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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00192
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 1, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00192

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
OuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
es.t growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to

S TR the City of Port St. Joe.
S T A Rthe ettrmen andupbildlg o


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING T HE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938

VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938 NUMBER 37





JULY FOURTH TO BE BIG DAY


LEGION POST

GIVEN HOMI

MARTIN THEATER INTEREST'
DONATE THEATER CON-
STRUCTION BUILDING

Gulf County Post No. 116. Amer
ican Legion, now is the proud
possessor of a pos: iiome, due tc
the generosity of the Martin thea
ter interests, who gave the post
the material shed ani office struck
ture used while the new Port the-
ater was under construction.
The building, aaout 35 by 15
feeS, faces on Fourth street at th'e
rear of the new theater, and is
on a lot owned by T. H. Stone.
Mr. Stone states that the building
may remain in its present location
until such time as he, starts, con-
struction of a building on the lot
or sells the property.
The local post is indeed grate-
ful to both the Martins and Mr.
Stone for their generosity.
All future meetings of the or-
ganization held in this city will be
at the new clubhouse.


PAGEANT TO

BEFEATUREOF

CENTENNIAL

IS UNDER DIRECTION OF MRS.
E. M. BREVARD, REGENT
OF THE D. A. R.

Preparation of script and pic-
tures for the historical pageant
which will feature the centennial
of the adoption of Florida's first
state constitution, which will be
observed in Port St. Joe Decem-
ber 7 to 10, next, is' going on un-
der the general vfIrection of Mrs.
E. M. Brevard of Tallahassee.
state regent of the Daughters of
the American Revolution.
The pageant will cover three
episodes in the history of Florida.
First, the Colonia:, -from the time
of the discovery by Ponce de Leon
in 1513 to the cession of the ter-
ritory by Spain to the United
States in 1827. The second episode
will cover the period from the ac-
cession by the United States,
through the holding of the con-
stitutional convention in old St.
Joseph to the abandonment of
that colorful community following
the decimination of its population
by an epidemic of yellow fever in
1841, and the third picture will
show the reclamanon of the aban-
doned territory through the build-
ing of the new industrial city of
Port St. Joe.
As an aid to the script writers
who are searching for every pos-
sible scrap of authentic history,
prizes are being offered high
school students of the state for
essays based upon attainable facts
covering the history of "Old St.
Joe" when it was the largest and
one of the most progressive cities
in Florida.
-- S------'
Misses Miriam Drenen Marshall
and Catherine Marshall of Apa-
lachicola and Miss Lou Hagerman
of Los Angeles, Calif., were the
guests Monday of Miss Dorothy
Anderson.


.4


SALARY FUND

LOAN REPAID

AHEAD OF TIME

SETS PRECEDENT FOR INJECT-
ING BUSINESS PRINCIPLES
INTO GOVERNiMENT

TALLAHASSEE, June 30 (Spe-
cial)-More than 30 days ahead of
the time set for repayment, Comp-
troller J. M. Lee today, on behalf
of the state's teacher's salary
fund, repaid to the 15 miscel-
laneous funds the half million dol-
lar loan made on June 6.
At the time of the loan, the
comptroller and the governor an-
nounced that assured income to-
taling $1,046,000 would be avail-
able within 60 days to repay the
oan totaling $574,000.
The teachers' salary fund repaid
840,000 of the loan to the grape-
fruit advertising fund two weeks
ago. Funds participating in the
loan were: Estate tax expense
fund, $75.000; gasoline dealers li-
cense expense, $20,000; small loan
licensee expense, $12,000; auto
transportation, $50,000; beverage
.ept. operating expense. $75,000:
teachers examination find, $2500;
state fire insurance, $65,000; state
board of nurses, $10,000; orange
advertisr in. $15n00n0 r ipan,,,,l ad rl


BAND CONCERT

IS' ENJOYED

LARGE NUMBER TURN OUT IN
SPITE OF THREATENING
WEATHER

After two Sunday afternoon
band concerts were. disrupted due
to heavy rains, the program of en-
tertainment in th e waterfront
park finally got under way Sun-
day with a goodly number of se-
;ections by the local band, under
the direction of Dan Farmer. A
large crowd was present to enjoy
the music in spite of threatening
weather, and all were lavish in
their praise of the efforts of the
members of the band to present
son thing really worth while in
the way of civic entertainment.
There will be no concert next
Sunday afternoon due to the fact
that the band is busy practicing
patriotic numbers for the parade
and concert to be held on July
Fourth.


DISTRICT MEET

OF BAPTISTS TO

BE HELD JULY 6


Entertain men, Fun


And Fireworks Are


Scheduled Events


Entire Community Co-operating With Chamber of Cbmmerce
And American Legion Post To Make Celebration a Big
Success; Will Be Forerunner of Future Events


All roads will lead to Port St. Joe next Monday, July 4th,
when this city stages the first Fourth of July celebration to
be held here in many years. And while the event may not be
the largest or most elaborate of its kind, it will be a joyous
and entertaining affair, for the entire community is joining
with the chamber of commerce and American Legion*post in


Program For The Day
0
10:30 a. m.--Baseball Game. Wewahitchka vs Port St.
Joe, Junior American Legion teams.
1:30 p. m.-Band Numbers on Reid Avenue, followed by
Water Fight and Battle Royal for Cash Prizes\.
3:00 p. m.--Baseball Game. Port St. Joe vs. Blounts-
town, Town Teams. At Ball Park.
7:30 p. m.-Band will form at A. N. Depot and parade


arusing, uu, ;vu; grapetruit a- .
vertising, $100,000; notel commis- ALL-DAY MEETING; MANY IM- down Reid Avenue and Fifth Street to Band Stand.
sion, $25,000; state game fund, PORTANT SPEAKERS 8:00 p. m.-Program at Band Stand. Selections by band
$25,000; tax certificate fund, $20.- ON PROGRAM and addresses.
000; racing commission, $20,000. 9:00 p. m.-Grand Pyrotechnic Display on Port Inn Pier.
This temporary utilization of Next Wednesday, July 6, will be
temporarily idle funds in the state a big day in Baptist church circles
treasury, upon which there state re- of Port St. Joe when members of staging the event and extending the glad hand of welcome
ceives no interest from depository that denomination will gather here to the hundreds of visitors who are expected to flock to the
banks, enabled the various school from the surrounding territory in .
boards of the state to save ap- a district meeting which is being city from neighboring towns and villages.
proximately $5.000 in interest, held in place of the regular yearly Two baseball games, a water fight and battle royal, band
which the boards would have been Baptist assembly. concerts, a parade, beautiful fireworks display and other
compelled to pay had they bor- The meeting, to oe held in the events will make up the day.
-owed the money from private in- high school auditorium, will begin p JThe afternoon ball game be-
dlividuals or banks. al 10 a. m. and continue until 9 t To Sta t tween the Blountstown and Port
The teachers' salary fund repaid o'clock in the evening. Theme for St. Joe town teams is expected to
the loan out of thie proceeds of the the session will be "I Will Build Pavi fl be the highlight of the day, as the
June 15 gasoline tax income, June My Church," Matt. 16:18. i two teams have been practicing
(Continued on page 6) Many notable speakers are diligently and both are boasting
sched-uled to address the gather- AvRenuSe Ne l eek oi what they are going to do to
S ig, including Dr. C. M. Brittain, their opponent. The local boys are
Am IP. S OW AA executive secretary; Hugh Lati- r r r saying two to one that they will
Rushing Grading Work In Order
PRT T Y Imer, Brotherhood secretary; Miss take the Blountstown aggregation
Eflie Sutton, book store; 0. K. To Begin Placing of As- over the hurdles, while the visi-
Radford, B. T. IT. secretary; Miss phalt Mix tors express scorn that the Port
So oise Smnitht, W. M. U. secre- St. Joe laddies can ever hope to
Sollie Child's, "Follies Tropicale"
Is First Vaudeville Troupe To ary; Rev. James Rawls, song C. A. Tovey, supervising grad- be in their class. We predict the
Is First Vaudeville Troupe To I
Play A New Theater leader; Dr. E. D. Solmon, of the ing work for the city on Long ave- referees will have a job cut out
SBaptist Witness. and Dr. W. nue from First street to Sixteenth for them.
The first vaudeville show to be Wil:iams, Sunday school secretary. street, stated, yesterday that if The water fight and battle royal'
presented at the n'ew Port theater The all-day program will open everything went according to pres- will be between negroes, and in
is Sollie Child's "Follies Tropicale" at 10 o'clock in tne morning with ent plans, work of paving the ave- the latter the combatants will be
which plays this afternoon and, music, followed with a prayer by nue with the asphalt mix would supplied with socks filled with
tonight. Rev. J. W. Sisemore and talks by begin the latter part of next week. sawdust, the winner of the fray
This troupe consists of 35 peo- various speakers on the topics for The Smith Construction company, i to receive a cash prize. This prom-
pie and features' comedy, dancing discussion. The meeting will ad- which has been laying a similar ises to be good,, and a number of
and singing, with gags and gals journ at 12:25 for lunch. mix on the grounds of the St. Joe colored boys have already ex-
galore, andi Manager Bill Turner The afternoon session will be Paper company, will do the work. pressed their intention of gather-
states that the show comes highly opened at 2 o'clock with music A large crew of men, together ing in the prize money.
recommended from other Martin under direction of Rev. Rawls, to with tractors and graders, is at Rev. Carlton of Panama City,
theaters where it has played. be followed with talks until 4:15, work on the project, which is be- a well-known and forceful speaker,
The feature picture today is when adjournment is scheduled. ing done with WPA aidi and from has been asked to deliver the
"Mr. Moto's, Gamble," starring The evening program opens at present indications it won't be address of the day at the band
Peter Lorre. 7:45 with a song service led by long before residents on this ave- stand preceding the pyrotechnical
----- Rev. Rawls to be followed with nue will be enjoying all the bene- display.
BISHOP JUHAN TO PREACH testing of visitors ,y question- fits of a paved thoroughfare. The committee in charge of the
AT METHODIST CHURCH naire and the evening sermon at --- --- celebration is made up of C. A.
Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, bishop 8:25. lMri. and Mrs. Harry Kaupp Tovey, general chairman; T. M.
of the Diocese or Florida, will Topics for discussion will be: spent the past week-end in Jack- Schneider, W. H. Turner, W. W.
conduct services and deliver the lGod's Program for a Baptist sonville visiting friends. Barrier. T. W. Wilson, R. C. Rec-
sermon at the First. Methodist Church; Adding to the Church ----- ,tor, Robert Haley and W. S.
church Sunday afternoon at 3:30 Through the Sunday School; How Miss Gertrude Boyer of Atlanta, Smith.
o'clock. A cordial invitation is ex- Missions Help Build the Church; Ga., arrived this week to visit her The committee is still soliciting
tended everyone to attend. -' (Continued on page 8) sister. Mrs. Edwin Ramsey. (Continued on page 8)


j_








L TW T


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ...... $2.0 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.>-{ Telephone 51 } ---

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Th'e spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

PUBLIC HEALTH IS A FULL TIME JOB

Proper health protection is bcing realized
more every year as one of the most import-
ant functions of any city or county. The
good health of any community is its best
and most outstanding advertisement and an
item of publicity that toots its own horn. A
healthful community is one tnat is soon
recognized, for people are prone to talk about
their sickness or their good health-simply
human nature.
The Gulf county health unit, since its in-
ception, has done wonders in promoting
health conditions in this county with the
limited funds at its command, and should not
be discontinued at this time.
Civic organizations have an important
bearing and a useful field of labor in promot-
ing the public health service of any city or
county. This is particularly true where there
is a local health unit similar to the one we
have here, working under supervision of the
state board of health.
In order to get the best results, the local
health unit must have the hearty support of
the entire community, which can be so well
attained through the co-operation of local
.civic organizations, which create interest and
,enthusiasm and aid in many ways in promot-
ing a better and more outstanding health
picture. This will result in more favorable
publicity that is so great an inducement not
only to the tourist, but worthwhile business
enterprises looking for favorable and health-
ful locations.
Gulf county's health picture is being
greatly improved by the work of the health
unit, and if it secures the backing of all the
civic organizations the result will be a bigger
and better Gulf county.
Public health is a full-time job, and needs
the hearty support of every citizen and or-
ganization to get the best results.
Let's all co-operate!

WHAT TO DO?

Governor Fred P. Cone has stated that he
will take no steps to prevent establishment
of a Nazi bund in Florida. His statement was
forthcoming after he received a protest from
a Jacksonville American Legion post which
said a Nazi camp was to be located in the
state.
The governor has no authority to prevent
establishment of such a camp, for under the
Constitution of the United States everyone
is entitled to. the privilege of free speech and
religious freedom.
But something should be done to prevent
this un-American organization from obtain-
ing a foothold in our state. The sole purpose
of establishing these camps over the country
is to teach American youth racial and re-
ligious hatred and allegiance to a foreign
power.
Are we going to sit back and watch these
disciples of Adolph Hitler undermine our
country, or are we going to rise up on our
hind legs and do something about it?

Europe has proved that no matter what
color a dictator chooses for a shirt, it can
still be stuffed.-Boston Transcript.


THE WAR WE PAID FOR

The usual announcement that all Euro-
pean nations are defaulting again this month
on their war debts to the United States (Fin-
land, as usual, is paying, but that is not a
war debt) reminds us once more that Ameri-
cans were taxed to pay for the participation
of European nations in the World War.
(Understand, please, that we are not re-
ferring to the taxes \we paid for our own par-
ticipation. Those taxes were heavy, too, but
they were our own responsibility, not
1)lurope's.)
Here, roughly, w\as the way of it: Money
was raised by selling bonds to Americans.
That money was lent to European nations
for the purchase of munitions and supplies
from American firms. Then the America-n
government taxed the American people to
retire (buy back) the bonds from the Ameri-
can people.
Of course the government never intended
to do that. European nations were supposed
to pay us the money to retire the bonds with.
Lut it soon bhccnme evident, first, that they
couldn't very well pay us back without caus-
ing an economic upset which would cost the
United States more than it got, and second,
that they didn't want to pay us anyway, and
thought we were unreasonable to expect it.
So the way it worked out was that the
American who paid $100 for a bond to raise
money to be lent to Europe, paid our gov-
ernment in direct and hidden taxes the en-
tire $100 plus interest (in addition to buying
the bond) after which the government paid
him the interest and eventually the principal
-with his own money!
That is crudely put, of course, and inac-
curate in respect to details. But it is a cor-
rect picture of what happened. And it is
whnt .--- .-- ..-- .* .-..-.'... g:,ain if we
lend money to help foreign nations win their
wars.
This is an appropriate time to remember
that.-St. Petersburg Independent.

LET'S NOT DUMP TRASH ON ROADS
Apparently there are a number of residents
of Port St. Joe who do not give two whoops.
as to what the highways leading into our
city look like, as they dump tin cans, gar-
bage and all sorts of rubbish along the shoul-
ders of the roads and on vacant land adjoin-
ing.
People who do things like that don't rate
very high with us-in fact, they don't rate
at all-and for their information we would
like to say that there is a law against and a
severe penalty provided for the dumping of
refuse along,the highways of our state. We
quote from the statute books of Florida:
Section 7816. Dumping Rubbish, Etc.,
Along the Rights-of-Way of Public
H highways and Roads-It shall be unlaw-
ful for any person, company or corpora-
tion to dump or cause to be dumped, or
place or cause to be placed any refuse or
rubbish of any kind whatsoever along
the rights-of-way of the public highways
and roads of the State of Florida. Any
person found guilty of the violation or
this section shall be fined not more than
$100 or imprisoned for not more than 30
days, or both such. fine and imprison-
ment in the discretion of the court.
Now that we find there is a law against
such practice it might be a good idea to sort
of check up on those who are marring our
roadsides and give them a gentle hint to
stop this reprehensible practice. And if a
'hint is not enough, there is the law to force
them to cease. A 30-day sojourn in the
hoosegow should go a considerable way in
convincing them of the error of their ways.

We've been wondering just what it is that
causes some folks, who are neither crazy nor
in love, to write poetry?

,Take care of your pennies and your dollars
will take care of the tax-eaters.-St. Louis
Star-Times.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


As usual, I'm the goat.
Editor Bill told me at the last
minute that he had filled his edi-
torial columns with hot stuff be-
fore he remembered that this is-
sue should carry a Fourth of July
editorial, and would I please use
my column to carry something
heavy on Independence Day?
And so-next Monday another
Fourth of July dawns, to furnish
anew the occasion for outward
demonstrations or peace-time pa.
triotism, the American brand of
which takes on an ever-increasing
savor of thankfulness that the na-
tion's founders wrought so wisely
and so well on that memorable
umnmer day in 1776.


Marigolds Have
Rich Velvety Colors


Marigold
Rich and velvety mahogany reds
and browns, crimsons, yellows and
orange are the colors which make
marigolds a brilliant part of the
landscape. Huge plants that arow



In a day when modern scientific to 4 feet tall with blossoms like
chrysanthemums, and tiny spar-
progress has given us command of klers no bigger than a bachelor's
the means of immediate compari- button are all members of this fa-
sons between our own and other vorite flower family; and they all
bloom from midsummer through
lands in the light of current fall.
events and their 'effects on the Give them plenty of room to
commonweal, no American can grow; 18 inches to 2 feet for the
feel called upon to utter any ap- large ones is good. They like a
fertile soil, but cannot stand
oogies for the land. of his na- over-feeding, which will result in
tivity or adoption. It may be a spindly, rank growth of foliage at
troubled old world we live in, but the expense of flowers and late
blooming. Marigolds should spin
the lot of American citizens, due up to a bud at once and then pro-
to the sound founcaiaons laid, on ceed to branch out and make good
July 4, 1776, is immeasurably bet- bushes.
ter than that of the inhabitantss Sow seed in the open ground only
I after all danger of frost is past.
of any other nation. I They can also be started indoors in
It is not braggadocio on which I a box when earlier bloom is want-
recognition of this fact rests. d Stake them to protect from
high winds.
Achievement of the status we en- New marigolds of outstanding ap-
joy was predicted by George pearance are available this year.
Washington in the only Fourth of Among the desirable qualities these
newest blooms possess is a delicate
July address he ever made. It fragrance, which contrasts with the
was delivered a' iancaster, Pa., pungent odor of older types.
on July 4, 1791. ----- --
"A sense of justice to my fel- CLAIM WPA WORK UNFAIR
low-citizens ascribes to o t h e r
causes the peace and prosperity The Florida division of the
of our highly favored country," he American oad Builders' associa-
said in modest response to the tion has urged Florida's congres-
greeting accorded him. sional delegation to do all pos-
Ssible to get federal relief officials
ncr 1eeuuuauu' ~Lj~iUV


ler freeduolll lnd,' ui tness a
founded on their patriotic exer-
tions," Ire added. "and will, I trust,
be transmitted to distant ages
through the same medium of wis-
dom and virtue."
The freedom and happiness of
which Washington spoke have
been transmitted to us from gen-
eration to generation since his
day, and each Fourth of July em-
phasizes anew the responsibility


to stop the expansion of WPA
work in competition with organ-
ized construction industry, point-
ing out that such competition is
ruinous and unfair.

the document which makes, the
day historic. Indeed, his figure
towers above those who created
and. gave the Declaration of In-
dependence to the world. And


of transmitting these benefits to justly so, for without Washington
the generations to follow, as the man of action, the doer,
It is natural to think of George the Declaration might have re-
Washington on the Fourth of July, mained empty words and the
although he was not a signer of sorry symbol of a lost cause.


TOO MUCH OF IT ALREADY!


I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORI~DA


FRIDAY, JULY 1,, 1938


PAGE TWO









, L1


1939 SESSION MAY

SEE BATTLE TO

RETURNPOLLTAX

AS SCHOOLS SEEK GREATER
FUND; NEGRO VOTE IS
BROUGHT INTO DEBATE

Demands for additional school
revenue from county sources to
augment the state allocation may
bring on a spirited fight during
the 1939 Florida legislative ses-
sion to restore the $1 a year poll
tax for voters, says an Associated
Press dispatch.
Assertions that the negro vote
nay become the dominating factor
in general elections unless there
is a poll tax restriction already
are coming from some source.
There are counter statements
that many white persons were
kept from voting because they
could not pay the tax.
Democratic nomination has been
tantamount to election in Florida
for the past 50 years. Prior to
that, in the two decades after the
Civil War of 1861-65, negroes oc-
cupied many local offices and
there were several in the legisla-
ture.
Florida Democrats many years
ago established the "white Demo-
cratic party" and laid down quali-
fications that excluded negroes
from party primaries. Negroes are
eligible to vote in the general
elections.
In 1913 the state legislature
passed a law requiring voters in
primaries and, general elections to
show they'had paid a poll tax of
S1 a year for t.e previous two
years.
Poll tax collections in each
county were tuired over to the
school f u nd. The collections
throughout the 67 counties to-
taled about $650,jOO for 1935 and
1936, the last collection .period.
Some counties this year had, trou-
ble gettir.g enough nioney to keep
their schools open full terms.
The 1937 state census showed
Florida's population to be 1,139,-
663 white and 46:-,"05 negroes. In
1870 there were 96,057 whites and
91.668 negroes.
Sponsors of the poll tax repeal
charged elections could be nomi-
nated; by organized interests mak-
ing block payments of poll taxes
f:)r Y-oi'rs. They s~_ id this con:li-
tion would be eliminated by pro-
viding free voting privileges for
all persons above 21 years old.
Now those seeking restoration
of the poll tax requirement assert
organized interests might upset a
Democratic primary organization
by organizing big blocks of negro
votes for tire general election.
In the 1936 general election
there were 253,638 Democratic and
59,832 Republican votes cast for
the office of governor.





M i K il. ou .



,- 1 1:-._., ,



SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE -PLANT

The plant that furnishes
you ice the year 'round

ST." JOE ICE

COiMPANY

Max. Kilbourn, Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
From Treated Water


WASHINGTON

SNAPSHOTS
By JAMES PRESTON


(1) threatened collapse of the ment and summoned congressmen
$20,000,000,000 railroad industry; to his presence to demand that
(2) bumper crops bogging down they amend the Walsh-Healey act
the "planned economy" scheme to set up a "blacklist" of com-
and farm structure, and (3) con- panies not seeing eye-to-eye with
tinuing business decline and the national labor relations board.
mounting unemployment. After the labor leader had "dis-
In reality-but not technically- missed" the congressmen, they
a special session would fall in the returned to the house floor and


The specter of a special session category of a "lame duck" session. launched themselves on a bitter
stalks the capitol building in The Norris bill, passed only a few denunciation of the affair. Many
Washington a capitol deserted years ago, forbids "lame duck" heated remarks went into the of-
by members who have gone home sessions but, of course, any ses- licial record as one member af-
to test their popularity with the sion called between November ter another described the inci-
voltrs. and next January 3 would be of- dent as "the most shocking and
Even. the joy which came as ficially referred to as an "emer- disgraceful activity that has taken
banging gavels announced sine die ge-ncy session" and. not a lame place in the nation's capitol in
adjournment of the house and sen- duck. decades."
ate was marred by the special
sessiion prospects. None of the Congressional tempers are es- The Seventy-fifth Congress, by
mnenl'-crs want to be called back, specially sharp in the closing days the way, was the longest since
but observers see strong possibili- of a session. C.I.O. Chieftain John the Seventy-first Congress con-
ties for an extraordinary session L. Lewis can vouch for that. Mr. vened to legislate emergency-de-
roon after the November elec- Lewis "moved in" on the speak- pression measures. The 71st re-
lions. The possibility is based on: Ier's office just before adjourn- mained in session 529 days. The
,-." -


last congress was In session 419.
-------- -------
Save by reading the ads!


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
S Married
Divorced
I-ad a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR

Phone 51-The Star
i '_,I ---- '-


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LnP~1t3 IJ


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Listen to the Voice of Firestone featuring R chard Cro)ks and Margaret Speaks and Tune in on the Firestone Voice of the Farm Radio
the 70-piece Firestone Svmp1'-ny Orchestra, under the direction of Alfred Wallenstein, eek
Monday evenings over Nationwide N.B.C. Red Network. Program twice each week during the non hour.


L L T" ES R1E A T


PHONE 10
gJauiamyt.'aaAs vI~


OPEN DAY AND NIGHT PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
* ";,.c":,-u^. ,_L-.- i. ayE a'-, .s.sa-2^ *'_" .


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLOR[DrA


PAGE THREE


FRIDAY JULY 1 1938






PAGEFOU THESTA, POT S. JO, FORID FRDAYJUL 1.,193


S Personals
MRS. JOS. B. GLOEKLER, Edito


Churches


MRS. DORSEY HONOREE MISS MONTGOMERY AND MRS. PURVIS ENTERTAINS
AT LUNCHEON MONDAY DUFFY LEWIS ARE WED MARIE JONES CIRCLE
Mrs. B. L. Kelly and Mrs. E. Miss Alma Elizabeth Montgom- The Marie Jones Circle o:
Clay Lewis, Jr., combined their ery, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Methodist church met Monda
charms as hostesses Monday G. Montgomery, became the bride ternoon with Mrs. Purvis H
when they entertained at a lun- of Duffy M. Lewis Sunday morn- at her home. The business fo
cheon complimenting Mrs. Robert ing at 8:30 o'clock at the home of afternoon was conducted by
Dorsey, who will leave this week the bride's parents. Rev. J. W. Charles Brown.
for Jacksonvile after residing in Sisemore performed the ceremony The program was taken
Port St. Joe for a year. before an improvised altar which the mission study book, "His
This delightful affair, which oc- was banked with greenery and nesses," by Andrew Sledd.
curred at the home of Mrs. Kelly, floor baskets of mixed flowers. first two chapters were give
featured a color scheme of yellow Only relatives and close friends Mrs. Temple and tne last by
and white. The appointed tables of the contracting parties were in Bradbury.
were arranged in me living room attendance. The hostess- had planned a:
where a two-course luncheon was Mrs. W. H. Turner, matron of vertisement contest which
served. honor, was the bride's only at- won by Mrs. Edwin Ramsey.
Seated at the tables with the tendant. William Coody acted as the social hour the hostess se
honoree and hostesses were Mrs. best man for the bridegroom. a sweet course to nine mem
D. C. Mahon, Mrs. George Gore, Miss Montgomery, who was *
Mrs. Harry Saunders, Mrs. W. B. given in marriage by her father, Mrs. R. J. Heyser, Mrs. N(
Edwards, Mrs. Nick Comforter, was lovely in her wedding gown Porter, Mrs. W. 4. Brown
Mrs. George A. Patton, Mrs. Ross of white crepe, designed with Mrs. W. M. Glass or Apalach
Watson, Mrs. E. C. Lewis, Sr., and pleated skirt and lace blouse, with were the guests last Frida
Miss Elizabeth D;ckenson of Mari- which she wore white accessories. Mrs. William Hamilton.
anna. H.er flowers weie a shoulder cor- ,, -
Sf sage of white roses and lilies of T. S. Gibson, Jr., of Atlanta
Mrs. Frank LeHardy returned the valley. rived Sunday to visit his
home Wednesday from a Panama Immediately after the ceremony Mrs'. Horace Soule, for a we
City hospital. the young couple left for a short
,* wedding trip.
T. H. Stone, one of our oldest Mrs. Lewis attended school in
settlers, has a free ice cream sun- Port St. Joe and is a popular mem-
dae awaiting him at LeHardy's her of the younger set. Mr. Lewis
___ is connected with the Lewis Gar-
i '1~- EE '- -- age of Port St. Joe. They will
S~ make their home in this city.


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS IN
MEETING FRIDAY
Miss Gwendolyn Howell was
hostess last Fricay afternoon to
A MARTIN the Lottie Moon Girls' Auxiliary
at her home. The meeting was
T E opened with singing of the hymn,
"Send the Light." The first psalm
H E was read by Miss Howell, followed
with prayer by Mrs. E. C. Cason.
BILL TURNER, Mgr. Topic for the afternoon was
"Treasures In Brazil,"
PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA .reas In Brazll,
Mrs. Cason announced that a
business meeting would be held
- SATURDAY-JULY 2 this afternoon at the home of
Miss Betty Joe Lane. Mrs. Bag-
gett closed the meeting with
Three Mesquiteers rae.
Three. new members were added
in to the roster: Mary He;en Ganeux,
D OR FWT dMary Louise Wooden andi Frenchie
RIDElS OF TI Wooden.
MLACK IRS. D. C. MAHON HOSTESS
BLA HLLS' ~AT LOVELY LUNCHEON
A most enjoyable affair of last
Friday was the luncheon given in
SUNDAY-MONDAY-JULY 3 4 Panama City at the Cove hotel by
Mrs. D. C. Mahon honoring Mrs.
LORETTA YOUNG in Robert Dorsey. A three-course
luncheon was served in the dining
'THREE BLIND room of the hotel. The beautifully
appointed table was centered with
/RMIrCE' a bouquet of gladioli and roses.
llL Invited were Mrs. B. L. Kelly,
Mrs. E. C. Lewis, Jr., Mrs, Ross
IWatson, Mrs. Harry Saunders,
Mrs. Robert Dorsey and Mrs. W.
- TUES.WED.- JULY 5-6 -
B. Edwards.

'WOMEN AIRE Mr. and Mrs. Henry Meyer re-
turned Monday from Mobile where
LIKE THAT' they visited relatives for several
days.
with -- *
PAT O'BRIEN & KAY FRANCIS Mrs. G. A. Patton has, an ice
cream sundae awaiting her pleas-
Bure at LeHardy's Pharmacy.

- THURS.-FRIDAY-JULY 7-8 Mr. and Mrs. Ross Watson
spent several days tmis week in
J AC K H O %. T Tallahassee on business.
in- M '
Mrs. L. M. Bass of Tallapoosa,
'UNIl R Ga., and Edgewater, Fla., and son,
Edwin Moncrief of Georgia Tech,
S- P i Atlanta, visited over the week-end
UJlI lI l with Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Allen of
Eighth street. Edwin left Tuesday
to continue his studies and Mrs.
S ALSO Bass will remain in the city for
an indefinite visit.

Selected Shorts Henry Hiles spent the week-end
EACH PROGRAM in Apalachicola visiting friends.
Additional Society on Page 8


Society


JLni T.ffBB(Bltl-'-J'--- "~'" II'ISI^^w.~Wis y^ssiew'


THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
June 30 July 1 July 2
RICE, 5 pounds ............25c 5c Washing Powder 4 Small MI T ]
JELLO, 3 boxes ......----....20c 3 for U 2 Large I 1 LI LI
SODA, 5 boxes ..............15c 5c CLEANSER, 3 for...10c 2 Pounds LARD ..........25c
MACARONI and P7 P & G SOAP, 6 for ......25c 4 Pounds LARD .........49c
SPAGHETTI, 2 for.. LYE, 2 cans ...--....--...-- 15c No. 2V2 PEACHES ......19c


10 POUNDS SUGAR .. 47c
5 Pounds GRITS ........... 15c Pound Box CRACKERS 10c
2 Boxes GRITS 15c Large Box VANILLA WAFERS-.....15c
3 10c Boxes OATMEAL ..................25c Big Box GINGER SNAPS ----..............10c
3-Pound Box OATMEAL 27c 2 Boxes CORN FLAKES 15c
(Premium with Each Box) 10c Cans VIENNA SAUSAGE, 3 for 20c


Maxwell House Coffee 28c

No. 2 CORN, 3 cans......23c MUSTARD, quart ........15c APPLE JELLY, 2 lb. ..22c
POTTED MEAT, 2 cans 7c VINEGAR, quart ..........10c PEANUT BUTTER, qt 22c
LIMA BEANS, 3 lbs....-19c DILL PICKLES, quart 15c KETCHUP, 14 ounce....l0c
NAVY BEANS, 3 lbs.... 18c Sweet Mix Pickles, qt. 19c Good Large LEMONS Iflc
Blackeye PEAS, 3 Ibs...19c GRAPE JUICE, 2 pints 35c Per dozen ........... 1


10 Ibs. No. Potatoes 25c
1Oc Cans PIMIENTOES, 2 for ..........15c No. 2V2 Cans PORK & BEANS .........10c
Dromedary DATE-NUT BREAD ....15c Six 5c Cans PORK & BEANS..........25c
French Fried Potatoes in cans, 2 for 25c 10c ORANGE JUICE, 3 for ..............25c
Ivanhoe POTATO SALAD, 2 for ......35c 10c GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 3 for ....25c
No. 2 Pineapple, Sliced or Crushed ....15c 46-ounce TOMATO JUICE .........--...25c

MARKET SPECIALS

NATIVE BEEF CHUCK ROAST- 15 CAS NLY
NATIVE BEEF Per pound .... ........._ CASH ONLY
No. 7 STEAK- C RIB STEW- 10c Smoked BACON-
Per pound ... Per pound .............. Per pound .........
BEEF CHOPS- OLEO- Cloverbloom Butter
Per pound ..............20c 2 packages ............. er pound .............
Per pound ..............

PRICES FOR CASH ONLY

PETS CASH AND

SE i Ta CARRY


00


S
f the
,y af-
owell
r the
Mrs.
from
Wit-
The
n by
Mrs.
n ad-
was
. At
served
bers.

ed S.
and
icola
y of

a, ar-
aunt,
ek.


With
JOE PENNER


A MARTIN & MARTIN



PORT ST. JOE, FLA.



ON THE STAGE


TODAY!!.
SOLLIE CHILDS


FOLLIES TROPICALE
STARS OF RADIO AND STAGE
BIG STAGE BAND

35 PEOPLE 35

A MO Orchestra 10c and 35c
ADV i1 IJUI Balcony . 10c and 25c


Al&4fe4b~L~sl6iC~ga~a~~2LP4~Pt~~ijiL- n ~~l~a~B~s~.~Blp.r*~i~


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938


I 41-L 029


ON THE SCREEN

'GO CHASE YOURSELF'






R IDA.JL .13 H TR OTS.JE LRD PAG FI


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Legion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Woman's Club meeting First
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
Port Inn parlor.

Mrs. E. C. Lewis, Sr., and Miss
Elizabeth Dickenson returned to
their homes in Mariauna Wednes-
day after a visit here with Mr.
and Mrs. E. C. Lewis, Jr.








(REDIT

PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St Joe, Fla.


At the Churches


PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Services are held in the Ma
sonic hall, over the postoffice.
Sunday School, 10 a. m. ever
Sunday.
Preaching services 11:00 a. m
every Sunday.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m. ,'

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve
ning at 7:30 o'clock.
-*-
FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marretta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning worship 11 a.m.
B. T. U. 7 p. m.
Evening worship 8 p. m.
W. M. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday
p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday
p. m.


A Declaration of


INDEPENDENCE


JULY 4th a symbol of FREEDOM.
On this day, during this and every year,
we commemorate the adoption of the
Declaration of Independence. As a free-
thinking people in a nation of democracy,
this day is especially heralded with an out-
ward burst of enthusiastic exuberance and
an inward feeling of well-being and peace.

JUST as the sagacious foresight of the men
who created the foundation upon which
now rests the bulwark of our indepen-
dence and freedom so will the fi-
nancial security of you and your loved ones
depend upon your wise foresight and syste-
matic planning. This bank can render valu-
able assistance in reaching your goal of fi-
nancial independence.


STRENGTH SAFETY SERVICE



Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation


TRADE IN


ONE MILE WEST OF PORT ST. JOE


HIGHLAND

OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT! PR


a-

y

i.








t


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY

When I was a kid I used to
sit bug-eyed for hours reading
Jules Verne's "Twenty Thousand


Leagues Under the Sea" and other
fantastic tales, until. I'd get so
groggy I couldn't hold my eyes
open. Then in my sleep I'd see all
manner of weird under-sea crea-
tures glarin' at me through imagi-
nary portholes.
The thought that the day would
come when I would actually go
through the same experience in
real life never entered my head,
but last week at "Marineland,"
SFlorida's newest and most amaz-
ing attraction, I enjoyed, the thrill
that heretofore I was certain
could never be anything but a
dream.
SThanks to the vision, courage
and 'enterprise of a group of scien-
tifically minded young men, Flor-
ida today has the world's most
unique and interesting aquarium.
But don't let the word "aquarium"
decieve you, for it falls far short
of describing "Marineland."
If you can imagine a sizeable
chunk of nice fresh ocean, includ-
ing depth, breadth and thickness,
and populated by all manner of
animal, vegetable and mineral life
found therein, literally lifted from
the heart of the sea and placed
before you for careful study and
inspection, you'll nave some idea
of this remarkable Institution just
opened. 18 miles south of St. Au-
gustine.
Housed in an odd modernistic
building, two massive tanks or
open-air swimming pools, differ-
ent from anything you have ever
seen, provide a home for a variety
of deep-sea monsters that you
have read about, glimpsed perhaps
at a distance, or seen as carcasses
hanging on some fishing dock.
You may stand above the pools
and look into their fascinating
depth.-or choosing tie level you
prefer, view their amazing interior
through convenient portholes, to
have porpoises, sharks, giant rays,
swordfish and massive sea turtles
return your curious stare with
beady eye as they swim past, en-
joying to the full their new-found
playhouse.
Tiger sharks sneer at you thru
the glass and lash their tails;
seals laughingly wave a flipper as
they glide by; saucy penguins de-
light you with underwater antics,
while myriads of smaller sea crea-
tures that include most every va-
riety of fish or shellfish, partici-
pate in the, marvelous pageant of
the deep, to astouna, educate and
amuse you.
Uncrowned queen and ruler of
all she surveys is charming and
graceful Mrs. J. Pierpont Porpoise,
who in company with her equally
winsome daughter, proves a de-
lightful hostess. Diving, twisting
and turning about the great tank,
she is here, there and everywhere,
while shark, ray, seal and all
other creatures exercise great
care to keep out of her way and
prove unoffensive. A mammal, she
nurses her offspring and unbur-
dened with false modesty, thinks
nothing of doing so in public,
while hundreds of poor "human"
fish gaze at h'er through glass
portholes.
The primary purpose of "Ma-
rineland" is the scientific study
of marine life and the creation of
a suitable undersea studio in
which "natural" life of the deep


might be staged nnc filmed.
Here, in years to come, picture
producers will secure the shots
and scenes of an underwater na-
ture, designed to g:ve genuine re-
alism to their feature attractions,
as everything necessary for the
perfect production of such under-
sea photography will be available.


Fortunate indeed


is Florida


that her tropical waters provide
such specimens as are desired,
that her climate and sunny skies
afford greater opportunity for
camera work, and that she was
chosen as the ideal location for
such an enterprise.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.

FAMED'OAK IN PAGEANT
The famed De. Soto Oak at
Tampa, which about 400 years ago
gave shelter to the great Spanish
explorer and his followers, will
again play an important part in
the pageantry to be staged from
January 31 to February 18, next,
commemorating the 400th anni-
versary of DeSoto's landing.

Miss Ruth McKown of Troy, N.
Y., is the attractive house, guest
of Mrs. J. S. Hiles.


VIEW

ICES CONSISTENTLY LOWER!


SKATE,--
for Health's Sake!
Skating is one of the most
enjoyable and health-giving
exercises that can be found.


COME OUT TO THE NEW
SKATING RINK IN HIGH-
LAND VIEW AND HAVE A
MOST ENJOYABLE TIME!


BEGINNERS WELCOME!
We Have Competent Instruc-
tors to Care for Those Just
Learning to Skate


Bring the Kiddies Out and
Let Them Have a Good Time




Williams'

Skating Rink
C. C. WILLIAMS, Prop.


Sea Foods .
WHOLESALE and RETAIL 0
We Carry a Wide Variety of Sea Foods
- OYSTERS IN SEASON -

E. L. ANDERSON FISH COMPANY
1/2 Mile W. Port St. Joe On Panama City Highway


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHERE BUSINESS IS BRISK YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND
FRESH GROCERIES


MILK 4 Small
or 2 Large ..........


15c TOMATOES- 24
S6 cans for .............


Henderson's
ISugar 5 Ibs 28c
10- .. ---... .-, '
Kill Kwick Mosquito c, Crystal White
Spray; 75c size...... TOILET SOAP, 6 for -23
SPAGHETTI, 3 for ...... 9c
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 24c LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs.....13c
FIELD CORN, 3 cans 24c MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c
COOKING OIL, gal.....85c Prince Albert Tob, 3 for 28c

Nice large New Po- 9 Best Grade White
tatoes, 4c lb.; 10 lbs. 0i Ring Flour, 12 lbs. 8

Golden Brand Oleo, 2 lb 25c ROLLED BONE SWIFT 9hC
Choice West. Steak, lb 35c PREMIUM HAM, Ib. ... .
Oil Sausage, gal .---..........95c Country BUTTER, lb....35c
We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT


BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


1- l- 11 11------------


~ Isx;x~rr;-r--r-).


4


-- --- ----


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, JULY 1., 1918







I S


THE POCKETBOOK

of KNOWLEDGE pps


-fIHE LIG oF
FOIR TilE "TH
%qwIPE


~I ~I .l

8.- I


I.'.


T7 -DAV' 15 4PTLY vIAMEP
UGS COF I PIA
OF KALI. .5 G OCD'bES
T'' ~cBli.2r c.


N


-7






i-! E


SP RU iVIN6


Fit -F t) NPi U
/I, '.'t Go



O r.AFRICA, -
LARIGEST EYTLE
tIN TH-E VtC., ~ -
GROW5 o g' -To*OF A!. ..... -
(L;;T'5 5.0 iN C't it cO:rC1 G/...' Y u 7's,



SIZE05A .., 4"" -- t.1 $ !u
MN 1CSl. FIST/,57&TA-- t


3
r
O


aret appropriated I'o tile county


FIGHT LOOMS

FOR GEORGIA

AND FLORIDA

LEVYING LICENSES AGAINST
WHOLESALE SEAFOOD
DEALERS IS ISSUE

Whlole.-ile seafood dealers who
live in one slate and sell products
in tlhe oilier are the center of a
license battle between Florida and
leorgia.
Georgia started the argument
by charging a license of $500 for
Florida dealers, and now Florida
threatens to invoke a similar law
in retaliation. In addition. Florida
mnay clamp) on a $2000-a-year li-
cense against Georgia boats fish-
ing for shrimp in this state's
coastal waters.
The discussion is a renewal of
a situation that developed in 1937
O- i e (inGorgia legislature put
!hI !ivi '.se on out-of-state seafood
dealers. The Florida' legislature
I h'ialncd reprisals by levying
heavy taxes on Georgians selling
poaches, vegetables, eggs and
other pro'lu-ets in Florida.
Ain agor leenlt Aas reac'iV'd at a
e iztihon held in Va;ciosta, and, the
Florida legislature withdrew its
ibre:tls. At that in'e it was stated
the (!Ior.gia lic'ensl- applied only
if ian out-of-state detleor estab-
li-h '.i a fixed place of business in

A r.c'e:t Georiia legiIslahiure en-


L) 1 :l d." 1 i1 oh alte 'fnd." license law without
S il conpOrlletr pointed out i,,, ixed place of business pro-
S'L, T' -1.- !"~:t1 t this sets a preceden for in- vision, and enforcement officers
j. c!ilng good business principles -e-an requiring the payment from
'- T ( -,'? ;:i0o g'overmt'enIl. at the sa:1e time ,-oridians who make bull! seafood
.'-. L/ A '!.' amply safeguardhing state mIonies ,a,,; across the state ;ine. It
and amply insuring the availabil- al-o applies against Floriida fish-
(Continued from Page 1) i;, oC Mtei' :!ni;es for tle pmu'- ing i:oai which land their cargoes
poses for which they were raised. .,i G(;orgia ports.
-Iro, ir:l,!ls taxes, store occu- !Je reiterated that no loans will _-----
pational licenses and motor ve-, e approved by him until he as- CARVER DRUG COMPANY
hic:e tag monies. !sures himself beyond all doubt If It's Drnugs, We Have It.
In repaying the .loan, Comp- that the borrowing funds will have '- -
trolier Lee pointed out that the :the n'oley with wlnich to repay EXHIBIT WILL 'STEAL SHOW'
original executive order, as drawn thOe loans before such time as loan-
by him for submission to the gov- ing funds will need the money. Those who have seen the model
ernor and as signed. ny the gover- I will not transfer monies from of Florida's magnificent exhibit,
nor, provided for tie "automatic find to fund, robbing Peter to pay proposed for the New Yorlk World
repayment of the loan" out of the Paul," Lere stated, "and I will Fair, all concur that this state will
first revenues collected for thethat such loans as ae maintain her reputation of "steal-
school fund, using the following made will ot be permitted to de- ing the show," in spite of stiff
language: I generate into transfers through competition.
"It is further ordered that such which any fund benefits at the ex-
temporary loans hereby made to pense of another fund." Mrs. W. S. McLin of Tallahas-
the county school fund be repaid se'e will accompany Mr. McLin
to the respective funds, from CARVER DRUG C IY back Sunday and will be his
which loans are hereby made from CARVER DRUG CO l' guest at the Port.Inn for a week


TO CELEBRATE OPENING
OF CANAL JULY 6 AND 7

A celebration marking comple-
tion of the Choctawhatch'ee Bay-
West Bay canal will be held July
6 and 7. The celebration wi:l begin
with concentration of water craft
tiing part at Valpariso on the
evening of the sixth, where they
will remain for the night for an


ready been assured f o r the
cruisercade.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.
------~------
ASK REPEAL OF TAX
An emergency organization of
Miami merchants is demanding a
special session of the legislature
to repeal the one-hallf of one per


iont'i'.aiini enti. cent gross receipts tax, contend-
A cruisercade wiii form Thurs- ing that unless this is done many
day, July 7, to proceed through will be forced to close their doors
Choctawhatchee Bay a n d the due to inability to pay.
newly-completed inland waterway --- --
to West Bay, where the craft will Miss Katherin'e DeCosmo has
stop for a fish try at noon. The returned- to her home in Apalachi-
boats are then scheduled to arrive cola after a pleasant visit here
in Panama City at 5:30 p. m. for with Miss Dorothy Travick.
dedication ceremonies. G I- *'
Craft from the war department iMr. and Mrs. T. A. Owens and
and two 75-loot coast guard boats, L.. W. Owens spent Sunday and
two war department engineers' Monday in Quincy on business.
cruisers from New Orleans, one i
from Galveston, one from Jack-[ Advertise that Special Sale. The
sonville and other :joats have al- Star prints dodgers and circulars.


'I "--*
I'




B FIVE


'"
w1t' -er -
'-'-


~I't1 JT1~T~ ~T "./Ifr cers in the news cousmns
P- VjAi` o L The Star irniiing you to
--m ai- at f; a-tn-- do so, and voyo will receive abso-
11 !, ihwit~cu cost an Ice Cream t6ndae of any flavor
yak desire.
FIVE NAM;V3 WILL APPEAR EACH WEEK!
Everykjodiy. ya-ln and old, enSoys
the refreshing g deliciousness of
our Ice Cream-


LeHARDY'S

PHARMACY
"Where Friends Meet"
Phone 5 Port St. Joe, Fla.


I'':-"v"

(.ir '"'
QyN) r


DRESS UP!


For The Fourth


the first revenues collected that pounCed. Phone 27. or ten days.

t :one as. Company





NATURAL GAS through underground mains and a standard gas meter to your home

SPositively NOT Bottle Gas. Low Cost|

Operation---You Pay Only What the Meter

Shows You Have Used After You

Have Used It

S WE HANDLE A FULL LINE OF MODERN GAS APPLIANCES

SRanges, Water Heaters and Servel Gas
Electrolux Refrigerators
SAlso a Full Line of Modern Gas Heating Appliances
SEE US BEFORE YOU BUILD YOURHOME. We Can save you Money!

Ranges as low as 54.95 and your old Range -* "





SA. M. MITCHELL, Mgr.

AT MARTIN'S, IN THE NEW COSTIN BUILDING,
NEXT DOOR TO STEP'S CAFE
l f -- iltl! llltllI',lllill. ',- 1 I t..II l.. .I.


DRESS SHIRTS
A large selection in all sizes
to choose from
--In colors or white
-Permanent shrunk
-Vat dyed

And at a price you can
appreciate-


FANCY TIES SHOES
Exceptional selection of Right out in front in the
new summer patterns in style parade. We have the
correct shoe for your new
silk and rayon
season's outfit

25c $1.98 $2.15

DRESS SOCKS MORE SUGGESTIONS
FOR THE FOURTH
Clock patterned. Mercer-
ized rib top, heel and toe.
Colors and White Genuine Cowhide Belts
Bordered Handkerchiefs
10c 35c SUSPENDERS



Owens & Murdock
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
."" '" "


-- -,- -- I I


------- --.~~-----~. ~ ~~------- .. .....


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938


PAGE SIX


S$j


;II


rl/ 47-V :' f..
LA I.. Ji m I::I I-~iT


jL miso





FRIDY UY1 98TESAPR T OFOIAPG E
p *a- bJB C-PISS-


CLLCB R A


JULY


IN


POR


DINE-


Where t he
food is of the
best where
you will find
the greatest
variety on the
menu and
r iawhere the ser-
vice is always prompt and efficient. .

BLACK CAT CAFE

DR. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
NEXT DOOR TO COSTIN'S DEPT. STORE
OFFICE HOURS: 9:00 A. M. TO 6:00 P. M.
TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
Closed All Day Monday


HAUSER'S

WHERE YOUR
DOLLAR DOES
DOUBLE DUTY
WE WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY JULY 4

QUALITY GROCERY
"ST. JOE'S LEADING FOOD STORE"


Free Delivery -:-


Phone 30


Clerks Polite Prices Right
OUR STORE WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY


Program of Events

10:30 a. m.-Baseball Game. Wewahitchka
vs. Port St. Joe, Junior American Legion
Teams.
1:30 p. m.-Band Numbers on Reid Avenue,
followed by Water Fight and Battle
Royal for Cash Prizes.
3:00 p. m.-Baseball Game. Port St. Joe vs.
Blountstown, Town Teams. At Ball
Park.
7:30 p. m.-Band will form at A. N. Depot
and parade down Reid Avenue and Fifth
Street to Band Stand.
8:00 p. m.-Program at Band Stand. Selec-
tions by Band and Addresses.
9:00 p. m.-Grand Pyrotechnic Display from
Port Inn Pier.


While Celebrating the 4th
In Port St Joe, let us service your
car. Fill up with TEXACO
GASOLINE!
St.JoeTexaco Service Station


THE STAR
YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER
Invites YOU
TO ATTEND THE
July 4th Celebration
NEXT MONDAY IN PORT ST. JOE


We are
happy to


Syou

THIS JULY FOURTH
A new organization in the building up
of Port St. Joe.
UNINTERRUPTED GAS SERVICE
TO YOUR HOME
ST. JOE GAS COMPANY
Our Office Will Be Closed Monday
9 DAD'S GRILL 9
IS UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Reconditioned and Up-to-Date
Prices Reasonable

SHOES REPAIRED
WHILE U WAIT-
Don't let worn-out shoes spoil your Fourth
of July celebration Bring them in
today. We can make them as good
S as new while you
Swait.
o---
We Will Be Closed
All Day
Monday
LEADER SHOE SHOP
NO STORE CAN TAKE THE PLACE
OF THE 5 AND 10 CENT STORE

MILES 5 & 10 CENT STORE
We Will Be Closed All Day July 4th


I
Celebration Sponsored By Port St. Joe Chamber of Commerce
and Gulf County Post No. 116, American Legion
I I II +. -- -_.. .


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLO-RIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938


AM
AS
mm
ff-IL
MT OHM







PAGEn .I.I.I.I...II.I li EIGHT T, I. SPORTS. J 11RD F D JULY t 1938
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ellringfie


DURING


OUR


WE.D ESDAY, JULY 6TH


r .I R i7,.


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For ,$4,.25 and your old tire

,, ,Kiolnt a 4.40x21

KeUl\ Dis'bcaich


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Uwe


e iiQ u I n
ojjrjil us I~CdY


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uetYic~sG~ &Lv~.tt~F Yrr~f:F-hA'WKW)T JZa .WrXhLa. -.r;,:,ii i~-. 'i~A-VlAL .. -


LET US EXCU ANE TOMiH


~d ~6

Ir~~rsi 4rsnnsx~lrr


FOR THOSE INSAFE T IRES


~4~%A4
';/&.~s -. Rk
fru.~~'I s


*i'I All


iIM


PHONE
41


In the Heart of Port St. Jc


)e OPEN 6 A. M.
TO 9 P. M.


rII.


I- I~---RIBn~P_-~IRHI*V.IY~W~*_r~ilL~L~ ~YL~ -- -I----- rs MIB~LPIII~d~gEdedl~nBB~d~i~~L~ba


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLO'RIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 1 1938


PAGE EIGHT


''


S, ';-- -1 >1< L''= ."'


', '-^ .
I


***u.\.'i-it. '.. : r...-.- .


,,I


A F ETY


MK AW


4fs~


KELLY'S


SUNNY\J







PI~1DAY JUY 1,1q3 TH STR, PRT T. OEFLORDA AGENIN


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN












ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
0o
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOEF FLA.






















Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others .
Let your family enjoy
some today.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S

Dairy

Products
4 4 1
4 O4U.is


GULF VIEW

TAVERN
We Carry the Best Lines of
WINES and BEERS


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of.
PLEASURE

Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent


The birthday of the United
States of America
A great day-a glad day-a
solemn day-that Fourth of July,
1776, when the great Liberty Bed
pealed out the glad tidings for all
the world to hear that the Dec-
laration of Independence had been
adopted.
According to noted historians,
the last ringing of the bell, while
it was in the tower of Indepen-
dence HaIT, took place on July 8,
1835, in honor of the funeral serv-
ices of John Marshall, chief jus-
tice of the United States, who
died in Philadelphia, July 6, 1835.
While the bell was being solemnly
tolled, it suddenly cracked. An at-
tempt was made to repair it in
1846 for the celebration of Wash-
ington's birthday ceremonies, but
the attempt failed.
Before it cracked, the Liberty
Bell had lived a life of 82 useful
years and had become one of the
most famous bells in the world.
All through the Revolutionary
War the Liberty Bell was used for
the purpose of calling together


Child Aid To Be

Given On Basis

Of Population

WITH BUT $600,000, NEEDIEST
CASES WILL BE GIVEN
NECESSARY AID FIRST

Funds to be expended for aid
to dependent children will be al-
located to the various counties of
the state on a population basis,
according to a statement by Clay-
ton C. Codrington, state welfare
commissioner.
The method of allocation will be
different from that employed in
administering old age assistance
and aid to the blind, where funds
are given on the basis of need


r- - - -

WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W. HORTON
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
4 4


the inhabitants of the city to
learn news from one battlefields.
At one time during the war it be-
came necessary to remove the
bell and take it out of the city.
This exciting event took place on
September 18, 1777, when the
news came that the British army
was about to occupy Philadelphia.
The bell was taken to Allentown,
Pa., where it was hidden in Zion's
Church until June 27, 1778, when
it was taken back to Philadelphia
and again placed in Independence
Hall.
Never from that time until 1835
did anything of great public im-
portance happen that wat not an-
nounced by the ringing of this his-
toric bell. It was joyously rung
when the news came of the sur-
render of Cornwallis to General
Washington, in 1781, which ended
the military campaign of the Rev-
olution.
The old bell is reverently pre-
served. It stands on the ground
floor of Independence Hall, where
it is viewed daily by thousands of
visitors from all sections of the
country.


and regardless of population.
Codrington explains that with
but $600,000 to spend during the
fiscal year in this public assist-
ance category, it would be pos-
sible to relieve only the most
needy cases.
"Realizing that a monthly ex-
penditure of $50,000 will not al-
low every dependent child in
Florida to be given aid," said Cod-
rington, "the money available un-
der this program will be allocated
to the various counties of the
state by the state welfare board
on the basis of population. The
board, realizing that the various
counties, through their commis-
sioners, have at some time in the
past given mothers' pensions to
the neediest cases within their
borders, proposes to use the coun-
ty lists first for their investiga-
tions by state staff in accordance
with the requirements of the na-
tional social security board. In
view of the fact that there is a
limited appropriation, it is ex-
pected by the. state welfare board
that in' considering these cases
approved at one time or another
by the respective boards of county
commissioner, the neediest cases
will be extended necessary aid."
Thp e aid to dependent children
plan is now before the social se-
curity board at Washington for
approval. It is anticipated that
the issuance of mothers' pensions
will begin in July.


ltIE LIBERTY BELL,


I


CITY TAX GOES INTO
EFFECT IN PANAMA
A city tax on theater tickets,
sports events of all kinds, cigarets
and utilities imposed recently by
the city council went into effect
Monday morning in Panama City.
Included is a levy of 11_ cents
on cigarets costing 15 cents or
more and one cent on packages
costing 10 cents or less. The tax
on theater tickets ranges from
one to five cents. On utilities a
tax of 6 per cent with a maximum
tax of $2.50 became effective.
The tax is termed an emer-
gency measure and is to be effec-
Live for one year.
---d- ---
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
------^-----~----
FOREST GETS ADDITION
President Rooesvelt issued a
proclamation last Friday adding
-318,000 acres to the Apalachicola
National Forest. Forest officials
slate 270,000 acres of the prop-
erty are in process of being pur-
chased.
An additional 22,000 acres re-
cently was acquired for the near-
by St. Marks migratory bird
refuge.

To attract tourists to ruins of
archaeological interest the Greek
government is spending $260,000
for roads to these sites.


FLA.


DR. C C. COE
- DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Tuesday and Fridays

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
Moved Next to Costin's Store
Panama City Port St. Joe


CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.


Professional Cards



William A. Young, R. A.f


.'; ~;-=-
rl '1 5.
~1 -~l-;-jL
~E~~- -~c~:
`i !~~~ :-
~ .~
~,
"


Let Us Service YOUR Car Today


For economical and efficient opera-
ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
service it with our modern equipment
WASHING-
-POLISHING-
-GREASING


i Texaco Products

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
Wilbur Wells Jesse Darcey


AUCTION!


100 LOTS

AT BEACON HILL
ATTRACTIVE TERMS


SATURDAY, JULY 2
COLONEL HENRY, Auctioneer
o


FREE FISH, DINNER

At 12 o'clock Auction Immediately After
Lots 50x100 feet. Each lot faces street with alley at
rear. Subdivision developing rapidly. Stores, bar,
service stations, dance hall, tourist cabins operating.
BEAUTIFUL BATHING BEACH-GOOD FISHING

E LOTS Each purchaser of a lot will be en-
titled to a chance on FREE LOTS




Beacon Hill


Development Company


BEACON HILL, FLA.


J. S. PATRICK


ARCHITECT
and Associates
PANAMA CITY


jr ~ aq~to 10 10 110 kPISr~


TH'E STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE NINE


FPZIDAY, JULY 1, l1r38


4


<







t


CASH DEMANDS Frank Bailey

McCALL DEATH Opens Cafe

FATHER OF 'SKEEGIE' SENDS Frank Bailey, formerly with the
MESSAGE ASKING FOR Carver Drug company, recently
MAXIMUM PENALTY |opened an up-to-date eating estab-
S lishment in the building formerly
About 100 persons attending a occupied by Crawford's beatuy
mass meeting at Homestead to shop on Reid avenue.
protest any leniency for Franklin The cafe makes a specialty of
Fierce McCall. sentenced to death seafood dinners, but also handles
for the kidnaping of Skeegie Cash, all kinds of short orders. Beer,
heard a statement from the dead a:e and soft drinks are also
boy's father stating that "anything served.
;as. than the maximum penalty This new eating house is rapidly
will be unsatisfactory to me and becoming a popular place, and
my family." Frank, with his cheerful smile
"I have never asked for leni- and ready greeting, should make
ency for McCall nor do I intend to a big success of his new venture.
do so," continued the statement --- --- -
of th'e father who paid $10.000 in BILL'S ORCHESTRA, NOT DAN'S
ransom in hopes he would recover In last week's issue we typo-
his already-dead child. "The law graphically erroneously stated, in
has stated that McCall has for- the sub-head on the Martin thea-
feited his right to live." ter writeup that music was to be
At the meeting it was decided furnished by Dan Farmer's orches-
to circulate 2000 petitions through lra, though in the story itself it
South Florida protesting any leni- read "Bill Farmer's famed orches-
ency for the kidnaper. tra of Dothan," which was correct.
The gathering adopted a resolu- Dan Farmer has no connection
tion which read: "In the name of with the orchestra. and we are in-


justice we ask that the sentence
of the court be allowed to stand
and that McCall be put to death
promptly. Such action by the par
don board will increase respect
for the law and will partly atone
for the wilful and unlawful mur-
der of Ilittle Skeegie Cash."
----X-----
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.
----X----
BAPTIST MEET

(Continued from pgge 1)
Time to Ask Questions; Time to
Ask More Questions; How Good
Books Help Build the Church; Ac-
tivitiess of Laymen In Building
the Church: Assurances of a
Lag'er Church Through the Train-
ing Program; The Religious Press
and Religious Literature In Church
Building; Testing Speakers By
Questionnaire; The Evening Ser-
mon.
Similar gatherings will be held
in Cottondale, Thursday, July 7;
Chipley, Friday, July 8; Mt. Olive,
Saturday, July 9; DeFuniak, Sun-
day, July 10; Pilgrim's Rest, Mon-
day, July 11, and Milton, Tuesday,
July 12.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Linle of Magazines.


Seed sorry this error occurred'.
------t------
S CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
t pounded. Phone 27.
JULY FOURTH

(Continued from Page 1)
funds for the event, and asks that
everyone give as liberally as pos-
sible, as there are a number of
.'expenses connected with the cele-
bration and as everything will be
free, there will be no cash return
on the investment, although it will
!bring returns of good will which
cannot be computed in dollars and
cents.
The celebration will also keep
money at home which otherwise
would be spent out of town, and
the business men of the city
should take this angle into con-
sideration when asked for dona-
tions.
The committee already is laying
plans for next year's celebration
which will be bigger and better
than this one. as they had but
three weeks in which to complete
plans and get things organized.
----
If Mrs. E. Clay Lewis, Jr., will
stop at LeHardy's Pharmacy she
will be given a free sundae.


Under the revised Federal Housing Act we are now in
position to make the following type Loans
under Title I of this Act:
CLASS I LOANS
Section A: For repairing and remodeling of residences,
stores, etc.', at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in cost from
$100 to $2,500.
Section B: For repairs and remodeling of commercial and
industrial property at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in
cost from $2,500 to $10,000.
CLASS II LOANS
For the construction of new stores, garages, filling stations,
roadside stands, barns, tourist cabins, beach cottages, etc., at 5
per cent from 1 to 5 years ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
CLASS III LOANS
For the construction of new residences or part residences and
part store building at 3/2 per cent interest from 1 to 5 years,.
ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
LOANS MADE ON ANNUAL PAYMENTS BASIS TO FARMERS
---- -~-----


Build--.Repair---Remodel

See Us If You Want ACTION!





ST. JOE LUMBER O.
PHONE 69 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


4'























I























I


"GO


BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETIES MEET
The missionary societies of the
Baptist church met in a joint ses-
sion Monday afternoon at the
home of Mrs. Troy Jones. Circle
Two was in charge of the pro-
gram, the topic being "Brazil."
The meeting was dismissed to
meet Monday. July 11th, with
Mrs. R. A. Patterson. Eighteen
members were present.

WOODMAN GROVE MAY
BE ORGANIZED IN CITY
Mrs'. Cora L. Gordon of Bagdad,
ila.. national representative and
district manager or the Wooman
Circle, spent several days in Port
St Joe this week in the interest
of the local work, and, reports
prospects good for organizing a
Grove here.
Mrs. Gordon expects to return
to the city within the next thirty
days to complete the work.
A A-
W. C. Roche, proprietor of Port
St. Joe's appliance store, has a
free ice cream sundae coming to
him at LeHardy's Pharmacy.

Miss Tinker Marks of Apalachi-
cola spent several days here this
week visiting her aunt, Mrs. Jos.
B. Gloekler.

Mrs. R. M. Mahon andi Mrs.
Stetson Pridgeon left Tuesday for
Tuscaloosa, Ala., where they were
called due to the illness of their
sister, Mrs.. Geraldine Conner.


Mr. and Mrs. Herman Pollitz of
Edgewater, Fla., will arrive to-
mo'r'ow to spend the Fourth with
Mr. and Mrs. Clyae Allen. Mrs.
Pollitz is a former resident of
Blountstown, her name at that
time being Mrs. A. L. Wesley, and
she is well known in this section.
HOUSE FOR RENT
Five-room house on Beacon Hill
highway; all conveniences. See
M P. Spear, Costin Building, or
phone 52. Iti


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready for Every House in

Port St. Joe

COOK ING -- WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
0--------
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

--~{ A full line of gas appliances in stock *-
Inquire Ritz Theater Building
Gulf Hardware Co. Phone 168
PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932
1" "~


ELE CTRI C


ggagps~lr~b-~1R~eaarPb~~~~4aii


S. for Efficiency, Economy and Coolness

--.-- -7 MAKE your kitchen modern and
i '" ) ) :ore efficient by installing an Elec-
..tric Range. Present low prices pro-
'"-..: vide an especially good opportunity
-- for you to "go electric" now. Know
all the facts about Electric Cookery
and its low cost of operation and
O you'll switch to this ideal method of
cooking.

Today's Completely Modern


ELECTRIC RANGES

PRICED AS LOW AS


S7950




Let These Electric Range Dealers Help You
GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY L. E. ROCHE
DANLEY FURNITURE COMPANY W. T. WEAVER & CO.

FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


'"~~


Mrs. W. W Barrier is invited to
have a free ice cream sundae at
LeHardy's Pharmacy.
*
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

COTTAGE FOR SALE
IOn Apalachicola Beach. All
furnished. Lot 100 ft. wide-,
from beach to lagoon.
J. H. COOK, Apalachicola


I


FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1938-


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TEN