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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00188
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 3, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00188

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
e.t growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANNIVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY1 FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938 NUMBER 33


COMMISSIONERS'



MEETING EVOLVES



INTO GAS DEBATE


Panama City Insurance Man Appeals To City Dads For Law
Prohibiting Installation of Underground Gas Tanks;
Facts Are Refuted By Representative of St.
Joe Gas Company

PLUMBING ORDINANCE DISCUSSED BY LOCAL MEN

Outline Street Paving Work To Be Done With Assistance of
WPA; Tractor and Grader Secured For Work
From County Commissioners; Volunteer
Fire Company Not Up to Par

What started out to apparently be an ordinary routine ses-
sion of the city commissioners Tuesday night, developed into
a spirited debate on "Buried Gas Tanks Versus Aboveground
Gas Tanks," with L. E. Merriam, Panama City insurance man,'
taking the negative and Robert W. A. Robinson, of Pensacola,
representing the Hydro-Gas company, the affirmative side.
Mr. Robinson, who took the floor first without the knowl-
edge that one of his listeners was connected with the gas con-
cern which he desired to have barred from operating in the
city, said: "I understand that a large number of your citizens
are installing gas appliances in your city, and I would like
to suggest that the gas supply for these appliances, if on the
owners' property, ?e. placed.?,
above ground. I am' ask- you gentlemen go into tire matter
ing this from the point of thoroughly."
view of an insurance man, as Robinson Takes Floor
I get considerable business Mayor J. L. Sharit then asked
from Port St. Joe, and if if anyone else desired to express
these underground tanks are an opinion on the matter, and
Mr. Robinson immediately took
allowed to be installed your thel loor.
insurance rating will be con- "I feel sure that most of Mr.
siderably raised. Underwriters lMerriam's information is false
in the past have not been in- and he has not checked on the
terested in this type of gas in- data," said Mr. Robinson. "Talla-
stallation, but are now taking hassee, I believe, has no ordinance
notice of it due to a number against underground tanks, as a
of such tanks exploding and Marianna concern !s now prepar-
causing serious damage." ing to install some 30 units in
Mr. Merriam then proceeded to that city. And as for Quincy, it
read from a pamphlet issued by has an ordinance against above-
the Bureau of Standards, Wash- ground tanks.
--'*'""M'any municipalities near Port
ington, D. C., pointing out that Many municipalities nea
St. Joe have underground sys-
leaks in buried tanks are hard to tens and others are contemplat-
locate. ing such installation Asf for thp


Big Hazard
"The biggest hazard," he said,
"is from corrosion on underground
tanks, and it is particularly bad
here due to the salt water close
to the surface of the soil.. The
hazard is not only to the owners
on whose property these tanks
are located, but to the entire com-
munity.
"I suggest that the city look
into this matter of underground


pamphlet Mr. Merriam quoted
from, immediately after its issu-
ance the bureau of standards is-
sued a corrective pamphlet, as the
information carried in it was
found to be entirely untrue.
"I have with me a booklet from
the National Board of Fire Un-
derwriters listing all aboveground
and underground systems and you
will not find any above-ground
systems in use in Port St. Joe
listed in this book, while you will
find the Hvdro-Gas comnanv an-


tanks and either require a heavy proved.
bond from those who install them "These underground tanks are
in order to pay for any damage to be found in cities all over the
that might result from an explo- United States, and any company
sion, or pass an ordinance to that would install systems that
eliminate these tanks, as the city would be a hazard would be
has been placed in the third class plainly foolish, for it would be
by the insurance underwriters and detrimental to their business. If
I believe will soon be in the sec- they had but one explosion their
ond class. You do not want to entire investment would be a to-
lose this favorable rating. The tal loss.
owners of property on which Receives Offer To Sell
the s e underground tanks are
placed and adjacent property own- "More underground systems are
ers are heavily penalized. in use in the United States than
"I am interested only from the above-ground systems, and if they
underwriters' viewpoint," Mr. Mer- are so hazardous why should the
riam continued. "Tallah'assee and president of the company that op-
Quincy have ordinances prohibit- rates the above-ground system in
ing these underground installa- Port St. Joe write me a letter of-
tions, and before any permits are fearing to buy out my company-
issnud for these I would suggests (Turn to 'Gas. Debate' page 3)


IMPRESSIVE

SERVICE HELD

MEMORIAL DAY

IN HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
UNDER DIRECTION OF
LEGION POST

An impressive Memorial Day
service was conducted at the high
school auditorium Monday eve-
ning by Gulf County Post 116,
American Legion, with Post Com-
mander T. M. Schneider in charge.
An introductory talk was given
by Commander Schneider, fol-
lowed with a prayer by Rev. H. F.
Beaty. An interesting talk and
reading, "In Flanders Field," was
given by Mrs. W. E. Murdock, af-
t ,r which the band rendered a se-
lection.
Rev. Benson, Episcopal minister-
of Apalachicola, gave the address
c(, the evening in which he
i),i.l :oquent tribute to the dead
o" all wars. He also sounded a
warning of wars to come unless
the peoples of the world regained
their liberties.
"The Star Spangled Banner"
was played by the band, after
which. D. G. Farmer sounded
"Ta.ps" and the service was closed
with benediction by Rev. J. W.
Sisemore.


HOUSE NOMINEES

DELAY SPEAKER

CHOICE TO JULY

TO HOLD ANOTHER SESSION
IN PASCO COUNTY TO
SETTLE QUESTION

Following speeches by eight
candidates for speaker of the 1939
Florida house of representatives
at an informal caucus held in
Jacksonville Wednesday, legisla-
tors voted to hold another caucus
at Moon Lake, in Pasco county, in
July to settle thespeakership
question. Date for the meeting
will be set by Speaker W. McL.
Christie.
There was a preponderance of
sentiment against, selection of a
speaker at this time mainly due
to indications of a "small county"
versus "big county" contest.
House members who cannot at-
tend the July meeting will be al-
lowed to vote by proxy, and Rep-
resentative E. Snow Martin of
Polk county said ne believed the
eight candidates should do their
campaigning during the next 30
days, get together, compare notes
on how many pledges each held
and agree to let the high man
have the speakership.
G. Pierce Wood of Port St. Joe,
representative of Liberty county,
was among the eignt candidates
for the speakership. Others were
Noah A. Butt of Brevard county,
John S. Burks of Pasco, LeRoy
Collins of Leon, F. B. Harrell of
Hamilton, Raymond Sheldon oT
Hillsborough, Robert F. Sikes of
Okaloosa and Peter Tomasello of
Okeechobee.
E. Clay Lewis, Jr., newly-elected
representative from Gulf county,
was in attendance at the session
in Jacksonville.
----- ---- .
"Mickey" 'Stone, student at the
University- of Florida, is home for
the summer months with his par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Stone.


Turnbull Is New

Democratic Chief

Is Chosen Thursday Afternoon At
Meeting Held In Jack-
sonville

T. T. Turnbull of Monticello was
chosen to head the state Demo-
cratic executive committee yes-
terday afternoon at a caucus held
in Jacksonville. The vote was:
Turnbull 67; Fred H. Kent of
Jacksonville 59, and Ty Cobb of
Orlando 6. Mrs. Louise McGreg-
ory of Volusia county was chosen
as vice-chairman.
Mr. Turnbull, at present attor-
ney for the railroad commission,
is a former state senator from
Jefferson county and former pres-
ident of the state senate.


CONE ORDERS

OFFICERS HALT

MIBS BOARDS

DECLARES COIN OPERATED
DEVICES ARE IN VIOLA-
TION OF LAW

Apparently taking a tip from
the recent action against marble
hoards in Port St. Joe, Governor
Fred P. Cone las: Monday sent
orders to coutity .law enforcementt
officers to stop the operation of
marble machines and similar de-
vices.
He stated that "they are noth-
ing .but slot machines in another
form. A strict violation
of the law and a subterfuge car-
ried on by the slot machine peo-
ple to evade the law."
Governor Cone requested state
attorneys, sheriffs and county
judges to "stop the operation of
every oue of' the machines in your
county and, if necessary, prose-
cute al persons operating the
machines. It is very important
that enforcement officers do their
duty and break up this slot ma-
chine subterfuge."

LeHARDY PHARMACY IS
GIVING FREE ICE CREAM
SUNDAES EACH WEEK
In this issue or The Star, the
l.elardy Pharmacy carries an an-
nincement stating that they are
giving free ice cream sundaes to
rive lucky individuals each week
until further notice.
Look through tLe news columns
of The Star today, and if you find
your name and an invitation to
drop in at LeHardy's fountain for
a free sundae, eo so, for there
are absolutely no strifigs attached
to the offer-it is merely good ad-
vertising on the part of Mr. Le-
Hardy to create good will.
-- ----i------
DONATES BRICK FOR NEW
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. W. Belk of Charlotte, N. C.,
has donated the brick for con-
struction of the Lew Presbyterian
church in this city. The gift was
secured through Rev. Wm. E. Mc-
Ilwain, D.D. Mr. Belk is head of I
the Belk chain stores and has
aided in building a large number
of churches.

GOVERNMENT TO SPEND
$24C-,000 ON WATERWAY
Approximately $240,000 has been
earmarked by the United States l
senate for construction and main- a
tenance of the Apalachicola Bay- t
St. Marks river waterway. t


GULF COUNTY

RANKS FOURTH

IN ACCIDENTS

DURING MONTH OF APRIL;
CERTAIN LINES HAVE
LARGEST NUMBER

A perfect record of industrial'
safety for the month of April was
reported by eight of Florida's 67
counties, while 10 others reported
a total of 2,553 more or less seri-
ous accidents in the industrial
field, with six of these accidents
resulting in death.
The counties with a perfect
record were Liberty, Baker, Char-
lotte, Flagler, Glades, Hamilton,
Holmes and LaFayette.
Those with the highest accident
'experience were Dade, 832; Duval,
394; Hillsborough, 234; Gulf, 232;
Polk, 202; Palm BeBach, 195; Pi-
nellas, 169; Orange, 126;, Brow-
ard, 89, and Escambia, 80.
While this report clearly shows
that most of the industrial acci-
dents are confined to the larger
counties, it is also noted that
Gulf, which ranks far down the
lists in point of population, has
the fourth largest accident experi-
ence.
B. E. Erwin, safety director of
the Florida industrial commission,
in discussing the 3,271 industrial
accidents in the state during +tb
past month, said. W- find .that
accidents have become stabilized
not only to location but also to in-
dustry. Ten industries including
general contracting, hotel employ-
ment, garages and filling sta-
tions, saw mills, municipal em-
ployment, packing houses, citrus
groves, street and highway con-
struction, department stores and
wholesale food dealers, reported
1,6,3 accidents in this field, or
more than half of the total for the
state. The other 1,588 accidents
occurring in 150 various indus-
tries."
"We find also that deaths in
this field are confined mostly to
certain areas," sLrwin continued.
"Last month two fatalities oc-
curred in Dade county and one
each in Palm Beach, Orange, St.
Lucie and Madison.
"If some of the largest indus-
tries in the state can hold their
accident experience to a minimum
there is no good reason why the
above ten industries cannot do
the same. As workmen's compen-
sation insurance rates are now
based on the state-wide experi-
ence of an industry, employers in
some localities are penalizing the
balance of the employers in that
particular industry by their bad
accident experience. This condi-
tion must be remedied if Florida
is to retain the reduction which
has just gone into effect on th'is
class of insurance," Erwin con,
cluded.


----*----
BUYS CHURCH
C. W. "Red" Horton this week
purchased the Assembly of God
church, located on Fifth street
near the St. Joe Ice company
plant, and moved it to a lot near
his home, where :t will be rebuilt
into a nice residence.
The Assembly of God will build
r new church in Highland View.
---r--- ---
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
eft Tuesday for St. Augustine to
attend the graduation exercises of
their daughter, who has been at.
tending school in that city.








A


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as.-Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at .th Pos'offica, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.CO Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c


...- Telephone 51 }V-.-


The spoken word is given p:::ant attention;
the printed word is thou ;lhiully weighed.
The spoken word ba-ely asserts; the printed
Y\ord thoroughly co::vinces. Tihe spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


LOCAL SUPPORT

No community can progress and grow
without. a means of publicity-a local news-
paper. It serves its community to a greater
extent than it serves the man who publishes
it. There is not much profit for the pub-
lisher unless he can awaken the community
to the value of the service he is rendering.
The venture is never firmly established until
such an awakening occurs and the community
begins to reciprocate.
People are more inclined tco buy adver-
tised merchandise than that which is not ad-
vertised. If the advertising comes in the
form of direct mail or in an announcement
in an outside newspaper, the party receiving
it is more likely to act upon its invitation
than to take his business to some local con-
cern which does not advertise. Outside com-
petition finds its most fruitful field in re-
gions where the local merchants do not ad-
vertise.
Initiative is always with the newspaper.
When it has done its part in an acceptable
manner i.t becomes necessary to put the' mat-
ter straight up to citizens; to ask the man
who patronizes outside interests, and thereby
weakens local ones, if he can depend upon
-any of these outside agencies in an emer-
gency.
Of these citizens we ask: Will these out-
side newspapers whose advertisements you
read and whose advertisers you patronize,
use their editorial space to support some-
thing of direct benefit to Port St. Joe? Will
they enter into a local fight with the zest or
effectiveness of your home-town newspaper?
Will the mail order houses whom you patron-
ize help to pay the taxes in Port St. Joe?
Do the outside advertisers and the mail order
houses contribute to our churches, our local
organizations, our schools? Do they help
pave our streets and pay for our sewer and
water systems?
Decidedly not! And if we should ask them
for contributions for these things they would
laugh in our faces and tell us to go jump in
the bay.
Trade at home, patronize your home-town
merchants who advertise in The Star and
keep your dollars in Port St. Joe where you
can get another crack at 'enm.


THE TALE OF A POLITICIAN

If you don't get a chuckle out of the fol-
lowing paragraph from Edd Burch's column
in the Dalton News you'd better have a doc-
,or examine your funny bone:
"Eugene's Tale Is Branded False," reads a
headline in the Macon News referring to Eu-
gene Talmadge. We always did say that
those people down on Sugar Creek in Telfair
county .were a little careless about the way
-they handled their branding irons.
-Blackshear (Ga.) Times.


Back some years ago when you were en-
joying a few of your favorite tunes the wife
would break in on your enjoyment with the
question: "Say, John, why don't you change
that needle ?"-Florida Times-Union. Now
she says: "Is that the best station you can
find ?"


THE REBUILT BLUE EAGLE


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


COMMUNITY PROGRESS

While Port St. Joe has much to boast of
as it considers achievements during the past
two years, it would be sheer folly at this
stage of its community development to rest
content on our laurels and cease striving for
further development.
Port St. Joe's present high standing among
centers of equal population has becn won by
foresight and aggressive policies in the past.
\'Ne should continue to be just as eager to
t:s:;ur a greater future for the community
as were those men who at times fought a
stiff, uphill fight to gain those things upon
which the city's present prestige rests.
Never before in its history has Port St.
Joe been in such good position to go forward
in rapid and substantial development as right
no(.. It has all its pristine attractions plus
many of relatively recent acquisition.
But to do the things that must be done if
the community is to progress along tlesirable
lines of commercial, industrial and residential
expansion and betterment, there must be no
diminution of that spirit of co-operation and
willing effort on the part of a considerable
number of citizens which has been mani-
fested in all its' past accomplishments.
And just as men and women of vision and
civic consciousness have always been avail-
able in the past, so will they come to the
service of the community in the future.

YOUR LIFE-OR DIVERSION!

Apparently this gasoline tax diversion
question is getting right down to a question
of "your neck"-and mine. From Asher
Frank, director of the Florida Safety Coun-
cil, comes this statement:
"Constant rise of traffic accidents and
deaths on Florida highways are due to de-
preciating and outmoded highways which
can not be made safe because too much of
Florida motordom's $30,000,000 tax con-
tributions are diverted to purposes other
than roads. Floridians should be aroused
to the necessity of using gas tax funds to
conserve their own lives."
There's not much a newspaper man can
add to that statement-which perhaps is the
best thing about the statement.
It comes from a man charged with con-
serving human life and advocating measures
to make your life and mine secure. It
comes from a man who apparently knows
what he is talking about.
There's nothing to be done about it, ex-
cept for "you and me" to arouse ourselves
to the danger-and use our own best judg-
ment. It's our business-yours and mine.-
Scenic Highlands Sun.

DIMINISHING RETURNS

There is ample evidence that taxation in
these United States has reached the point
where the law of diminishing returns is op-
erative. The shackles of excessive taxation
need to be loosened, not tightened, but the
federal government and almost all state and
local units continue to search for fresh means
of extracting money from helpless taxpayers.
The problem is so simple that even a run-
of-the-mine politician could grasp it, if he
ever could be induced to direct a little atten-
tion toward it. Business thrives and enter-
prise is stimulated when a reasonable part of
the profits can be retained by the business
men. If government exactions take an un-
reasonably large part of the returns of indi-
vidual effort, that effort is blanketed and
smothered.

Another visitor who wanted to get rich
quick reveals that he turned $3000 over to
confidence men, which still proves that a
sucker is born every minute along with two
smart fellows to take his money.-St. Peters-
burg Times.

Cats are said to have the same number of
bones in their bodies as humans. But cats
take much better care of them.-Atlanta
Constitution.


River Valley Is

World's Producer

Of Tupelo Honey

More Than 600.000 Pounds Pro-
duced This Year In 75-Mile
Strip of the Apalachicola

The Apalchlachicola river valley
produces more tupelo honey than
any other section :n the world, it
was demonstrated in recent inter-
views with leading honey ex-
porters. Ranking higher than Cali-
fornia white clover honey in mar-
ket value, tupelo is non-granulat-
ing and has a distinctive flavor
which, by many, is claimed to be
superior to any other variety.
More than 600,000 pounds were
produced in the 75-mile strip of
the Apalachicola river valley this
season, it was brought out, about
183,000 pounds coming from the
immediate vicinity of Apalachi-
cola.
In Wewahitchka a special co-
operative group of apiary owners
Ins been formed to regulate honey
production. Three main types of
honey are made in this section-
maple, ti.-ti and tupelo.
While bees work in every warm
nonth of the year, the actual tu-
)elo season is limited to a few
veeks in April and May. But the
energy of the bees is unlimited. A
ive miay fil up in three days.
'ourt.een pounds of honey may be
brought into each hive during a
2-louir period. During the tupelo
season a hive may produce from
72 to 190 pounds. A. B. Marchant
of Apalachicola states that one
box produced an average of 72
pounds each season over a period
of 35 years.
A record yield this year was
made by Fred A. Hoff'man of Apa-
lachicola, who stated that 283
hives produced 54,300 pounds in a
60-day season, an average of 190
pounds per hive. Mr. Hoffman at-
tributes this record to a special
type of foundation comb made for
him by an Ohio company. He said
that E. R. Root of Medina, Ohio,
had introduced this type of comb
and that this sanre honey expert
was the first to bring the Italian
bee to this country. The Italian
bee is a prolific honey-maker.
Since tupelo honey is non-gran-
ulating, special foundation combs
must be used in each hive.-Apa-
lachicola Times.

Send The Star to a friend.

think Jim Lee will become unduly
alarmed by the howls of culprits
whom lie finds it his duty to
spank.


Stqrdust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


By RUSSELL KAY
Guest Contributor
Much after the manner of G-
Man Hoover. who doesn't hesitate
to lead his men into battle when
the going gets tough, Comptroller
Jim Lee personally led a raid on
ta-x-dodgers down in Dade county
-a short time ago and as a result
has got himself a reputation on a
par with Simon Legree.
Ever since its passage, three one-
half of one per cent gross receipts
tax has been in the hair of Flor-
ida merchants, but most of them
have paid it under protest and
await another session of the legis-
lature in the hope of its repeal.
In the meantime Jim Le'e is em-
ployed by the people to collect the
Lax, and a flocl or school teachers
.re depending on this revenue for
oneir salary checks.
Jim's more or less direct method
or collection' taxes is contrary to
all the rules oi the game, for
while all politicians agree that
taxes SHOULD be paid, few of
um would ever go so far as to
actually try and MAKE somebody
pay 'em. They usually plead and
beg and whimper for a year or so
and then wind up by settling' the
account for a few cents on the
dollar, makin' the guy who was
dumb enough to pay 'em a first-
class sap. To justify their action
they usually picture a poor widow
woman, all tattered and torn, being'
forcibly ejected from her ram-
snackle home.
Every Florida merchant able to
read or write has known all along
that he was obligated to collect
and pay to the state one-half of
one per cent on his gross receipts
and in the case of Dade county 96
per cent of the merchants met
this obligation. Four per cent ig-
nored the comptroller's frequent
demands and warnings and in-
sistted they wouldn't pay it. Jim
Lee just happens to ne tile wrong
guy to talk that way to, and sev-
eral merchants, as a result, have
been forced to close their doors.
Dade county legislators and
other noble citizens are horrified
and condemn I'ee for his action.
They are demanding' an extra ses-
sion of the legislature to repeal
this obnoxious law, but seem to
forget that 96 per cent of our mer-
chants have paid it, and fail to
explain how we are goin' to jus-
tify cllectin' from them if we
turn around and let the rebellious
4 per cent go untax-ed. Returnin'
a million and a half to those who
have already paid might be fun
for the merchants, but it would be
costly and darned inconvenient to
the state and the taxpayers.
Whether or not the law in ques-
ttion is good or bad piece of
legislation is beside the point, for
it nevertheless is the law and
should be enforced with equal jus-
tice on all alike. Governor Cone
might call .a special session of the
legislature to accommodate the 4
per cent who want to get out of
paying' a tax that 96 per cent have
already paid, but somehow we just
don't think he will. Nor do we








1


Many Long Years Ago


(From The Apalachicola Times,
Saturday, June 9, 1900)
APALACHICOLA FIRE SWEPT
Friday noon of May 25, 1900,
will never be forgotten by the
residents of Apalachicola, for on
that date the most destructive
fire in the city's history occurred.
At 12 o'clock the alarm was given
and investigation showed that the
kitchen to Mrs. Geo. Broughton's
residence was wrapped in flames.
The flames spread to the main
dwelling. Then almost in the
twinkling of an eye the old his-
toric Methodist church was wrap-
ped in its winding sheet of fire.
Just before the roof of this old
building fell in, the bell in the
steeple pealed out its sad requiem.
Across tthe alleyway from the
church was a house occupied by
Miss Philomena Murat and sis-
ters, the Opera House, Armory,
Mrs. Goodlett's residence, Mrs.
Livingston's millinery store and
two vacant buildings owned, by


cry store, a vacant building owned
by Mr. Geo. F. Weifing, Willis'
drug store, Lucido Spano's barber
shop (all wooden buildings), were
soon a mass of roaring, crackling
flames.
Again the fire crossed the street
on its onward march to the river.
Pro1: the Central hotel on C(entre
Ltrcet to the wharf, a distance of
t' o blocks, all of which was
baUrncld to the ground. Adjoining
'the Central ho.(l was Marler's
siug store; then came Wilhelm's
snioan. In the rear of the saloon
was a dwelling owned by the Or-
man estate. This building soon
burned, also a dwelling nearby
owned by Wm. P. McCormack.
On the opposite side of Com-
merce street were a blacksmith
shop owned by Jovanna Martina,
a warehouse filled with salt, own-
ed by Ruge Bros., the residence
and shop of C. R. Harris, Web-
ster's restaurant on the corner of
Commerce and Centre street, two
warehouses of Grady & Co., an


Mr. J. L. Clark. These soon sue- iron warehouse of Ruge Bros.
cumbed to the flames. Much hard From this point the flames ex-
work had been done on the resi- tended to Water street, burning
dence of Dr. Willils, adjoining the three-story brick building
Mrs. Broughton's, and it was owned by the Porter estate, the
thought at one time that it would two wooden buildings adjoining
be saved, but the terrific heat the store of Grady & Co., with
from the opera house made the ac- custom house and inspector's of-
complishment impossible. fice above, the bank, Walsh's sa-
The wind at the beginning of loon, Antone Messina's oyster and
the fire was from the south. But fish house on the wharf, Segarees
in a short time it changed, blow- Bros: and H. H. Lind's fish
ing from the west, and drove the houses adjoining, Hall's saloon on
sparks and cinders across the the corner of Water and Centre
street, igniting first Judge Hicks' streets, the ice house, express of-
office, the three buildings just be- fice, telegraph office, Coombs' of-
yond and facing on Chestnut ica and Griggs' wharf. Just be-
street, Lovett's store, and on Mar- yond Hall's saloon was a one-
ket street Patton's butcher shop story wooden building, a carpei-
and Knights of Honor Lodge, Ew- ter's shop and the engine house
ton's butcher shop, Neel's butcher of the ways near Cumberworth's
shop, Cone's barber shop and shop. These were also consumed,
laundry, Nick Swa.a's tailor shop, but hard work saved Cumber-
Toney Spano's fruit store, Lon worth's shop, the lumber piles and
Allen's barber shop and R. Col- rmil: of the Kimball Lumber Co.
lines' general merchandise store. .11l in all. there were 71 build-
And still there fire fiend was not ings consumed, and what was
satisfied. On its onward course to once a thriving, bustling centre is
the river the entire block be- today a mass of blackened ruins.
tween Market and Commerce All that is left of the business
streets, containing Rice & Henry's portion of the city is the rorth-
grccery, Warren's grocery, Rush's west side of Chestnut street, from
drug store. A. H.oppe's jewelry Mark,' bak'ary and confectionary
store, A. Flatauer & Co.'s dry to the Hill Supply Co., those
good store (11ll brick buildings), buildings beyond and up the river
C. Lichtenfielt's and Ginsberg's from Chestnut street, Ruge Bros.
dry goods store, The Times office, store on the corner of Chestnut
Singer's saloon, Christo's restaur, and Water streets, the three-story
ant, a vacant two-story building brick building adjoining Ruge
cwned by J.ohn Cook, Alexander's Eros. belonging to the Orman es-
'drug store, Hoffman & Moore's tate, the Ruge wharf and the
store, with Masonic and K. of P. buildings from the Ruge wharf
hail above. Misses Murat's millin- cookingg uD the river.


G D b in the above-ground company.
Gas Debate Ve do not inl'nc; to continue
with! our plans for a c:iy gas corm-
(Continued from page 1) pany if it interferes with a local
and I have that letter right here company which I understand may
with me to corroborate my state- be formed here, and if it is formed
ment. we wi:l turn over all our equip-
"There has never been an ex- m t to this local concern and
plc-oion in the Ur ted States from withdraw from the field.
an- underground system in the Would Use Streets
past 17 yea s. These tanks are "We are putting in 40 installa-
;isted by the fire underwriters as tio.s within the next 30 days and
absolutely safe and bear their we ask for your ipermission to go
stamp of approval, ahead as all of our equipment has
"Since we have come into Port the stamp of approval of the
St. Joe we have ,iad applications board of fire underwriters labora-
from 15 customers of the above- stories on it, and we want permis-
ground company here to change Hion to run our pipe s under your
to our gas, but we have not paid streets and alleys to serve these
attention to these" as we do not customers."
believe in this dog-eatitog prac- At this point Mayor Sharit in-
ti'e. tc:rr'pt'd to say: "I do not believe
"I do not know of a city that we should at th;s time give you
has an ordinance against the use permission to use our streets un-
c unde:'r-'o"n' tanks, and I. ask til such time as we are able to
Tr. Mc' ::i:r- to ave t: ti the t:Ike act'o i one wqay or another
o0 O0:iny !v-s s.c:i an ordin- :o tI' mratte- of yo:'" f:'aneblse
a I know it has an ordin- :ir you have appeliI fo-. If
*.!? against the use cf above- you do that. 'yo. are -o::r:g o a2k
:o-.'n::rd tksc. this I .o: : oup to take over yoa.r
'OC w+e?-c: aftel' p-:tiing our lines and they may not -e':'e so
o e:'i::g a!nnou-nce-:ent in The to do."
Star we had applications from "Then I withdraw my request
one- one r. o* lhe users of gas '-- '"e of the streets anr we wi"l


serve our present customers from
individual tanks until such time
as you take action," replied Mr.
Robinson.


Po:tpone Action
"I think we shouldn't allow any
underground tanks until we take
the matter up with the city at-
torney and the commissioners dis-
cuss it," said Mayor Sharit, "as
we do not want to jeopardize our
present firo insurance rates."
"I think it is all right," com-
mented Commissioner B. A. P.rid-
g '0:1, "but I don't want to take
an:y action until I talk with City
Attorney Lewis." (Attorney Lewis
was not at Tuesnay night's meet-
ing, being out of the city.)
"1 don't believe we should go
ahead with this matter until we
investigate it thoroughly," put in
Commissioner B. W. Eells, "and
get Mr. Lewis' reaction to it."
"But we have 25 or 30 custom-
ers waiting to be served," pro-
tested Mr. Robinson, "and we
have a crew of men here and de-
sire to start making installations
tomorrow."
"I'm in favor of letting you pro-
ceed," said Mayor Sharit, "but if
it is going to increase our insur-
ance rates I'm opposed to it, but
if it meets with Mr. Lewis' ap-
proval we should be able to give
you permission to install tanks by
Saturday or Monday."
City Took License Money
"But," Mr. Robmnson said, "the
city accepted ou money for li-
censes, which we took as permis-
sion to proceed with our installa-
tions, and we now save three in
the city. But, if it is agreeable
with you, we wl;; put in above-
ground tanks to hold our cus-
tomers until: this thing is ironed
out."


"That's okeh, buddy," said Com-
missioner Pridgeon as he drew a
cup of water from the cooler, "if
you want to do that to hold your
customers."
"That is all right with me,"
said the mayor, and, "It is agree-
able with me," said Mr. Eells.
And so the matter was left at
that and other business was taken
up by the commissioners.
Pi:n bing Ordinance
The commissioners nave had on
hand for some time a bulky or-
dinance pertaining to plumbing
regulations and practices, but as
it was too technical for the aver-
age person to grasp, E. M. Watts,
local plumber, was asked to read
it over and report to the board.
Said Mr. Watts:
"I find that the plumbing ordin-
ance just about covers the field,
with a few exceptions. You will
have to appoint a board of health
in order to prosecute violations o!
the code, as no court would up-
hold a case unless you had such
a board. Your code permits gal-
vanized iron pipe for vents and
enairelware urinals and toilet
combinations. These should be re-
moved from the ordinance as




*S"


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Port St. Joe, Fla.


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SEE W ewahitchka State Bank FIRST


Traveler's Cheques will make your vaca-
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they are eaten up by the acids
and gases and soon become unfit
for use." He also mentioned a
number of other minor changes
which he thought should be made.
"I believe such an ordinance to
be one of the best things for the
sity," continued Mr. Watts, "as it
is growing rapidly and the health
of your citizens should be one of
your main requisites."
John O'Keefe, another plumber,
was asked his opinion, and he
reiterated Mr. Watts' stand on the
matter.
At the suggestion of Mr. Watts
and Mr. O'Keefe, tie commission-
ers agreed to secure copies of an
ordinance enacted by Lakeland as
(Continued on page 4)


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


. .. 7 ..


-121-, 1,,, -1-


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PAGE FOUR

FATHER OF SAM DAVIS
PASSES IN ALABAMA

Mr. James S. Davis, father of
Sammie Davis of this city, passed
away at his home in Henry coun-
ty, Alabama, last Saturday morn-
ing. He had been in ill health for
the past two years following an
automobile accident. He was
stricken with a heart attack Wed-
nesday of last week, pneumonia
developed the following morning,
and he lasted but a few hours.
Mr. Davis had visited his son
in this city a nunmer of times and
made many friends here. He was
a member of the Methodist church
since boyhood and his life was
truly an example of the Golden
Rule. He will be greatly missed
in his community.
Children surviving are Mrs. M.
O. Armstrong of Columbia, Ala.,
Mrs. R. L. Blacksnear of Richland,
Mrs. G. W. Vining and Mrs. Cecil
Moore of Orlando, Miss Corene
Davis of Headlad and J. Sammie
Davis of this city; also nine
grandchildren survive.
The beautiful floral offerings
and the number of friends and rel-
atives present at the funeral serv-
ices was evidence of the esteem
in which he was held. Interment
was made in the Center cemetery
with Rev. Hicks of Old Center
church officiating.
---k---
Mrs. Be le Land, former owner
of Crawford's Beauty Shop, has
sold out and moved to her former
home in Wewahitchka.

..j-.---- -


WOOD FIBER

FLOWERS

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONSi
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~IETh~CTTLT~U...~.


LEGION DANCE AT VAN'S
IS DELIGHTFUL AFFAIR
The dance sponsored by Gulf
County Post 116, American Le-
gion, at Van's recreation hall at
Beacon Hill Wednesday night was
a delightful affair for the lovers
of good music and dancing in this
community. One of the largest
crowds for some time enjoyed the
evening. Proceeds from the dance
went to the crippled children's
fund of the Legion post.
Music was furnished by Bill
Farmer and his Dothan Boys. This
orchestra is always a drawing
card, and as they will play every
two weeks it is apparent that
Van's will this season be more
popular than ever before. Groups
from Panama City, Apalaricola
and Wewahitchka attended the
dance.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT BRIDGE
CLUB IN MEETING MONDAY
The Wednesday Night Bridge
Club met Monday night of this
week instead of Wednesday at the
home of Mrs. Bernard Pridgeon.
Two tables were placed for play
;n the living room, which was
decorated with spring flowers.
After several progressions, the
prizes were awarded to Mrs. Joe
Gloe:ler, high, and Mrs. B. Owens,
cut.
Refreshments or strawberry
shortcake, whippet cream and
iced limeade wery served to Mes-
dames J. M. Smith, J. Gloekler,
B. Owens, M. Tomlinson, C. Ed-
wards, H. Soule and E. Ramsey.

Mesdames C. A. LeHardy. Dell
Mahon and Clay Lewis attended a
tea last Thursday afternoon in
Apalachicola given by Mrs. Aub-
rey Marks honoring Miss Teresa
Zingarelli, who was married to
Jimmie Mahon on June 1.

Mrs. Robert Haley has an ice
cream sundae awaiting her at the
LeHardy Pharmacy.

Mayor J. L. Sharit and City At-
torney E. Clay Lewis, Jr., at-
tended the Democratic session in
Jacksonville. They returned yes-
terday.


5c and $1.00 Carlyle Matthew.s left Thursday
o last week to spend the summer
with his grandmother and other
IITH relatives in Alabama.
Port St. Joe "
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
_-- --'. Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.


Men's rkI k C ng


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Costing's Dept. Store


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Sunday School, 10 a. in. every
Sunday.
Preaching 11 a. m., first, third
and fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.
Preaching in Wewahitchka the
first Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:30 p.
m., central standard time.
-A-
EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
-A-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. Mdney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. nM. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
eiv. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning worship 11 a.m.
B. T. TU. 7 p. m.
Evening worship 8 p. nm.
W. M. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
S p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
4 p. m.
4'
MRS. HENDERSON HOSTESS
AT BEACH COTTAGE
Mrs. Charles Henderson of Troy,
Ala.. entertained at an al fresco
dinner Tuesday at "Rest Haven"
at Lagoon Beach. Guests were
Mrs. IV. C. Black and daughters of
"Hurricane Hall," Lagoon Beach;
M-. and Mrs. W. A. Ruffin and
Mr. and Mrs. Gorcon of Auburn,
Ala.: Mrs. W. W. Henderson of
Troy, Ala.: Mrs. H. T. McKinnon
of Luverne. Ala., and Mrs. James
Allred of Se'na, Ala.
*& -i'- -t I
Mrs. Robert 'Tapper, George
Tapper. Alton Dendy, L. W. Owens
and Roselle Stone left Wednes-
day for Jacksonville to attend the
Democratic rally.

Mrs. Sammie Davis returned to
t'e city Tuesday from Headland,
-la.. wlhre. she was called by the
ieath of !-cr father-in-law.

Mrs. Elgin Bayliss and sons of
Tallahassee are visiting Mrs. Nora
P-Toward.

Mercer Spear and Mark Tom-
linson were business visitors last
T.u-day in Panama City.

Mrs. V. S. Smith l-ift Saturday
for Fo.-t Myers where she will
visit for a couple of weeks with
her sister, Mrs. Annie Pigott. She
was accompanied by her mother,
Mrs.. J. Smith, who had been
visiting in Sumatra with her son.
.T. 0. Smith.

M\:ss Del;a Ward of White City
will leave today to spend several
months in the Paanma Canal
Zone.


APALACHICOLA W. M. S.
ENTERTAINS ST. JOE GROUP
The Apalachicola Methodist Mis-
sionary Society was hostess to the
Port St. Joe society Monday after-
noon when they entertained in the
community house in the neighbor-
ing city. The rooms were tastily
decorated with spring flowers,
carrying out a color scheme of
yellow and green.


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


After a lovely program or m1-, soda fountain.
sic, conducted by Mrs. Ham, an I, A
interesting Bible romance game Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett,
was played. The prize, an attrac- Mrs. Clyde Wages and aunt spent
tive salt and pepper set, was pre- a delightful day Wednesday fish-
sented to Mrs. J. L. Temple of ing on the Dead Lakes.
Port St. Joe.
At the close of the afternoon's CARVER DRUG COMPANY


activities, delicious rerresnments
of cake, ice cream and punch were
served.

Mrs Charles Henderson of Troy,
Ala., has as her guests for the
summer at her nome at Lagoon
Beach, Mrs. Charlotte M. Wilker-
son, Miss Ida Montgomery and
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lane Enzer, all
of Troy.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Haley have
as their guests Mrs. Haley's moth-
or, Mrs. W. C. Gentry and son
Billy of Winfield, Ala., and sister,
Mrs. J. H. Miller of Birmingham,
Ala.


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Made in, Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs-
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OPTOMETRIST
Panama City Port St. Joe


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PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938


CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many
friends, for their beautiful floral
offerings and kind expressions of
sympathy in our recent bereave-
ment.
Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis
and Son.
---'--
Among 24 Floridians receiving
diplomas Wednesday from Colum-
bia University yesterday was
Mary S. Dodd of Apalachicola who
received a Master of Arts degree.

Adolph LeHardy invites E. C.
Pridgeon to drop in and receive a
free ice cream sundae at his


'SALE FOR MEN''


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938


F


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


PHONE 30







FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938 THE 'STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA PAGE Fl',~F~


Andrews Urges

National School

Safety Patrols

Pays Tribute to Work Patrols Are
Doing Throughout Our
Nation

In a speech delivered May 9 in
the United States senate, Hon.
Charles 0. Andrews of Florida
highly praised the work of the
boys and girls working in the in-
terest of safety through the me-
dium of school safety patrols.
In the interest of safety in Port
St. Joe, and with the hope that it
may prove of value to residents of
the city, we are quoting excerpts
from Mr. Andrews' speech:
"It is my understanding that
there are nearly a quarter of a
million boys and girls now mem-
bers of the school safety patrols
in more than 3,250 communities,"
said Air. Andrews. "'aily these
youngsters are giving a practical
demonstration of youth's contribu-
tion to the safety movement by
protecting the lives of more than
6,000,000 schoolmates.
"School, police and A.A.A. Mo-
tor club officials throughout the
nation give enthusiastic and full
credit to these 'sentinels of safety'
and their sponsors for their im-
portant part in the splendid safety
record among children of school
age. This group has done what no
other age group can rightfully
claim-they have materially re-
duced their accident death rate in
the past several years.
No traffic accident is
necessary. There sdiouid never be
a time when a driver of an auto-
mobile or a truck is in such a
hurry that he will'take a chance
of sacrificing a human life. I
think the slogan adopted by the
',\vasiligtLOn and tGreene counties,
Pennsylvania troops, 'Alert Today
-Alive 'I'omorrow,' is one we
should all remember.
"-Mr. President, I think it well
that we pause a moment and
recognize and pay tribute to the
good work that the members of
the National School Safety Pa-
trols are doing throughout our na-
tion. When we- consider that more
Amnerican citizens are killed each
year than were killed in the great
World War, we must realize what
a serious problem automobile
1- :klessness is, ard do what we
can to help carry on the good
work the school safety patrol is
now doing.
"Most of us here are fathers,
and I am sure that our sympathies
go out to every father and mother
who has lost a son or a daughter
through a ruthless and unneces-
sary traffic accident. A short time
ago there appeared in ihe Eu-
faula (Ala.) Tribune an editorial
which I feel deserves a place in
the Congressional Record. I am
going to read it. I wish it were
possible to have this editorial
printed on the front page of every
newspaper in the United States,
or else in some mnannetr brought
to there attention of al: those who
drive automobiles, in the hope
that it would cause them to pause
just a moment and not take that
unnecessary chance which might
cause the loss of life for sonre
little boy or girl.
"Here is the editorial:
My Little Girl
"Today my daughter, who is 7
years old, started to school as
usual. She wore a dark blue dress
with a white collar. She had on
black shoes and wore blue gloves.
Her cocker spaniel, whose name
is Coot, sat on the front porch
and whined his canine belief in
the folly of education as she
waved goodby cand started off to
the hall of learning.
"Tonight we ta lk e d about
school. She told me about the girl
who sits in front of her, the girl
with yellow curls, and the boy
across the aisle who makes funny
faces. She told me about her
teacher. who has eyes in the back
of her head, and about there trees
in the schoolyard, and about the
big girl who doesn't believe in
Santa Claus. We talked about a
lot of things--tremendouly vital,
ini"l'por'tant things; and then we
studied spelling, reading, arithme-
t.--and th'en to beid.
"lShe's hack the:'e now-bhack in
<' n r r'et-v s il'ti caslnp, wi'b
'-" "",',,- TE lza)lbt.h' iha.t'i a. doli
c--"'led 'n het rit.i t arm.
"Y'Vo atuys wo-Idn't hurt her.
wenl yvou? You s'ee. I'm her:
d- ". V'hWh- hPe deo is broken or
h.:r f;rder is cut or her head gets
I`n-'pled. i can fix it-but when
" -'ats to school, when she
wa:?I r:e os bhe street, then she's


in your hands.
"She's a nice kid. She can run
like a deer and darts about like a
chipmunk. She likes to ride horses
and swim and hike with me on
Sunday afternoons. But-I can't be
'with her all the time; I have to
work to pay for her clothes and
'er education. So please help me
look out for her. Please drive
slowly past the schools and inter-
sections and please remember
that children run from behind
parked cars.
"Please don't run over my little
girl."
_____^_____
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

TO ASK BIDS FOR KEEPING
UP HIGHWAY WEST OF CITY
Among highway construction
con' racts totaling about $500,000
to be awarded by the state road
department on bids to be received
in Tallahassee June 7 will be a
maintenance project on the 61/2-
mile stretch west of Port St. Joe
to the Bay county line.
.----^------
Mrs. J. T. McNeil will be the re-
cipient of a free ice cream sundae
iF she will stop at LeHardy's.

It pays to advertise-try it!


Gas Debate

(Continued from page 3)
it is much more condensed than
.'ie proposed ordinance for this
city.
Street Paving
Mayor Sharit stated that he had
secured a tractor and grader from
the county commissioners for use
in grading Long avenue, which is
to be paved from 1st to 16th
street with WPA aid, and that
the 'equipment was then in the
city ready to go to work.
Long avenue will be closed
from 16th street to 12th street
during the paving operations, andl
some discussion was had as to
routing of traftce during progress
of the work. No definite decision
was reached, but the suggestion
was male that ast is a lon-foot
street and the paving is to be but
20 feet. that traffic could be sent
down each side of the grade.
Fire Department
The matter o: a ;rop in the
number of volunteer firemen turn-
irg out for drill was brouhi.t up,
it being state'l that at the last
practice only three put in an ap-
pearance. The board of fire un-
derwriiers require that at least 10
-'en show up at practice drills to
he held once each mo-eth.
Teil commnissione:- a-k that
Yo!'nteers who agreed to fortn
'.'i conmptny lease co-operate in
oldr t'hat: requirements of the
fire underwriters be met. as it is
for the good of the city as a
K a- W -s arm-^mia&^ an^i~g'


REMODELING
RESTORING
REPAIRING
DYEING
We have just installed new
machinery in order that we
can give you perfect work
and lasting satisfaction.
SHOES REPAIRED
WHILE YOU WAIT


REASONABLE PRICES



LEADER

SHOE SHOP
AUSTIN HUGGINS, Mgr.
Port St. Joe Florida


whole.


Other Matters


City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson in-
formed th'e commissioners that
one large taxpayer desired to pay
his taxes without the interest
charge, which on June 1 was 4
per cent, but the board informed
Clerk Tomlinson tnat this could
not be allowed, as it is a provision
ofn the city charter and if the in-
terest charge was written off for
one taxpayer it should be written
i'.' for al'.
Th charter provides that taxes
*:I1ll draw 1 per cent interest on
anl after March 1, 2 per cent on,
April 1, 3 per cent on May 1, and
) o0., until paid.
Jim Perrit appeared before the
commissioners and asked if they
could noot do something about the
"No U Turn" markers at the in-
tersections on Reid avenue, as he
was stopped by a police officer
because he did not go around the
pole. He said that he had to cut
around it due to the fact that cars
were parked on all four corners
and he could not turn the pole.
The suggestion ,vas put forward
that no cars be allowed to park
within 10 feet of corners.
The board donated $50 toward

- won


a fund to keep Bandmaster Dan
Farmer in the city through the
summer months in order to keep
the band intact and practicing and
present weekly concerts. Dona-
tions from individuals and busi-


ASK FOR OUR TRADE TICKETS -
A PRIZE WILL BE GIVEN TO THE
LUCKY ONE EVERY SATURDAY

MUSTARD, quart -.......-....... ............. ... 15c
PTEANUT BUTTER, 32 ounce --....-...-... .......... --22c
SALAD DRESSING, 32 ounce --..... 23c
MOTHER'S OATS, with Plates ......-....- 25c
DOG FOOD, per ca:n .........-.....c-..-.......- 5c
0:- GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 3 for ........... .. ..... ..- 25c
PRUNE JUICE, 32 ounce ......-.......c..... 19c
ARGO PEACHES, No. 2' can -....---.............---.---19c


Table Salt, 2 boxes 7c

KRAFT DINNER (a meal for 4 in 9 minutes) ...-.15c
tvLACARUO'M or SPAGHETTI, 2 for 6c
GRITS, 2 boxes ....................--... 15c
G 5c CANS PORK & BEANS .................... 25c
2-1-. Box COCOA, 2 boxes .........................---. 25c
1/' RN ING C.-O''R COFFEE, 100% Pure ----...... 19c
10c PIMiEN'TO, 2 for ----....-.........---------.---15c


KETCHUP, 14 oz.... Oc

CORN FLAK E S (2 Boxes) 5c
HUSK IES (1 Box) I.C


Potted Meat, 6 cans


* 19C


MILK
SMALL CANS, 3 for


GET A SAMPLE OF


JELLO
ALL FLAVORS, 2 for

13c


ness concerns will be sought to-
ward this end.
----- --------
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready for Every House In

Port St. Joe

COOKING WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
o----- --
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

-...{ A full line of gas appliances in stock I--


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


lli-W--mapsnna;mwma^r


SUGAR
10 POUNDS




BEANS
Navy or Lima
3 POUNDS


BLACKEYE PEAS
3 LBS. 180


10c OATMEAL
3 for




TOMATOES
No. 2 Can
2 FOR

15C


FLOUR *
12 !bs. ..........------ 40
24 lbs. .........-------79


PINEAPPLE
No. 2 Can
SLICED OR CRUSHED

15C

GOOD CANE


Gallon ............. 550
/2 Gallon ... 300


CUDAHY'S CHOICE TENDERIZED HAM


FRIDAY. EXTRA GOOD PRICES ON HALVES OR WHOLES


p CASH AND


.T CARRY


PORT ST. JOE


PHONE 79


FLORIDA


ILI -


FOR THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY

JUNE 2, 3 AND 4
w- r 'aflmes-- ..jr-- -w


P & G SOAP, 6 bars .....-------........- --------.......25c
MATCHES, 3 Sc boxes --.. ..........-...10c----
LARGE BOX CRACKERS ....... 0c
LARGE BOX CRACKERS ------------------------------------------- o
T.ARCE BOX VANILLA WAFERS -.............. -- ...-...15c


BROOM -u-- SODA
4-STRING 5 BOXES

19C 15c
I ^^ g
i&<^^ea A^


~


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938


THE 'STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1938


KAY FAILS TO

GO AIR MAIL

Effort To Send Press Association
Secretary By Plane Fruitless
Because He's Not Animal

Strict postal regulations and
about 50 pounds of excess weight
served to cheat Russell Kay, sec-
retary of the Florida Fair and
Florida State Press Association,
out of an airplane ride to Wash-
ington during Air Mail Week.
Postmaster Edgar Wall, Tampa,
anxious to advertise the advant-
ages of air mail during Air Mail
Week, conceived the idea of stuff-
ing Kay in a mail sack, locking it
about his neck and shipping him
to Washington as an "Ambassa-
dor of Good Will" for the Pan-
American Hernando de Soto Ex-
position to be held in Tampa next
February.
Kay, who weighs but 123 pounds,
was game, and Superintendent of
Mails Harrison even went so far
as to actually stuff him in a sack
and make sure tne stunt was
feasible.
The postal regulations were re-
ferred to and it was found that
while it was permissible to ship
an animal by air nra:l so long as
such an animal was harmless and
had no offensive odor and re-
quired no feeding or watering en
route, the weight limit permitted
was 70 pounds.
.Still hopeful of pulling the
stunt, Wall wired postal officials
in Washington for special permis-
sion, but it could not be granted,
so Kay failed to become an "Air
Mail Male."
Had permission Been granted,
the postage would nave amounted
to $130, including air mail special
delivery and special handling. Af-
ter due consideration, Wall fig-
ured that since such a parcel
would be of doubtful value, no in-
surance would have been neces-
sary. and as no one would have
minded much if it had been "lost
in transit" there was no occasion
for sending Kay as registered
mail.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.
JUST A REMINDER

In case our readers are not
yet fully acquainted with the
new names recently given to
the city's avenues, we reprint
them herewith:
Firht-Baltz'ell Avenue.
Second-Monument Avenue.
Third-Reed Avenue.
Fourth-Williams Avenue.
Fifth-Long Avenue.
Sixth-Woodward Avenue.
Seventh-Park Avenue.
Eighth-Gadsden Avenue.
Ninth-Knowles Avenue.


'-


SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT

The plant that furnishes
ycu ice the year 'round

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
Max Kilbourn, Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
From Treated Water


IN


HIGHLAND

OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT,


ANDERSON F IS H

COMPANY TAKES

PRIDE IN SERVICE

Highland View Dealer Carries
Large Variety of Fish For
Wholesale, Retail Trade

Many of us give little thought
to the fish that are served at our
dinner table, but Mr. Anderson of
the E. L. Anderson Fish Company
of Highland View can assure you
that there is a big difference in
fish just taken from the water
and those that have been held
over for several days.
The E. L. Anderson Fish Com-
pany, which caters to both the
wholesale and retail trade, takes
pride in the fact that their fish
are ALWAYS fresh which, conse-
quently, gives a tastier flavor
when served at your table. They
can supply you with mullet, snap-
per, pompano, flounder, shrimp
and a number of other varieties of
fish and sea foods, including oys-
ters in season, which will give
you added variety at every meal.
Just tell them your needs. and
they will supply you.


According to an ancient Roman
register, issued about 200 A.D., the
Roman Empire then had 372 im-
portant paved highways, totaling
about 48,000 miles.

Do you need Letterheads and
Envelopes? Let The Star print
them.



Phelps Grocery
CIa. C. A. PHELPS
Co0' Manager
HIGHLAND VIEW
Cheapest Grocery Prices In
Gulf County
The More Business We Do,
the Less It Costs You

We Have No Specials-
These Are Regular Pricess
BRIAR PIPE -ft
j 50c se'ler ..... 3
and we give you two 10c
packages of Tobacco

Prince Albert, can........10c
SUGAR- 48
10 pounds .....
Matches, 3 Ig. boxes -.. 10c
Best grade Water 9.
Ground Meal, peck 2-
Pearl Grits, 1 lb. pkg....8c
All-Good PEACHES 1.
No. 2/2 can ..-- 18

These are just a few of our
prices. Come in
and see the rest


A Store of Service and Courtesy


This is the modern home of the it secures not only from the resi-
Bayshore Grocery, owned and op- dents of Highland View but from
rated by Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Port St. Joe, also.
Christianson at Highland View. When you are preparing your
This grocery, which stocks a Sunday dinner and discover there
complete line of nationally adver- is some necessary article you for-
tised canned and package goods, got to purchase, just hop in your
operates an up-to-the-minute meat car and drive out to the Bayshore
department and socks a nice Grocery, for they remain open on
line of fresh fruits and vegetables Sunday for the convenience of
in season, well merits the trade their many customers.


Highland View

Jesse Coggins, who was work-
ing here as a painter and was laid
off, is back from Atlanta, Ga. He
has been employed in painting the
A. N. depot.

Mr. Courtright and Mr. Young-
blood, local carpenters, are build-
ing a restaurant on the Dead
Lakes.

Mrs. S. Johnson's sister who is
visiting here from Tampa. is now
e: -p'oyed at Stepp's cafe in Port
St. Jos.

The Other Fcllw was asked a
question: .s Mr. Sheffield taking
u p :" 1" .'1. ?"

George Ruze is building a new
home here.

Mr. Sheffield has made several
additions to his building in High-
land View.

Speedy Halter, who went to the
Grand Snapper Banks and re-
putedly brought back 350 pounds
of snapper, has had a hard time
explaining where he went and how
he got there. But it was Speedy's
first trip and'his mind was rather
hazy as to just how he got there.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
Save by reading the ads!
Save by reading the ads!


Sea Foods
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
We Cnrry a Wide Variety of Sea Foods
OYSTERS IN SEASON --

E. L. ANDERSON FISH COMPANY
IV2 Mile W. Port St. Joe On Panama City Highway


SKATING RINK OPENS

The new skating rink in High-
land View constructed by C. C.
Williams, opened its doors to the
public last Tuesday night and a
large crowd was on hand to par-
ticipate in the festivities and en-
joy the skating.

C. D. McC'oud, who has been
operating a coffee shop in the old
ice cream parlor, is now closed.
Th'e Highland View barber shop I
is also closed.


ONE MILE WEST OF PORT ST. JOE





D VIEW

PRICES CONSISTENTLY LOWER!


START WORK ON CHURCH

Construction work on the new
Assembly of God church is pro-
ceeding rapidly and it will be but
a short time before services will
be conducted in the new building
which is located in the Forehand
subdivision.
The old church, located on the
Wewahitchka highway, was sold
to C. W. Horton to be rebuilt into
a residence, as it was found im-
possible to move it through the
streets of Port St. Joe without
taking down telephone wires.


SWe Carry a
Complete Stock of

GROCERIES

and MEATS :

Everything In Our
Store Is
PRICED TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE
4 4

Let Us Supply Your
Grocery Needs At
Prices Well Within
Your Budget


GASOLINE and
OIL



HIGHLAND VIEW.

GROCERY

C. C. WILLIAMS, Prop.


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHERE BUSINESS IS BRISK YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND
FRESH GROCERIES


MILK 4 Small
or 2 Large ......--..


15e TOMATOES- 24
6 cans for .......---..


PAGE SIX


Su gar Granulated 5 28


K'I Kwick Mosquito Crystal White 9)
Spray; 75c size.. 60 TOILET SOAP, 6 for 23
Spray; 75c size......
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 24c SPAGHETTi, 3 for ...... 9c
FIELD CORN, 3 cans 24c LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs.....13c
COOKING OIL, gal.... 85c Milnut Mi-k, 3 large ...23c
MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c Prince Albert Tob, 3 for 28c
Nice large New Po- Best Grade White C
tatoes, 4c lb.; 10 lbs. 5 Ring Flour, 12 lbs. 8e

Golden Brand Oleo, 2 Ib 25c ROLLED BONE SWIFT Qne
Choice West. Steak, lb 35c PREMIUM HAM, Ib.... 3
Oil Sausage, gal ........95 Country BUTTER, lb ..35c
We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT


BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


-


~~~~~~~ ~~~ ~~- ~~--~--r--~--~`---- ~~~~--~


--------,-------t-- ----------1--~.


- -








~RlDAY, JUNE 3, 19Z8 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA PAGE SEVEN


24-HOUR LECTR
2 O SERVICE
Phone 98 Port St. Joe
Ca;l us any hour of the day
or night for
ELECTRIC REPAIRING


PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker




CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


And we found, when we gave him
a start,_a
That he forged away to the top, |
For our helping had given him .
heart, *
And it doesn't seem now that he'll Three handkerchiefs, printed
stop. Three handkerchief, printed
How much better to boost than With designs of the 1939 Golden
to kick, Gate International Exposition on
And to help him along to the end. San Francisco Bay, make up the
We are sure that it helped him to bathing suit worn by Gloria Daily.
stick, Gloria donned the attire Xor a dip
And we're sure that a straight tn the surf at Santa Cruz.
way he'll wend.
And we all feel much better some-
o how, State's Re c o rd Of
For helping to pick up a lad,
And our hearts have a warmth___ __ T
D.* *


and a glow
In learning he wasn't ALL bad.
When you find one that's down in
the dirt,
Reach out with your kind, friendly
hand;
You will find that you never get
hurt
By helping a brother to stand.
-T. W. Wilson, Port St. Joe.

SPRING
I always know that spring is here
Because the birds are full of
cheer.
They seem to say:
"How can anyone be sad and blue
today?"
White and yellow butterfllies-so
gay
Their cares and sorrows are gone
away-
If ever they had a care.
Mocking b birds singing every-
where,
Singing, saying "Spring is here."
Johnnie-jump-ups all in a row,
Beside my garden gate,
Seem to say to the other flowers:
"Wake up, or you'll be too late
To feel the joys of spring!"
Redbirds whispering everything
To listening mates, the while they
cling
To branches with Jhe bursting
buds.
Bees everywhere humming,
Glad that spring is coming.
Let us all be happy and gay,
Because, by what the birds and
flowers say,
We know that spring is here.
Surely we can give' as much cheer
As spring draws near
On the wings of the breeze today.
-Mrs. Willie Ola Martin,
Port St. Joe, Fla.

A SPIRIT FROM THE HAPPY
HUNTING GROUND
The mystic moon lit up the spot
from whence you stood-
While your tall straight figure
made a lengthwise shadow on
the sand;
A gale wind blew in from the
east, and a seagull flew in to-
ward the land.
The red eyes of the beacons re-
flected o'er the watery way,
As you stood facing Apalachicola's
bay.
In the distance the pounding surf
Made rhythmic mus:c in the. blow,
And you listen hungrily, for you
know
It is the Gulf of Mexico.
But your eyes focus on the horizon
Across Apalachicola's bay-
0 Indian, did you see a pirate's
ship out there
That once had passed this way?
-Mary Donate,
Apalachicola, Fla.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.


rest radication Is

OneTo Merit Praise

Plart Board's Inspectors Working
Night and Day To Keep In-
.cts From Entering

Since the Florida State Plant
Board was created in 1915, this
state has accumulated an excep-
tionally creditabl- record in the
eradication of plant pests which
threatened serious and continuous
damage to crops, particularly cit-
rus trees and fruts. Three sep-
arate pests, one disease and two
insects, at least two of which
were of major importance, have
been driven 'from the state during
that 23 years.
Canker disease struck Florida
citrus trees in 1912 and was par-
ticularly serious' by 1914. When
the state plant board was created
one of its first undertakings was
the eradication of this trouble.
Ably aided with finances and as-
sistance from the United States
Department of Agriculture, plant
board inspectors applied the flam-
ing torch to thousands of trees-
contributions to the campaign by
the growers, many of whom saw
their lifetime savings go up in
smoke-in an intensive campaign
that soon began to show results.
After several years of eradication
effort, careful inspection showed
only occasional outbreaks of the
canker. And in 1927 the last ves-
tige of the disease was stamped
out.
After a breathing spell of only
two years, the Mediterranean fruit
fly was discovered in Florida in
April of 1929. Again state and fed-
eral forces were mobilized for a
great battle, an undertaking the
like of which had never been in-
augurated' before-the complete
eradication, of a; major insect pest.
Some there were who said the
bug never would be completely
driven from the state, and others
who knew the magnitude of the
job, believed that it would re-
quire from five to ten years. Yet
in 18 months it was marked fin-
ished, and federal quarantines
were lifted.
Then in 1934 the citrus blackfly
was found on the island of Key


POET'S CORNER Fair 'n Warmer

TO HELP A BROTHER TO RISE
He was drunk when he came into
camp,
And he reeked with the stench of
rum.
We all put him down as a scamp;
We figured hin- out as a bum.
He slept tire first night neathh a -. ,
tree.
We found him there in the morn.
He was seedy, and just off a spree
And his clothes were tattered and
torn.
'He was dirty and needed a shave,
And sadly in need of a bath. .:
We could see that to drink he :
was slave,
And far down a dissolute path.
But to every man God gave a soul -
And the freedom to gain Paradise, i.-
So we wanted to help him get
whole,
And from his low state to arise.
So we chipped in a dollar or two,
Each one as much as he could-
Or some gave a shirt or a shoe.
But everyone helpea-as he should.
And we made him look decent
again,
And fit to associate with;
We made him respected of men,
And killed off that "down and oat"
myth.


West, and plant board and federal
forces again, went into intensive
action. Quarantines restricted
movement of the fly to the main-
land, a nd eradication efforts,
prosecuted under difficulties wip-
ed out the pest.
The board's inspectors work
night and day to keep these and
other pests from gaining entry to
Florida and scourging its agricul-
ture. They are a valiant coast de-
"ense, their efforts unsung and of-


WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. W. HORTON


PHONE 70


1


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


We Invite You
to enjoy the Friendly, Refined Atmosphere of Port St.
Joe's Finest Bar and Billiard Parlor
--4' Our Cocktails Are Mixed By Experts .--

St. Joe Bar and Billiard Parlor
ED. GEORGE, Manager

- ----------------- --- ---------------- -

Let Us Service YOUR Car Todav

For economical and efficient opera-
ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
~service it with our modern equipment
S WASHING-
--POLISHING-
-GREASING
Texaco Products

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
Wilbur Wells Jesse Darcey


Give YOUR


Family a Home



In Beacon Hill

Subdivision
Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means. .



Lots $50 to $600

$10.00 DOWN AND $5.00 PER WEEK

WH Y PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. .
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent. .


INVESTIGATE!


0

COTTAGES FOR RENT

o



Beacon Hill


Development Company


BEACON HILL, FLA.


Ip c I ---


LET US SHOW YOU!


ten cursed, but nevertheless of in-
estimable value to farm producers
within the borders of both state
and nation.
Florida deserves some plaudits
for its successful 'eradication ef-
forts, and citizens of this state and
the nation might well extend a
vote of thanks to its corps of
eradicators
.4X
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
IE CALL FOR and DELIVER
-0-
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others .
Let your family enjoy
some today.

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S

Dairy

Products



GULF VIEW

TAVERN


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE
4 4*
Please Use No Profanity

W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent
'p "" -


--- ------ l ----- -- .mI


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 19S8


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN


J. S. PATRICK








PAG EG T


Senator Says Floridian
Will Get Judgeship

A Southern senator stated Tues-
day he had it "pretty straight"
that a Florida lawyer would be
appointed to the new judgeship on
the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.
The circuit includes Florida, Ala-
bama, Georgia, Mtssissippi, Texas,
Louisiana and the Canal Zone.
The new circuit judgeship was
created under a oni; President
Roosevelt signed Tuesday. It will
increase the court's membership
to five.
Three recommendatlons for th'e
judgeship have been sent to the
White House by Florida senators.
Senator Claude Pepper recom-
mended his former law partner,
Curtis L. Waller of Tallahassee,
and Senator Andrews asked the
president to choose between As-
sistant Attorney General James
W. Morris and District Judge L.
W. Strum of Jacasonville.
Florida and Alabama are the
only two states in the circuit
which are not represented on the
New Orleans court.



A Lucky ]

of hig
close-
short
of Po

500 L
for
1000
for


We h
thousa
paper.
Bond
nation
our st
have
letter
to con

EN
500' fo


THE S

"Your Home-Town Newspape:


GULF HARDWARE OFFERS CONE ASKS FISHING
OUTBOARD MOTOR LINE STRIKE SETTLEMENT
The Gulf Haraware & Supply
Company has taxen the agency Due to the fact that fish dealers
for the Champion outboard mo- reduced their prices by one-half
tors and are offering them to cent a pound for snapper and
sportsmen and oiters at special grouper at a meeting of whole-
introductory prices. sales in Panama City May 12,
"There is no motor in America fishermen of Cedar Key quit their
that gives you so much for so boats in an effort to force higher
little," stated Robert Bellows. "No prices.
one appreciates ownership if it is Governor Cone urged the strik-
realized later that real value has ing fishermen this week to adjust
not been secured. T'at's why we price differences with the whole-
say, 'try the Champion. Compare sales and go back to their boats,
't feature by feature with any out- because "a small income is better
board motor at any price'. We than none."
believe that if you desire a motor "I urge fishermen and dealers
you'll: select a Chambion, because to get together and continue to
Champion gives you every worth- fish and sell at such prices as the
while feature that you can find trade can pay," said Cone.
elsewhere, and more. They cost ____
vou less to buy and to own." CARVER DRUG COMPANY,
--- ----- Registered Pharmacists
If Mrs. Jas. Marea will call at
LeHardy's Pharmacy she will re- ONE OF ST. JOE'S OLDEST
aeive a free ice cream sundae. DARKIES TAKEN BY DEATH
....- ---4 ---
David Gray spent Tuesday in Elisha Mose, one of the oldest
Panama City on business. darkies in Port St. Joe, passed
^ away Tuesday due to an accident
Read the ads-it pays! which occurred n the woods
where he was employed cutting
timber for Mr. Croxton.
S "Geicrhe Mose," as he was
known, was cutting timber near
h Will Harrison, another negro, and
Will's axe slipped, severing an ar-
gh grade Bond Paper at a tery in Mose's left arm. Death
out price enables us for a soon followed *from loss of blood.
S t o Mose had many friends, both
time to offer business men
white and colored. and many will
rt St. Joe miss his familiar grinning face.

LETTERHEADS $ 75 Mrs. Fritz Christiansen is in-
37 vited to stop at LeHardy's Phar-
LETTERHEADS $ 25 macy and get a free sundae.
DEPOT IN NEW DRESS
Painters this week finished a
ave been getting $6.50 per nifty paint job on the. Apalachi-
and for this same grade of colla Northern depot, and the old
This is a superior building looks quite 'presentable
Paper of 20-pound weight, in its new dress of cream and
ally advertised, and when dark greeni
stock on hand is used (we Woodrow Wilson, member of
sufficient to print 30,000 the Blountstown Record force, was
heads) we will not be able a caller in The Star office yes-
itinue this price, terday afternoon. He had been
enjoying our beautiful beaches
VELOPES TO MATCH and leaving his tired limbs in the
soothing waters of the Gulf.
r $4.00 1000 for $5.25 hr JT
Mayor P. C. Coombs of Apa-
r I nlachicola was a business visitor in
the city Wednesday.
Robert Nedley of Apalachicola
r" Port St Joe, Fla. was in the city Wednesday on
business. /


: .1MLi. w _____11' 1 ir. ;'Mll l l



St. Joe Gas Comp

NATURAL GAS through underground mains and a standard gas meter t

Positively NOT Bottle Gas. Lo

Operation---You Pay Only What the

Shows You Have Used After Y(
Have Used It
WE HANDLE A FULL LINE OF MODERN GAS APP1

Ranges, Water Heaters and Servel G

Electrolux Refrigerators
Also a Full Line of Modern Gas Heating Appliances.
SEE US BEFORE YOU BUILD YOURHOME. We Can save yoi
Ranges as low as $54.95 and your




i DR A. M. MITCHELL, Ma
1H it Cm *
AT MARTIN'S, IN THE NEW COSTIN BU
NEXT DOOR TO STEPP'S CAFE

,i iiirIrr ni i nr ? n i rllnlm n linTn n' lr[ifiin liii iiI ii IiiiI h i


any

to your home

w Cost

Meter




LIANCES

as



i Money!
old Range




tnager
JILDING,


mrmmm~~mmm i


Little Miss Norma Jean Lewis Mrs. B. H. Graves, Jr., left Sat-
is visiting relatives in Bonifay urday for Tampa on a visit with
and Dothan, Ala., this week. her mother and brother.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY Miss May White of Lakeland is
Complete Line of Magazines. visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hughes.


Under the revised Federal Housing Act we are now in
position to make the following type Loans
under Title I of this Act:
CLASS I LOANS
Se-tion A: For repairing and remodeling of residences,
s'o:'s, etc., at 5 per cent from 1 to 3 years, ranging in cost from
$100 to $2,500.
Section B: For repairs and remodeling of commercial and
industrial property at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in
cost from $2,500 to $10,000.
CLASS II LOANS
For the construction of new stores, garages, filling stations,
roadside stands, barns, tourist cabins, beach cottages, etc., at 5
per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
CLASS III LOANS
For the construction of new residences or part residences and
part store building at 3/2 per cent interest from 1 to 5 years,
ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
LOANS MADE ON ANNUAL PAYMENTS BASIS TO FARMERS
-

Build-..-Repair.-Remodel
See Us If You Want ACTION!


ST. JOE LUMBER CO.
ST. JOE LUMBER CO.


PHONE 69


EVERYTHING YOU


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


WANT FOR THAT


FISHING
STRIP





Or An Outdoor VACATION


OUTBOARD MOTORS
Special Introductory Prices
CHAMPION
Standard Single $49.95
2.9 h.p., 1 to 9 miles per hour
Do not confuse the
Champion with the
lesser horsepower
motors on the riar-
ket. You get nearly
double the horse-
power at only Va
$49.95th
Standard Lite Twin $79.95 Ch
At the price of the ordinary single Re
it offers light twin smoothness
and performance. Fishermen tihe
world over sing its praises.

CAMP STOVES
Burn gasoline. Have hinged wtre grates,
cover and windbreakEi Two burners.
Large fuel tanks with built-in pump.

Priced $695 to $895
From 6


RODS
STEEL CASTING
RODS
lound and Octagonal

$1.95 $10
-----___-

SURF RODS
hree-piece split bamboo.
various lengths to suit
e individual user.
hromium plated brass.
reinforced head and tail
ates. You'll like' em.


$2.95 $10


We Carry a Complete Stock of Reels, Lines, Hooks,
Casting Plugs and Other Requisites for the Fisherman

Garden and Lawn Restores the soil elements most
FE R T I L I Z E R frequently exhausted In lawns and
10 lbs .............-.. .50 gardens. Contains 4% nitrogen,
25 lbs ................-$1.00 8% phosphorus and 4% potash.
50 lbs. .......-.........1.75 Use about 5 pounds for every 100
100 lbs. ................$2.50 square feet of soil.



GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.
PHONE 2 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


.1
1


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I


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FIIWl~illlllllllllll1I)S~1IRlllllllil;li


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY JUNE 3 1938


5


... ... .


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I I I


NEW FHA LOANS


I