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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00187
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 27, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00187

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
eat growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt. T


The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANNIVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1938 NUMBER 32


KENNEY MILL

TO LOCATE IN

PORT ST. JOE

MOVING TO THIS CITY FROM
BLOUNTSTOWN; SITE WILL
BE ON NEW CANAL LINK

The Basil E. Kenney Lumber
company last week closed down
its sawmill operations in Blounts-
town as the initial step in moving
the huge plant to its new location
near this city.
Basil E. Kenney. Sr., president
of the company, states that work
has been started on moving the
mill to the new site near the Pan-
ama City highway adjacent to the
new canal link west of Port St.
Joe.
It will require several months
to complete moving of equipment
and milling facilities, and Mr.
Kenney said. a goot portion of his
employes will remain in Blounts-
town for four or five months. It
will be necessary, he stated, to
transport a part of the men back
and forth until housing facilities
have been made available here.
The Kenney mill has been em-
ploying some 150 men recently,
which is about half the number
on the payroll last year, and it is
anticipated that m the new loca-
tion at least 250 men will be em-
ployed,.
The company has acquired suf-
ficient timber for a 20-year opera-
tioi, Mr. Kenney said.


ALTON DENDY IS

RE-ELECTED AS

COUNTY JUDGE

INCUMBENT IS WINNER OVER
SAM HUSBAND BY MARGIN
OF 152 VOTES

In a race for the seat of county
judge of Gulf county that was
conducted in a clean, above-board
manner, Alton Dendy, incumbent,
was re-elected over his opponent,
Sam P. Husband, by a margin of
152 votes, according to unofficial
figures.
The vote by precincts follows:
Precinct- Dendy Husband
Port St. Joe ...... 378 253
Wewahitchka ..... 266 202
Overstreet ........ 74 70
Dalkeith ........... 64 84
White City. ...... 21 29
Wetappo .......... 18 31

Total ............821 669

STANDARD OIL TO BUILD
SERVICE STATION HERE

It is learned from a reliable
source that the Standard Oil com-
pany will shortly begin construc-
tion of a service station on the
corner of Third street and Monu-
ment avenue. A building permit
for construction of this station
was issued several months ago
but has'now expired.

ENGINEER CHECKING
GRADES FOR PAVING

A WPA engineer was checking
grades yesterday afternoon on
Long avenue from Fifth to Six-
teenth streets preparatory to
starting of grading, and paving op-
orations


Death Takes Mrs/ Legion Benefit C. OF C. LACYS PLANS

Lenora Mizener Dance June 1st a P R A
To Be Held at Beacon Hill With FOR CIVIC PROGRAMS
Passes way At Home In High- Msi Furni hed B Bill
land View; Had Been Bed- Farmer's Orchestra ---


TO OPEN SOON

WORK PROCEEDING RAPIDLY;
WILL BE MOST MODERN
IN WEST FLORIDA

A prevue of the new Port thea-
ter made yesterday by the editor
of The Star indicates that it will
be one of the most modern and
up-to-date in Northwest Florida.
The walls and ceiling of the
spacious auditorium are beauti-
fully paneled and it will be lighted
indirectly. A large stage with a
number of dressing rooms will al-
low the presentation of good-sized
road shows, and the projection
(Continued on page 8)


Mrs. Lenora Mizener, aged 57,
passed away late Thursday night
of last week at her home in High-
land View. She had been bedrid-
den for 14 years, having been par-
alyzed for that length of time.
Mrs. Mizener, who was a devout
member of the Baptist church,
was born and lived in Eufaula,
Ala., during her childhood, but af-
ter marriage had made Port St.
Joe her home.
Interment was in Magnolia cem-
etery in Apalachlcola last Friday
with Rev. J. W. Sisemore and
Rev. H. P. Money officiating.
Surviving are the husband, A.
L. Mizener, and three children,
Thomas, Ethel and Mayme Mize-
ner, all of Port St. Joe.


given Wednesday evening, June
1, at Beacon Hill by Gulf County
Post No. 116, American Legion,
proceeds to go to the crippled
children's fund of the post.
Music for the affair will be fur-
nished by Bill Farmer's orchestra.
The dance held recently by the
Legion was well attended, netting
a tidy sum to the post's crippled
children's fund, and everyone is
invited and urged to attend the
coming dance in order to help
this worthy cause.
-----4-----
LIGHTHOUSE TENDER VISITS
The lighthouse tender Magnolia
steamed into St. Joseph's Bay
late Tuesday afternoon to change
channel marking buoys. It left
Wednesday.


ridden Fourteen Years
Another benefit dance will be NEW T TER


Legion Post to Pay Tribute to Dead and Living Who

Followed Flag Into Wars At Home and Over-Seas


Gulf County Post No. 116,
American Legion, and the Ameri-
can Iegion Auxiliary unit will
hold memorial services next Mon-
day evening, May 30, at 8 o'clock
in the high school auditorium for
veterans of all wars.
All ministers of the city will as-
sist. in these services and music
will be rendered by the school
band. A cordial invitation to at-
tend these services is extended to
the public.
Commander T. M. Schneider
asks that all business houses .of
the city co-operate with the Le-
gion post in observance of Me-
morial Day by displaying the
American flag all day Monday.

There are debts that can be
honored, but never paid in full.
Of such is the nation's debt to its
departed heroes, which we at-
tempt in a small way each year
to acknowledge.
We may honor eir memory,
but can never discharge our ob-


ligation to them for their heroism any flowery phrases that the lips
and patriotism. may utter.
What we have and are we owe We of Port St. Joe have no
in large measure to the brave graves to decorate, so our tribute
souls who gave their lives that we must take some other form-let
might live a free and unfettered us make it in deeds and, service
people. Their service was no unselfish enough to be a tribute
greater, however, than the inspir- to those we honor.
ation. they furnished. Each has A mere message is not enough.
contributed equally to our ad- As we gather together in the
vancement as a nation, high school auditorium Monday
Their lips are stilled, and yet evening to pay homage to the de-
they are not silent. The dead have parted, we should rededicate our-
left a message for the living and selves to the perpetuation of that
the message is that we keep in- for which they sacrificed.
tact the glorious heritage they All over this great country of
fought to preserve. ours next Monday wherever a
We know not what the dead grave is marked it will be decor-
may see or hear or think, but of ated, and. for those that sleep
this we may be certain: That if somewhere beneath the waves,
they are observers of the living, the waters will be strewn with
they will take more account of flowers. .
the high resolve within our souls No matter where they fell, on
than of the flowers we strew upon land, at sea or in the air, the na-
their graves on Memorial Day. tion's heroes should and will be
It is a beautiful spirit that shown some sign that they are
moves thie living to decorate the not forgotten, but we, too, must
graves of the dean. It is recog- not forget our own duty to our-
nition that the speech of flowers selves, to our children and to our
is more eloquent of the heart than nation.


1939 WorlJ4's Fair of West from Air


e- ae ri. ... ut treasure Island in San Francisco Bay and some of
.i.8 palaces and towers nep ria:g com :et:on for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition. In
foreground are the ferry slips; in background, a view of the East Bay end of the San Francisco-
Oakland Bay Bridge. The tallest building seen here is the 400-foot Tower of the Sun.


Concerts and Other Forms of
Entertainment To Be
Presented

BAND STAND IN PARK

Donations of Cash and Lum-
ber Are Being Solicited
By Committee

Action was taken at the last
meeting of the Port St. Joe Cham-
ber of Commerce to sponsor some
type of. civic program for enter-
tainment of the public. T, W. Wil-
son was named as chairman of a
committee to formulate plans, se-
lect a suitable site and secure the
entertainment features.
Several sites were offered by
public-spirited citizens, among
whom were B. W. Eells and T. H.
Stone, but owing to the activity
in our rapidly growing city it was
not considered advisable to ac-
cept these offers, as the lots
might be sold at any moment.
The bay front park opposite the
Port Inn was considered as offer-
ing the best features it it could
be secured, owing to it being
shaded, near the cooling ocean
breezes, nearness to the center of
the city and. ;, ,,i- from dis-
tracting noises that might mar
the programs.
(Continued on Page 5)


START WORK ON

N E W BAPTIST

CHURCH HERE

OLD EDIFICE BEING DEMOL-
ISHED TO MAKE WAY FOR
BRICK BUILDING

Work of demolishing the old
wooden Baptist church at the cor-
ner of Third street and Baltzell
avenue began this week in order
to make way for a new two-story
brick edifice to cost $7,000.
The new house of worship will
be 50 by 80 feet and will be mod-
ern in every respect with a seat-
ing capacity greatly in excess of
the old church. Construction work
on the masonry will be under the
supervision of Mr. Neiding.
"We are building according to
donations," stated Rev. J. W.
Sisemore, pastor. "and are work-
ing on a 'pay as we go' plan. We
have sufficient money on hand
now to get the walls up, and, by
the time this work is done we an-
ticipate having sufficient cash to
proceed with there balance of con-
struction."
Construction of the new church
will add much to the city and will
mean a great deal to the members
of the church, as for the past few
months the old building has been
inadequate to care for the atten-
dance.
"Due to the fact that our pres-
ent building is being torn down
we will not be able to have our
services at the present location."
said Rev. Sisemore yesterday.
"However, we have made arrange-
ments to use the senior high
school building for the next few
Sunday, and will carry on all our
services there."








PAGE TWO THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1938


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.CO Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.. Telephone 51 )-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


LET'S CLEAN UP

Two weeks ago we intended to write this
"Clean Up" editorial, but after taking a look
at our back yard we decided 'to keep mum
until we practiced' what we preached and
could "point with pride" to the fact that we
were keeping pace with the times.. Now that
we have our own premises -cleaned up, we
can proceed with great gusto to point out. to
others that they are lagging in civic pride.
For the past two weeks city employes
have been working to clear weeds and rtub
bish off our streets and vacant lots prepara-
tory to the clean up campaign the first week
in June inaugurated by the chamber of com-
merce in a move for city beautification.
Property owners of the city should take
pride in keeping their, premises clear of weeds
and trash, for by the concerted efforts of the
individuals it would take but a short time to
make Port St. Joe a spic and span town-
and after that it would take but little effort
on the part of each one of us to keep it that
way. ,


WHY NOT A UNIFORM WPA WAGE?

A number of Southern congressmen have
been endeavoring, with little success, to se-
cure more uniform wage scales for the WPA
throughout the country. There has been
much discussion of the South's attitude to-
ward the wage-hour legislation and much
criticism by the North of its representatives.
In an effort to test the sincerity of the ar-
dent critics of the South, an amendment
was offered which would have wiped out all
wage differentials in the WPA, just as the
wages and hours bill is to wipe them out in


private employment.
The WPA laborer in the South now gets
as low as $19 per month, whereas the same
laborer in the North gets $58 per month. The
skilled WPA worker in the North gets as
high as $94 per month, while in the South
he gets as high as $61 per month.
It was argued that, if the cost of living is
to be discarded as a basis for the wage scale
,in private industry and a uniform wage set,
it would be inconsistent for the government
to cling to such a basis, and that it should
lead the way in setting a uniform scale itself.
If the federal government is to prohibit the
payment of less than a minimum wage for
the entire country, insofar as private employ-
ment is concerned, it should practice the
same doctrine on its relief rolls.
The amendment was defeated by the same
Northern and Northeastern forces who so
strongly contend for uniform wages in indus-
try.-From Millard Caldwell's Washington
Letter.

If a lawyer's success depends upon his gift
of gal, why aren't there more women law-
yers?-Times-Union. Because they don't
stop talking after they've made their point.

Yes, anti-aircraft guns can repel bombers
-provided the bombers pick out the spot
where our three guns are located.-Birming-
hanm News.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


I have long been tempted to
write about sleep (probably be-
cause I enjoy it so much myself).
At one time I was ashamed to ad-
mit that I found it necessary to
sleep at all. I envied
those who boasted that they could
get a;ong on five or six hours of
sleep each 24 hours. Obvi-
ously anyone who could do that


MAGNIFICENT SYSTEM FEDERAL AID HIGHWAYS CAN BE COMPLETED IN
-TWO OR THREE YEARS IF ALL GASOLINE TAX FUNDS GO TO ROAD FUND


Only gas tax diversion is stand-
ing in the way of rapid comple-
tion. of Florida's important fed-
eral aid highway system-figures
available at the state road depart-
ment showing that the job could
be done in a couple of years if all
tax monies collected from the mo-
torists were "put to work" on the
projects.
Estimates are that the 2,628
miles of the federal aid system
can be builtt up to the 20-foot
trunk-highway standard for $48,
198,000. And Uncle Sam stands
ready to go 50-50 or better.
With the motorists pouring ap-
proximately $30,000,000 into the
state and county treasuries, it is
possible to give Floridians a real
highway system in short order-a
highway system that would be
:safe for modern traffic and which
would tap 58 of the state's 67
counties directly and reach all
otbnties through the connecting
ftate roads.
' With the present program of
motor tax diversion it will take
10 to 15 years to complete these
roads if no other roads are built


-while if progress is continued
also- on the state road system it
will take 50 years to finish the
job. Before that is, done, what's
finished now will be worn out
Of the 19 federal aid routes
(not to be confused with federal
numbered highways) 1,235 miles
has been completed to the stan-
dard of 20-foot highways; 1,119 is
less than 20 feet wide, much of it
with sub-standard base, grade,
etc. There remains 135 miles for
which only the grade has been
thrown up, while 139 miles has
not been definitely "located" as
yet-most of this being on Fed-
eral Route 19, which is the new
military highway eown the center
of the state to Miami by way of
Leesburg, Avon Park, Moore
Haven and the canal into Miami.
Estimates are that it will cost
$11,427,000 to bring Federal Aid
Route 3 (State Roads b, 4-A and
205) up to standard. No 6 (State
Road No. 1) wilt require $9,388,-
000 to bring up to standard. Three
other trunk liness-Federal Aid
Roads No. 2, 11 and 12-need
more than $3,000,000 to bring
them up to the 20-foot standard.


added three or four hours to each
day; increasing his working or
playing day by 50 per cent. .
Against such competition what
could a. sleepyhead hope to accom-
plish?
With the exception of family
doctors, like Doc Bartee, who is.
called out all hours of the day
and night, the late Thomas Edi-
son was one of the few men who
had anything to say on the sub-
ject of.sleep. Edison made
Lhe statement that he and his as-
sistants -for 40" years worked an
average of 18 hours daily. He ad-
vanced the theory that sleep is
scientifically; unnecessary. If the
earth were flooded with daylight
always, and there were no nights.
lIe doubted whether anyone would
3ver sleep.
I have often wondered whether,
during those years when Mr. Edi-
son was working 18 hours a day
and sleeping four or five, he ever
dozed at his desk or laboratory
bench. I don't wish to in-
sult the memory of Mr. Edison by
airing these queries, but from ob-
serving others, I have come to re-
alize that the whole story is not
told when a man says he does not
go to bed until 2 a. m. What time
do s he get up? Does he take
naps during the day? Does he
sleep at lectures, concerts and
plays? Does he sleep a couple of
hours after dinner?
Perhaps you are aware by this
:ime that I am skeptical of the
abilityy of any, excelp a few like
die late Mr. Edison, to function
efficiently on less than seven or
eight hours of sleep daily. Fur-
thermore, I doubt the advisability
of trying.
The determination of the num-
ber of hours a person should
spend in bed is complicated by
other considerations. Per-
haps it is not so much the lack of
sleep that disturbs many of us the
morning after a big night as the
excessive eating, drinking and
smoking we do on these occasions.
These reflections are an intro-
duction to the assertion that it is
ridiculous to feel inferior because
one requires seven to nine hours
sleep. What of it? I en-
joy sleep about as much as any-
thing. I can think of, even though
I hate to go to bed at night and
hate to get up in the morning-
and I think this must be true of
the great majority of people.
Take, for example, Mark Tom-
linson: His wife says if it wasn't
for her, Mark would never get to
work in the mornings. And Mark
comes back with: "Never mind,
old girl. I got to work every day
on time for years before I mar-
ried you."


WILTED!


FRIDAY, M~AY 27, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO








i M 2 13 T


MAYO CHARGES

GROCERS GIVE

SHORT WEIGHT

SAYS INSPECTORS DISCOVER
SHORTAGES IN MANY
FLORIDA STORES

A warning that many Florida
stores are short-weighting their
customers on packages of staple
foods was issued this week by
Nathian Mayo, state commissioner
of agriculture, under whose office
the state food laws are adminis-
1tered.
In a communication to The Star
.Mr. Mayo has this to say:
"As commissioner of agriculture
I deem it my duty to inform the
buying public anci ile retail gro-
cery stores of this state that
within the last few weeks reports
from our food inspectors indicate
a considerable disregard of the
state pure food law on the part of
grocers as to shortweight food
packages. It is somewhat as-
tounding that our -ien are finding
this evidence of unfair trade prac-
tice, neglect and, carelessness to
such a degree over the state.
"Specifically, the offense is
usually found in zae packages; of
staple groceries such as rice,
grits, meal, sugar, potatoes and
similar articles of food wrapped in
package form ahead of sale, gen-
era:iy for the week-end trade. As
an illustration o; this condition,
one of our men reports finding
463 packages of toonistuffs which,
upon examination, were found to
weigh only 14 or 15 ounces for
each pound indicated on the pack-
age. Another inspector found a
large number of packages of po-
tatoes representeQ as weighing 10
pounds which by actual test were
shown to be from one-fourth to
one-half pound under weight.
"Under our state pure food law,
packages of fo .sisuffs are re-
quired to show the correct net
weight, numerical coumm or meas-
ure, in plain, conspic;uoas print on
the label or outside of package
wh-ere it rnay be readily seen by
the purchaser. A five-pouad pack-
age should bear the words 'five
pounds net weight' and the term
'net weight' is construed to mean
the actual weight of the contents,
not including the wrapper, at the
time the custclnow !cakles thp. 'ur-
chase. .['Phi ,vords 'vitein packed'
on a fi-,od label are not permis-
sibl'p in connection with the net
weight, as the customer is en-
titled to know the exact weight
of the contents at the time of
purchase.
"It is the duty of the commis-
sioner of agriculture to enforce
this law. Therefore I am taking this
means of warning all handlers of
food packages that such packages
shall not only bear a declaration
ot the net weight of the contents,
but this statement shall be in ac-
cordance with the facts. Short-
weight packages will be seized
and if the offense is repeated and
the evidence warrants the action,
prosecutio:s will ensue in appro-
priate courts. Shortweight pack-
ages are in violation of the law
and the statute fixes the penalty
for this misdemeanor at a fine not
to exceed $500 or imprisonment
for not more than six months for
the first conviction, and doubles
the penalties for a subsequent
co eviction.
"Unfoitunately, Florida has no
weights and measures law under
which faulty scales may be tested
and corrected or condemned. We
hr:ve o auIhority, therefore, over
v':i:ghi";g devices the'mselve-s, but
-" P a:0 yo:.chi tills pro' lenm tihsu
t: i ; .:'' aO' .s i.';r as t relZ 's tao

'Tl'a nbuyi:-g pa:. ii of :Florida -s
tnitlie to receive 10 ounces for a
;cundi, and it is my duty under
,he !aw to do E.e lni:- possible
to see tUat this is done."
I


WEEK'S TRAINING FOR Some 300 boys are expected to
4-H BOYS AND GIRLS IS 'gather at the University of Flor-
SET FOR EARLY JUNE ida May 30, while between 550
Annual short courses for Flor- and 600 girls will assemble at the
ida 4-H club boys and girls will State College for Women at Tal-
.:onvene during the weeks of May lahassee June 4 to 11.
30 and June 6, and plans for them The entire week in each case
already are well under way, it is will be devoted to courses of in-
announced by officials of the state' struction and recreation, train-
agricultural extension service at ing the boys ana girls for better
Gainesville. Farm and home life and more use-


ful citizenship. Various contests
will conclude at the short courses
and outstanding members for the
year in different ilnes of work
will be chosen.
--------4----
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.
--------
The Star is $2 per year-sub-
scribe now!


BUDDING EINSTEIN
"Give three reasons for saying
the earth 'is round,'" confronted
Johnny Jones in an examination
paper.
He put down: "My teacher says
it's round, the nook says it's
round, and my father told me it
was round."
Send Th Star to a friend.
Send The Star to a friend.


FIRESTONE
AUTO RADIOS
3 95 ,1
5-UBE
This now
Airchief is
"AsEasyto
Tune as Blowing Your Horn."
Merely, Push a button-get your
station. 6 tube $24.95.


FIRESTONE Gives You

This High Quality Tire

at This New Low Price

eWCiWa Je Firestone saves
money by controlling and
securing rubber and cotton at the
sources and by more efficient
manufacturing and distributing.
Thcse savings make possible extra
values at lower prices. You get:
High Quality-First choice
rubber and selected cotton that
conform to Firestone's high
standards and rigid specifications. 1
Long Mileage Safe, silent tread
design made of tough, slow wearing
rubber that assures long mileage.
Sturdy bars and rugged notches
give protection against skidding.
BliWOMt Protection-Nine extra
pounds of rubber are added to every
100 pounds of cord by the Firestone
Patented Gum-Dipping process. .
Every fiber of every cord in every
ply is saturated with liquid rubber "
which counteracts internal friction and '' "-:
heat that ordinarily cause blowouts.
Puncture Protection Due to the
Firestone patented construction of two
extra layers of Gum-Dipped cords under the tread.
New Low Prices-Never before have all these safety
features been combined in a tire priced so low.
Don't take chances on your holiday trip. Come in
today. Let us put a set of these large size, rugged, long
wearing tires on your car-remember, you save 25%.


Listen to
THE FIRESTONE VOICE OF THE
FARM-Interviews with the Champion
Farmers of America, featuring Everett
Mitchell. Twice weekly during the noon
hour. Consult your local paper for the
station, day, and time of broadcast.


THE VOICE OF 1In2'STONEW
featuring Richard Crooks and Margaret
Speaks and the 70-piece Firestone
Symphony Orchestra, under the
direction of Alfred Wallenftein, Monday
evenings ovr ti.c Nai,-nwiJe N. B.C.
Red Network.


jay 'wr w 1^BATTERIES





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use a Firestone Extra Power.

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5 8 -9 6 Lobor Exha
5.50-17......... 10.45
6.00-16.......... 11. Smooth, quick stops-soft pedal.
6.25-16.......... 13.15 Long wear- low cost.

Tires For Trucks And Buses I C N I C


tw R L! Y.&,: A


Little's Service Station


Phone 10


Open Day and Night


Port St, Joe, Fla.


_I r-_l _~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, F~LORIDA


PAGE THREE


FRIDAY, MVAY 27, 1938









PAEFU H TR OTS.JEFOIAFIAMY2,13


List of Annuals Society
for Many Purposes; o y



WOMAN'S CLUB
INSTALLS OFFICERS
An installation luncheon was
held last week at Beacon Hill by
the Port St. Joe Woman's Club,
with Mrs. C. P. VanHorn acting
as hostess. A large number of
members were present at the af-
iair. The club flower, .the mari-
Gomphrena. old, was the predominating fea-
For edges and borders-Sweet ture in the tasteru; decorations.
alyssum, dwarf nasturtiums, lo- A regular business meeting
belia, dwarf marigold (tagetes the club year preceded
signata pumula), ageratum, Vir- oig the club year preceded
ginia stocks and forget-me-nots. the installation services, with the
Long stems for cutting-Asters, retiring officers and committee
calliopsis, mourning bride or chairmen turning in most accept-
scabiosa and cosmos.
Short stems for cutting-Mari- able reports. At this session it
golds, snapdragons, calendulas, aas voted to present a scholar-
sweet peas. annual chrysanthe- thip to the most outstanding 4-H
mums, bachelor buttons, sweet
sultans, ten weeks' stocks and club girl attending the short
gygsophila. coursee to be held at the Florida
For color masses--Petunia, State College for Women at Tal-
phlox Drummondi, verbena, ahassee next month.
stock, aster, salvia and poppies. Guest speaker was Mrd. Annie
For light or poor soil-Nastur- Ryan Marks of the Philaco club
tiums, Clarkia, igodetia, poppy, of Apalachicola who, at the close
portulaca and zinnias.
For fragrance Mignonette, of the meeting, installed the fol-
heliotrope, nasturtiums, alyssum, 'owing officers for the ensuing
ten weeks' stocks and sweet peas. :ear: Mrs. B. W. Eells, president;
For shady places--Pansies,
torenias or wishbone plant, go- rhIs. G. A. Patton, vice-president;
detia, forget-me-not, nemophila, .\Mrs. E. C. Lewis, recording' secre-
musk plant and other varieties of ary; Mrs. Horace Soule, corre-
the handsome monkey flower ponding secretary; Mrs. William
(mimulus)..
For hot situations-Sunflowers, Bragg, treasurer; Mrs. Fred Cur-
heliotrope, portulaca, ice plant, ts, parliamentarian, and Mrs. G.
petunias, balsam and annual gail- A. P cr .
)prdia. A. Patton, critic.
To grow after frost- Sweet Comittees namedi for the year
alyssum, bachelor's buttons, pe- were: Program, Mrs. Joe Hiles,
tunias, marigolds, calendulas, Mrs S. Lilius
candytuft, stocks and phlox 'Mrs 11. S. Lilius, Mrs. F. Mil-
Drummondi.sos l 'er, Mrs. Fred -turtis and Mrs.
Vines--Morning glories, moolW- Ed Ramsey; American citizenship,
flowers, Japanese hop, climbing Mrs. Robert Bellows and Mrs. A.
nasturtium, cardinal climbers,
cobaea, cypress vine, balloon D. Lawson;American home, Mrs.
vine, scarlet runner and hya- Robert Tapper and Mrs. Joe
cinth beans. Whitfield; education, Mrs. Ed
Color harmonies-For yellow Whitfield; education, Mrs. Ed
and deep blues; white cosmos, McGowin, Mrs. ThIlomas McPhaul
annual sunflower, centaureas, and Mrs. Roy Gibson; conserva-
blue larkspurs, Swan river tion and natural resources, Mrs.
daisies, ldbelia tenuoir and the
dwarf forms, burnt orange
shades in the zinnias and the s'y; public welfare, Mrs. Ed Ram-
CPlifornia popDies. sey, Miss Enid M\t-thison and Mrs.
Lavender, violet and orange- -Joe liles; fine arts, Mrs. D. L.
Ageratum, African marigolds,
asters, lilac, larkspurs. helio- Owens; legislation, Mrs. E. C.
xroe and dwarf marigolds. Tlewis; press and publicity, Miss
T illian Ferrell; international re-


Mrs. Wash Vining and Mrs.
Cec'l Moore of O'randlo spent
W'c'nesday in Port St. Joe with
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Davis.

1vr. and Mrs. George W. Cook
.:'u.ned W'edre -ay from Cairo
end Thomanavi:'e, -a., where they
visited for a week with relatives.

Winsto-n Jones, student in Ed-
wards Military School, Fayette-
ville, N. C., returned home Sun-
cay for the sumnu'er vacation.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.


















WOOD FIBER

FLOWERS

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS,
FOR CORSAGES
They Look Natural and Last
for Months
P.i:ed at 25c, 50c, $75c and $1.00


MRS. W. S. SMITH


Star Building


Port St. Joe


~mm~"""" liii


latioins, Mrs. L. H. Bartee; foun-
'ation fund, Mrs. Ross Watson.
'The out'ine fo-: tiie new 1938-39
cear book was presented, favor-
bh!y commented upon and ac-
cepted.
The retiring president, Mrs. G.
A. P1atto.", was graciJusly thanked
'or her efforts in mailing the club
such a success and responded
with a few well chosen words of
thanks.
It i- ihe desire or the club to
alt the public know tiat it stands
ready and willing to aid the city
;n any manner in which it may be
called upon.
Visitor, at the luncheon were
Mrs. Annie Ryan Marks, Mrs. Sam
Montgomery, Mrs. Eleanor Floyd
ind Mrs. John Marshall, all of
Apalachicola.
Three new members, Mrs. P. A.
Howell. Mrs. G. R. Winchester
n(md Mr. C. A.. Brown, were taken
into the club at this time.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
Nf- *.-
Mrs. W. S. Smith and Mrs. J.
L. Christmas motored to Sumatra
.-csterday on a visit to Mrs.
3mith's mother, Mrs. J. W. Smith.

Pilly Smith of Graceville and
,r.ct'les Marsales, a registered
IT':!:acist of Pensacola, have ac-
eepted positions in LeHardy's
'rug store.

'Lefty" Wadsworth was a
-vcek-end visitor in Panama City
last week.

Misses Gertrude Thompson and
Elsie Nedley of Apalachicola were
the guests Monday of Miss Iva
Mae Nedley.


Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Sunday School, 10 a. m. every
Sunday.
Preaching 11 a. m., first, third
and fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.
Preaching in Wewahitchka the
first Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:30 p.
m., central standard time.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.
-_-
CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. Mdney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladles' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.
-f--
FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. 1m.
Morning worship 11 a. nm.
n T. U. 7 p. m.
Evening worship S p. m.
W. M. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
S p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
4 n. m.

LADIES' NIGHT AT LIONS
CLUB TUESDAY
Next Tuesday night will be
ladies' night at the regular meet-
ing of the Lions club. A banquet
will be served in the dining room
at the menhaden plant, followed
by installation of officers.

W. E. Stuart, representative of
the Norge factory, is at Roche's
appliance store for a few days.


New Spring Styles


EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when needed
Made in Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9a.m. to 6p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs-
day and Fridays

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
Panama City Port St. Joe


MRS. B. OWENS ENTERTAINS
HER BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Buster Owens entertained
her bridge club at her home Wed-
nesday evening, three tables be-
ing arranged.
At the conclusion of play, high
prize was awarded Mrs. Horac.e
Soule, second high to Mrs. Joe
Gloekler and cut to Mrs. Mark
Tomlinson.
Refreshments of pecan and
marshmallow pie and soft drinks
were served by the hostess to
Mesdames Tom Owens, Horace
Soule, E. Clay Lewis, Ed Ramsey,
Charles Brown, Jesse Smith, Joe
Gloeckler, Mark Tomlinson, Ber-
niard Pridgeon and H. S. Lilius.

INFORMAL BEACH PARTY
IS ENJOYABLE AFFAIR
An informal beach party which
was greatly enjoyed by those at-
tending was held last Thursday
evening at Beacon Hill. Swimming
was indulged in, after which a
fish supper was served.
Enjoying the affair were Mr.
and Mrs. D. C. Smith, Mr. and
Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon, Mr. and Mrs.
Stet Pridgeon, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse
Smith, Mrs. Homer Cain, Miss
Sara Kelly, Mr. and Mrs. Don Me-
Clellan and G. L. Kennington.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.


New Spring Ties at
Various Prices


TO GO WITH THE
NEW SPRING HATS!
Be sure that your coiffure
will match and accentuate
the fine details of the new
hats come to a
modern shop.
Princess Permanent
This famous special is
complete with shampoo
and wave set.
$3 to $6.50

PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOP
PHONE 55 Port St. Joe
----------


WORTHY GRAND MATRON
VISITS PORT ST. JOE O. E. S.
The Port St. Joe Eastern Star
lodge was hostess last Friday
night to Worthy Grand Matron
Mrs. Beatrice Brandon and Worthy
Grand Patron ant Mrs. C. R.
Kemp.
The hall was beautifully decor-
ated for the occasion and an in-
teresting program was presented,
including the iniatory work when
two candidates were taken into
the organization.
Refreshments were served fol-
lowing the business meeting.
,-I *
Mrs. Charles Mahon and Mrs.
Rosalie Bragdon were visiting Mr.
Mahon in the city tuesday from
Apalachicola.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

Miss Erie Gulledge of Dothan,
Ala., spent Monday in the city vis-
iting relatives.



EXTRA

I
SPECIAL


9 i





ALL
SCROQUINOLE WAVES
Regular 95
$3.00 r$1.95


WITH EACH $1 FACIAL
A FREE ARCH



CRAWFORD'S:
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Under Management of
Mrs. Belle Land
Licensed Operator
MISS GOLDA BOWLING

- - -4


NEW SHIRTS


$1


- $1.5


All Collar Styles!
Checks! Stripes! Solids!
Broadcloth! Madras!


Stock your Spring wardrobe
NOW at this special sale!
Not only will you save money
-you'll have a much wider
selection of advance styles to
choose from!



SHIRTS and SHORTS


25c and 35c
Pain and patterned
Broad::cth!, ful cut.


Owens & Murdock

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
I ^J. ^^^^^-- ^^ A-l J.J.^^I ^^--.^ *^ .^A^^ *^*^^^^J.


So"'LE FOR MEN


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 27, 19-38


1


PAGE FOUR







FRDY MA 7 98TESAPR S.JE LRD AEFV


THE POCKETBOOK

of KNOWLEDGE rTs




. L / n


rnM 4 AtV AWI44 A L -


Mercer Spear, David Gray and
the Misses Martha Belin and Mae
Jones spent Sunday in Perry.

J. R. Holliday left Tuesday on
a business trip to Brooksville.

C. OF C. LAYS PLANS

(Continued from page 1)
The committee contacted G. P.
Wood, general manager of the
duPont interests aere, owners of
the park, and he very generously
offered the use of any portion, of
the park that tue committee
might select as suitable, and De-
Witt Marks gave his time in aid-
ing in selection of tie most favor-
able place where the public could
gather and be enter-ained. The
site chosen lies between the ten-
nis courts and the bay front, hav-
ing a natural" slope to the pro-
posed band stand.
Pernrission was granted to
erect a stage or band stand and
seats and Mr. Wood also stated
that he would see that the grass
was mowed and the premises
cleaned after each performance.
It is indeed splendid that the
management of tae company's af-
fairs is so interested in the wel-
fiare of the people who live here
and offer to do all in their power
in co-operate in every way to
promote the best interests of the
city.
"It is to be hoped that many


other plans in the forming will
mature in the near future, so that
our city will be second to none in
the entertainment offered," said
Committee Chairman Wilson. "It
is the duty of every person to
help this movement, and to share
in it, for it is for you, and a part
of you. The best way to get ac-
quainted is to meet and visit, and
the very nicest way to do' that is
to enjoy an entertainment where
sea breezes blow and where na-
ture has done her part in making
beauty. So the public it urged to
avail itself of this timely move-
ment."
The committee has arranged to
have the high school band, under
the direction of Prof. Dan Farmer,
as the main feature of the pro-
grams which will neg;n as soon as
the necessary staging and seats
have been provided. These stu-
dents have just won state honors
with their playing, and with a
little practice anu e::,::-agement
will no doubt bring greater honors
to Port St. Joe. They will play
once a week for the present, and
later, when their repertoire of mu-
sic has enlarged, will be able to
play oftener. The programs will
be interspersed with other talent,
and anyone desiring to take part
is invited to see t;e entertain-
ment committee and offer his or
her services.
As there will be some expense
incurred in getting this program


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready For Every House In

Port St. Joe
COCKING- WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
0----- --
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS
-t A full lne of gas appliances in stock }-.--
SInquire Ritz Theater Building
Gulf Hardware C-o. Phone 168
S PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932

arm"


under way, anyone who cares to and credit to our city. Public address system may be ac-
make a contribution for any The committee requests the aid quired as soon as possible in or-
amount, large o0 small, to help of all who wish to co-operate, and der to amplify the music.
along this worthy cause may do welcomes suggestions as to the -----
so at Mr. Wilson's office next the conduct and makeup of these en- CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Kerr jewelry store. tertainments. It is hoped that a If It's Drugs, We Have It.
Donations of lumber for con-
structing the stage and seats are
beingg solicited and very liberally
responded to, and also many have
i'fn_'ed labor in erecting these
requisites. Thert- will be lights
necessary, and the local power
company wil; be asked to furnish
these as their contribution. All
money contributed will be used
exclusively for promotion of these Twenty-four Hour Service! .f .
programs, the committee working
entirely without pay and for the Easy, Safe and Conveiiant!
good it may bring to everyone.
The band needs music, instru-
ments and other equipment, and
any money donated for this cause
will be so used. Among these chil-
dren there may ne developed
some outstanding musician in the
yeaxs to come, bringing renown



,ki i


Y
OU will find this one of the many
services of the Wewahitchka State Bank
that makes banking here so pleasant and
easy. If you are going on your vacation,
or if you find it inconvenient to use our
regular banking facilities, come in today
and let us explain how easy to use and
convenient this service i's. We will be glad
to help you determine if our Bank by Mail
service fits your individual requirements.
This Bank Is Eager and
Able to Help You With All
Your Financial Problems!


Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA
Member: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation


SEASON


... OPENS JUNE 1

"Cast" Your Eyes On These Big


- Values In Fishing Tackle!


RODS
STANDARD RODS AT REAL
SAVINGS
Get every thrill out of casting
and playing your fish with
these strong, light rods
$ 95 to $ j10


REELS
Designed and built with pre-
cision; distinctive in appear-
ance. Heavily chromium plated
-non-tarnishing and non-cor-
rosive

$ 1 to $1200


LINES
We stock the most popular
lines on the market. Braided
silk lines; waterproof lines;
casting and xRrnk-proof lines

50 to $300


Tackle Boxes HOOKS
Outstanding values in carntilever Fine assortment of all sie.
tray style boxes. Rounded corners,
baked-on enamel Long and short shanks.

J$00 to $ '95 5S to 25c Per Dozen

SIN K E R S CORKS- LEADERS-FISH STRINGERS


Let Us Supply Your Fishing Needs!



ST. J E'HARDWARE0a COMPANY


PHONE 14


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


REMODELING
RESTORING
REPAIRING
DYEING
We have just installed new
machinery in order that we
can give you perfect work
and lasting satisfaction.
SHOES REPAIRED
WHILE YOU WAIT


REASONABLE PRICES



LEADER

SHOE SHOP
AUSTIN HUGGINS, Mgr.
Port St. Joe Florida


as~--------'------Apcs~sr~b~.`F


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1938


F;ISHING[ T








RAG SI H OTS.JE LRD RDY A 7 93


GASOLINE USED IN COUNTY
According to the monthly re-
port from the inspection bureau
of the state department of agri-
culture, Gulf county consumed 79,-
939 gallons of gasoline and 8,920
gallons of kerosene during the
month of April.
Bay county consumed 249,147
gallons of gasoline and 30,073 gal-
lons of kerosene; Franklin county
74,847 gallons of gas and 8,734
gallons of kerosene, and Calhoun
county 82,056 gallons of gas and
5,430 gallons of kerosene.
Total state consumption for the
period was 28,695,155 gallons of
gasoline and 2,901,097 gallons of
kerosene.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.
UNAWARE OF BROKEN NECK
James Miller, 37, of St. Augus-
tine, Fla., suffered from a broken
neck for eight days before he
found out what had happened to
him. He said he fell 25 feet while
painting a sign. Days later, when
his neck began to pain him se-
verely, he entered a hospital in
Elyria, O., where he was working.

The United States ordered all
amateur radio stations dismantled
during the World War.



You're Next

There's No Waiting In

COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP

You're next for better service.
Expert attention without
waste of time!









ERElIT
a--------
PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT

The plant that furnishes
you ice the year 'round

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
Max Kilbourn, Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
From Treated Water


IN


ONE MILE WEST OF PORT ST. JOE


HIGHLAND

OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT! PR


Highland View

Mrs. J. W. Doggett has re-
:urned home from a visit to her
parentss at Live Oak.

Mrs. T. Y. Connor has just re-
turned from a three weeks' visit
n Shreveport, La.

Fritz Christiansen was in Pana-
na City on business Monday.

Speddy Halter went fishing
Tuesdayy about five miles out and
brought back 350 pounds of red
snapper. The place is known as
Grand Snapper Banks.

Mrs. S. Johnson has returned
rom a trip to Tampa. Her sister
-eturned with her.

Mrs. Benton Ramsey made a
business trip to Panama City last
week.

Ed McKinsly of South Florida
was here a few days on business.

Mr: and Mrs. Arnold Cox left
'his week for their home in North
Carolina. Mr. Cox had been em-
ployed by the St. Joe Paper com-
pany.
----f----
According to a French theory,
certain medicines, such as seda-
tives, might be made synthetic-
ally in the chemical laboratory in
gas forn, so that the medicine
could be taken by breathing it.



Phelps Grocery
Ca. C. A. PHELPS
OU. Manager
HIGHLAND VIEW
Cheapest Grocery Prices In
Gulf County
The More Business We Do,
the Less It Costs You

We Have No Specials-
These Are Regular Pricess

BRIAR PIPE
50c seller ..... 3 5 C
and we give you two 10c
packages of Tobacco

Prince Albert, can--......10c
SUGAR- 48
10 pounds .....4
Matches, 3 Ig. boxes ....10c
Best grade Water 90
Ground Meal, peck 2 c
Pearl Grits, 1 lb. pkg.....8c
All-Good PEACHES 1
No. 2/2 can ...........

These are just a few of our
prices. Come in
and see the rest


PHELPS GROCERY HAS
UP-TO-MINUTE STOCK i M SI G
The Phelps Grocery in High- MUS
land View, operated by Mr. C.. By STEVE
Phelps, is modern in every re-
spect and stocks a line of nation-
ally advertised goods that is up- Now I don't claim to know any-
lo-the-minute in every respect, thing-maybe I do and maybe I
Mr. Phelps not only operates don't--that's what I'm trying to
this grocery, but is a construction find out.
engineer and draughtsman. He Folks. I've been studying liter-
also has a number of modern cab- nature for 50 years, more or less-
ins for rent in this rapidly-grow- mostly more. Often I get .to think-
ing subdivision. ing of some of these successful
S Nauthors and I wonGer how they
NEW SKATING RINK get by. Have they inherited a lot
IS NEAR COMPLETION of money and paid the high-class
The new skating rink being magazines to publish the drivel
constructed in Highland View by they send in or no--well, it just
C. C. Williams is rapidly nearing beats me.
completion, and Mr. Williams an- You know, folks, I read a yarn
ticipates having his grand open- when I was about eight years old
ing probably within the next ten about a king wanting to marry a
days. young gal. Well, the gal lived in
The rink, which is built on pil- Ireland and so the king sent a fel-
ings out over the waters of the low named Tristram over there
bay, is quite large and will ac- to bring her back, as kings were
con:modate many skaters. Win- so busy in those days, and you
dows on three sides and a large know how busy kings are now try-
entrance door will allow for cool ing to keep their crowns adjusted.
breezes to waft through the build- Well, Tristram f o u n d Isolde
ing at all times. and started back, but on the way
they drank some kind of dope
MILL WILL AID BUSINESS that made them fall in love for-
IN HIGHLAND VIEW SECTOR
ever, or so the yarn goes.
Moving of the Kinney lumber But it ended sadly, because
mill from Blountstown to its new Tritsram's uncie got on to it and
location on the canal in the High- had some unidentified person jab
land View section wnil be a great a knife in some part of Tris-
boon to the business men here. tram's anatomy, so that ended, it.'
Undoubtedly many: of the mill
ndoubdly many of h mill But you know, folks, its funny
employes will buy or rent houses.
how human nature is. t
here and secure their necessities human nature is.
from the local stores. We all dream over Tristram
As the mill will: employ a large and Isolde, and feel so sorry for
crew. this should mean a consider- them, hut let a bunch of young
able increase in business. folks get killed at a railroad cross-
-_ ing and we forget it almost before
CHURCH WILL BE MOVED the train gets started.
TO HIGHLAND VIEW Now another thing. I read when
I was about nine years old about
It is understood that members
o, the congregan o the As Caesar crossing the Rubicon, and
o0 the coniea'ation of the Assem-


bly of God church are contemplat-
ing moving their church building
front' its present location on the
Wewahitchka highway near the
ice plant to Highland View.

OFFER REWARD FOR
RETURN OF ISLAND
Offering a substantial sum for
the return of an island is some-
thing unique in the annals of ad-
vertising, but Davis & Gist, oper-
ating Bird Island Cruise, carried
an ad in the Ocala Star this week
offering a reward for the return
to the vicinity of their docks of
the much-publicized "Floating Is-
land," featured recently in Rip-
ley's "Believe It or Not" cartoon.
The island disappeared three
weeks ago andi`o trace of it can
be found.
-----f-----
The export chemical trade of
the United States remains about
one-fourth below the high level of
1929, and our chemical Imports
are less than 60 per cent of their
value in that abnormal year.


Sea Foods '
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
We Carry a Wide Variety of Sea Foods
- OYSTERS IN SEASON

E. L ANDERSON FISH COMPANY
I V2 Mile W. Port St. Joe On Panama City Highway


VIEW

ICES CONSISTENTLY LOWER!


while folks now think children are
so smart, I realiaec at that early
age that he crossed it because he
wanted to get on the other side.
What I'm trying tto g-et at is
this: "Is we got as much sense as
we used to have or is we ain't?"

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
ANCIENT, IN FACT
First Student: "I wonder how
old Miss Smith isT"
Second Student: "Quite old, I
imagine-they say she used to
teach Caesar."


SWe Carry a
Complete Stock of

GROCERIES

and MEATS

Everything In Our
Store Is
PRICED TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE


Let Us Supply Your
Grocery Needs At
Prices Well Within
Your Budget


GASOLINE and
OIL



HIGHLAND VIEW

GROCERY :

C. C. WILLIAMS, Prop.
.^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ :1


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHERE BUSINESS IS BRISK YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND
FRESH GROCERIES

MILK 4 Small 15e TOMATOES- 24c
or 2 Large ........... 6 cans for ........



Sug r Granulated 28c


Kill Kwick Mosquito Crystal White 99
Spray; 75c size... 60 TOILET SOAP, 6 for
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 24c SPAGHETTi, 3 for ...... 9c
FIELD CORN, 3 cans 24c LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs.....13c
COOKING OIL, gal. ..85c Milnut Milk, 3 large ....23c
MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c Prince Albert Tob, 3 for 28c
Nice large New Po- 9C Best Grade White C7
tatoes, 4c lb.; 10 lbs. JcJL Ring Flour. 12 lbs.

Golden Brand Oleo. 2 lb 25c Wilson's Sliced 25
Choice West. Steak. Ib 35c Breakfast Bacon, lb..-
Oil Sausage, gal ............95c Country BUTTER, Ib....35c
We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT


BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


PAGE SIX


THP Stift, POWT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1938







PAGE SEVEN


ePInAV MAV 97 lTR3


24HOURELECTRIC
24-HOU R SERVICE
Phone 98 Port St. Joe
Call u. any hour of the day
or night for
ELECTRIC REPAIRING

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker




CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
CALL FOR and DELIVER


In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE- FLA.























Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others ....
Let your family enjoy
some today.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON' S

Dairy

Products


,------------ - -
GULF VIEW:

TAVERN
We Carry the Best Lines of
WINES and BEERS






5 4




Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent
..................I


Oyster Projects

Of Great Worth

Work of Conservation Department
Will Restore Waters to Ade-
quate Production

Commercial fishermen meeting
recently in Panama City agreed
the oyster rehabilitation project
now under way in Florida is of
great worth to the state's eco-
nomic future.
Oystermen and fishermen learn-
ed that the state conservation de-
partment intends to keep up the
work with a view of completely
restoring the depleted bay waters
to adequate production.
Through the efforts of R. L.
Dowling, supervisor of .conserva-
tion, the conservation department,
with the assistance of the WPA,
is putting into effect a state-wide
oyster planting and oyster bar re-
habilitation program :-h4y will re-'
store production to Florida's oys-
ter industry.
The program calls for an outlay
of $411.815, which amount is to be
spent jointly by the two depart-
ments.
The project will have units in
at least 20 counties within a few
months, all operating simultan-
eously, with the expectation that
oyster plantings will eventually
be made in all of the 40 coastal
counties before the project is
completed.
Employment will be given hun-
dreds of men now on the relief
rolls in the communities where
the plantings are to be carried
out.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Cem-
pounded. Phone 27.


Many Long Years Ago


(From United States Saturday
Post. March 8, 1845)
OUR WEEKLY GOSSIP
The message- of President Polk
occupies the place In this day's
paper which is due to the inaug-
ural of a man holding the highest
office 'ever conferred by the suff-
rages of a great people. Various
comments are made upon it by
the party press-to which we do
not belong-and as we regard
subscription to the Post as prima
facie evidence of intelligence, we
leave our intelligent readers to
make their own comments.
The close of the session of con-
gress will leave us one depart-
ment the less to look out for in
our weekly labors; but the
changes which must follow upon
the accession of a new President
will give the newspapers addi-
tional interest for a few weeks;
and, if as some suppose, or as a
contingency may require, a spe-
cial session of Congress is con-
vened, the topics discussed will
not be by any means uninterest-
ing.
We are far, however, from sid-
ing with the alarmists who are
full of wars and rumors. Any in-
terference with us by European
nations we consider as entirely
without the pale of probability,
not to say possibility, although
the latter term in the present as-
pect of the world's relations would
hardly be too strong. And the
danger of collision with any na-
tion upon this continent is, we ap-
prehend, quite as distant. We
have always hitherto prophesied
good rather than evil, and if the
Mexican Minister has demanded
and received his passports, it was
in pursuance of old instructions;
and we are conflent it will only
prove the suspension of diplo-
matic intercourse to be renewed
upon a better basis.


WASHINGTON

SNAPSHOTS
By JAMES PRESTON


The congressional scene this
week is not unlike a small boy
anxious to get out and play ball
and willing to concede almost any-
thing to speed up his chores.
The legislators are anxious to
get home, to feel the pulse in the
grass roots, but leaders have firm-
ly laid down the ultimatum that
"must" bills must be ground thru
th'e legislative mill before there is
any campaigning at home.
The congressmen are doubtful
about the whole thing. The lead-
ers, however, insist the wage-hour
and spending programs are the
"people's mandate." Although re-
luctant to accept this word, the
members have had no choice in
the absence of any voice from the
folks back home.

Another item on the "do or
else" program for the congress-
men this session is the plan for a,
half-million dollar investigation of
monopolies. The odd part of it,
however, is that the government
-spokesmen asked the half a mil-
lion for the job after one of the
senators-Bailey, of North Caro-
lina-had figured out it could be
done for only $25,000.
The Bailey investigation resolu-
tion has already been approved by
the senate commerce committee
and the senate audit and control
committee. Perhaps gov-
ernment check-writing machines
are no longer geared to such
small figures!

Speaking of the depression,


We congratulate the nation
upon the passage of the Post Of-
fice Law. It is an oDoection to it
that postage in advance is not in
some way encouraged in the bill,
and perhaps there are other things
which might have been better
managed. But the Bill as it stands
is much better than any which
has preceded it; and we hazard
little in predicting that it will
open the way to much more im-
portant changes.
The admission of Florida and
Iowa increases tile number of
States in our confederacy to 28-
to say nothing of Texas, from
which we shall probably have two
new States, Texas and Brassos.
The Senate will hereafter com-
prise 56 members, or 58 including
those from Texas; and the.House
225; or including those from
Texas, 227.

IN A BAD FIX
At the last election in Canada,
the political excitement ran so
high that several clergymen voted
though for so doing they were
subjected by law to a fine of
$2000. Eighteen of them had been
indicted for the offence, and pe-
titioned Parliament to remit the
fine. It seems that there is no
prospect of their petitions being
granted.

NEW ORLEANS
The following statement of the
exports of New Orleans for about
six months shows a busy season.
From the 1st of September, 1844,
to February 19th, 1845, there were
shipped: 378,365 bales of cotton,
13,314 hhds. of tobacco, 42,779
hhds. and 932 bbls. sugar, 7,361
hhds. and 61,698 bbls. molasses,
135,663 bbls. flour, 79,141 bbls.
pork, 2,115 bbls. bacon, 185,826
kegs lard, 10,5583 bbls. beef, 260,-
523 pigs lead, 11,202 bbls. whis-
key, 31,319, sacks corn.


I-KI)A t VI T 4 I VO ---- 1 --


some of the C.I.O. officials are
already planning for the next one!
In Atlantic City last week C.I.O.
Chairman John Lewis told some
of his followers that just as soon
as the current depression is
ended he is going to begin "the
greatest labor organizing cam-
paign in history." "Already,". he
said, "we see the next depression


T w T- TT-TT I~ W---TTTTTT T- --- ---7.T -

WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. W HORTON


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


,',, ,. ., v -V - -- --- -- -- -'' -''

We Invite You
to enjoy the Friendly, Refined Atmosphere of Port St.
Joe's. Finest. Bar and Billiard Parlor
-*{ Our Cocktails Are "Mixed By Experts }.*-

St. Joe Bar and Billiard Parlor
ED. GEORGE, Manager
$^;-ri^...-----------"" --'----- -- ---,<-






Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything


SH. H. TAYLOR

gW Our Work Speaks for Itself
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe






Give YOUR


Family a Home



In Beacon Hill

Subdivision

Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means.



Lots $50 to $600
$10.00 DOWN AND $5.00 PER WEEK
WHY PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. .
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, ,or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent. .

INVESTIGATE! LET US SHOW YOU!
0

COTTAGES FOR RENT





Beacon Hill



Development Company

J. S, PATRICK BEACON HILL, FLA.
Youca pa fr ahoe i Baco Hll ubiviio


coming." He didn't say just when.
Many people around the capital
are wondering if the C.I.O. really
knows how much it has con.
tribute to the current slump. It
was the chief leader for estab-
lishment of the National Labor
Relations Board, and the NLRB
has been one 'of the chief factors
in creating fear and uncertainty
in the business world.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA








r E


Sholtz Reports He Spent
$14,837.19 On Campaign

Dave Sholtz is the first sena-
torial candidate to file his final
campaign expense statement with
Secretary of State Robert A.
O;ay. Sholtz reported yesterday
he spent $14,837.19 in his unsuc-
cessful campaign for the United
States senate. He listed contribu-
tions of $4,335.
Final campaign expense state-
ments must be filed by all candi-
dat"s by June 3.


VOTE OF THANKS

I wish to take this means of
thanking the voters of Gulf
County for electing me County
Judge.
I will endeavor to show my
appreciation by serving Gulf
County fairly, impartially and
tc the best of my ability. '
Again thanking those who
saw fit to support me and ex-
tending my thanks to my worthy
opponent and his supporters for
their friendly accord and fair
play, I am,
Gratefully yours,
R. ALTON DENDY.
(Paid. Political Advertisement)


MANY ATTEND

BIBLE SCHOOL

AND SERVICES


ONE


HUNDRED AND MORE


CHILDREN ATTENDING
DAILY

Rev. J. W. S:semore reports
that large crowds have been at-
:ending. the revival services being
held nightly, except Saturday, in
the high school auditorium and he
expects the building to be packed
.it all services Sunday.
An average attendance of 100
or more children is reported daily
at the Bible school, with a total
registration of more than 150.
The Bible school and revival ser-
vices will continue through next
,veek and Rev. Sisemore hopes
that everyone in the city will
make every effort to attend.
----
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists
Dr. D. E. Cline of Marianna was
Visitor in Port St. Joe Monday.

David Gray spent Tuesday in
Panama City on business.


Fishing Season



Opens



June 1st

In GulF County

LET US SUPPLY YOUR NEEDS FROM OUR
COMPLETE STOCK OF

FISHING TACKLE
RODS, priced from..--............-----$3.50 to $4.50
REELS, priced from ....-..-..-------$1.50 to $7.00
High Grade LINES, ranging from 450 to $2
PLUGS that get the bass .........--954 to $1.25
HOOKS SINKERS FLIES --

LeHARDY'S PHARMACY
"Where Friends Meet"


PHONE 5


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


A Lucky Purchase

of high grade Bond Paper at a
< close-out price enables us for a
--short time to offer business men
S of Port St. Joe

500 LETTERHEADS $375
for .......
1000 LETTERHEADS $525
for ...

We have been getting $6.50 per
thousand for this same grade of
paper. This is a superior
Bond Paper of 20-pound weight,
nationally advertised, and when
our stock on hand is used (we
have sufficient- to print 30,000
letterheads) we will not be able
to continue this price.

ENVELOPES TO MATCH
500 for $4.00 1000 for $5.25



THE STAR


"Your Home-


Town Newspaper"


Port St. Joe, Fla.


L. D. McRAE NEW

STATE ATTORNEY

UNOFFICIAL COUNT GIVES A
MAJORITY OF 142 OVER
MARIANNA MAN

According to complete unoffi-
cial returns from the six counties
comprising the 14th judicial cir-
cuit. L. D. McRae of Chipley has
a lead of 142 votes over John H.
Carter, Jr., of Marianna, incum-
bent, for state attorney.
The unofficial results from the
116 precincts was Carter 11,840
and' McRae 11,982. McRae carried
Gullf. Bay, Holmes, Calhoun and
Washington counties.
County canvassing boards will
meet today to declare the official
results, but it is not likely that
there will be any great change in
the results.

THOMAS WINS
Circuit Judge Elwyn Thomas of
Fort Pierce defeated J. Tom Wat-
son of Tampa for tie Democratic
nomination for justice of the
state supreme court. Unofficial re-
ports from 1,234 of the state's
1,336 precincts gave Thomas 145,-
577 and Watson 101,695.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.
--------
FISHING SEASON
OPENS WEDNESDAY

The closed season on fresh wa-
ter fishing in Gulf county ends
Tuesday night at midnight, and
quite a number of our local
anglers plan to take advantage of
the half-holiday Wednesday and
go out and bring in strings of bass
and bream.
The St. Joe Hardware company
and LeHardy's Pharmacy in this
issue of The Star are tempting
the disciples of Izaak Walton with
some rare bargains in fishing
paraphernalia.

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
TO MEET IN PENSACOLA
The Association of County Com-
missioners of Florida will hold
their annual convention at Pen-
sacola. June 13 to 15, it has been
announced by Wilbur C. King,
president of the organization.
-it----
THEATER TO OPEN SOON

(Continued from page 1)
equipment will be of the most
modern type.
On the second floor commodious
and tastefully finished living quar-
ters are provided for Manager
Bill Turner and his wife, and they
have already started housekeep-
ing in their new home, although
it is not yet finished. To look at
them in their new apartment one
would take them for a nrewly-mar-
ried couple just starting out in
life.
Manager Turner stated that it
was his desire Co open the new
playhouse on June 15, but from
present indications it probably
will be a few days after that date
that the opening show will be
presented.
Port St. Joe can well be proud
of this new theater and it should
be able to care for theatergoers
of this city for some time to come.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
-------
ONE WAY
Barber: "Is there any particu-
lar way you'd like your hair cut?"
Youngster: "Yeah-off."
-- -
Miss Veta Cook of Auburndale
is visiting Miss Elizabeth Bow-
man, having returned home with
her last week.
$-K-
The first radio distress call was
sent from the British lightship R.
F. Matthews, in 1899.


COUNTY GETS $2000
FROM RACE FUND

Gulf county this week was $2000
richer upon receipt of a check for
$2000 from Comptro:ler J. M. Lee
as final payment rrom race track
funds. This brings the total re-
ceived by the county from this
source to $26,251.15.


WOOD MENTIONED AS
SPEAKER OF HOUSE
A lively contest is expected in
the selection of speaker of the
next Florida house of representa-
tives. Among candidates men-
tioned are Pierce Wood, Port St.
Joe; Bob Sikes, Crestvew; Barn-
berg Harrell, Jasper; LeRoy Col-
lins, Tallahassee, Raymond Shel-
don, Tampa, and Noah B. Butt of


This final payment comes as a Cocoa.
result of a surplus kept in the -----
race track fund until all bills had The best car that any manufac-
been paid and was distributed turer can make is not fool-proof
upon order of Governor Cone. against a fool driver.


Let Us Service YOUR Car Todav
For economical and efficient opera-
ttion of your car, let us thoroughly
service it with our modem equipment
WASHING--
-POLISHING-
-GREASING
Texaco Products

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
Wilbur Wells Jesse Darcey



METERED



Gas Service

ENJOY GAS ADVANTAGES, METERED JUST
LIKE NATURAL GAS-YOU PAY ONLY
FOR WHAT YOU USE, AFTER
YOU HAVE USED IT




Low Cost Operation


Trade-in allowances will be made until June 1st.
Convenient terms on the balance.





ST. JOE GAS CO.
A. M. MITCHELL, Representative
Bargain Furniture Co. New Costin Bldg.





NEW FHA LOANS

Under the revised Federal Housing Act we are now in
position to make the following type Loans
under Title I of this Act:
CLASS I LOANS
Section A: For repairing and remodeling of residences,
stores, etc., at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in cost from
$100 to $2,500.
Section B: For repairs and remodeling of commercial and
industrial property at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in
cost from $2,500 to $10,000.
CLASS II LOANS
For the construction of new stores, garages, filling stations,
roadside stands, barns, tourist cabins, beach cottages, etc., at 5
per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
CLASS III LOANS
For the construction of new residences or part residences and
part store building at 3/2 per cent interest from 1 to 5 years,
ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
LOANS MADE ON ANNUAL PAYMENTS BASIS TO FARMERS
o-------


Build---Repair---Remodel
See Us If You Want ACTION!




ST. JOE LUMBER CO.
PHONE 69 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


- '


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1938