy a chasing of revenue stamps for
unndred or more years ago. It bper, wine, liquors and oleomar-
garne y wolealeand iletail


seems that in the winter time the
tars had, a habit of wiping their
noses on their coat sleeves, so
the order went through to sew
buttons on their sleeves to break
them of the habit. And it
probably did, because we still
bave them. I imagine a
button or two scraping across a
frozenn proboscis is a very unpleas-
ant feeling.

If you have frequent headaches,
dizziness, fainting spells, lame
back, accompanied by chills, bun-
ions, cramps, jaundice, chilblains
or epileptic fits, it's a sign you are
not well and are liable to die any
minute. Hasten to The
Star office and pay your subscrip-
tion a year in advance, and thus
make yourself solid with Editor
Bill for a good obituary notice.

If you, toot your little tooter
and then lay aside your horn,


marine by wholesale and retail
dealers.

there's not a soul in ten short
days will know that you are born.
The man who gathers pumpkin
is the man who plows all day,
and the man who keeps it hum-
ming is the man who makes it
pay.
The man who advertises with a
short and sudden jerk is the man
who blames the editor because it
will not work.
The man who gets the business
takes a long and steady pull, and
keeps the local paper from year
to year quite full.
He plans his advertising in a
careful, thoughtful way, and keeps
forever at it until he makes it
pay.
He has faith in tre future, can
withstand a sudden shock, for like
the man in scripture, he built his
business on a rock


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1937


PAGE TWO








R A


ri u ment, $154,000; judicial depart-
FlOlda S Budget ment, $549,700; supreme court,
$76,259.
For Fiscal Year Funds for the state prison, the
livestock sanitary board, the state
Totals $5 4 3 board of health and some other
Totals $5,406,366 departments are raised by ad va-
lorem taxes. Others are financed
Does Not Include Gasoline Tax, from the general revenue fund:
Eleven Million For Schools The budget amounts were fixed
And Other Large Items by the legislature in the biennial
appropriations for departments in
The state cabinet last week ap- the 1937 session. They may be re-
proved allotment of $5,406,366 to duced by the budget commission
the cost of general state govern- at any time, and no department
ment in the fiscal year beginning can, by law, exceed its appropria-
July 1. tion.
The expense, which is said to ---
be about the same as the last fis- CARVER DRUG COMPANY
cal year, covers the expense of If It's Drugs, We Have It.
the governor, cabinet offices and
the courts. It does not include the'Hack's Sweet Shop
$21,000,000 annual proceeds ofs U C
gasoline taxation, the $11,250,000 n for Business
going to schools, and other large
items.
Departmental budget figures for Next Door to Pete's Cash and
salaries and operating expenses Carry; Serves Sandwiches,
for the new year included: Gover- Soft Drinks, Ice Cream
nor's office, $51,680; secretary of
state, $69,260; comptroller, $184,- Harold Williams, a local high
186; state treasurer, $102,000; at- school boy known to his friends
torney general, $70,S64; superin- as "Hack," this week opened for
tendent of public instruction, business a new sweet shop in the
$110,280; vocational education, building adjoining Pete's Cash &
$487,801; free textbooks, $450,350; Carry formerly occupied by the
commissioner of agriculture, $96,- offices of Dr. Newberry.
000. The new establishment, known
Florida .state hospital, $1,528,- as Hack's Sweet. Shop, handles a
955; Florida farm colony, $142,000, complete line of ice cold soft
Industrial School for Boys, $225,- drinks, all kindss of sandwiches,
000; Industrial School for Girls, Solomon's ice cream (the best
$50,000; state board of forestry, there is) and, other delectable vi-
$414,255; state prison farm, $636,- ands that appeal to the public.
460; livestock sanitary board, The sweet shop is under_ the
$225,000; state board of health, capable management of Karl Hall,
$595,549; Florida National Guard, and from present indications it
$114,218; -.state auditing depart- is developing a large clientele.


SC. F. Marks, Standard Oil com- and to urge the adoption of a con-
1 n Launch pany, Apalachicola, chairman; R. stitutional amendment to accom-
M. Witherspoon, Gulf Refining plish that end.
7-Point Program company, Carrabelle, vice-chair- 3 To urge recognition of the
man; E. M. Spear, Standard. Oil fundamental principle that the
company, Apalachicola, secretary, state alone should tax gasoline,
Insist On Fair Taxation and New On the legislative committee are and to seek adoption of a consti-
Measures To Help L. H. Mahon, Gulf Refining conw- tutional amendment prohibiting
Motorists pany, Port St. Joe. chairman; C. municipalities from taxing this es-
R. Witherspoon, Gulf Refining sential commodity.
company, Apalachicola, vice-chair- 4 Tc urge that date for regis-
Meeting in Apalachicola last man; W. T. Wathen, Standard Oil tration of motor vehicles bV post-
week, oil men of Gulf and Frank- Co., Carrabelle; Wilbur Wells, pond to April 1.
lin counties, consisting of terminal Texaco, Port St. Joe.. To render assistance to state
5. To render assistance to state
operators, wholesale and retail The group ratified a seven-point and federal authorities in the de-
dealers and their employes, form- program which is being sponsored section and elimination of gasoline
ed the Franklin County Oil Men's by oil men throughout Florida, as tax evasion.
association, follows: 6. To urge the repeal of the un-
Acting as a co-operative group, 1. To advocate that the gaso- just and unfair federal gasoline
the organization is affiliated with line tax be reduced from seven and lubricating oil taxes.
the Florida Petroleum Industries to six cents per gallon. 7. To oppose all tax andi other
committee, and will work on a ,2. To insist that all gasoline proposals inimical to the pe-
non-partisan, non-political basis. and motor vehicle tax revenues be troleum industry and its motorist
Officers of the association are used for highway purposes only, customers.


onery


Printed by The Star

Commercial Shop Con-

tinues to Give the Best

of Satisfaction


Last -week we printed a .thousand
statements for a man who -has since
collected a small" fortune from a dead
aunt. ..

.Two months ago we. sold some per-,
.sonal stationery- to a young man to
use in writing to his sweetheart. A
Smooth later we 'printed wedding an-
nouncements for them ..

S 'Last, week .we printed sale bills for
the bride's father, and this week we
printed postal cards for the sheriff,
SE who is looking for the whole bunch.
PE
I By using our stationery and printing
you .can collect old accounts, tell for-
S. tunes, pFake rain, change the color of
your hair, be successful 'in business,
remove corns and warts, triumph over
your enemies, and get elected to of-
fice.


THE STAR

"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"

Envelopes -'-BillHeads Letterheads -' Posters
Placards--, Business Cards Dodgers,
All Kinds of Ruled. Forms.

WHEN. YOU..,NEED PRINTING PHONE 51.
And.Our Representative Will Call On You


FIRESTONE cuts the cost of Tire Safety
just at the time when you need a new set of tires. At
-this time of the year you should replace tires that are
worn and smooth for greatest safety during the
summer driving season. Tires may look alike on the
outside but inside they are different. The name
FIRESTONE on a tire is your assurance of extra
safety and long mileage because only Firestone Tires.,
are builtwith these patented and exclusive construction
features:
Gum-Dipping, the Firestone patented process by
which every fiber of every cord.in every ply is saturated
with -liquid rubber, counteracts tire-destroying
internal friction and heat which ordinarily cause
blowouts. Nine extra pounds of rubber are added to
every 100 pounds of cord.
Two Extra Layers of Gum-Dipped, Cords under
the tread, 'another patented Firestone construction
feature, protect against punctures.
Scientifically-Designed Non-Skid Tread made
of tough slow-wearing rubber, assures safer stops -
and longer non-skid mileage.
Now that Firestone gives you all of these safety and
economy features at these low prices, you cannot
afford to take chances with unsafe tires this summer.,
Come in today and join the Firestone Save-A-Life
Campaign by equipping your car with a set of new
Firestone Convoy Tires-the safest tires that money
can buy at these low prices,


THE VOICE OF P VESTONE every Monday, tE.P FIRES ONE VOICE F THE ARM Twice
evcnlngovertheNadtinwide N. B. C.'Red Network. weekly during the noon hour. Consult your local paper


LITTLE'S SERVICE STATION
PHONE 10 OPENDAY AND NIGHT PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
a I( .. I II. .


Stati
|


FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1937


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE








r


MRS. HILES COMPLIMENTS
NEW YORK VISITOR
Mrs. J. S. Hiles entertained yes
terday afternoon with an inform
tea at Van's recreation pavilion:
at Beacon Hill in honor of he
house guest, Miss Ruth McKowl
of Pleasantville, N. Y.
The spacious room where the
guests were entertained was at
tractively arranged with red zir
nias. Refreshments were serve
from a gaily decorated table]
carrying out the color scheme o
the national holiday. Mrs. Hile
was assisted in caring for he
guests by Mrs. J. A. Mira.
Guests at this lovely affair were
Mesdames Henry Lilius, Fred Cur
tis, J. A. Mira, Stephen Kaser, D
L. Owens, T. A. Owens, Richarc
Miller, Horace Soule, B. L. Kelly
George L. Snowcen, C. P. Van
Horn, E. Clay Lewis, Del Mahon
Harry Saunders, George Wimber
ly, Robert Bellows, J. L. Sharit
Edwin Ramsey, Ross Coburn, Jos
B. Gloekler, George Gore, Charles
Brown and Ross Watson; Miss
Bobby Watson, Miss Hazel Bills
of Jacksonville, and Miss Zenobia
Brown of Atlanta.

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS MEET
WITH BETTY JO LANE
The Lottie Moon Girls' Auxili-
ary met last Friday afternoon
for a short business meeting with
Miss Betty Jo Lane at her home.
The roll call was answered by
each member giving her favorite
Bible verse. The treasurer's re-
port was given by Miss Gwendo-
lyn Spencer and dues collected.
Payment on the Golden Jubilee
Tree'was 'made by several mem.
bers. An interesting talk on "Loy.
alty" was given by, Mrs. J. W.
Sisemore. Eight members and
three visitors were present.
The meeting adjourned to meet
this afternoon with Miss Carolyn
Baggett. .

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.

Mrs. Mary LeGallee, Mrs. Sadie
Hill and Miss Cordelia LaGallee
of Apalachicola were visitors in
the city. Monday to enjoy the
Fourth of July celebration.

Mercer P. Spear spent the week-
end. in Apalachicola with his par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. J, B. Spear.

,Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Watts re-
turned Wednesday from their
home in Lakeland, where they
.spent the week-end.

C. A. Tovey if he will stop in at
LeHardy's Pharmacy, has a free
ice cream sundae awaiting him.

Mrs. W. J.-Belin returned Wed-
nesday from Bogalusa, La., where
she visited her daughter, Mrs.
Nelson Haygood, for several
weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Tomlinson
returned Tuesday from Pearson,
Ga., where thpy spent the holidays
with relatives,

Mrs. A. N. Fortunas, Miss Lois
Harrison and. Miss Emophia For-
tunas of Apalachicola spent Wed-
nesday here.
*'*
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Miller
have moved into their new home
on Long avenue.

Mrs. Harry Towson of Gaines-
ville will arrive this week to visit
her daughter, Mrs. T. A. Owens.

Mr. and Mrs. Rose Watson and
daughter, Miss Bobby, spent the
last week-end in Tampa visiting
with friends.


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Services are held in the Ma-
sonic hall, over the postoffice.
Sunday School, 10 a. m. every
Sunday.
Preaching services 11:00 a. m.
every Sunday.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.


e .
CATHOLIC
S Father Massey, Priest
d Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
S H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
s Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. in.
s Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
SSaturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.
-fr-
FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
inm.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning worship 11 a. m.
B. T. U. 7 p. m.
Evening worship 8 p. m.
W. M. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
8 p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
4 p. m.

METHODIST W. M. S. IN
PATRIOTIC PROGRAM
The regular meeting of the
Methodist Missionary Society was
held Tuesday afternoon at the
church. After a short business
session conducted by the presi-
dent, Mrs. Boyd, a patriotic pro-
gram was presented as follows:
Song, "America"; prayer, Mrs.
Tom Gibson; talk on "World Fel-
lowship," Mrs. Bodge; solo, "My
Task," Mrs. Roy Gibson; duet,
Mrs. E. Ramsey and Mrs. C. E.
Boyer.
The meeting closed with sen.
tence prayers by the members.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
*fr
SMiss Enid Mathison spent the
holidays 'with relatives at her
home in DeFuniak Springs.
r 4
Mr. and-Mrs. Nan Page. Hall re-
turned to their home in Tallahas-
see Tuesday after spending a
week here as the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. W. J. Ferrell.

Hon. P. H. Pleoger of Darien,
Ga., was a visitor in the city Sat-
urday.

Miss Betty Parker Parnell of
Atlanta, Ga., arrived Wednesday
and will be the guest of Misses
Flora Mae and Hazel Cason for
several weeks.
**
H. A. Kidd returned Wednesday
after a short visit In Lynchburg,
Va. He was accompanied by his
family, who will make their home
in Port St. Joe.

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Edwardas
were guests over the week-end at
the Wakulla Spriuns' hotel.


LIONS ELECT NEW
OFFICERS FOR YEAR
At the regular meeting of the
Port St. Joe Lions Club held at
Stoutamire's dining room, officers
for the ensuing year were elected
as follows: B. G. McPherson,
president; George Gore, first vice-
president; M. K. Hurlbut, second
vice- president; Harold Palmer,
lion tamer; Joe Mira, tail twister;
Joe Gloeckler, secretary; Henry
Lilius, treasurer; Tom Owens and
Ed George, directors.
President McPherson expressed
his appreciation'of the honor be-
stowed upon him and stated that
he would endeavor to make this
club the best in this section of
the state. The retiring officers
thanked the members for the co-
operation accorded them during
their tenure of office and wished
all success to their successors.
It was voted to hold all future
meetings of the organization at


Stoutamire's.


MRS. T. OWENS ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. T. A. Owens entertained.
at her home Thursday evening
with a contract bridge party, the
occasion being tne regular meet-
ing of the Thursday Evening
Bridge club.
Garden flowers of mixed colors
were arranged on the veranda
where two tables of players were
entertained. At the conclusion of
three progressions, appropriate
prizes were awarded the winners.
Mrs. Owens' guests were Mrs.
Ross Coburn, Mrs. D. L. Owens,
Mrs. George Gore, Mrs. Horace
Soule, Mrs.''J B. Gloeckler, Mrs.
Edwin Ra&sey Mrs. Mark Tom-
linson, Mrs. Jessie M: Smith and
Mrs. E. Clay Lewis.

Mrs. Charles Doyle and Miss
Eva Doyle of Apalachicola were
the week-end guests of Mrs. Ches-
ter Edwards.

Mr. and Mrs. Winston Stewart
of Rockford, Ala., spent several
days here this week as the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Miller.

Miss Miriam Drenen Marshall of
Apalachicola is spending the week
as the guest of Miss Dorothy An-
derson at her Beacon Hill home.

Mrs. Robert Bellows left Tues-
day for Jacksonville where she
will spend a week.

Mrs. W. E. Murdock is invited
to have a free ice cream sundae
at LeHardy's fountain.

Arthur L. Core spent the holl-
days in Apalachicola with his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Core.

Mr. and Mrs. E. Clay Lewis
were Sunday visitors in Panama
City.

Miss Viola Barber spent Thurs,
day and Friday in the city visit-
ing friends.

Mi. and Mrs. 'Elgin Bayliss and
sons, Elgin and Billy, of Tallahas-
see, were the week-end guests of
Mrs. Bayliss' mother, Mrs. Nora
Howard.

Mrs. B. Z. Gray, Tommy and !
Billy Harper of Pensacola were ]
the week-end guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Jos. B. Gloekler.

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Hiles and t
Miss Ruth McKown spent the
week-end in Pensacola visiting
friends.
&* *f f
Mrs. W. J. Bledsoe and daugh- .
ters, ,Nancy and Jane, of Tallahas-
see, .were the' guests Sunday of
Mrs. J. B. Gloekier.


Society Personals Churches

MRS. JOS. B. GLOEKLER, Editor


Tower of Suit


t


BAPTISTS HEAR SPEAKERS
AT ALL-DAY SESSION
Baptists of Port St. Joe anc
neighboring towns gathered here
Wednesday in the high school au
ditorium in a district meeting tak
ing the place of the regular yearly
Baptist assembly.
Many notable speakers address
ed the gathering from the theme
"I Will Build My Church." Dr. C
M. Brittain, executive secretary
gave a lecture on "Activities ol
Laymen In the Church"; Hugl
Latimer, Brotherhood secretary.
delivered an interesting message
on "Stewardship"; Miss Louise
Smith, W. M. U. secretary, awak
ened the minds of her listeners tc
the deplorable condition of mis
sions as she spoke about the Wa
man's Missionary Union.
O. K. Radford, B. T. U. secr.e
tary, told of the great possibilities
of the Baptist Training Union and
especially the opportunity to in
crease the attendance of the eve
ning worship. Miss Effie Suttor
was next on the program, bring
ing to her audience the story of
the Baptist Book Store. Dr. W.
W. William, Sunday school secre
tary for the state, was really at
his best in the delivery of his
message.
Without a doubt Dr. E. D. Solo
mon, of the Baptist Witness, stole
the meeting with his wonderful
address on the subject, "The Win-
dows of Heaven."

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.

H. B. Whitaker spent the July
Fourth week-end in Gainesville
with his family.

Mrs. Jessie M. Smith and daugh.
ter, Mary Jean, spent the week-
end. in Albany, Ga., visiting rela-
tives.

Mrs. E. C. Cason and son Em-
ory spent several days this week
in Lake City. They were accom-
panied home by the Misses Flora
and Hazel Cason who spent the
past month there Visiting rela-
tives.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Little of We-
wahitchka and and Mr. and Mrs.
Gordon Warren of Blountstown
were the Sunday guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Lovett Mahon.

H. E. Ross returned Monday
from Jacksonville, where he spent
the holidays with his family.

Mrs. Thomas McPhaul returned
Monday to Gainesville, where she
is attending the summer session
at the University of Florida, after
spending the holidays here with
her family.

Mrs. T. R. L. Carter is invited
to partake of an ice cream sundae
without cost at LeHardy's.
*r
Mrs. Sammie Davis, who is at-
tending the summer session at
the Florida State College for We-
men in Tallahassee, returned to
the city 'for the holiday. She has
not returned to Tallahassee due
to the injuries sustained by her
son.

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Marks of
Apalachicola were visitors in the
city Sunday.

Prof. and Mrs. W. H. Drake and
family of Colquitt, Ga., spent
Monday in the city as guests of
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake.

F. 0. and J. D. Drake and fam-
ilies of Bainbridge, Ga., were in
the city Monday veslting with Mr.
and Mrs. H. A. Drake.

H. H. Saunders has returned
rom Tampa where he spent a
week on business.
,. :
Bill Alderman spent the week.
end in Lakeland visiting relatives.


8ruking 400-foot Tower ot the
hKa, at t-e 'lSGolde' Gate' Ia
r utmaal Exposition- m Tre-
ret Island Ia San -Fraiseo Bay.
m ,twer ..pow hearing eel-
WilU ase a riUk, aI44
aig *a wfihw wM-farwim bten
gers wIn sly threagLt the
a of tbmh F ..



IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork'
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR


iE~;l M, 2-'mu-K, anwww"Ir''~7~


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PO-RT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY Ll, 1937


WOOD FIBER

FLOWERS

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
FOR CORSAGES
They Look Natural and Last
for Monthe
Priced at 25c, SOc, $75c and $1.00



MRS. W. S. SMITH ,.
Star Building Port St. Joe

ll yii L Blm mij min i ll








FRDYJLY8 13 TESTR PR S.JOFLRDAPGEFV


GULF COUNTY

BENEFITS IN

AID TO AGED

AVERAGE GRANT IS ALMOST
DOUBLE THAT OF
YEAR AGO

Progress made by the state wel-
fare board in administering old
age assistance and aid, to the blind
during its first year is revealed in
a statistical report just released
by C. C. Codrington, state welfare
commissioner.
The period covered is for the
year beginning July 1, 1937, at
which time the board was in-
ducted into office, through June of
this year. During that period old
age assistance grants increased
from a total of 10,838 cases receiv-
ing $125,240.74 to 29,469 cases re-
ceiving $428,795. The average
grant was $11.56 on July 1, 1937,
and $14.55 for June, 1938.
The aid to the blind program
did not get under way until Janu-
ary, with only 47 checks issued
for the month. During June 1,426
checks were issued for a .total of
$11,019. The average grant for
this year was $13.47.
Gulf county was receiving $307
in old age assistance in July, 1937,
with 41 recipients enrolled;, and in
June, 1938, was receiving $1,253,
distributed among 93 recipients.
The average grant for July of last
year was $7.49, and for June of
this year was $13.47.
Half of the money paid out in
old age assistance iin Gulf county
prior to July of last year, came
fron county coffers. None: of the
funds received, since. Juie of 1937
have come from, the.county treas-
ury iherfeby reli vlig Its 'public
'assistance burden a'gd enabling
:the .,county .to care more gener-
ously for those in need-. of direct
relief.
* Although only four counties ben-
etitted from aid to the blind in
January of this year, all of them
were profiting from this form of
assistance last month. In Gulf
county four persons' received $85
during June.
---.
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.


Boy Injured When

Car Strikes Bicycle

Carlyle Matthews Suffers Serious
Injuries In Accident
On Highway

Carlyle Matthews, 15 year- old
son of Mr. and Mrs. James S. Da-
vis of this city, was seriously in-
jured Monday afternoon when he
was struck by an automobile on
Monument avenue near the home
of Mayor J. L. Sharit.
The boy was returning to his
home after playing with the high
school band for-the Fourth of July
celebration when the accident oc-
curred. Driver of the car was Miss
Anne Demos of -Apalachicola.
Young Matthews'was rushed to
the office of Dtr. L. H. Bartee for
treatment, where it was found
that the handlebar of the bicycle
had passed completely through the
right leg some distance above the
knee, and that he had sustained a
severe scalp wound and minor
cuts and bruises about the head
and body.
Following first aid treatment he
was rushed to a Panama City hos-
pital and reports yesterday were
that he was restIng comfortably.
His mother, Mrs. Laneta Davis,
has been at his bedside since the
time of the accident.
Carlyle had returned Friday eve-
ning to the city from Alabama
where he had spent several weeks
with his grandparents.


Road System In

Need of Millions

Group Informed

Development and Maintenance of
Good Roads Necessary In Prog-
ress of State, Says G. P. Wood

Legislators and state road de-
partment officials meeting in Tal-
lahassee last week estimated that
about $142,800,000 is needed to put
the Florida highway system into
first class condition for present-
day traffic.
Arthur B. Hale, road depart-
ment chairman, said more money
must be provided for highway
work, or the present system must
be reduced to meet the present in-
come.
He handed to ten legislators a
compilation listing at $238,000,000
the investment in the present sys-
tem of state roads, with an income
of $8,500,000 this year from state
sources for maintenance and new
construction, not including federal
funds.
The legislative group began a
study of the highway system and
its future requirements, and will
submit a report to the 1939 legis-
lature.
Representative G. Pierce Wood
of Liberty county andi Senator J.
Locke Kelly of Clearwater said
the road department should have
more money.
"The proper development and
maintenance of good roads is
necessary in the progress of Flor-
ida," said Wood.
"Since it doesn't seem possible
to get any more money, there ap-
pears? to be only one 'plan left-
reducing the system," said Sena-
tor G. F. Westbrook of Clermont.
The legislators will study a pro-
posal by Representative Dwight
L. Rogers of Broward .county to
do away with the present first,
second and third preferential sys-
tem for road construction and es-
tablish instead a system of pri-
mary and secondary roads'. The
primary system would be princi-
pally the main line highways on
which federal aid funds are avail-
able.
No definite decisions were made
and the committee will hold other
meetings before January 1. Mean-
while three sub-committees will
study highway laws and finances,
present and future operations and
future planning. The main com-
mittee is made up of a senator
andi representative from each con-
gressional district.
The committee will not be con-
cerned with individual road proj-
ects and will not hear any dele-
gations.

FIND USE FOR MANGO SEEDS

Hillsborough county home dem-
onstration women have found a
use for mango seeds. Cleaning and
scraping then, they are painted
and polished, a small eyelet in-
serted at the top, and they make
excellent window shade string
tassels.
____*------
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Chapman
and children of Tallahassee spent
the week-end with Mr. and Mrs.
James S. Davis.

Some men are so unlucky they
would walk out of their way to
step In a bear trap.

Miss Zenobia Brown arrived
this week from Atlanta, Ga., to
visit her sister, Mrs. J. L. Sharit,
for two weeks.

Miss Hazel Bilk of Jacksonville
is the attractive house guest of
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sharit.
S* r *
Mrs. B. Owens is invited to have
a free ice cream sundae at the
L-sHardy Pharmacy.


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Legion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Woman's Club meeting First
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
Port Inn parlor.

John O'Keefe is invited to have
an ice cream sundae at the ex-
pense of LeHardy's Pharmacy.

Henry Hiles spent the week-end
in Tallahassee visiting his par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. George Hiles,
Sr.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.
-4--------
FOURTH CELEBRATION
GOES OVER IN BIG WAY

(Continued from Page 1)
ground, and the others washed
him thoroughly as they advanced
to the stake. The crowd then ad-
journed to the ball park.
Following the ball game there
was a battle royal between six
negroes in the Lion's club arena
at the park, which was a laugh-
able affair, for each was furnished
with two socks filled with sawdust
and early in the fight the socks
burst and sawdust filled the air.
Some of the combatants wrapped
the socks around their fists and
continued the fight until stopped
by Referee Haley. No winner be-
ing possible, the stake money was
divided equally between, the con-
testants, which, met. th th. ap-
proval of everyone.
Parade at 7:30
The next featuic or the day was
begun at 7:30 with a parade along
Reid avenue, beginning at Second
street, going. to the depot and
:hen back down Reid avenue to
Fifth street and thence to the
band stand in the park. The pa-
rade was led by the high school
hand headed by Miss Virginia
Stoutamire as drum major. She
put the 'band through several
maneuvers which drew heavy ap-
plause, and they played a number
of marches as they progressed. At
the stand they rendered several
selections, among them patriotic
numbers and religious hymns.
Our band is making a hit when-
ever and wherever they appear,
and the audience of about 600 at
the stand gave them round after
round of applause.
Darden Haley acted as master
of ceremonies for the evening's
program, and he first called on
Rev. HI. F. Beaty for the invoca-
tion. Dick Rector said a few words
on behalf of the Port St. Joe
Chamber of Commerce, under
whose auspices, combined with
the American Legion, the program
was arranged, and then the
speaker of the evening, Rev.
Carlton of Panama City, was
introduced.
Inspiring Address
Rev. Carlton, who is commander
of the American Legion post of
Panama City, gave an inspiring
talk on the reasons for celebrating
the Fourth of July, and beauti-
fully brought out its application to
the present generation. He greatly
impressed the audience by his
closing remarks wnen he stated
that America is not great because
of its politics, because of its mills
and factories, because of its busi-
ness of any line, but because of
its inherent patriotism instilled
into the minds of everyone, and
because of the observance of a
policy.of wanting every nation to
live, and for universal peace. He
is a very able speaizer, and the
chamber of commerce will en-


leavor to have him give another been heard about the entire cele-
address in the near future. bration, which was conceived and
The master of ceremonies then carried out in three weeks' time.
called upon T. W. Wilson, origi- Many who were out of town or
nator of the idea of building a visiting in other towns for the
band stand and conducting pub- day, have expressed regrets at
lie programs, who spoke of the' missing the celebration and de-
aims for finishing the work begun clare they will be present next
and of having committees ap- time.
pointed from all lodges, clubs and Tlre coirmittee in charge of the
churches to meet with the central affair consisted of C. A. Tovey,
committee to form programs so chairman; T. M. Schneider, W. H.
that there will ba constant public Turner, W. W. Barrier, T. W. Wil-
use of the stage and the beauti- son, R. C. Rector, Robert Haley
ful park in which It stands. He and W. S. Smith.
told of the co-operation of the Du- ---
Pont interests in helping to have CARVER DRUG COMPANY
these programs for the people Registered Pharmacists
and of the hearty assistance of'
the business men of the city and' .. .. ....,,,
surrounding towns.
It is hoped: that funds can be KEEP COOL!
raised in the near future for com-
pletion of the band shell, which
has gotten away to a good start, You don't have to worry
for the purchase of an amplifying when the mercury spurts up
system to bring out the programs -just drop in to
to their highest beauty, and for a
lighting system that will help to
make the programs enjoyable. lACK'S SWEET


Mr. Wilson also announced that
union services of the churches of
the city will be held each Sunday
evening at the band stand. He
also announced a band concert
for next Sunday afternoon.
Brilliant Fireworks
Following Wilson's talk the
hour for the fireworks arrived
and the signal was given. C. A.
Tovey and Robert Haley had been
busy for two hours setting up the
fireworks, which had. arrived from
New Jersey on the morning train,
and at the signal a bomb was shot
into the air and the glory of a
perfect Fourth or July was then
celebrated in brilliant colors.
For an hour the crowd was en-
tertained by rockets, flower pots,
pinwheels, candles and, bombs, and
everyone voted it an exception-
ally, fine display.
Many favorable -comments :have


SHOP
(Next Door to Pete's Cash
and Carry)
FOR SOME


Ice Cream
0-

SANDWICHES
All Kinds of Ice Cold

SOFT DR IN KS


HAROLD WILLIAMS,. Prop.
(Local high school boy, bet-
ter known as "Hack")
KARL L. HALL, Manager
C -L-^ --n -- L c* **-*-.) *. ^* A ^


We Are Now Open At Our

New Place of Business

DIRECTLY ACROSS FROM BUS STATION


We Are Equipped To Handle Your Wantrs In

GAS APPLIANCES
Metered Gas Through Underground Mains To Your Home
See Us Before You Build

RANGES AS LOW AS $ 34.9

ST. JOE GAS COMPANY
A. M. MITCHELL, Manager





FOR SALE


Building, including Shelv-

ing, Counter, Table, Coca-

Cola Box, Scales, and Ap-

proximately $100 of re-

maining Stock. All for ..



$100 CASH


Must Be Sold At Once




C. A. PHELPS


Owner


Highland View


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1937








A P -, ...


RAPID DEVELOPMENT

Research in the oil industry has
developed so rapidly that more
than 400 refineries operate in 33
states.


WHEN YOU

FISH
STOP AT -

MIDWAY PARK
5 Miles North Wewahitchka
-0--
On the Famous Dead Lakes,
Center of Florida's Best
Freeh Water Fishing
-o----

B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.



FISHING--

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.

TROUT
BA S.S
BREAM

BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.
SEE-


J. O. 'Jim' SMITH

-SUMATRA, FLA.
^ i*^ *- ~--L-* 1-1_-__-_


SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT .

The plait' thdt furnishes
you ice the year roundd

ST. OE ICE

COMPANY
Max Kilbourn, Pfop."'
Manufacturers of
CRYST A L ICE
From Treated Water









(REDjT ID
*- A
; PATRO0t1E A .
HOME-OWNED
STORE" ,
Our Prices Are
S LOWER!
Our Terms
E EASIER

Oldest F.urniture Store. in.
Gulf County
S-- :-

BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


State Real Estate TRADE IN


Tax Remains Same

Governor Cone Announces That
Rate Has Been Set At
3% Mills

Governor Fred P. Cone an-
nounced this week that there
would, be no increase in the state
tax on real estate, which has been
set at 3% mills, the same as last
year.
Florida counties are required to
levy this tax for the state in ad-
dition to county villages for local
operations. Last year the amount
produced by this tax was close to
one million dollars.
One mill is for the state school
fund, one-half for the state live-
stock sanitary board, three-eighths
mill for the state prison fund,
three-quarters for the free text-
book fund, and one-half mill for
the pension fund.
-- -----__----
MURPHY ACT PUTS
BURDEN ON THOSE
KEEPING UP TAXES

(Continued from page 1)
being saddled on the backs of the
people who have been paying
their taxes all these years.
One county netted a full, round
goose egg, the Murphy Act buyers
in Monroe county failing to bid as
much as a thin dime of the taxes
for $186,906 in tax liens. In this
county the buyers bid only the
costs. -
IA 6ome counties, tax-paying
groups refused to permit the ter-
rific losses andi organized their
own groups to bid against the
Murphy buyers, Leon proving the
.most successful by netting more
than 50 cents on the dollar for its
tax liens as $9,045 of tax assets
brought the -county $5,906.
Other counties were as follows:
County- Liens Sold Realized&
Alachua ...$133,764.38 $ 987.62
Baker ...... 20,178.67 183.19
Bradford ... 103,126,24 20,095.53
Brevard" .... 163,916.89 '1,450:34
Broward ... 139,714.00 456.37
Charlotte ... 145,101.75 5,787.89
Citru ... .. ...... 1,483.90
Clay,...... 29,888.74 .........
Collier ..... 13,181.55 5,269.03


Columbia ... 19,294.25
Dade ..... 884,736.81
DeSoto .... 179,690.38
Duval ..... ........ .
Escambia ... 499,487.38
Faigler .... 196,819,39
Gadsdnh ... 9,462.95
Gilchrist ... 23,530.06 .
Glades ..... 14,959.59
Hamilton .. 46,511.96
Hardee .:... 46,020.73
Hendry ..... 32,329.35
Highlands .. 115,642.86
Hillsborough 124,032.99
Holmes .... 62,581.01
Indian River 28,182.88
Jackson .... 5,684.07
Jefferson .. 6,453.51
Lafayette .. 6,978.13
Lake ....... 594.718.57
Lee ........ 124,186.51
Levy ...... 27,050.70
Madison ... 13,602.10
Maaatee ... 445,731.09
Marion ..... 665,442.19
Pasco ...... 160,966.63
Pinellas .... 89,519.11
Polk ....... 217,285,23
Martin ..... 115,776.09
Nassau ..... 53,170.25
Okaloosa ... 41,191.04
Okpechobee 61,324.42
Orange .... 310,441.31
Osceola .... 20,802.13
Palm Beach. 14,992.84
St. Lucie .. 341,866.18
Sarasota ... 273,381.90
Seminole ... 27.3,350.84
Sumter ..... 233,911.64
Suwannee .. 83,372.45
Union ..... 326516.69
Volusia .... 369,485.04
Walton. ...... .60,519.69


Washington .r 35,758.65


128.28
6,652.93
2,299.68
8,300.04
2,006.22
5,889.11
56.77
613.28
1,093.09
S98.48
797.86
228.26
652.63
4,407.98
330.79
537.97
152.06
1,406.00
494.00
2,060.00
13,599.08
395:73
259.22
17,301.29
11,955.94
2,860.65
1,063.68
1,683.39
1,064.91
760.43
442.32
S730.76
16,400.85
805.11
11,850.50
873,97
2,473.24
1,186.22
1,473.24
7,851.92
263.95
2,729.48
469.30
S164.86


CARVER DRUG COMPANY
.Clomplete LAne of Magazipes.


ONE MILE WEST OF PORT ST. JOE





LAND VIEW


OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT!


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


One nice thing about being in-
vited to a Florida citrus banquet
is that it provides an opportunity
for a fellow to catch up on his
consumption of Hawaiian pine-
apple and California canned fruits,
but then I suppose serving "citrus
fruit" to citrus growers would be
something' like carrying' coals to
Newcastle or making' a shoemaker
wear shoes.
Anyhow, I enjoyed a delightful
evening last week as a guest of
the Florida citrus commission at
a dinner held in Lake Wales to
give growers, shippers and news-
paper men an opportunity to join
in a round-table discussion of "the
things that were done and should
not have been done, and the
things undone that should have
been done and where do we go
from here?"
Just how much good was accom-
plished is more ou less problem-
atical, but nevertheless it gave a
lot of folks an opportunity to ex-
hale their ideas, some of which
were potently pregnant,
The general impression prevail-
ing seemed to be that next season
Florida is gonna have enough
grapefruit to fill e Grand Can-
yon, with the bulk of this fruit
all cluttered up inside with a mess
of seeds, while the trade favors
seedless varieties. Some folks felt
an effort should be made to in-
fluence the public away from the
infertile fruit and glorify those
with seeds. Maybe advertising' our
"Seedy" fruit is all right, but it
leaves a lot *of' leeway for misun-
derstandin'on the consumer's part.
Another question that arose
was whether or not Florida fruit
should be soldI by the dozen or by
the pound, and it was pointed out
that Florida fruit carries more
weight than that of competitive
sections, but if. you ask me we
better get busy and sell it by the
carload if we want to keep a jump
ahead of the well Known wolf. I
used to sell mine by the yard: $3
for the front yard and $4.25 for
the back yard.
Somebody tlhouist tat if we'd
quit quarrelin' with the rustmites
and just sit back and let the little
devils get caught up with their
tattooin' we could advertise our
fruit as "Russets" and develop an
exclusive market. The name "Sun
Tanned Fruit" was suggested, and
the .idea isn't as. screwey as it
sounds. (The deep-throated grow:
of opposition you hear comes
from insecticide manufacturers.)
But kiddin' aside, the present
citrus problem is the grower's
"morning after" and it is a head-
ache and hangover that we can't
laugh off. Our only answer is sin-
cere and intelligent co-operation
of all interests, to the end that
the good of all will be served. A
billion dollar advertising campaign
won't help a group who won't try
to help themselves, and cutting
each others' throats, throwing
monkey wrenches, and gypping
the public may be a delightful
sport but it's damned poor busi-
ness, only some folks have to live
a long time before they find it out.
When.we substitute brains, hon-
essty, energy and confidence in
:he place of selfishness, greed,
suspicion and sharp practice, we'll
find black ink replacing red ink
on our balance sheets.

Read the ads-it pays!


PRICES CONSISTENTLY LOWER!


GEORGIA AND FLORIDA
GET TOGETHER ON FISH
BOAT LICENSING ROW

Agree To Slash License In Half
For Year At Conference

Georgia andi Florida entered a
reciprocal agreement Friday at a
conference in Atlanta to slash in
half their $500 licenses on out-of-
state fish dealers.
It was agreed that about fifty
shrimp boats seized by special
agents at Savannah on charges of
non-payment of licenses, would be
released upon payment of $200 li-
censes provided they did not en-
gage in fish business in Georgia
any more this year.
Any of these boats continuing to
engage in fishing in Georgia will
be required to pay half the regu-
lar fee, or $250.
-----.-.-----
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.
-K
A LOT OF CIGARS
Tampa's cigar production so far
this year totals over 386,000,000,
or two million above last year
during the same period,


Save by reading the ads-
Save by reading the adsl


SKATE.--
for Health's Sake!
Skating is one of the most
enjoyable and health-giving
exercises that can be found.


COME OUT TO THE NEW
SKATING RINK IN HIGH.
LAND VIEW AND HAVE A
MOST ENJOYABLE TIME


BEGINNERS WELCOME!
We Have Competent Instruc-
tors to Care for Those Just
Learning to Skate


Bring the Kiddies Out and
Let Them Have a Good Time




Williams'

Skating Rink
C. C. WILLIAMS, Prop.


Sea Foods
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
We Carry a Wide Variety of Sea Foods
- OYSTERS IN SEASON ---

E. L .ANDERSON FISH COMPANY
1/2 Mile W. Port St. Joe On Panama City Highway
-" - -. A l ._ -. -. .


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHERE BUSINESS IS BRISK YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND
S. FRESH GROCERIES


MILK 4 Small
or 2 Large .........


I TOMATOES- 2
S6 cans for ..........24c


r Henderson's
,. r- Granulated 5 "


Kill Kwick Mosquito ,
Spray; 75c size-.... ..


Crystal White .
TOILET SOAP, 6 for C
SPAr 4FTTIr ^, o


POTTED MEAT, 6 for 24c OU P%%Jrlr Ix-
POT, 6 for 24c LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs...13c
FIELD CORN, 3 cans 24c MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c
COOKING OIL, gal....85c 3 lbs. Whole Grain RICE 20c

Nice Large NEW PO- Best Grade White
TATOES, 3c lb.; 10 Ibs. 25 Ring Flour, 12 lbs. t

Golden Brand Oleo, 2 lb 25c Wilson's Choice CURED 9 '
West. T-Bone STEAK, Ib. 30g HAM, per pound .....
Oil Sausage, gal ............95c Country BUTTER, lb....35c
We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT


BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY S, 1937


I


r..,;, iii,,,,, i~~l~~~l


4


k







FIAY JUL 8,13 H TR OTS. OFOIAPG EE


THE POCKETBOOK

of KNOWLEDGE Ios


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
-0-
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE., FLA.


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.


Professional Cards



William A. Young, R. A.


FISHING INDUSTRY
BRINGS BIG SUMS
Valued At $20,000,000 Annually,
Represents Valuable Resource

Florida fishermen are contrib-
uting lavishly to the nation's
choicest food supply. The fishing
industry represents one of the
most valuable resources of Flor-
ida.
R. L. Dowling, supervisor of
.oonservatinn, is authority for the
statement that fish, oysters and
-ihrimp represent productive in-
duptry in this state valued at $20,-
100,000 annually.
Florida's coastal waters are the
source from which comes a va-
'ioty of sea foods that eventually
will fill the market basket of a na-
t!o: already hungry for them.
Dowling's problem, he said, is
to conserve the supply, increase
the production and facilitate the
handling of this food supply.
Added to these duties is that of
enlisting the support of the fisher-
men and the public in a wide-
spread campaign of education
that will multiply sales and great-
ly increase consumption in Flor-
ida and outside the state.
------S-----
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
------C------
If you want -things to come to
you, let the other fellow do the
waiting.


FLA.


DR. I C. COE
- DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Tuesday and Fridays;

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
Moved Next to Costin's Store
Panama City Port St. Joe


Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others .
Let your family enjoy
some today.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

. SOLOMON' S

Dairy

Products

I------------------v vv vve

GULF VIEW:

TAVERN 4


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent
.................


BOARD BLAMES

TARPON MASTER

HOLDS CAPTAIN ERRED IN
NOT ALLOWING SHIP TO
BE BEACHED

A marine investigating board
meeting in Washington, D. C.,
blamed the late W. G. Barrow,
ship's master, in connection with
the foundering of the steamship
Tarpon in the Gulf of Mexico near
St. Andrews Bay last September 1.
The report, approved by Secre-
tary of Commerce Roper, said loss
of the vessel resulted from the
"unwarranted determination" of
the master to hold it on its course
and in his continued countermand-
ing of the mate's orders to beach
the ship. Captain Barrow and the
mate, W. H. Russell, lost theil
lives along with 16 others.
Thie board, which expressed the
opinion the ship might have been
saved if it had been beached, said
the boat when it left Pensacola,
carried, six persons in excess of
the number allowed by its cer-
tificate. The vessel, the report
said, was seriously overcrowded
and did not have a load line as
required by law.
The Tarpon left Pensacola Au-
gust 21, encountering a storm
that reached "gale proportions"
about dawn of September 1 Al-
though a portion of the cargo was
jettisoned when the ship began to
list, the board said it never re-
covered and "foundered at about
8:30 a. m., September 1." Eight
of the crew were saved.

The name "Old Glory" for the
name of the United States flag
was first applied in 1831 by Wil-
liam Driver, a ship captain of
Salem, Mass.


WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULIIG
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W. HORTON
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
.. . . .


CLOSE SCHOOL

AT OVERSTREET

CHILDREN WILL BE BROUGHT
BY BUS TO PORT ST.
JOE SCHOOL

At a recent meeting of the Gulf
county school board held in We-
wahitchka, Mrs. R. B. Hardy and
Charles Gaskin, trustees of special
tax school district No. 11, sub-
mitted a written request that the
school at Overstreet be discon-
tinued and transportation facili-
ties be provided; for children in
the vicinity of Overstreet and
Beacon Hill to the Port St. Joe
school.
The request also asked that
a portion of the maintenance
funds of the district be trans-
ferred to the Port St. Joe school
to defray expenses of children
from district 11 attending this
city's school.
After discussing the matter
from all angles, it was unanimous-
ly voted by the board of public in-
struction t h a t the Overstreet
school be discontinued., transpor-
tation facilities he provided for
the students, and that funds of
tihr district be allocated to the
Port St. Joe school, except such
funds as would be necessary to
keep the Overstreet school build-
ing in repair.
The following bills in District
No. 16 (Port St. Joe) were paid
by the board: Royal Typewriter
Co., two typewriters, $120; H. &
W. B. Drew Co., window shades,
$50; E. C, Pridgeon, tax collector,
$1.39; City of Port St. Joe, .water,
$8.13; B. E. Parker, delivering
ballot box, $2.50; Gulf County
Breeze, notice and ballots, $8.50;
Follett Book Co., book, $1.60; Dan-
ley Furniture Co., chairs, $12.00;
Florida Power Corp., lights, $11.62;
Encyclopedia Britannica, balance,
due, $29.67.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
-----_------
ASBESTOS FABLE
The ancient Tartars believed as-
bestos, developed by modern in-
dustry into a product of many
uses, to be the skin of the sala-
mander, fabled beast that lived in
fire,


Let Us Service YOUR Car Today
For economical and efficient opera-
ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
C service it with our modern equipment
WASHING-
-POLISHING-
-GREASING
.Texaco Product -

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
Wilbur Wells Jesse Darcey

- %- = _-_-_ %_ -------------- ------- .
- ^- ^ *- *- -^ *- .t ^i




Give YOUR


Family a Home


In Beacon Hill

Subdivision
Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means. .



Lots $50 to $600
$10.00 DOWN AND $5.00 PER WEEK
WHY PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. .
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent. .


LET US SHOW YOU!


0
COTTAGES FOR RENT




Beacon Hill


Development Company


BEACON HILL, FLA.


INVESTIGATE!


ARCHITECT
and Associates
PANAMA CITY


I-L-l '--LIPCIL~d4se*- -bdl~~-LQLi~C)L~V- -~-L~L -Y-r )~~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN


FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1937


J. S. PATRICK








A E


tLOCALS SE TWO in the surprise of the day. He did
L AL LOSE TWO not look the part as he walked to


BALL GAMES BUT

MAKE FINE SHOW

LEGION JUNIORS LOSE 9 TO 5
TO WEWA, AND BLOUNTS-
TOWN WINS 5 TO 3

Port St. Joe's two ball teams,
the American Legion Junior lads
and the town team, both met de-
''uat in the Fourth of July exhibi-
tions, but both went down fight-
ing up to the last pitched ball.
The Juniors opened the day's
festivities by taking on the We-
wahitiika Juniors at 10 o'clock
in the local ball park. The Port
St. Joe boys were beaten by a 9
to 5 score, but fought all the way,
with the breaks of the game going
against them. Never for a moment
did they give up, and with that
spirit they will win many games
in the future as they become bet-
ter seasoned.
Claude Stoutamire was the
starting pitcher for the locals,and
for six innings had the Wewa
boys bewildered with Ls dazzling
speed, and assortment of curves.
Errors scored two runs in the
first inning, and one in the second
came as the result of wild throws.
In the sixth inning he weakened,
and this, coupled with some fluke
bounds of the ball, started a scor-
ing spree. He voluntarily retired
from the box when he saw his
curves breaking badly and his
straight balls being hammered.
Young Pridgeon took his place
on the mound and succeeded in
stopping the rally after two had
scored, and held the visiting team
well in hand from then on. The
local boys seemed to have better
team work as the game went on,
and had there been another inn-
ing perhaps- there would have
been a different story to tell.
A crowd of more than 100 wit-
nessed this game and were well
pleased with it.
The second game of the day
took place between the Port St.
Joe and Blountstown town teams.
ilt was a hard-fought game at all
.times, as the score of 5 to 3 indi-
_cates, the locals being on the
short end. A crowd of 500 saw
this .game and had many oppor-
itiaities to cheer e: uzrilliant plays
by both teams.
It seemed to be hard for either
side to get a clean hit, for always
there was a player waiting. How-
ever, several sizzling liners went
for hits and one beautifull Texas
leaguer over second was a fea-
ture. Snappy double plays ended
rallies more than once.
One boner was pulled by the
visitors when with a n an on first
the batter bounded one high in
the air to the third baseman. The
runner 'evidently did not see the
ball hit tie ground and ran slowly
toward second, ani when the ball
was caught and thrown to first to
cui him off, as he thought, he
started to walk from the field, be-
lievi-:g he was out. But the throw
had merely retired the batter and
the first baseman tossed the ball
io Dick Rector at second who, in-
stead of touching second, and re-
tiring the runner, elected to run
back and tag him, which h'e barely
succeeded in doing.
The Blountstown pitcher was
very steady all the way, and
-e-sperially good in the pinches. He
.pitched the full nine innings. Tom
Pridgeon started the game for St.
Joe, and while he had splendid
breaks on his curves he had some
-difficulty in locating the plate and
was succeeded in the second inn-
Sing by Ralph Swatts, who pitched
). ,bfaaufiful game and was never
in difficulty. He is a fine pitcher


the box, nor did his windup im-
press anyone that he could pitch,
but he opened up on the first bat-
tor with a fast one that was met
soundly and went through second
with the speed of the wind. But
ihat was the end of it, for his
curves were whippet in, and with
the batters breaking their backs
reaching for them where they
weren't he retired the side on
'even more pitched balls, tire first
of which caused an out by an in-
eli d pop fly and the next two
h'lyters retiring on strikes with
only three balls being served to
-eac. HIe has earned the right to
:ry again and we expect much
from him. Lefty had already done
a good job at first, stopping many
wild throws and tagging the bag
ahead of the runner. All the lo-
cal players, both infield and out,
took care of everything that came
their way.
(------
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
---- --~-----
ST. JOE GAS COMPANY
MOVES TO NEW OFFICES
The St. Joe Gas Company has
moved its offices from the Bar-
gain Furniture Store, in the new
Costin building, to the store build-
ing on Reid avenue formerly oc-
cupied, by Geiger's department
store, across from the bus station.
The gas company has on dis-
play in their new quarters a com-
plete line of gas ranges and other
appliances.
-------+-<-----
UNION SERVICES TO BE
HELD EACH SUNDAY

(Continued from Page 1)
that the following choruses will
be used and requests that those
planning to attend clip these out
and bring them to the service:
HEAR CHRIST CALLING
Come to the Church; I will bless
you there.
Study My Word; Learn to do My
Will.
All men are lost; If they believe
not.
I shed My Blood; To save you
from sin.
I died for you; That you may live
for Me.
Believe in Me; Receive Eternal
Life.
I give you power; To be Sons of
God.
I am the Way; Of Life, Peace and
Joy.
I am the Door; come in to be
safe.
1 am the Bread; Eat and. you shall
live.
I am the Light; leave the dark-
ness now.
If you love Me; You will obey
Me.
I an Ithe Vine; But you bear the
fruit.
What a friend we have in Jesus,
All our joys and pleasures share.
Precious Saviour, how we love
Thee,
And rejoice in hours of prayer.
By Thy presence give us Thy
peace.
Give us joy in midst of pain;
In Thy arms hold and, fold us,
Till in heaven with Thee we reign.

In case of inclement weather,
the union services will be held at
the Methodist church.
Rev. J. W. Sisemore stated yes-
terday that the First Baptist
church voted not to join the union
services due to the belief that it
would, hurt the fall attendance
and also the fact that they are
constructing a new church and it
would cut down considerably on
money being raised for the
project.


CARVER DRUG COMPANY


and with him in the box we ought Complete Line of Magazines.
to win many a game. He is also a -----------
good batter, which is a rarity in Miss Margaret LeHardy, Miss
a pitcher. Blanche LeHardy and Mrs. Rober-
The final inning was pitched by son, all of Albany, Ga., were visit-
Leity Wadsworth, and he turned ing relatives here Tuesday.


I


There are 34,000,000 radio sets
in the United States.
------C--------
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.


NAME COMMITTEES COLD STORAGE FOR BULBS
FOR CENTENNIAL
A $4000 cold storage plant to
(Continued from Page 1) keep millions or gladioli bulbs
Pridgeon, C. A. Tovey and R. A. through the dormant period is
Dendnow under construction at Ar-
cadia where 3,000.000 bulbs were
Publicity Committee-W. Shelby planted this season.
Smith, chairman; It. C. Rector, C. __
i. Hanlon, Thorne Lane, Sam El-
SMany deep sea fish have phos-
lis, H. K. Johnston, J. H. Perry, eset as ih eve to
ennet Ballenger and. Henry phlorescent organs which serve to
Kennetgive light around tiem and at-
Wrenn.
Wrenn.tract prey.
Sports and Pastimes-Aquatic-
H. D. Marks, Jr., chairman, with -
power to name his aides. Foot-
ball-W. S. McLin, chairman, with N A TURA L
power to name his aides. Base- N UI
bal'-Tom Owens. chairman, with
power to name his aides. Horse NOW Ready for
Racing-D. C. Mahon, chairman,
with power to name his aides. Port
Track--R. C. Rector, chairman,
with power to name his aides. C O O K I N G -
A meeting of the committeemen REFRIGERATION
was held last evening at the city
hall to formulate definite plans
and programs for the event, and NO EQUIPM
while no set program was adopted NO D
at the meeting, the various chair- NO DEPOS!
men and their aides submitted JUST PAY F
many suggestions, the majority.
of which will be worked, out to --4{ A full line of gas
make this celebration the biggest Inquire
and best ever held in this section Gulf Hardware Co.
of the state. PORT ST. JOE
Further general committee meet-
ings will be called from time to S T R
time by General Chairman Sharit SOUTHERN L]
and the heads of committees will YOUR GAS COM
also call sessions to work out de-
tails for their particular parts.


3AS SERVICE

r Every House in

St. Joe

WATER HEATING
- HOUSE HEATING
o- --
IENT TO BUY
IT REQUIRED
OR YOUR CAS

appliances in stock }-<-
Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


LIQUID GAS CO.
IPANY SINCE 1932

Bill I M 11111


Before You Buy That New Cookstove .


See the Completely Modern, Low Priced




ELECTRIC RANGES


Now On Sale At Your Electrical Dealers


Priced As Low As


Don't Miss This

Opportunity To

Enjoy Modern

Electric Cooking


SHOP electrically for your next cookstove. Right now
you can purchase a completely modern Electric Range for as little as
$79.50. Terms may be arranged to suit your household budget. The
Dealers listed below cordially invite you to see the Electric Ranges now
on display or, if you prefer, a representative will call and explain the
amazing facts about cooking this modern way at low cost.
Switch to Electric Cooking and enjoy healthful meals, prepared in a
cool kitchen. It's easier to cook electrically.

See These Electric Range Dealers


ROCHE'S
W. T. WEAVER & CO.


I FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION I


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY
DANLEY FURNITURE COMPANY


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY S, 1937


COTTAGE FOR SALE
|On Apalachicola Beach. All
furnished. Lot 100 ft. wide,
from beach to lagoon.
J. H. COOK, Apalachicola


I
I