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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00186
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 20, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00186

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site
DuPont Paper Mi
est growing little
the heart of


Sof the $7,500,000
ill-Florida's fast.
city. In H
thq pine belt.


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANNIVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1938 NUMBER 31


YOUTH KILLED

WHILE RIDING

MOTORCYCLE

CHARLES WOLCOTT DIES OF
BROKEN NECK WHEN MA-
CHINE OVERTURNS

Charles Harvey Wolcott, 24, of
White City. met instant death last
Saturday on the Wewahitchka
highway, just beyond the Hodges
lumber mill, when the motorcycle
he was riding overturned and
threw him to the pavement.
Young Wolcott was riding his
motorcycle behind the car occu-
pied by his father and mother, en
route to Panama City. Mr. Wol-
cott stated that n;s son was rid-
ing a short distance to the rear
of the automobile. He heard a
crash and looked back, seeing his
son lying in the highway with the
motorcycle beside him.
Mr. Wolcott stopped the car and
rushed to his son's side. He
Placed him in the car and rushed
him to Miller's drug store for a
doctor's examination. He was car-
ried from the car into the drug
store by Sam Davis and passed
away in Mr. Davis' arms. Exami-
nation revealed that death was
caused by a fractured neck. The
body was badly lacerated.
Cause of the accident could not
he determined, as an examination
of the tires on the motorcycle
showed that neither had blown.
The body was taken to North-
umberland, Pa., where interment
took place. The young man is
survived by his parents. Mr. and
Irs. A. H. Wolcott of White City.


But One County

Office Is To Be

Filled Tuesday

Only Race Is For County Judge;
Voters To Choose Between Mc-
Rae, Carter; Thomas, Watson

Little has been heard in the way
of politicking in Port St. Joe for
the runoff primary to be held next
Tuesday, May 24, although the
voters will choose between R. Al-
ton Dendy, incumbent, and Sam P.
Husband for county judge of Gulf
county; John H. Carter. Jr., in-
cumbent, and L. D. McRae for
state attorney of the 14th judicial
circuit, and Elwyn Thomas and' J.
Tom Watson for justice of the
state supreme court in Group 2.
The name of Eugene S. Mat-
thews for railroad commissioner
will also appe-'a upon the ballot,
but any votes for him will be en-
tirely complimentary, as his op-
ponent, Buck Hancock, withdrew
from the race.
It is conceded that the race be-
tween Dendy and Husband will be
close. Husband was high man in
the three-way race at the first pri-
mary with 603 votes; Dendy was
second with 578, and R. A. Mc-
Keithen third with 523. Friends
of both Dendy and Husband are
-"orking to gather in as many of
the McKeithen votes as possible
fo- their candidate.
Little talk is heard in regard to
the state attorneyship, but the
consensus of opinion in this city
;s that McRae will defeat Carter
by a fair margin, some even pre-
dicting that McRae will poll more
votes in Jackson county, (Carter's
home county) than the incumbent.
J. Tom Watson is the talk here
for supreme court justice, al-
though Thomas has some sup-
porters. but it is generally con-
ceded that Watson will carry the
county.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Rhodes left
Wednesday for Savannah to make
their home. Mr. Rhodes has been
emjlyed by thd St. Joe Paper
compandy.


Two Are Held In MAYOR SETS

Connection With TOMORROW AS
11.4-L' -- I -"..4 iDATDV IR X


Ueatin oi lOutil

SCoroner's Jury Asks Two Young
Men Be Held In Suspected
Killing.of Vasti Nichols

A coroner's jury convening in
Wewahitchka Tuesday evening at
the call of Sheriff B. F. Parker to
investigate the death of Benjamin
Vasti Nichols, 20-year-old son of
Mrs. Viola Nichols Griffith of
Overstreet, asked that Hugh Mel-
vin, 20, and Leroy Stevens, 25, be
held in connection with young
Nichols' death.
The body of Nichols was found
last week floating in Wetappo
creek near Dave Gaskin's still at
Ringjaw. and examination of the
lungs by Dr. Thomas Meriwether
disclosed there was no water in
them, indicating that the youth
was dead before his body was
placed in the creek.
According to information gath-
ered by Sheriff Parker, Nichols,
Melvin and Stevens were reported
seen together near the turpentine
still Sunday night, May 8, the
night that Nichols failed to return
home. A searching party, headed
by the boy's stepfather, Joseph
Griffith. found the body Wednes-
day morning of last week.


REVIVAL OPENS

HERE SUNDAY

WILL CONTINUE TWO WEEKS
WITH REV. SIPEMORE
PREACHING .

A two weeks' revival service
will open Sunday night in the
high school auditorium with Rev.
J. W. Sisemore preaching. Serv-
ices will be held each evening at
8 p. m., except Saturday.
"We shal: have old-time singing
and preaching," stated Rev. Sise-
oire. "and it is our prayer that
tile church might be turned over
to the Lord and that this shall be
the starting point of building our
urch front' the inside as well as
from the outside."
Song service will start promptly
at 8 o'clock, and prayer meetings
will precede each service, with
these groups starting at 7:30.
One night will be given over to
an old-time service, using kero-
sene lamps and an old-fashioned
-r-an. Invalids, cripples, poor
folks, and especially old folks, will
be present.
Everyone is cordially invited to
attend.
----
MOTHER OF MRS. FRED
MADDOX DIES SUNDAY
Mrs. Frank McFarland. mother
of Mrs. Fred Maddox, died Sun-
day at her home in Frink. Her
death came as a great shock as
she was ill but a few hours. Fu-
neral was from the home with
burial Monday afternoon in the
Frink cemetery.
Mrs. McFarland leaves to mourn
her passing her husband, Frank
McFarland; four sons, Peter, Earl,
Everette and Perry McFarland,
four daughters, Mrs. D. E.
Cumbie, Mrs. Viola Wimberly,
Mrs. Ethel Bridges and Mrs. Mad-
doox, and five grandchildren,
Clara Mae, Jane, Frank, Elere and
Murphy McFarland.
---------
DENTIST OPENS OFFICE
IN NEW COSTIN BUILDING
Dr. J. C. Coe in this issue of
'The Star announces the opening
of dental offices in the new Cos-
tin building on Monument avenue.
Residents of -the city welcome
Dr. Coe, as his coming fills a
'ong-felt need in this city.

Mrs. Albert Hickey and chil-
dren of Orlando arrived Wednes-
day and will make this city their
home.


Mrs. W. A. Bowen and daughter J. M. and D. C. Smith were busi-
oF Eastman. Ga., are visiting Mr. ness visitors in Orlando Tuesday
and Mrs. Purvis Howell. and Wednesday.
4---------- L-
Rev. and Mrs. Dempsey Hodges Joe Kirkland of Grjacev'ill- is
n-'d f'lmilv of Dothan. Ala., are visiting his :'roith-r. Hiro'ld Kirk-
spending this week at Beacon Hill. land, this week;.': ::


YUrurrI VA Y'


LADIES OF LEGION AUXILIARY
TO SELL MEMORIAL POPPY
ON STREETS OF CITY

Saturday, May 21 (tomorrow),
was proclaimed "Poppy Day" in
Port St. Joe in a proclamation is-
sued Wednesday by Mayor J. L.
Sharit. The proclamation urged
all citizens to honor the World
War dead and aid the war's living
victims by wearing the American
Legion and Auxiliary ilemorial
poppy that' day. The proclamation
reads:
PROCLAMATION
WHEREAS, Saturday, May 21,'
has been designated .Poppy Day
in commemoration of the dis-
tinguished service rendered to
our country by the veterans of
wars; and
WHEREAS, the American Le-
gion Auxiliary, on said Poppy.
Day, offers for contribution pop-
pies made by disabled veterans
in our Veterans' Hospitals, for
which they received little or no
compensation; and
WHEREAS, it has been the
custom to utilize this day in
raising such funds as are pos-
sible through the sale of pop-
pies for the benefit of the dis-
abled veterans, and it being the
desire of the citizenship of
America generally, and of Port
St. Joe in partieutar; therefore,
I. J. L. Sharit, Mayor of the
City of Port St. Joe, ny virtue
of tihe power in me vested, do
hereby proclaim saturday, May
21, 1938, as Poppy Day, and re-
quest our citizens to co-operate
and assist our 'Legionnaires and
members of the Auxiliary in the
sale and distribution of poppies
for the benefit of our disabled
veterans:
This 18th day of May. A. D.
1938.
J. L. SHARIT,
Mayor Comnmissioner.
Attest:
M. P. Tomlinson, City Clerk.
A corps of women volunteers,
members of the American Legion
Auxiliary, wilE bring America's
flower of remembrance to the peo-
ple of this city tomorrow. Com-
pletion of plans was announced
yesterday by Mrs. Lois A. Van-
Horn, president of the Gulf county
unit of the Auxiliary..
All the workers will serve as
unpa i d; volunteers, permitting
every penny received for the pop-
pies to go into the Auxiliary's re-
habilitation and welfare funds.
This money is the principal source
of support for the continuous pro-
gram of aid .for disabled veterans
and families of the dead and dis-
abled carried out by the Auxiliary.
The local corps will b'e part of
an army of 100,000 women who
will distribute the little red me-
morial flowers throughout the na-
tion to honor the war dead and
raise funds to aid those living in
suffering and need because of the
wa r.
When you are asked to buy a
poppy tomorrow, do not refuse,
but make your contribution as
large as ,possible to aid in carry-
ing on this good work.

DR. WARD TAKES OVER
OFFICE OF DR. McMULLEN
Dr. A. L. Ward has taken over
the offices of Dr. D. Byrd McMil-
len in the Miller drug store and
wi:l practice medicine here.
Dr. McMullen left Wednesday
for Jacksonville, where he will
work with the state board of
health.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Morning worship 11 a. m. Topic:
"The Southern Baptist Conven-
tion."
B. T. U. 7 p. m.
Evening worship 8 p. m. Ser-
mon theme: "I Shall Never Die."
W. M. U., Monday 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting Weednesday at
8 p. m.
Girls' Auxiliary meets Friday at
4 p. im.

.The.Star does all types of Com-
mercial Printing. See, us.


Commend Mayor

On Gambling

Table Action

APALACHICOLA CITY HEADS
ARE FACED WITH SAME
SITUATION

The following letter received
this week by Mayor J. L. Sharit
froin Mayor J. P. Coombs of Apa-
lachicola commending the stand
taken by Mayor Sharit and the
hoard of city commissioners to
rid Port St. Joe of gambling de-
vices of all sorts is self-explana-
tory and needs no comment:
Hon. J. L. Sharit, Mayor,
Port St. Joe, Florida.
Dear Mayor Snarit-This coim-
munity has watched with con-
siderable interest your fight
against the gambling tables
which are trying to take the
place of slot machines, and we
wish to compliment you on your
enforcement of the law.
Such action on your part is
of material assistance to us in
Apalachicola, as we have been
asked permission to install
these tables in our city, based
Supon the fact that they were be-
ing installed in nearby towns.
We have refused to permit them
and are considerably encour-
aged by the convictions which
you have gotten against the op-
erators and owners of this type
of machine.
Please accept our congratula-.
tions for your firm stand for
law and prder.
Yours very truly,
J. P. Coombs, Mayor.


DISAGREE ON

OPENING OF


"'W


Does the fishing season open VU ill t1 I UIU)n 1
tomorrow in Gulf county or does
it remain closed until June 1?
That is the problem confronting IN HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
disciples of Izaak Walton. UNDER DIRECTION REV.
According to a letter from I. N.
Kennedy, executive secretary of J. W. SISEMORE
the state fish and game commis-
sion, black bass may be taken a Rev. J. W. Sisemore states
ter May 20. The following letter\ that the city-wide vacation Bible
has been sent out to all county school will open tomorrow after-
judges and conservation officers noon at the high school and he
by Mr. Kennedy: expects a? large number present.
To All County Judges and "Parents, your children will ob-
Conservation -Officers: tain things during the next two
In re. closed season on black weeks that you could not possibly
bass: The law providing for a give them in a lifetime at home."
closed season on black bass says Rev. Sisemore. "They will
reads as follows: learn how to conduct a church and
During the period of how to conduct themselves, and
each year beginning March 15 along with this they will have a
and ending May 20." great time. They will laugh until
Our interpretation of this law they cry, they will see that the
is that the season for taking hand is quicker than the eye. We
black bass will open on the 21st will have an object lesson for
day of May. -them each day and along with
Very truly yours, this will be sure enough 'black
I. N. KENNEDY, magic'. Games will be played on
Executive Secretary. the school grounds and we expect
Now comes a ruling from F. M. all' to come."
Campbell, county attorney. An adult class will also b'e con-
Says Mr. Campbell: ducted and Methodists, Presby-
It is my opinion that Chapter terians, Assembly of God and all
17932, General Acts of Legisla- other denominations are invited.
ture of Florida, 1937, providing. Rev. Sisemore believes that
for closed season for large or with full co-operation of everyone
small mouth black bass during this school will become one of the
*the period of March 15 and end- largest in the state.
ing May 20, does not repeal -
Chapter 15230. Special Acts of NEPHEW OF C. CHAVERS
Legislature of Florida, 1931,. DIES IN ATLANTA FIRE
providing for closed season inS N ATLANTA F
Gulf county during the months Aubrey Chavers, 20, of Panama
of April and May, of each year. City, was one of the victims of
Therefore it is unlawful to take the tragic fire which swept thru
fresh water fish from the fresh the Terminal hotel in Atlanta
waters of Gulf county, whether early Monday morning with a loss
they be large or small mouth of 30 lives. He was a nephew of
black bass or any other kind of Clark Chavers and was employed
fish, except catfish from the by the Chavers-Fowhand Furni-
Apalachicola river, and it is the ture company which has a branch
duty of the enforcement offi- store in Port St. Joe. He had gone
cers to arrest any person in vio- to Atlanta to bring a truckload of
lation of the above special act. furniture to Panama City.
y-----
There it is, and those fishermen '
who contemplated hieing them- Mrs. H. A. Drake left this morn-
selves to the lair of the wily bass ing for Atlanta for a visit of sev-
come tomorrow, seem doomed to eral days with her sister, Mrs.
disappointment. Knowle Tucker.


BASS SEASON

TO FISH OR NOT TO FISH TO-
MORROW IS PROBLEM CON-
FRONTING ANGLERS


COMMERCIAL

LIGHTING RATE

IS REDUCED

FLORIDA POWER CORP. GIVES
BUSINESS MEN CUT, EF.
FECTIVE MAY 21

Another reduction in electric
rates foi Port St. Joe-this time
lowering the commercial lighting
rate was announced yesterday
by J. P. Coombs of Apalachicola,
manager of the western division
of the Florida Power corporation.
The new commercial lighting
rate becomes effective with cur-
rent consumed after May 21. The
reduction is made following a
study by company officials of the
growth and expansion of Port St.
Joe and is in line with the com-
pany's policy of lowering rates as
rapidly as conditions permit.
This is the fifth rate reduction
since April, 1937, at which time
the domestic service rate was re-
duced. Last May the electric wa-
ter heating rate was lowered, fol-
lowed in August by-another reduc-
tion in the domestic service rate
and a lowering of the commercial
lighting rate. Tie new commer-
cial lighting rate reduction puts
local electric rates on a compar-
able basis with charges in other
towns served by the Florida
Power corporation.
The old rate was lle per kilo-
watt hour for the first 100 kilo-
watt hours, with a graduated
scale for each additional 100.
The new rate is 10 cents per
kilowatt* hour for the first 50,
nine cents per kwh for the next
150. with a sharp drop from there
on. The complete rate may be
seen by turning to the advertise-
ment of the company on page 8
of this issue.
It is pointed out by Mr. Coombs
that the lower rate opens an op-
portunity for local business es-
tablishments to take advantage of
additional store lighting for sales
building.


BIBLE SCHOOL TO
-flDPVI A TYTD AV






FRIDAY., MAY 20, 1938


1


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued 'every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star BuIldirg

Entered as Second class malt 'r, Dacember 10,
1937, at the Postortice, Port St. Joe,,Florida,
under AcL of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Pa:a':lea In Advance
One Year ......$2.,0 Six Months ....$t125
Three Months ......65c

--.-{ Telephone 51 J-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thouhltully weighed.
The spoken wo;d barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


PRIDE IN ACHIEVEMENT
Did you ever stop to think that you 'ca
go to stores right here iii Port St. Joe and,
by judicious selection, be assured of getting
the same quality as that which a purchaser
in New York, San Francisco or Chicago gets?
Modern methods of manufacture and dis-
tribution have given you tnis advantage.
Your grandparents bought their candy,, their
soda crackers and their raisins in bulk,, from
a grocer who scooped the merchandise ont- of
bin or a barrel. In those days the etyir
could only hope that. he would get full.
measure-or perhaps extra measure. He'
could only hope that the goods he bought
would be pure-as high in quality one week
as the last.
But until business genius found a way to
package merchandise, and until business
pride and business foresight inspired the
marking of packages with dependable brands
the consumer could never be sure of uni-
formity in the weight or the quality of the
things he bought.
Today the manufacturer who places his
trademark on a pair of shoes, a bottled bev-
erage, or a can of peas, proclaims with pride,
"This is my product; I shall keep it good."
Then, if he is wise, this manufacturer will
advertise his trademark' to the nation, and
tell you, in your home-town newspaper,
where you can. secure his brand. And the
people in the New England states can buy
with confidence, and the people in Florida
can buy with confidence-sure of getting the
same value as the people in Idaho, in Ore-
gon or in California.

GAMBLING DEVICES ARE OUT
The good citizens of Port St. Joe should
indeed feel gratified that .the board of city
commissioners are doing everything in their
power to rid the city of gambling devices of
all sorts. And while their action to some
may seem a bit drastic, nevertheless it is all
for the good of the public in general, and we
feel sure that there/will be no hard feelings
on the part of anyone.
The publisher of The Star has always been
opposed to the operation of slot machines
and other gambling devices in public places,
and while we have occasionally dropped a
nickle or a dime into their insatiable maws,
we knew doggone well we would get noth-
ing in return, though, like other suckers, we
looked forward with anticipation to the
thought that maybe the machine would spew
forth the jackpot-even though we knew
the odlss. were approximately ten thousand
to one against it.
-Now, if the commissioners will repeal the
,iordiance pertaining to "games of skill," we
should have no further trouble with marble
Ii-ords or slot machines, for that ordinance
was the opening wedge for return of the
"pay-off" type of machines.

We saw the name of a woman the other
.day who .didn't listen to gossip--but it was
e,:hisled on a tombstone.

*" One of the reasons romance lasted longer
in the old days was that the bride looked
much the same after washing her face-Sa-
vr.:: "l: Nevs.


SUBTLE PROPAGANDA
We are in receipt of "Sanders Synopsis,"
(Vol. I, No. 1) published in Washington, D.
C., by Leslie Sanders, who recently lost his
job as editor of the National Young Demo-
crat because of his radical writings, we un-
derstand.
It ostensibly is a publication to fight the
Sait-cs of the little business men but, from
our close perusal of Sanders' brain child, we
.re led'to the conclusion that it is fighting
lte battles of big business in the name of
little business.
In this sheet, Mr. Sanders derides the Pep-
per landslide in F'orida as an indication of
popularity for the New Deal, pointing out
:that had the administration endorsed any of
Sthe candidates it would have been Sholtz,
SAnother article of subtle propaganda and
i: information is a diatribe purporting to
priwve that President Roosevelt is co-operat-
liing with LaFollette in organizing a third
party.
Apparently Mr. Sanders likes to eat with-
out performing manual labor and his "Synop-
sis" should bring him plenty of donations
from those who gather wealth while men in
legitimate business decay, for it has un-
stinted applause for everything reactionary,
and is thumbs down on every move for pro-
gressive government and national betterment.
We invite any of our readers to drop in
and look over this propaganda sheet.

HOME, SWEET HOME
He comes in and says: "Well,, how's every-
thing?" And she says the chimney cleaners
have just finished; that they left ai bill for
$17.50. She says something went wrong with
the plumbing, to( !, today. So she sent for a
plumber who got an, Dbstruction out of at pipe.
She says the tile man didn't come, and. it
doesn't look as if he'll ever come and the
hole will just go on staying there in the kit-
chen wall. She says Johnny's hay fever'
doesn't seem much better,, in spite of the in-
jections; and that Mary isn't feeling any too'
well an.d appears to be running a fever.
She says she's found moths in the upstairs'
closet and doesn't know how much damage
they have done during the summer, and that :
there is a great big grease spot on the rug. in
the front bedroom and nothing seems to take
it out. She says Mary dropped her wrist
watch and it stopped going and she is afraid
the main spring is broken, and that the dog
almost got run over by an automobile and it's
only.a matter of time if they don't break him
of the habit of chasing them, and that the
left back tire on the automobile looks low,
as if it had a slow leak.
She says she tried to burn a piece of the
new firewood and it's as green as it can be,
and he will be shocked at the prices she is
having to pay for the groceries, and that the
desk lamp is bent as if it had been knocked
off, and there is a short circuit in the electric
iron, and she wishes lie would look at it.
He says he is relieved to hear that every-
thing is normal. Hfe says when he first came
in he judged by the look on her face that
something had g-onie wrong.---laltimore Sutn.

INTERESTING INFORMATION
The Southern Forester says a pine sixteen
inches in diameter four and a half feet from
the ground, under average conditions in the
South, yields ten times as much lumber as
an eight-inch tree and twenty times the
value, since the lumber is of much higher
grade, and the second eight inches will re-
quire no more time for its growth than did
the first eight inches. Similarly the sikteen-
inch tree will yield five times as much pul)p-
wood as an eight-inch tree.
When full advantage is taken of the op-
portunities presented by nature and timber is
cut on a sound selection basis, there will be
a constant stand of trees on the land and na-
ture will take care of the job of planting newv
trees by natural reseeding.
The Forester thinks timber owners should
wake up to the greater annual revenue that
can be secured from a fully stocked forest
.hy light sel:-.;tiini cutting.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


While I do not give advice to
the lovelorn nor conduct a column
tor wayward, and erring girIs, I
received an epistle the' other day
that I thought wonldi be of inter-
est and help, fill tl i- e-l'hmn very
nicely and it might give
some of the young people' ot Pert
St. Joe a slant at themselves.
Here 'tis :'
"Dear Other FYellow:'
"I have been reading your col-
umn regularly, and' notice that
you seem to, know a lot about
everything, so I wonder if you
could: lielp me out a little.
"I' tihk I have aan inferiority
complex. Irdon'.t seem to get along
well with the boys and' I feel wor-
ried and nervous about my ap-
pearance when I'm out in com-
pany. T thilk I mm fairly good-
looking- and I know lots of the


boys do: too, but there
be something wrong.
help me' with a little of
dom?'


seems to
Can you
your wis-


"'H. V. R."
There's an opportunity for me
to get a swelled head, but I will
hasten to state that I don't know
everything for instance, Ein-
stein's tfreory of relativity is 'way
over my Ihead, but I can grasp the
general idea, and what a woman
will do under a given set of cir-
cumstances is something that I
cannot pl-edict. However, some
dlay, norhaps, I may solve these
cmIlIplex questions.
But to stop this rambling and
it dlown to the mra-ntr in hand.
. It's wise. H. V. R., not to
value ourselves too lightly nor to
'alae ourselves tco su':-onusly. Many
,r us have inroriority complexes.
lWe imangilo thlt we are blow par
in loo ks, int oligen"e, popularity.
-t., and our thinking that way
mann.lis it tnue. A person who is
'!i"vollS ;llaolt h1o' appearance or
"innr's. cannot 1)ossiblyl be at her
best. Even n beautiful girl will
lack the poise and assurance
necessary to suess.
On the other hand, even an or-
linarily nice-looking girl (as I am
sure you are, H.. V. R.) with the
last-named qualities and good
grooming, will be a charming per-
son.
Too much confidence in one's
good qualities, however, is just as
disastrous as too little. Nothing
is quite as disgusting as the men
or women who are so blatantly
sure of themselves. No matter
.- */**'


WASHINGTON

SNAPSHOTS
By JAMES PRESTON


The word "must" is again
plaguing the congress, and mem-
bers who had previously set June
1 as an adjournment deadline .are
now telling the folks b'a k" b6me,
not to expect them re-t-e...
middle of June. '':.
It was carefully plann-lJ 't.:
egy that brought the "must" pro-
gram back to the fore.i The stra-
tegists figured many weeks ago
that thie best way to get a doubt-
ful or objectionable measure thru
the congressional channel was to
hold it until the eleventh hour.
The theory, of course, is that mem-
bers anxious to get home for their
forthcoming election campaigns
would more quickly yield to the-
admrinistration's program.
Then, too, they figured that the
new spending scheme would give-
them a tool wita which to pry
some members out of the ranks
of the revolters, because when the,
spending starts nobody wants to
be left holding an empty bag.
Leaders are so confident now
that their strategy will work, they
have quietly set about to revive
the rejected government reorgani-
zation program. It is not yet of-
ficially on the "must" calendar
with the wage-hour and spending
measures, but wei; informed ob-
servers say it Nwill be soon.

The agriculture department is
having plenty of troubles of its
(Continued on page 6)

what subject is being discussed,
they always bring the subject
back to themselves. They com-
iare their acts ;aiini adventures to
those of everyone 'else, always to
their own advantage. The main
word in their voc:- uilary is "I'."
They tlink everybody is inter-
est d in their l'cast thought or

Many of us have a touch of ego
without realizing it. I
know I have. or I wouldn't Ibe try-
ing to give advice to a girl.
If we could only be natural and
human, what a pleasant plac- this
old sphere would be. If
none of-us ever felt embarrassed
or considered it, necessary to
make an impression, how much
nicer we would seem to others.
A good idea, it seems to me, is
that of keeling to the middle of
the course, taking ourselves seri-
ously enough. but not too much


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDAA


PAGE TWO







FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1938

MUST IMPROVE HIGHWAYS
TO HOLD TOURIST TRADE
If Florida is to hold her tourist
trade, she must begin making
plans for the improvement of her
highway systems. Public conveni-
nc and safetv demand mnrdern


two- and four-lane highways, and NEWS FROM SANTA
roads of this typL: must be con- St. Louis Republican, Mch
structed from the Georgia line
s6uth to Key West, from Lake Te i epenene
City to Miami via Tampa and the Expositor, of the 1st, not
Tamiami Trail. and from Jackson- arrival there of seven ge


ville to Pensacola via Port St.
Joe.

The Star does all types of Com-
mercial Printing. See us.



You're Next

There's No Waiting In

COOPER'S

BARBER SHOP

You're next for better service.
Expert attention without
waste of time




EYES EXAMINE


Glasses fitted when needed
Made in Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs-
day and Fridays

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
-Panama City Port St. Joe
In










PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County
----:-

BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


=1-- I .
SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT

The plant that furnishes
you ice the year 'round

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
'."T- Ki'boaTr., Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
r",-" Tr-ted Wpter


SFE
. 6. 1845
Missouri)
prices the
gentlemen


from Santa Fe, after a safe but
arduous journey across the plains,
via Bett's fort. They left New
Mexico early in January. The
news they bring is interesting to
the mercantile com;i:unity. Up to
the date of their departure every-
thing was quiet in New Mexico,
the civil and military commandant
of that province, Generall Mariano
Martinez, holding aloof from any
participation in the revolution, no
doubt waiting to declare for which
ever party (Santa .-na or the Con-
.:'csc) might obtain the upper
hand.
The only internal disturbance
teared in New ilexico was the
Yute Indians, in revenge for the
massacre of their head men at
Santa Fe in August last. The
whole province was kept in con-
stant alarm by their depredations
and they threatened an attack on
Santa Fe itself. They have taken
the fort of Antoine Robidonx, on
the Wintao, and killed the traders
-nb hands found in it.
Mr. Albert Speyre, who took out
twenty-five wagons from this
place in September last, suffered
from severe weather in Novem-
b.-r, between the Arkansas and
hie Ci-mrrone, during the continu-
:nce of which he lost one hundred
I.d fifty of his mules. He finally
rivedd in Santa Fe the latter end
of December.
The re was much rickness among
the co:::panies that went out last
summer. Two deaths occurred
'mo'. the Amer:-ais in Santa Fe
-Ja'm'es Peebly, residence not
"-ow:, who went out with Wethe-
nnd Keefer of Jackson coun-
'' wnt out with Dr. Con-


George C. Gibbs Is

Named As State

Attorney General

Former Duval Circuit Judge Ap-
pointed By Governor Cone To
Fill Land s' Office,

Govc :-or Fred P. Cone an-
:13~urccd Saturday that he had ap-
pointed George Coupar Gibbs, 59-
year-old Jacksonville attorney and
former circuit judge, as attorney
gSieral of Florida to succeed Cary
9. Landis, who d:ej last week af-
er -even years in the off.ce.
Core stated that Gibbs had ac-
cepted the appointment and would
be a candic'ate for election to the
office. He must run in a special
primary to be called by the state
Democratic executive committee
Sa meeting June 2 in Jackson-
lie. The nominee of this pri-
nary w::l be listed on the Novem-
)r- election ballot. If the Repub-
ican party wishes to present a
lom!nee. he also must be chosen
)y primary.
The attorney general of Florida
-a member of the state cabinet
:id most of the special boards its
Shicr-: co 14:ose. HIe is legal ad-
-;er to all constitutio-al state of-
.ci?'l an: has bra-d powers in
he ir'.?erpretation of laws which
ave ro. bCen tested in the courts.
--- --3------
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

in a, recent test with a ":-
hanical stenographer" p""ndirg
ie keys, a typewriter's spe-d ca-
acity proved 20 s:ro-;es a second.
he record with human fingers is
1 strokes 'er sCcond.


my i a:,xc viW-. it. F!r in-
SI a c Ne ,I'.j-l ::.ic.r : hccra",
xCi.L': ... Ulirl a coupic ( I,:ft dril-l'-


PAGE THREE


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clipping,. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


SOMETHING FISHY
A Scotchman decided to go into
the fish business, so he sent a
Jacksonville wholesale fish dealer
50 cents and wrote as follows: "I
am going into the fish business
and am enclosing you 50 cents.
?lease send me some mullet, a
few red bass, several mackerel
ind about a half dozen mixed
freshwater perch. If there is any
money left over. clip In a lobster
or two and make up the balance
with crabs."
The next day he received a re-
ply from the fish dealer which
said: "Too bad you didn't add an
extra dime. I would have sent
you a net and a trawler."-Florida
Times-Union.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Try Our Fountain Specials.


nelly. All the Americans in Santa
Fe were well.

NEW YORK LICENSE LAW
New York Daily Sun. Mch. 19, 1845
The bill respecting Licenses
winch has passed our Assembly
with scarcely any opposition, will
u.x'oubted;y pass the Senate. It
meets with hardly an objection
from any quarter.
By its provisions each Town or
City in the State is required to
..ol a Special Election on the
Tuesday preceding tne first Mon-
day in May, at which the electors
will vote on the simple question,
"License" or "No License." If
"No License" has a majority, then
there will be no Licenses granted
for one year at least, and until
another Election is demanded by
at least one-fourth of the Legal
Voters, and reverses the first de-
cision. If "License" prevails, then
Tavern Licenses to sell Liquors
are to be granted, much as at
present, only no charge is to be
made for a License. The People
are not to be briDed to legalize
the drunkard-making business. No
Grocers' Licenses to retail Liquors
are to be granted in any event.
If any sell without License,
whether Licenses are granted or
not, then the Overseers of the
Poor may prosecute and recover
the penalty. If they fail, any citi-
zen may prosecute, giving security
for costs and receiving half the
penalty ior his trouble.
Give us this law, and we shall
hape to shut off I.icenses even in
this grogs'hop-cursed: City. But
even if "License-- should prevail
here, the horrors and woes of the
drunk ard-making business would
inevitably be greatly diminished.
Friends of Temperance! urge up-
)- the Senate th- passage of this
'lI;. ane prepare to act under it.

Advertise that Special Sale. The
Star prints dodgers and circulars.


or v.aT' ri "'- -- r r'-
i d ey ciu r ; c ai .. in
(e :n-.cn-m ; -" r, ;' i (.;-'. L.ecl..;.y
is your lcast *-:;P .:.:.; < -cr ::.;.


F !a LAaI P We" '! i-i A


THE. STAR, PORT ST.. JOE, FLORIDA


CLOSES STORES FOR
NON-PAYMENT. TAXES

Deputy sheriffs, led by State
Comptroller J. M. Lee, this week
closed the Shadowlawn grocery in
Miami for non-payment of $300 in
taxes. The action carried out Lee's
threat to close 100 stores if neces-
sary to collect delinquent taxes
estimated at over $100,000 in the
Miami area.
------Xk------
TO CELEBRATE OPENING OF
OVER-SEAS ROAD JULY 4TH
Key West will celebrate the
opening of her new Over-Seas
Highway with a monster celebra-
tion on July 4th. An all-day pro-
gram is being arranged and the
event will be publicized through-
out the country.


A Lucky Purchase

.-_ of high grade Bond Paper at a
close-out price enables us for a
short time to offer business men
of Port St. Joe

500 LETTERHEADS $ 75
for ...3

1000 LETTERHEADS $ 25
for ... .... 5

We have been getting $6.50 per
thousand for this same grade of
paper. This is a superior
Bond Paper of 20-pound weight,
nationally advertised, and when
our stock on hand is used (we
have sufficient to print 30,000
letterheads) we will not be able
ito continue this price.

ENVELOPES TO MATCH
; 500 for $4.00 1000 for $5.25


C11119~81~88WrCI-- -~a~ss ---as ----- --rarra~ c_ ,


T"HE STAR

("Yaur Honne-Town Newspaper" Port St. Joe, Fla.








PAGE FOUR THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FRIDAY., MAY 20, 1938


MRS. BAGGETT HOSTESS TO
MISSIONARY SOCIETY
Mrs. J. 0. Baggett was hostess
to Circle 1 of th'e Baptist W. M.
U. at her home Monday after-
noon. Mrs. Holliday was in charge
of the devotional. A short busi-
ness session was held after which
the meeting was turned over to
Mrs. Baggett for Bible study.
During the -ocial hour Carolyn
Baggitt and Betty Jo Lane served
refreshmennts to the members.
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Lin'e of Magazines.
,T. I :elly and .T. 3:organ of
WVewahitch:ka were unsinless visi-
tors in the city ':atu'day.


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS'
AUXILIARY MEETS
The Lottie Moon Chapter of the
Cirls' Auxiliary of the Baptist
church met last Friday afternoon
at the church. The topic was
"More Missionaries for Japan,"
i'd iinter'esiing talks were given
iby u:''inber-.. Betty .lo .....:i
w.s ; chlomcd as a new inember
a;.d hr'. ,I;;chcll, a visitor, gave


Rev. anid Mrs. J. W. Sisemore A'.::;. meet
retunri ed Tuesda'y from Richmond, ill a'j nd r
Va.. where ihey attended the u h 3
Southern Eaptist convention. neti a


EXTRA p
E i

SPECIAL
S 4




S REI
RES

DYI
ALL
CROQUINOLE WAVES we hav
machinery
Regular 41 can give
Regular 95 o vo
$3.00 $ 9 and las
-:- SHOE
WITH EACH $1 FACIAL WHILE
A FREE ARCH
:- REASON

CRAWFORD'S
BEAUTY SHOPPE LE
Under Management of
Mrs. Belle Land SHC
Licensed Operator AUSTINI
MISS GOLDA BOWLING Port St.
_, ^ . ib~aeas aaass a~


he duties of the G. A.
r in will be at Beacon
embers will leave the
:30 p. m. today.


MODELING
STORING
PAIRING
BEING
just installed new
in order that we
you perfect work
ting satisfaction.
S REPAIRED
E YOU WAIT


NABLE PRICES



ADER

)E SHOP
I HUGGINS, Mgr.
loe Florida


~B~fP~ C~~Bi~i~Ri~ 'q


Bank By Mail


Ss and ts C-m-snietat


- '-.


Y
OU will find this one of the many
services of the VcWwahitchka State Bank
that makes banking here so pleasant and
easy. If you are going on your vacation,
or if you find it inconvenient to use our
regular banking facilities, come in today
and let us explain how easy to use and
convenient this service is. WVe will be glad
to help you determine if our Bank by Mail
service fits your individual requirements.


This
Able
Your,


B:'nk Is Eager and
to Help You Wilth All
Financial Problems!


W e\ \/d*h-LChkl S-tate Bank
"A Cc'ullyT, Ican-isac7k'
WIVEWAHi T C..IKA., FLORIDA

Meyrrnbr: Federal DepositLInsur'ance
Cacroration


,^'l ;\lU Y iA S iI v 1I
Circle 2 of the Baptist Woman's
\Vissionary Union met Monday at
h'a church with Mrs. Mitchell as
hostess and Mrs. Daughtry in
charge of the program.
Next meeting will be a ,Royal
servicee meeting at the church.


New Spring Styles


-N

TO GO
NEW S]
Be sure t
will matel
t.iie fine d
hats
mrod rn sh
Princes
This far
complete
and wav
$3

PRI
BEAL
PHONE 55


SWI
PRIN
hat ye
h and
details
c
iop.
ss Pek
nous
e with
ve set.
to


TY
"TY


FH THE
G HATS!
our coiffure
accentuate
of the new
ome to a

rmanent
special is
shampoo

$6.50

SESS
SHOP
Port St. Joe


Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bernal and
Ben Alsobrook spent the week-end
in Tallahassee.

Additional Society on Page 8


$1


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETIES IN MEETING
The Missionary societies of the
Methodist church met in a joint
mcetinsg Monday afternoon at the
cinuch with the Young Matrons
circie in charge of the program.
Prior to the program, a short busi-
ness session was held.
The following program was pre-
sented under tile direction of Mrs.
Charlie Brown: "Sixty Years In
'hina," by Mrs. Purvis Howell;
,uet by Mrs. Ratph Swatts and
\Mrs. Omar Branch. Brief talks
were given by Mrs. Swatts, Mrs.
Temple and Mrs. DeBus. Devo-
tional was led by Mrs. Lupton,
followed with prayer by Mrs. Roy
Gibson. Mrs. Stewart of Birming-
ham gave an interesting talk on
the general conference to be held
in Birmingham.
'The inexs meeting of the Young
Matrons Circle will be held Mon-
day at the home of Mrs. Max Kil-
bourn. with Mrs. O)mar Branch as
hostess.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. LEWIS
Mrs. E. C. Lewis was hostess to
the Wednesday Night Bridge club
this week at her home on Garri-
son avenue. Adding to the at-
tractiveness of the living room
were vases o, spring flowers.
Three tables were placed for
bridge and after three progres-
sions scores were tallied and high
prize presented to Mr. J. Gloek-
ler and second high to Mrs. T.
Owens. Refreshments of pie and
coffee were served to eleven mem-
bers and Mrs. Charlie Brown, a
guest.
MRS. HOWELL HOSTESS TO
LEGION AUXILIARY
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
American Legion met Monday eve-
ning at the home of Mrs. W. H.
Howell for the purpose of making
plans for Poppy Day, also to or-
ganize a Junior Auxiliary for the.
daughters of Legion members.
Mrs. Roy Gibson was appointed
rehabilitation chairman at this
meeting. The hostess served,
eco ities and iced drinks to mem-
bers present.
WEDNESDAY SEWING CLUB
HAS ENJOYABLE MEETING
Mrs. J. Spivey was hostess to
the Wednesday Sewing club at
'-:honme on Eighth street this
-veek. Contests were enjoyed af-
-whic: prizes were presented
`',- Rn' Collins and Mrs. W.
S. Smith. Cake and ice cream
were served to Mesdames P. J. !
TFarmer. W. M. Howell. H. Cain,
D. C. Smith, T. Jones and W. S.
cmith and guests, Mrs. Collins,
Miss Sara Kelly and Miss Ruth
C'l]lin s
BAPTIST W. M. U- MEETS
r' Mks. r A V AT CHURCH


- $1.50


All Col:ar Styles!
Checks! Stripes! Solids!
Broadcloth! Madras!


New Spring Ties at
Various Prices


Stock your Spring wardrobe
NOW at this special sale!
Not only will you save money
-you'll have a much wider
selection of advance styles to
choose from!



SHIRTS and SHORTS


25c and 35c
Plain and patterned
Broadc oth, fu:l cut.


Owens & Murdock
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MRS HOWELL ENTERTAINS
SEWING CLUB
Mrs. W. M. Howell entertained
the members of her sewing club
last Friday at her home on Eighth
street. Bridge and bingo were
played and after scores were tal-
lied prizes were presented to Mrs.
W. S. Smith, high for bridge, and
console tion to Mrs. P. J. Farmer,
and for bingo, high to Mis. H.
Cain and consolation to Mrs. D. C.
Smith. Delicious refreshments were
served to Mrs. H. Cain, Mrs. D.
C. Smith, Mrs. W. S. Smith, Mrs.
P. J. Farmer, Mrs. G. T. Boswell,
Mrs. Sam Davis, Mrs. T. Jones,
and guests. Miss Sara K'elly of
D,1w:;n, Ca.. and Miss Mary Edna
Everett of Malone.
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

BENEFIT CARD PARTY
NEXT WEDNESDAY
A benefit card party will be
held next Wednesday, May 25, at
the home of Mrs. Nick Comforter
by the ladies of the Auxiliary of
St. James Mission for the benefit
of the 'Episcopal church.
A cordial invitation is extended
everyone to attend.


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready For Every House In

Port St. Joe

COOK I N G WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
o----- -
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

-4{ A full line of gas appliancesin stock j.-


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932






i SALE FOR MEN


NEW SHIRTS


I


ANNOUNCING---

Opening of a


DENTAL


OFFICE

IN PORT ST. JOE,

On or about May 23rd.
To be located in the new
Costin Building.





DR. J. C. COE


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


Iwcl~rmrrr,~l~ws,,mc~,~


. - I I I I '-- # ** *t .W R., 14* rtjftA rdAA





THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1938


'PAGE FOUR


I


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


I


i


i





PAGE FIVE


. FRDA, MA 20 1 TE TRPR TJDL'R


Saturday, May 21

Is POPPY DAY




Once more Poppy Day comes to Port

St. Joe, and once more we pay our re-

spects to the living heroes who are in

need of your generous help. Let us not

forget them. Your contribution

will aid in maintaining hospitalization

care and medical treatments. Let's all

remember to give tomorrow!


This ad sponsored by the following business men on behalf of the
Gulf County American Legion Auxiliary:


LeHARDY'S PHARMACY
LITTLE'S SERVICE STATION
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
GU,.F HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.
MILES 5-10-25c STORE
PETERS CASH & CARRY
CRAWFORD'S BEAUTY SHOP


BLACK CAT CAFE
QUALITY GROCERY & MARKET
KERR JEWELRY COMPANY
ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE
STATION
.ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
REINERTSON & HALEY


DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
COSTIMNS DEPARTMENT STORE
PORT ST. JOE ELECTRIC CO.
TRIANGLE CAFE
DAD'S GRILL
PARKER'S BARBER SHOP


~~qa


Os~isaar~a~~4s~x~ L9~IF ,, 9I q I J


THE STAR, PORT ST. JDEr, 'FL!G)RI-aA


FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1933


k 0

PPU








PAGE SIX
T*rn


FRIDAY.. MvAY' n3 1 '


Surplus Fish

Purchasing Act

Gets Approval

B'II Provides Purchasing of Fish
For Distribution To Re-
lief Clients

A bill authorizing $2,000,000 for
immediate purchase of surplus
fish for distribution to relief cli-
ents, introduced by Senator Claude
Pepper, has been favorably re-
ported on by the merchant marine
and fisheries committee of .con-
gress.
The bill, introduced with the
aim of relief for both relief cli-
ents and the fishing industry of
the Northwest Florida Gulf coast,
was sponsored in :ne senate by
Senator Pepper. worRing together
with Congressman Mi;lard Cald-
well.
The bill authorizes the federal
surplus commodiLtes division to
purchase fish as well as other
commodities, and is aimed to
stimulate the fishing industry dur-
ing the seasons in which produc-
tion exceeds consumption.
Authorization of the fund for
the purchase of surplus fish will
mean much to the fishing indus-
try in Northwest Florida.
_____^_____
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Complete Line of Magazines.


Zinnia Is a
Bold Beauty


The zinnia of today is a bold
beauty and a striking improve-
ment over its ancestors.
Many new forms as well as new
colors and color combinations
have been developed by scientific
planitsien. Zinnias like warm
weather and the seed must be
sov,-n in warm soil. If the soil is
cold they may decay and never
ger'iin.ata. If you sow:the seeds
of zinnias in the open ground
where the plants are to remain,
you will have early flowers, and
sturdy plants.
Sow the 'seeds about /2 inch
deep. Plants should be evenly
spaced a foot to 18 inches apart,
but may be sown more thickly
and the extra plants moved to
some other location. Firm soil
over the seeds and in dry weather
keep the ground moist until the
plants emerge; this should be
only a few days in warm weather.
When the plants are 'growing
vigorously they are likely to
bloom best if not watered too
frequently. As the florists' say
"keep them on the dry side," but
this does not mean they should.
rot be watered thoroughly during
drought periods.
The dahlia-flowered types are
perhaps most popular. The flow-
ers of these are of enormous size,
up to 6 inches in diameter. The
metals are slightly cupped and
Ihe stems are long with attrac-
tive foliage.
The California giants are other
tall ones. They are excellent for
planting in back of the dwarf and
miniature zinnias, which grow
into bushy border plants with
hundreds of blossoms.
There is no more satisfactory
fower for garden and for cutting
than the zinnia, and for mass
ranting they are unrivaled. They
--- easily grown, bloom quickly
o--m ccad. and can be kept free
nests with an occasional ic::~
in

The first regular commercial
ship to be equipped with radio
was .the Kaiser Wilhelm der
C;o t., ic 1900.


TRADE IN


HIGHLAND

OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT!


LVIEW FISH DEALERS TO PAY
ISLAND VIEW LESS TO FISHERMEN

SECTION IS week, fish dealers of Northwest
Florida agreed to pay fishermen
COlMING TO FORE three cents a pound for grouper
CIOlMNli.G TO FORE and seven cents for snapper until
further notice. This is a half-cent
Many Homes and New Businesses reduction over what they have
Being E.tablished Irt been paying.
Suburb One dealer said there might be
some sit-down strikes, but ad-
The Highland View section, one miutted it didn't bother him par-
-n'li west of Port St. Joe, is ticularly because of the present
rapidly taking on all the marks of "demoralized market."
i thriving communmy. New homes Dealers discussed plans for co-
eo up each day, and hardly a operative selling, for the building
veek passes but some new busi- of freezing plants to absorb sur-
less enterprise opens there, plus supplies, and a tax on the in-
Land is cheap in, this suburb dustry, supplemented by state and
ind as a consequence rentals are government funds, for an adver-
low. Bearing these factors In tisig campaign to increase the
nind, the business men of High- consumption of all seafoods.
'and View are able to offer their ____
-erchandise at a considerable WASHINGTON SNAPSHOTS
-aving to their customers. (Continued from page 2)
The St. Joe Lumber Company own with the corn-belt farmers
has their large warehouse located and the cotton farmers of the
"ere and also own a number of South over crop allotments. When
ots which they offer at very rea- quotas for crops are announced in
sonable prices and allow the pur- various communitIes, it has be-
'hascrs liberal payment terms, come a sure-fire signal for an in-
not only on lots, but on lumber dignant meeting of protest, and
or the construction of homes., ome farmers arc even mailing
i'his concern has had a great deal their contracts back.
-o do with the rapid growth of In the corn belt the protest is
Highland View. taking organized rorm in the
C. C. Williams has under con- "Corn Belt Liberty League." Now
-truction at the present time a the department is beginning to
skating rink here. It is built out worry about what the wheat farm-
over the water and will offer a ers are going to sat- about soil
greatly needed recreational center conservation payments when they
when completed. 'omnr due. It seems that most of
There are a number of filling i e wheat growers had the:r grair
stations. a garage, several fish planted before the farm act o'


houses three grocery stores, a
modernn barber shop, an up-to-date
,fe. a bar and hillard parlor and,
s veral other business establish-
"ients in operation here, with the
):'omlise of more to come.
Highland View has everything
'o ofFer the home seeker-a beau-
-.ifu location surrounded with
pires on the shores of St. Joseph's
Bay, cool sea breezes during the
"ot summer days and a beach
nearby for recreation.

B' IND, HE KEEPS BOOKS
WV. C. Smith. blind, operates a
"ieral merchandise store in Cal-
oun, Ala. He waits on the trade
cd 'cpCn his own books.



Phelps Grocery
S C. A. PHELPS
Co 0 wManager
HIGHLAND VIEW
Cheapest Grocery Prices In
Gulf' County
The More Business We Do,
the Less It Costs You

We Have No Specials-
These Are Regular Pricer.s

BRIAR PIPE
50c seller ..... 3 5 c
and we give you two 10c
packages of Tobacco

Prince Albert, can........10c
SUGAR- 4
10 pounds ... 4
Matches, 3 lg. boxes ....10c
Best grade Water 98c
Ground Meal, peck j
Pearl Grits. 1 lb. pkg.....8c
All-Good PEACHES 1
No. 2/2 can ........-...

These are just a few of oixr
prices. Come in
and -see the rect


li':. granting; payments mor soil
c,'.-crvation, wsaa: -.pproved. They I
t ,.i they could plant al' they


ONE MILE WEST OF PORT ST. JOE





D VIEW

PRICES CONSISTENTLY LOWER!


nIIIIOl:I C bU 111 Ctllll lUACY y lOl" (C ,-
:!:announced niscandidacy f most of tori rmchair-
::.i to. Now most of hi arm- man of the committee to succeed
>:tvC lorg.- \, 1at "c" ,O conr-
Sh:ave r \,heat co 'e late am -s B. Hodges.
'us up and will have trouble quali-
:','!n: fo" the "scarcity checks" '
fo th "scarcity checks" Send The Star to a friend.
unless they plow under part of
their crop.


Members in th'e house noticed
a h wcomer sitting on the house
fioor one day recently. He was
absorbed in the debate. Members
assumed, after whispering among
themselves, that he was a former
member. Oire legislator, however,
asked the doorkeeper to identify
him. He didn't know him, so they
diplomatically asked the stranger
if he had the privilege of the
floor.
"Oh, no." he said, "iry name's
Plunkett, and I'm just looking
around."
So to a visiting stranger who
will so into the records simply as
"Mr. Plunkett," goes the distinc-
tion of being the only sight-seer
ever to have sat in congress, even
for a few minutes.
---^---+-----
FISHING FLEET TO USE
BIRDS AS MESSENGERS
T. J. Bodiford, Panama City
fisherman, is training carrier
pigeons to be used by his boatmen
who ply the Gulf waters, some as
far out as 150 miles. He said the
birds will be released at sea when
there is need of speedy communi-
cation with the shore office.
In cases of accident, death, ill-
ness or other emergencies, the
pigeons will bring the information
ashore and communication will be
established more quickly.
Bodiford said he believes he is
the first commercial fisherman in
the United States to employ car-
rier pigeons in his business.
-------S---
Do you need Letterheads and
Envelopes? Let The Star print
them.


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHEPE BUSINESS IS BRIS'< YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND
FRESH GROCERIES

MILK 4 Small 1 TOMATOES- 24
or 2 Large ...... 6 cans for ............


Sugar Henderson's
|Silugar Granulated l 28c


K :I Kwick Mosquito Lr-"' White 9)
Spray; 75c size..... 0 ,TOILET SOAP, 6 for
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 24c SPAGHETTI, 3 for ...... 9c
FIELD CORN, 3 cans 24c LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs.....13c
COOKING OIL, gal.....85c Milnut Milk, 3 large ....23c
MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c Prince Albert Tob, 3 for 28c

Nice large New Po- Best Grade White 580
tatces, 4c lb.; 10 Ibs. t)5 i Ring Flour, 12 Ibs.

Golden Brand Oleo, 2 Ib 25c Wilson's Sliced 95
Choice West. Steak, lb 35c Breakfast Bacon, lb...
Oil Sausage, gal ...........95c Oleomargarine, lb ........15c
We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT


BAY SHORE GROCER Y
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


I


I


I


THE STAR, PdRT~ ST. JOE, FLORIDA


:1


C. C. WILLIAMS

INTERESTED IN

VARIOUS LINES

Operates Grocery and Filling Sta-
tion. Has Cottages, and Is
Erecting Skating Rink

C. C. Williams, a long-time resi-
dent of Port St. Joe, was one of
the pioneers in opening up High-
land View and has played a most
important part in the -growth of
this locality.
Mr. Williams operates the High-
land View Grocery and filling sta-
tion, and in addition has for rent
a number of cottages and now has
under construction a skating rink
across the highway from his store.
The Highland View Grocery
stocks not only a complete line of
groceries and fresh meats, but'
handles hardware, toDacco, candy,
notions and dry goocs. It is more
or less unusual in these days to
find a business that is capable of
handling such a diversified line of
merchandise as does Mr. Wil-
liams. and it speaks well of his
management in the respect that
he must know how, when and
where to buy-and he sells at
prices that mean savings to his
many customers.

-CHATTAHOOCHEE MAN
WOULD HEAD DEMOCRATS
Risdon L. Boykin, Chattahoo-
'hee attorney, who was elected.
ladsden county's member of the
state Democratic executive com-
mittee in the May 3 primary, has
dii.^...^ flU~ diiCt' i a a i m ay tt ns.m ^r.^


GULF COUNTY HAS 36
LICENSED RESTAURANTS
Gulf county has a total of 36
restaurants licensed by the state
hotel commission to do business,
according to records of the com-
mission. These restaurants have a
total capacity of 654 chairs or
seats.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
------C----
The total production of gasoline
Ior 1900 would last a little over
an hour today.


We Carry a
Complete Stock of

GROCERIES '

and MEATS

Everything In Our
Store Is
PRICED TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE



Let Us Supply Your
Grocery Needs At
Prices Well Within
Your Budget


GASOLINE and
OIL




HIGHLAND VIEWi

GROCERY

C. C. WILLIAMS, Prop.








M A R


ECLECTIC
24-HOUR SERVICES
Phor~e 28 Port St. Joe
a![ us any hour of the day
:night for
ELECTRIC REPAIRING


PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitakev,




CIT'Y PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


CHILD LABOR

LAW RULING

BY CHAPMAN

JUSTICE EXPLAINS DECISION
IN SUPREME COURT
DAMAGE SUIT

Florida's child labor law is
equally binding on the child, the
parents and the employer, and the
intentions or desires of none of
the parties can modify the statute,
according to a recent ruling by
Justice Roy H. Chapman of the
state supreme court.
The court's five other members
agreed with Justice Chapman in
sustaining a $3,550 damage award
to the parents of a boy under the
age of 16 who was killed while
working in a Tampa shipyard.
Justice Chapman cited judicial
precedent that the employer of a
child is guilty of negligence solely
"by permitting or suffering the
child to work in violation of posi-
tive inhibition of the statute."
"The legislature intended
to prevent the employment of chil-
dren. It had as its objective thi
protection from then: existing
abuses. The legislature had a right
to enact such a law," the justice
ruled.
"The violation of the statute
gave rise to a cause of action. The
responsibility rests on all to see
that the spirit and letter of the
act is observed and kept."'
Attorneys for tne shipyard, itl
their appeal to the high court, had
contested admitting as evidence a
Bible bearing the date of the boy's
birth, and had argued that the
$3.550 damage award was exces-
sive.
Justice Chapman held that all
evidence relating to the boy's age
was a question for the trial jury.
"'Ve fail to see error in tie ad-
mission of the Bible as evidence,"
Ire declared.
in regard to the amount of
d:m-ages awarded, he cited a state
law which "authorized a recovery
by the father for the loss to him
of his child's services during the
child's minority, also for the pain
and suffering of the parents. He
showed that sums up to $12,500
have been sustained in similar
cases in the past.

CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
------_--4-
SIMONE SIMON, PAUL PAUL
TLatest rival for- name honors
held by Simone Simon is Paul
Paul, director of the Fresno, Cal.,.
-: lnilioial band.


Huge Federal Aid

Highway Bill Is

Passed By House

Calls For $238,000,000 From Taxes
On Gasoline, Oils, Tires, Au-
tomobiles and Accessories


Congressman Millard Caldwell
ivrites from Washington that a
bill providing $238,000,000 for next
year for federal highway aid was
passed by the, house and will
likely become a law at this ses-
sion.
This bill provides $125,000,000
for regular federal. aid; $25,000,000
for secondary or feeder roads;
$50,000,000 for elimination of grade
crossings; $14,000,000 for forest
highways. roads -a.:i trails; $2,-
500,000 for public lands highways;
$7,500,000 for national park roads
and trails; $10,000,000 for national
parkways; $4,000,000 for Indian
reservation roatf. The bill au-
thorizes $8,000,000 to assist the
states in the repair and restora-
tion of roads ana bridges dam-
aged by floods or other catas-
trophes.
The government collects an-
nually more than $350,000,000 in
special takes on gasoline, lubri-
cating oils, tires and inner tubes,
automobiles fid motorcycles, au-
to accessories and trucks. The
amount alppro'priated for roads for
the next year is not as much as
the amount collected from the fed-
eral road: s'ers.
Prdgre:E In West Florida
West Florida is faring well in
legislation now be:ng considered
in congress, Congressman Cald-
well further states. Its farmers
are going to have the benefit of a
new farmers' ma:,:eL news serv-
ice if a house provision is finally
agreed upon. The house is also
providing for additional rural elec-
trification.
The St. Marks river project and
the Carrabelle harbor project were
both definitely provided I'or by the
house committee on appropria-
tions, and it looks like money will
be provided' for the construction
of the Apalachicola-St. Marks
river canal.

MINT APPEARS AS JAIL


Any building with bars on the
windows looks like a jail to Wal-
ter T. Weaver, 18, of Waterman,
Calif. Noticing bars on the win-
dows, of, the U. S. minit in Denver,
Colo., the youth w'alked- in and
"surrendered" as a parole violator.
"I thought it was a jail," he apolo-
gized. "'I saw bars on the win-
dows."
; *- .- .i<-


h
n


h
n


sc


VERY POOR SERVICE 'ORANGE BOX DERBIES' GIVE
Woman at Postoffice: "Look PUBLICITY TO THIS STATE
.ere, Mr. Drake, you must have The staging of Florida "Orange
lade a mistake. My husband Box Derbies" by the Florida Wa-
rent to Chipley to spend the terways Congress will go far to-
reek-end with his brother, and ward interesting the youth of the
ere I get a letter from him post- state in the development of Flor-
larked Tampa." ida's waterways, and should serve
to give much valuable publicity
The Star is $2 per year--sub- to this state's advantages as a
cribe now! "yachtsman's paradise."


OFFICIAL PRIMARY RETURNS

SHOW 415,293 VOTES CAST


Returns from all precincts in S. Matthews, 135,286; Bruce Da-
the state to the state canvassing vis, 84,575; W. E. (Buck) Han-
board at Tallahassee show that cock, 67,934.
Florida Democrats cast 415,293 Rairoad Commission-Jerry W.
votes in the May 3 primary-87,- Carter, 194,070; Wilbur C. King,
000 more than the state's previous 60,220; Walter Kehoe, 58,912.
record set in June, 1936. S.tte Attorney, Fourteenth Cir-
The official returns follow:' cuit-L. D. McRae, 9,587; John H.
United States Senator--Claude Carter, Jr., 9,109; John C. Wynn,
Pepper. 242,350; J. Mark Wilcox, 6,965.
110,675; Dave Sholtz, 52,785; Fin- Results in the only state-wide
ley Moore, 5,417; ,r. C. Merchant, RCpu'-':icn contest:
4.066. Uri'ed States enate-Thomas
Congress, Thira District Mil- E. Swanson, 5,195; Allen E:
lard Caldwell, 46,789; Parkhill Walker, 3.492.
Tays, 23,537, The figures iuncated run-offs
would be necessary in 'the follow.
Supreme Court-Justice Rivers ig races:
Buford, 170,135; D. Stuart Gillis. Supreme Court Thomas and
112,455. Watson.
Supreme Court-J. Tom Watson, Four,eenth Circ::!t State Attor-
96,064; Elwyn A. 4iiomas, 109,875; ne/-McRae and Carter.
Truman G. Futch. 75,074., Bruce Davis had enough first
Supreme Court-Justice Roy H. p"'mary votes to enter a run-off
Chapman, 191,497; John Melvin with Eugene Matthews in the rail-
Heari, .58,491. road commission contest, but with-
Railroad Commission Eugene drew due to lack of funds.


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


We Invite You
to enjoy the Friendly, Refined Atmosphere of Port St.
Joe's Finest Bar and Billiard Parlor
-..{ Our Cocktails Are Mixed By Experts }j -

St. Joe Bar and Billiard Parlor
ED. GEORGE, Manager
.,,,,,,,,~----~L---


Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET' US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS

We Buid Anything


H.BTAYLOR

gW-g Our Work Speaks for Itself
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe


- -- -- ----



iveuen'UR



Family a Home





Subdivision.


SNow prospective home owners with modest budget'
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means.



,$50 down-$25 month

W-H PIY PA AY R E N T
When you have'paidl rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts.: '
itYo~u caAh pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent....

INVESTIGATE! LET US SHOW YOU!



COTTAGES FOR RENT





.DerconHill



Development Company

J. S. PATRICK BEACON HILL, FLA.


-------------------------

WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. W HORTON


:iGULF. VIEW


SWe Carry the Best Lines of
WYNES and BEERS 4
34J









Con;re Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please 'Use 'No Profanity
Wt E. LAWRENCE

7Miles 'Du on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent


"' "'"


2b, mn


(AGE SEVEN


T6HE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


ALL WORK -
GUARANTEED
WE. CALL FOR and DELIVER


In Reaf of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT T. JOE, FLA.




c W NW"-T-- -- --
l m


Yet Sol-oron's millk costs
no more than others..
Let your family enjoy
some tcday.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMVON'&'

Dairy

Pro du cts


4
<
4
<


<






PAGE EIGHT


Mesdames John Marshall, Sam Miss Myrtle Cronin Marks of
\!o,-:.omery, Eleanor Floyd and Apalachicola spent Tuesday in
the city with Mrs. J. Glorkler.
Annue Ryan Marks of Apalachi- the ct with Mrs J. Gl er
cc 2 attended the Woman's Club.
luncheon Wednesday at Beacon Advertise that Special Sale. The
-ii. i Star prints dodgers and circulars.


. and


SKeep



SHealthy



Don't let yourself become soft due to lack of
proper exercise.
BOWL AND BE HEALTHY!
Come in today and make your bid for the
WEEKLY HIGH SCORE 1.
PRIZE OF $ 1


MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT

CORNELISON'S BOWLING ALLEY


PORT ST. JOE


ELECTR


FLORIDA


C


NEW RATE


First 50 KWH
Next 150 KWH


used per month @ 10c per KWH
used per month @ 9c per KWH


Next 800 KWH used per month @ 8c per KWH
Next 4000 KWH used per month @ 5c per KWH
All excess used per month @ 2c per KWH

Monthly Minimum-$1.50


TH'E STAR,. PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Walter Mattier of Boston, Mass.,
Mrs. W. I. Mattier, Mrs. R. G.
Bradford and children of Carra-
bc;le were the guests Tuesday of
Mrs. Omar Branch.
CARVER DRUG COMPANY
Registered Pharmacists
Mary Charlotte Farmer of Co-
lumbia is visiting her father, Dan
G. Farmer, during the summer
months.
(Paid Political Advertisement)

Notice To Voters

Mr. S. P. Husband,
Chairman. Board of County
Commissioners, Gulf County,
Wewahitchka, Fla.
Dear Mr. Husband:
This is your information to
quote me directly that no persons,
other than Mr. R. E. Hartman and
myself are authorized to promise
employment to anyone for the St.
Joe Paper Company, St. Joseph
Land & Development Company,
Apalachicola Northern Railroad
Company or any of the afifiated
companies and anyone making
such a promise has made a gross
misrepresentation.
None of these companies have
in anywise promised or inferred a
promise to any candidate for po-
litical office in this county that
we would give jobs, nor the prom-
ise of jobs for favorable votes.
Yours very truly,
G. P. WOOD.


RATE


L:


OLD RATE

First 100 KWH used per month: @ 11c per KWH
Next 100 KWH used per montn @ 0lc-per KWH
Next 100 KWH used per- month ( 9c perKWH
Next 200 KWH used per month @ 8c per KWH
All excess used per month @ 6c per KWH

Monthly Minimum--$.50


-.--------------- --------

Let Us Service YOUR Car Today
For economical and efficient opera-
ttion- of your car, let us thoroughly
service it with our modern equipment
WASHING-
-POLISHING--
-GREASING
Texaco Products

ST JOE TEXACO STATION
WILBUR WELLS, Mgr. PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
^ ----^ ^^ -- -- ------- - ----- ---- --
rTr---.-~-.----T~---,------------------

M ETERED 0



Gas Service

ENJOY GAS ADVANTAGES, METERED JUST
LIKE NATURAL GAS-YOU PAY ONLY
FOR WHAT YOU USE, AFTER
YOU HAVE USED IT



Low Cost Operation


Trade-in allowances will be made until June 1st.
Convenient terms on the balance.




ST. JOE GAS CO.
A. M. MITCHELL, Representative


Bargain Furniture Co.


New Costin Bldg.


NEW FHA LOANS
Under the revised Federal Housing Act we are now in
position to make the following type Loans
under Title I of this Act:
CLASS I LOANS
Section A: For repairing and remodeling of residences,
s'.res, etc., at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in cost from
$100 to $2,500.
Section B: For repairs and remodeling of commercial and
industrial property at 5 per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in
cost from $2,500 to $10,000.
CLASS II LOANS
For the construction of new stores, garages, filling stations,,
roadside stands, barns, tourist cabins. beach cottages, etc., at 5
per cent from 1 to 5 years, ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
CLASS III LOANS
For the construction of new residences or part residences and
part store building at 3'/2 per cent interest from 1 to 5 years,
ranging in cost from $100 to $2,500.
LOANS MADE ON ANNUAL PAYMENTS BASIS TO FARMERS
---------------

Build---Repair---Remodel
See Us If You Want ACTION!



ST. JOE LUMBER CO.
PHONE 69 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


REDUCED


Commercial Lighting Rate Lowered


The Commercial Lighting Rate in Port St. Joe and:
Apalachicola has been reduced, as shown in the new
schedule given below, effective with current consumed
after May 21, 1938. This reduction is in line with the
Company's policy of lowering rates as rapidly as possible
based on local conditions such as growth and normal
expansion of facilities.



COMMERCIAL LIGHTING


This new commercial lighting rate opens an opportunity for lbcali business
establishments tto take advantage of additional store lighting for sales
,building.




FLORIDA PO ER

CORPORATION

J. P. COOMBS, Manager, Western Divisionm

=---r~ar II- III~ p~I


CARD OF THANKS
We want to thank our many
friends for their te'eds of kind-
ness and the beautiful floral offer-
ings in the death of our wife,
mother and grandmother, Mrs.
Frank McFarland.
Frank McFarland, Mr. and
Mrs. D. E. Cumbie, Mr. and
Mrs. Feta McFarland and
children, Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Maddox and son David, Mrs.
Viola Wimberly, Perry Mc-
Farland, Mrs. Ethel Bridges,
Mr. and Mrs. Everett Mc-
Farland and children, Mr.
and Mrs. Earl McFarland.
Read the ads-it pays!


FRIDAY., MAY 20, 1938

IMBIBERS REALLY SEE SNAKE
Bibulous participants in a re-
cent rodeo at Salinas, Calif., had
reached a point where when a
snake appeared in the middle of
the street, they were not sure
it was real or they were just "see-
ing it." While they discussed the
matter, an automobile came along,
ran over the luckless snake and
settled the question.
Steve McPhaul returned to this
city Tuesday after a month's visit
in Tampa with his sister.


I b~PBBn-- -- --- -P--~ --1~L9. ,, rle~


-----------------------------------------------


I