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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00183
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 29, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00183

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
et growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100,,TH ANNIVERSARY-1938
! ,


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1938


FLORIDA FEDERATION LABOR

ENDORSES E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.


E. C. Rhodes Is

Fatally Injured

In Auto Wreck


PRESIDENT ENDORSES LOCAL
MAN ON PAST RECORD
IN LEGISLATURE

E. Clay Lewis, Jr., of Port St.
Joe, candidate for member of the
state legislature, has received the
Inntnalified endorcemennt onf the


LOSES CONTROL OF CAR AT Florida Federation of Labor on
SHARP TURN 10 MILES his previous record in the Florida
SOUTH OFST. JOE house of representatives.
Edward Conrad "Buck" Rhodes, Wendell C. Heaton. president of
32, Tallahassee painter and in- the federation, in a letter to Mr.
terior decorator, died at a Talla- Lewis this week, has this to" say,
hassee hospital Tuesday morning in part:
of injuries received in an automo-
bile accident on the Port St. Joe- "Organized labor of this state is
Apalachicola highway. He was interested in the campaign for
rushed to the hospital, but died representative in your county.
on the operating' table.
oBe operating taner of the "It has been my privilege to
Bernard Luniing, owner of the
car Rhodes was driving., was not. work with you in past sessions of
seriously injured, receiving cuts the Florida legislature, and a care-
and bruises. He stated Rhodes fnl review of your record during
lost control of the car at the sharp
turn about 10 miles south of this these sessions indicate a most
city and it overturned, friendly and favorable attitude.
Besides his widow. Rhodes is "I trust that the members of
survived by a brother and sister, the labor movement in your coun-
William and Miss -Edna Rhodes, ty are well aware of the import-
and an uncle, G'eorge Kupfaian,
all of Pensacola. The body was ance of giving careful considera-
taken to that city Wednesday for tion to the candidates in this race
burial. and appreciate the Importance of
G"A sending to Tallahassee a person
GRADUATES. CLASS OF '38
oGRADUATES. CLASS OF '3 who has already a friendly atti-
Port 'St. Joe High School
tude as well as plenty of abltlty
\Iiss Margaret Belin to properly represent them.
Miss Juanita Bowman I anticipate with a,
Miss Carl Collingsworth great dea' of pleasur- the ,uriv-
Miss PFf h Moore Connell ileep nf worlinn- v.-, ) ,u it
,:,, Tibson, Jr. only in the development of Gulf
Miss Adelaide Hardy county, but in the passage of.
Mrs. Gladys Huggins l)en'eficial measures during the
Miss Julie Hughins 1939 session of the legislature.
Miss Florine Johnson "Because of our past relations
Miss Elizabeth Kennington and your previous record, I un-
Jerome Morrison hesitatingly endorse your candi-
Jimmie Morton
Miss Marjorie Stepp (Continued on page 10)


VOTERS URGED TO CAST BALLOTS

EARLY TO AVOID LAST MINUTE JAM


COUNTY ASKS

MONEY FOR

HEALTH UNIT


IN ORDER THAT WORK
BE CONTINUED; $337.50
SUM SOUGHT


MAY
IS


A letter was read from J. R.
Hunter, circuit clerk, at the city
commissioner's meeting Tuesday
night in which Mr. Hunter stated
that the tri-county health unit
would have to be discontinued un-
less funds could be secured, and
gsked that the city of Port St. Joe
contribute $337.50 from its share
of the race track money toward
.the health unit. He stated that
the city of Wewahitchka had al-
ready agreed to contribute a like
amount.
The board agreed that the
health unit was a fine thing, but
that as the work is county-wide
-t should not be necessary for the
county's two cities to support the
project. They agreed to contribute
the suum asked for, but Mayor J.
L. Sharit will appear before the
county commissioner and request
that they place additional millage
to take care of the unit and take
the upkeep cost off the shoulders
of the cities.

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Steele of At-
thore, Ala., were the guests Sun-
iayy'of Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Rob-
erts. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts re-
turned with them and spent Mon-
day and Tuesday in Atmore.

jlarold Smith of Dothan, Ala.,
was the guest last Friday and Sat-
rday of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Davis
and Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Smith.


EXPECT 1200 REGISTRATIONS
HERE; TOMORROW LAST
DAY TO REGISTER

According to C. G. Rish, super-
visor of registration for Gu:f
county, he anticipates approxi-
mately 1200 voters to be regis-
tered in the Port St. Joe precinct
before he closes his books tomor-
row at midnight.
This is by far the largest num-
ber of voters ever recorded here
and due to this fact, everyone is
urged to go to the polls as early
as possible next Tuesday to cast
their ballots in order to avoid a
last-minute jam that may cause
some to lose their privilege of
voting. It will also make it easier
on the election officials.
Today and tomorrow are the
last days to register for partici-
pation in the May 3 Democratic
and Republican primary elections
and the May 24 "run-off" Demo-
cratic primary election.
Today is also the last day for
"absentee" voting privileges for
the May 3 elections. Anyone who
expects to be out of town Tuesday
may cast an "absentee ballot." The
privilege period will end at 5 p.
m. today.
Go to the polls Tuesday as early
as possible and vote-no matter
whom you vote for-but vote!
-----~~
Mesdames J. R. Hunter. Joe
Whitfield, Whidden, Campbell, C.
G. Costin and many others from
Wewahitchka attended the flower
show here last Friday.


CLAUDE PEPPERHAS



MADE GOOD---GIVE



HIM A FULL TERM


Speaking at Jacksonville May 25, 1914 (when he was up
for re-election the first time) Senator Fletcher said:
"There has not been an instance in the history of the state
where the people have denied their senator a second term...
They have the right and the power, undoubtedly, but they
have heretofore held the view that a senator's greatest use-
fulness would follow his first term."

MORE SO TRUE TODAY

In 1914, Senator Fletcher also used these very words:
"If that view (the above paragraphs) was well founded in
the past, it is more sound today for the reason that year by
year the government has grown in its various branches and
its problems have increased."
No more fitting statement can be applied to the present,
24 years later. The duties and responsibilities of a
senator today are obviously far greater.
These additional words of Senator Fletcher can well be ap-
plied to Claude Pepper's situation today:
"It is not claimed that I have wasted time, neglected duties
or failed to accomplish results. Acts of omission, at least,
have not been charged. Some acts of commission have been
mentioned, and we shall consider them later. It will be
borne in mind that such criticism could not be urged if I had
spent the time in idleness or pleasure. The man who does
things these days, who moves men to action, is sure to be
tongue-lashed and ink-splattered. The penalty of every for-
ward movement is criticism by the skeptical, the jealous-
hearted, the bigoted, the enemies of real progress.
"Sometimes such criticism is prompted by selfishness and
the over-leaping ambition of aspirants."

Claude Pepper is the friend and champion of the people.
S A vote for Claude Pepper is a vote for all Florida.

GIVE CLAUDE PEPPER A FULL TERM IN THE
UNITED STATES SENATE-HE HAS EARNED IT

Pay no attention to affidavits and other devices common to
slush-fund politics in these last hours of the campaign. .
Tboy ~s Er s l'ush-fund campaigns designed to deceive.


VOLUME I


NUMBER 28


BOARD BOOSTS

COST OF WATER

SERVICE T APS

FOUND NECESSARY DUE TO
LACK OF FUNDS IN WA-
TER DEPARTMENT

Heretofore anyone desiring wa-
ter service in Port St. Joe could
secure such service by depositing
$5 with the city clerk, but under
this system it has been costing
the city an average of $25.60 for
each connection.
The matter was brought up 'at
a meeting of the board of city
commissioners some time back,
it being pointed out that taps
were being made at a rapid rate
and there was not sufficient cash
in th'e water department fund to
pay for the installations.
Tuesday night, at their meeting,
the commissioners decided to da
something about it, and passed an
amending ordinance which pro-
vides that those desiring water
connections must put up a deposit
with the city clerk sufficient to
cover the cost of pipe, material
and labor.
This is but a temporary meas-
ure, and when the water system
becomes more profitable a refund
will be made on these installa-
tions and more than likely the
previous $5 fee 'will be reinstated.
Building Permits Advanced
Another ordinance was passed
at Tuesday night's session of the
board, which went into immedi-
ate effect, providing that building
permits shall be charged for at
ihe rate of 50 cents per $1000 of
c:onstrnclion. wilh a minilrnitm fes
of', U cents. Previous charge has
lbeen 50 cents, regardless of the
cost of the building.
A charge of $1 for each sewer
connection inspection, $1 for elec-,
'-,- a,,tal:ation inspection on new
buildings and 50 cents for electric
alternadion or repair inspection
was also instituted, effective im-
mediately.
To Abandon Streets
An ordinance abandoning the
following streets was also passed
Tuesday by the board: Sixth street
between Knowles and Gadsden
avenues, Seventh street between
Woodward and Knowles avenues,
Eighth street between Knowles
and Gadsden avenues, Ninth street
between Woodward and Gadsden
avenues, and Park avenue between
Sixth and Tenth streets.
These streets and avenues are
in the new St. Joseph's Additions
Nos. 1, 2 and 3 being opened up
by the St. Joseph Land and IDe-
velopment company, and abandon-
ment of the streets has been
found necessary due to a new
laying out of the section.
Abandonment by the city is con-
tingent upon moving of city water
and sewer mains now on these
streets by the land company.
Pridgeon Acting Judge
Due to the fact that Mayor J. 1,.
Sharit may be called out of the
city at any time or for some other
reason would not be able to offici-
ate in municpial court, the board
passed a resolution Tuesday night
naming Commissioner. B. A. Prid-
geon acting municipal judge Ut
serve in such absence of Mr.
Sharit and be empowered with full
authority to carry on the duties
of the office.
Advisory Tax Committee
W. W. Barrier appeared before
the board with the suggestion that
an advisory committee be selected
from the chamber of commerce
members to work in conjunction
with the city commissioners sit-
ting as a board of equalization.
The commissioners deemed it a
good idea, but suggested that
the members should not all be
chosen from the chamber of com-
merce, but from all walks of life
in the city. The committee finally
agreed upon is to be made up ol
T. R. L. Carter. Nick Comforter,
G. F. Kaser, W. W. Barrier and
Ben Farrell.
_--,--^i-----.-
McMULLEN TO CLEARWATER
Dr. D. Byrd McMul;en left yes-
terday for his home in Clearwa-
ter to vote in the primary election
next Tuesday. He will go to Mi-
ami on May 7 to attend the State
Medical Association meeting there
May 9 to 11. returning to Port St
Joe about May 15.







P


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Puilding

Enered a.i Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Ac, of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-*.. Telephone 51 }*-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed..
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Tire spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


GULF COUNTY'S FRIEND
Gulf county should roll up an overwhelm-
ing vote for Millard Caldwell who is seeking
re-election to congress from the Third dis-
trict, for he has ably represented the citizenry
of this county in every move that has been
initiated by any citizen or group of citizens
for the betterment, need and interest of the
county.
Congressman Caldwell needs no introduc-
tion to those of us in the Third Congressioi al
District who have resided here for any length
of time. He has held office with honor, dig-
nity and credit to himself, his immediate dis-
trict and our state.
He has co-operated to the fullest extent
with the city of Port St Joe in securing a
direct grant from the PWA in Washington
of $160,000 for the $400,000 water and sewer
systems of which we are so proud and for-
tunate in securing.
lie has been most helpful in securing ap-
proval of the board of army engineers for
the dredging of'our channels and turn basin
in St. Joseph's Bay. lie personally appeared
here and strongly urged and recommended to
the army engineers that the government
should dredge the canal that is now under-
wray and for which lie will urge the reim-
bursement of funds to the county, as well as
funds advanced by the city for the dredging
of our channels and turn basin.
He has been too closely associated with
the things that Gulf county and Port St. Joe
most needs and desires to oust him from the
office in which he has worked hard and ef-
fectively, proving his ability to get things
done. -.. *.,: -,,
He has gained the good will of his associ-
ates in Washington. Hle knows how to work
with congress and the government depart-
ments. He is a member of tie committee
on appropriations-the most powerful and in-
fluential committee in the house-and is the
first member of congress from Florida, in
either the house or senate, who has ever been
a member of that committee. Let's keep him
on that committee, for through the years his
seniority will gain him new prestige and
influence which will aid him in better serv-
ing the interests of his constituents.
His past record and service to Gulf county
merits the support of everyone. Let's roll
up an overwhelming majority for him as an
expression of our appreciation for everything
he has done.for us.
Let's return Millard Caldwell to congress
by the biggest majority ever given a con-
gressional candidate in this district!
Vote next Tuesday-and vote for Millard
Caldwell!

Upon state and national offices Gulf
county should vote as a unit, for thereby its
influence will be felt throughout the state
and when we go out after something we will
be pretty sure to get it.

You have four days in which to remember
to vote, This district should turn out ap-
proximately 900 ballots. Be certain yours is
one of them.

^ Happiness is not in getting what you want
but in not wanting what you can't get.


STILL DANCING THE POLITICAL
"BIG APPLE"
Last week former Governor Dave Sholtz
discovered that the word "lien" did not ap-
pear in the state social security act of the
,905 legislature, which he signer, and he is
now otfering a reward of $500 to anyone
who can show that the word "lien" appears
in the act. But he forgot to explain that the
word "claim" was used with equal dignity
i( iaw 11 that respect.
All of \which is just a clever attempt to
play upon words. The 1935 law provided
that the state or county, or both, "shall be
entitled to have a claim enforced' to the ex-
tent of the public assistance provided to the
said deceased against the estate. An open
account, a promissory note, a retain title
note, a mortgage, a lien, and every other
kind of a claim against a person, all amount
to the same thing when they arc enforced;
that is, they take the property of those
against whom they are enforced. So this
-lever play upon the difference between a
"lien" and a "claim that shall be enforced"
is just more hokum being fed to the people
about a law signed by the man doing the
hollering and is the old game oi playing upon
the difference between Tweedledum and
Tweedledee.
Now, while we are upon the subject of the
1935 social security law, let us point out sev-
eral real harsh provisions it contained:
Section 17, which preceded the section pro-
viding for the "claim" against estates, pro-
vided for a court hearing against a husband,
wife, father, mother or child of a person re-
ceiving public assistance or liable to become
in need of publlic assistance, to determine if
such dependent was able to support such per-
son in need of assistance; provided for a
judgment to be entered up against such hus-
band, wife, father, mother or child, and pro-
vided further that a wilful failure to pay the
amount adjudged should be punished as a
'contempt of court."
In other words, the law provided for a
court order putting the person held liable to
pay the money in jail without a jury trial,
under the power of courts to punish for con-
tempt. As we all know, this is the power
under which defendants are put in jail until
they pay alimony decreed against them, and
also the power under which labor leaders
have been sent to jail luring labor disputes
without a jury trial.
For political reasons Dave Sholtz is liter-
ally frothing at the mouth about this law.
Do we want a man in the United States sen-
ate who would, for political gain, drag into
a political campaign the welfare work being
done in Florida for the aged needy?
Decidedly not !
The man, be he ex-governor or ex-what-
not who misrepresents the work of our wel-
fare boards is playing the cheapest kind of
politics and is deserving of the condemnation
of every good citizen.
There is only one way we can show what
we think of such a man: Go to the polls next
Tuesday and cast a ballot for Claude Pepper
'or United States senator!


SHOLTZ ADMITTING DEFEAT
Sholtz certainly complimented Senator
Pepper when he asked why Pepper has not
repealed the federal lien law, implying that
he could have had the law repealed if he
had wanted to. That is certainly giving a
junior senator credit for his influence.
On the other hand, Sholtz claims that the
law giving the state a lien on the property
of those receiving old age assistance was not
passed while lie was governor, when anyone
who cares to can find the law as passed in
the 1935 laws of Florida.
It is evident that Sholtz has no idea of
winning, but is making a desperate effort to
confuse the voters. Probably trying to earn
the fee the utility crowd is paying him to
run.-Highlands County News.

How many readers of The Star can tell
for what important office a candidate by the
name of Merchant is running?


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


Men limit their progress in two
ways. First, there is the
man who can't stand disappoint-
ment without acknowledging his
inferiority, perhaps unconsciously.
When things go wrong he cracks,
and looks for a way out.
Second, there is the man who,
if fortune smiles upon him, gets
a swelled head and-floats around
in space like a free balloon.
One can't stand failure the
other can't stand success.
Both of these limiting qualities
will usually be found in the same
individual, because the man who
inflates easily generally deflates
with equal promptness.
Ex-Governor Dave Sholtz is such
a man.
The first-class man knows him-
self. ... .This knowledge gives
him the courage to hold up his
head, even under adversity and
when success opens before him he
keeps his head, c:a:lenged by the
conviction that he has not yet
done his best work.
The men who dominate us, and
by whom we like to ne dominated,
possess this reserve of power.
Whatever burden may be on their
shoulders, they seem to carry it
easily. Our pleasure in working
with them is comparable to the
satisfaction we get from driving
a motor that will take us over
anything and through anything,
easily and pleasantly. .. Claude
Pepper is such a man.

I was talking to a friend the
other day, and in all seriousness
he made the remark: "'The early
bird gathers no moss."
Which mixed metaphor reminded
me of a number of others I have
heard and read. Mixed metaphor
has a large place in our curious
language. I heard a prom-
inent orator make the statement:
"As we look down the foggy high-
way of the misty ages, we see'the
footprints of a mighty hand!"
And he doesn't live a hundred
miles from Port St. Joe, either.
Senator Nye, in making a
speech several years ago, reeled
off this dizzy one: "This troop of
pirates, these economic leeches in
the Northwest, these barnacles on
the grain-marketing ship will be
unhorsed."
And I am reminded of the story
of the. East Indian clerk who had
attended an English university
and was particularly proud of his


PUBLIC ASSISTANCE
GRANTS TO FLORIDA
COME TO $1,633,800

Advances Certified By Treasury,
But Not Distributed, $1.53&,213

The social security board at
Washington, D. C., has disclosed
that Florida received $1,633,800 in
public assistance grants during
the first seven months of the 1938
fiscal year. For the whole of the
preceding fiscal year the grants
amounted to $735,600.
Advances certit'ed to the treas-
ury for fiscal 193s, but as yet un-
distributed. totaled $1,535,213.89
on Febrtuary- 2. .
On the same date, the board had
advanced during the year $139,-
133.46 for unemployment compen-
sation. There was no Florida
grant for expansion of the em-
ployment service because the
agency was suspended soon after
the fiscal year began.
Florida was shown to have a
January 31 balance of $3,007,783.15
in its unemployment trust fund.
-----^------
WANT THE ANSWER
Americans scan the business
horizon, unable to read its signs
and trends. If anything is wrong.
government is responsible, most
of them agree. In the presiden-
tial year of 1932 that's what many
voted, and in 1936 they voted
much stronger.
In 1920 the Russian revolution
was a fact. Its terrors were to
come later, just -s -xcesses fol-
lowed the French revolution. We
have had some uprising in South
American countries, including
Cuba and Mexico, if they could be
so listed for convenience, and the
English elected a labor govern-
ment, the Frencw, turned far to
the left. Germany and Italy went
to the other extreme.
And nowhere are the people
contented. Everywhere the people
want security.
The old order has changed-
changed with the World War-
and some of us do not realize it.
Well, what are you going to do
about a system that gets all out
of joint every now and then?
The American people want the
answer.-Lakeland Ledger.
knowledge of the English langu-
age, especially the idiomatic....
When his mother died he tele-
graphed a friend in England: "The
hand that rocked the cradle has
kicked the bucket."
But my favorite, and one which
should win the rubber toothpick
for mixed metaphor, is the dec-
laration of the Irish member of
parliament: "I smell a rat, I feel
him floating in the air, but I shall
nip him in the bud!"


OUT THE WINDOW


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 2% 1938







RR3PIR


Save by reading the ads! COUNTY CONSUMES 73,877
Paid Political Advertising GALLONS GAS IN MARCH
According to figures released
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER yesterday by the inspection bu-
To the Democratic Voters: Ireau of the department of agricul-
I hereby announce my candidacy ture, Gulf county consumed 73,877
for the office of County Commis- gallons of gasoline and 8,966 gal-
sioner, District No. 5, subject to ions of kerosene during the month


the will of the voters at the May
3 primary. Your vote and support
will be greatly appreciated.
I will work for the interest of
the county to the best of my
ability.
J. 0. BRAGDON.

For County Commissioner
I hereby announce .my candi-
dacy for the office of County Com-
missioner, District 5, Gulf County,
subject to the Democratic Pri-
mary.
If elected I promise to discharge
the duties of office to the best of
my ability and for the betterment
of Gulf County.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
C. ARTHUR LUPTON.

FOR STATE ATTORNEY
To the Voters of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit of Florida:
I am a candidate for the Office
of State Attorney, subject to the
Democratic Primary, May 3, 1938.
Your votes and influence will be
greatly appreciated.
Respectfully,
L. D. McRAE.

FOR STATE ATTORNEY
Fellow Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election
as State Attorney for the 14th
Judicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson and Washington,
subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office
promptly, fairly, courteously and
to the best of my ability. If re-
elected, I will continue to do so.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr.,
Mrianna, Fla.
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Democratic Voters
of Gulf County:
In the belief that my past ex-
perience as a member of the legis-
lature should be of value and that,
if honored with election, I may be
able to render some service. to my
County, I announce my candidacy
for Representative in the Legis-
lature in and for Gulf County. The
older, residents of the County are
familiar with my past legislative
record and I invite the investiga-
tion of our new citizens. On my
past record and my desire to be of
future service, I solicit your vote
and support in this campaign. I
assure you that your vote and sup-
port will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.


of March. Franklin county used
86,552 gallons of gasoline and 8,-
441 gallons of kerosene during the
period.
Total consumption for the state
was 32.394.982 gallons of gasoline
and 3,079,358 gallons of kerosene.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Oar Fountain Specials.
Read the ads-it pays!
Paid Political Advertising

VOTE FOR
D. STUART GILLIS
CANDIDATE




Oi E
ti For



SUPREME
::'~. i. COUTRT
.Gro
One


OF THE

SUPREME
COURT
pe/,ocraffr Prmary, /P~38
Twnty-Five Active Yeas Expeoi nc in the
Cereal Preatice of La~
- ---
LECT

JOHN G. WYNN

He will n
Appreciate .
YOUR : '
VOTE .
and
Support -A
For


State Attorney
-sovurteenth Judicial Circuit


- ; YOUR ALL-FLORIDA

CA~NDEDATC


Advertisement Paid For By Friends of Euaene S, Mattnews


CITIES MAY GET

FEDERAL CASH

SANS INTEREST

FOR PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS;
TO BE REPAID IN 50
INSTALLMENTS

If congress approves the pro-
posal to allow cities and counties
to borrow federal money for im-
provements, without interest and
to be repaid in ao annual install-
ments, the plan will be found
more advantageous to the bor-
rowers than outright grants of 50
per cent, writes Congressman Mil-
lard Caldwell this week.
As much money is ordinarily
paid in interest on a bond issue
as is paid on tire principal. The
new type of credit can be fur-
nished through the Federal Re-
serve Bank System without actual
cost to the government, but even
if the government pays interest
on it, the rate will be much lower
than the borrowers could obtain
for themselves in an open market.
Loans without interest on grants
of not less than 45 per cent seem
reasonably certain. it is suggested
that interested towns, cities and
counties will do well to see that
applications for tnese funds are
made ready for submission quick-
ly after the law is passed. The
Amount of money available will be
limited and the applications first
on file will have an advantage.

Mr. Caldwell writes that the Re-
construction Finance Corporation
has available under a recent law
one and a half billion dollars to
be loaned to indua-ry. This money
can be used on credits too slow
for the banks to safely accept.
The RFC will co-operate with the
banks and endea,'or to see that
the local institutions have the op-
portunity to make every loan pos-
sible, but loans that are not con-
sidered sufficiently liquid f o r
banks but are ot-ierwmse sound,
such as capital loans, will be
eligible for acceptance by th'W
RFC.


Carrabelle Looks

Forward To Many

Improvements

PLAN CITY DOCK TO CARE
FOR EXPECTED COM-
ME'RCE INCREASE

With official notice received
from the United States War De-
partment at Mobile, Ala., that
dredges would' be brought to Car-
rabelle on or before July 1, that
city is looking forward to a com-
mercial .rejuvenation and is mak-
ing plans accordingly.
Accori~ing to Mayor Raymond
M. Witherspoon. final negotia-
tions for the settlement of prop-
erty contracts between the city
and the Seaboard railway are be-
ing rushed through in the hope
that work can be started on the
new city d o c k simultaneously
with the first harbor dredging.
T.lke ai backbone to several new
industrial enterprises which are
planning to locate in Carrabelle,
the new city dock will occupy a
space a:ong the eastern river
tfon'. following the shoreline for
a distance of approximately 1000
feet from the Gulf Oil company's
warehouse to the John AMoore
building On steel sheet pilin:,
with a steel n.c: concrete base,
the dock will c cmti'in all requli-
mlent r'eces r:"' f1or' the expedient
handling of freight, including a
cold storage room. loadi g crane
and warehouse facilities.
It is pointed out by Mayor
Witherspoon that freight rates on
all leading commodities shipped


to Carrabelle would be cheaper interested parties.
than those now existing between Engineers have demonstrated
nearby territories and eastern ex-.that sufficient commerce would
port centers. This would include pass through the proposed dock to
rates on wholesale foodstuffs, retire the bonds in a period of
"otton, lumber, naval stores and less than 25, years.
any manufactured product. Construction ot the new dock
Attempts are being made by thewill give employment to most of
city of Carrabelle to hasten the the available labor in Carrabelle,
Sand its completion will mark the
sale of bonds to finance immedi-g
beginning of a new industrial era
ate operations, and it is stated in our neighboring city.
that bids for the purchase of the bonds have already been made by



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PHONE 2 PORT ST. JOE. FLA.


M-1 MI'


FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1938


. THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


. c mSG







PAGE~~~~~~~~~~~~ FOU TH STR OT T O, LRD RIA.ARI 913


RADIO REVUE PROVIDES
MUCH ENTERTAINMENT
The Radio Revue broadcast on
Monday night from station ALAF O Cl
at the high school auditorium
with Fred Allen (Dardin Haley)
as master of ceremonies, provided
great entertainment for a large
and appreciative audience.
The show opened with the mas- Flower Show Brings Out
ter of ceremonies introducing Beautiful Display
Tom Dorsey's orchestra (school
band) playing several numbers, With a perfect blending of na-
followed by a tap dance by Miss ture's soft colors that radiated
Ginger Rogers (Ann Treadwell). with dazzling hue, as well as a
_Kate Smith (Mrs. Roy Gibson) more staid color-tone, the first
was there in all her glory to sing flower show sponsored by the
songs for the veterans in the Lake Port St. Joe Woman's club was
City hospital, she was accom- held last Friday at the Danley
panied by Mrs. Laneta Davis. furniture store. Mrs. J. A. Whit-
The different flavors of Jello field, home demonstration agent,
were impersonated by six little was in charge of the exhibits,
girls, and as the "J-e-l-l-o" was which were entered by residents
sung they shook to remind their of the city. The committees in
audience that they were the Jello charge did their part in making
flavors. Paderwiski (Mrs. Joe the show the success it was.
Hiles) delighted the audience with The table displays, loaned by
two instrumental numbers. Mrs. Robert Dorsey, Mrs. E. C.
Bob Burns (Dick Boyer) re- Lewis. Mrs. Robert Bellows and
ceived many laughs with his Mrs. J. L. Sharit, were exquisite.
"*yarn spelling," after which the During the afternoon refresh-
U. S. Marine Band (school band) ments were served by Mesdames
rendered two numbers. Lily Pons R. R. Hodges, A. D. Lawson, J. T.
(Mrs. W. E. Murdock) sang "Nea- McNeill and C. Boyer. Mrs. J. R.
politan Nights" in her own inimit- Hunter of Wewahitciika and Mrs.
able way. Dan Farmer played W. M. Howell of this city, won a
"Lover Come Back to Me" on the beautiful cake donated by Thomp-
cornet and accompanied himself son's Bakery.
at the piano, which brought much At 4:30, in front of the store,
applause, and he was called back Mrs. Horace Soule, chairman of
to play "I Love !o0u Truly" as an the program committee presented
encore. an interesting program: Introduc-
Major Bowes Girl Unit was also tion of judges and awards made,
represented by Ann Treadwell Mrs. George Patton; welcome ad-
singing "Rosalie." Rubino:'f and dress, B. W. Eells; numbers by
his violin (Mrs. Ramsey) and the school band; tap numbers by
Paderwiski at the piano played several Port St. Joe and Wewa-
the beautiful and ever popular "O hitchka girls; "Flower Garden of
Sole Mio." Fanny Brice (Mrs. the '80's" by eight small girls of
Charles Brown) recited that diffi- Wewahitchka.
cult poem, "Mary Had a Little In the awarding of prizes total-
Lamb," which brought a storm of ing $50 given by W. T. Edwards
applause from the audience, for the most attractive yards, the
Lowell Thomas (Mr. McPher- judges, Miss Mary Lewis and
son) brought the news of the day, Mrs. S. L. Walters of Tallahassee,
and concluding the program the presented the first prize of $20 to
Gospel Singer (Rev. D. E. Mari- Mrs. Robert Tapper, second prize
ettta) sang that beautiful hymn of $15 to Mrs. B. W. Eells. and
"Eve'u Song." third prize of $15 to Mrs. F. M.
This entertainment was pre- Rowan.
sented by the Port St. Joe Ameri- Those winning ribbons on the
can Legion Auxiliary and pro- flower exhibits were: Pink tea-
ceeds will go to the child welfare rose, first, Dorothy Cotin; red
department of the auxiliary. tea-rose, first, Mrs. George Pat-
a a ton, second, Mrs. J. L. Sharit;
BRIDGE CLUB MEETS WITH climbing rose, first. Mrs. E. D.
MRS. CHESTER EDWARDS Dendy; basket of roses, Mrs.
The Wednesday Night Bridge George Patton.
club wasentertained this week by Annuals-Petunia: first, Mrs. D.
Mrs. Chester Edwards at her home A. Williams; second, Mrs. Ed.
on Seventh street. The living Romsey.Phlox: First, Carolyn
room where three tables were piggett: second. Mrs. D. A. Wil-
placed for play was decorated lis. Marigold: First, Mrs. E. Ram-
with vases of Easter lilies and sey. Nasturtium: First. Mrs. E.
Ran:sey; Second, Mrs. J. Hiles;
larkspur. Three progressions were se second, J. Hiles
played after which scores were tla M errenial: .. Shasit.
tallied and prizes presented to Hardy Perrenials--Zinnia: First'
Mrs. E. C. Lewis, high, and Mrs. Mrs. D. C. Mahon; second, Mrs.
B. Owens, cut. D. C. Mahon. Larkspur: First,
B. Owens, cut. s. eorge Patton; second, Mrs.
The hostess served a frozen Mrs. George Patton; second, Mrs.
alad course and iced tea to Mes- H. Soule. Easter lilies: First,
alad course and iced tea toi Mes- Mrs. F_ M. Rowan; second, Mrs.
dames J. M. Smith, B. A. Pridgeon H. Soule; third, Mrs. Robert Tap
E. C. Lewis, B. Owens, HR Soule, per. Amaryllis: Pirst, Lenora
J. Gloekler, E. Ramsey, T. Owens, Tohn. Carnation: First, Mrs. F.
M. Tomlinson, G. Gore and R. Co- M. Rowan. Pansies: First, Molly
burn. Mrs. Navarre was a guest. Jean Kelly; second, Mrs. Robert:
tr Dorsey; third, Mrs. D. C. Mahon.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO. Forget-me-not: First, Mrs. Geo.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27. Tapper. Calendula: Mrs.. D. A.
Williams. Queen Ann Lace: First
H. A. Drake and his sister, Mrs. rs George Patton. Verbena:
Phil Yarborough and little son, First, Mrs. W. M. Howell; second,
Phil Jr., spent Tuesday and Wed- Flora Mae Cason. Snapdragon:
Phil, Jr., spent Tuesday and Wed- Robert Tapper.
nesday in Bainbridge and Iron First, Mrs. Robert Tapper.
City visiting relatives. Mixed Varieties-First, Mrs. R.
City visiting relatives. A. Costin; second, Mrs. George
Patton; third, Mrs. McGowen.
C. L. Fain of Apalachicola was Wild Flower: First, Mrs. Robert
a business visitor in the city Dorsey; second, Mrs. George Pat-
Wednesday. ton.
S. Potted Plants-Firsts for be-
i gonia, maiden-hair fern, sultana,
Mexicsn moss and new azealia,
Mrs. H. F. Beaty.
Cactus-First Mrs. H. F. Beaty;
second, Mrs. F. M. Rowan.
,,FWgU A,..BK*


Musicale Is Presented
At High School
SThe high school auditorium was
packed to capacity last night when
the pupils of public school music
and glee club, directed by Mrs.
Laneta Davis, and the band, di-
rected by Dan Farmer, presented
their final program of the year.
The stage was lovely with its
background of greenery and bas-
kets of Easter lilies, larkspur and
roses across the front of the stage.
All of the pupils did their part
in making the program a success
and much could be said in praise
for the progress they have made
this year. Following is the pro-
gram presented:
"Grandfather's Clock" .......
.................. First Grade
"Pardner, Come Dance" ......
.. ........ .. Second Grade
"Too Many Memories" ...Mari-
gene Smith, Carlyle Matthews
"I'm An Qld Cowhand" .......
............ Charles Gangneiux
"Sweet and Low" .............
.....Third and Fourth Grades
Bell Lyre Solo, "My Dear" ....
...... ...... Dorothy Crockett
"Gold Mine In the Sky" ......
...... Adelaide Hardy, Vilura
Strauss, Virginia Stoutemeyer
"Welcome Sweet Springtime" ..
.......Fifth and Sixth Grades
Trio Tap.Onnie LeHardy, Caro-
:yn Trammell, Amelia Gibson
"Once in Awhile"..Adelaide Hardy
"Trees," "Memories of You,"
"Dat Watermillion"...Glee Club
Accordion Solo, "Lady Moon"..
.. Carolyn Baggett
Solo Tap ........Ann Treadwell
"Bells of St. Marys" .........
............ Adelaide Hardy,
Kathleen Saunders, Virginia
Stoutemeyer, Vilura Strauss,
Fred Townsend, Tom Smith,
Carlyle Matthews, Roy Gibson
Following these numbers the
band played: "Headway," march;
"Annett," waltz; "Service," march;
"Bright Star" overture; "Don A
Do Dot," fox-trot, and "Success"
march.
The program was concluded
with the glee club singing and the
band playing "Auld Lang Syne."

MRS. DRAKE HOSTESS
TO J. A. M. CLUB
Mrs. H. A. Drake was hostess
to the J. A. M. sewing club Mon-
day night at her home on Reid
avenue. The living room was at-
tractively decorated with vases of
roses, larkspur and other spring
flowers. Contests were enjoyed
and Mrs. Lewis Perritt was given
high priz-e with consolation going
to Mrs. Ed. Pridgeon.
The hostess served delicious
cherry pie, whipped cream, sand-
wiches, salted nuts ana coffee to
Mesdames J. M. Smith. Lewis Per-
ritt, Ed Pridgeon, C. Boyer, B. A.
Pridgeon, Leroy Gainous, J. A.
Connell and W. C. Pridgeon.

Miss Mary Lewis and Mrs. S. L.
Walters of Tallahassee attended
the flower show last Friday and
acted as judges.

B. W. Eells, Sr., was a visitor
Tuesday in Marianna.


New------------- Sprin Styles
New Spring Styles
4I


Baccalaureate Services
Are Held Sunday
Baccalaureate services were
held Sunday morning at the First
Methodist church, with Rev. D. E.
Marietta delivering the sermon.
The auditorium and balcony of the
church was crowded to capacity,
with many standing in the en-
trance and on the steps of the
church.
Miss Erline McClellan played
the processional, "March of the
Priests." by which the graduates
took their places. The invocation
\as by Rev. J. W. Sisemore, fol-
lowed by the high school choral
club rendering "The Lord Is My
Shepherd."
Announcements were made by
Prof. D. G. McPherson and the
congregation sang "Holy, Holy,
Holy." Scripture was read by
Rev. H. F. Beaty and the choral
club sang the beautiful "Heavens
Resound."
Rev. Marietta then preached a
most interesting sermon to the
seniors and for anyone who is en-
tering a new life.
Benediction was by Rev. H. P.
Monev. The recessional was
played by Miss McClellan.

METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS MONDAY
The rpgilar meeting of the
Methodist Missionary Society was
held Monday afternoon at the
church with a good attendance.
Mrs. Boyd, president, presided.
Srintir'. John 21:1-17, was
read by Mrs. George Patton and
onecial music was rendered by
Mrs. Roy Gibson, vocal solo, "This
'Is My Task," and a piano solo by,
Mr-. W. E. Boyer.
The hour of meeting has been!
changed to 4 p. m. for the sum-
mer months.


Sewing and

Hemstiching
OF ALL KINDS
VERY REASONABLE
--o-

MRS. FATE RADFORD
Maddox Trailer Camp
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


EXTRA

SPECIAL


ALL
CROQUINOLE WAVES
Regular
$3.00 $1.95


WITH EACH $1 FACIAL
A FREE ARCH



CRAWFORD'S
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Under Management of
Mrs. Belle Land
Licensed Operator-
MISS GOLDA BOWLING


A-E FOREN-------



SALE FOR MEN


NEW SHIRTS


$1


- $1.50


All Collar Styles!
Checks! Stripes! Solids!
Broadcloth! Madras!


GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.

TRI-COUNTY TEACHERS'
MEET HELD HERE
Teachers of .Bay, Franklin and
Gulf counties met at the. high
school auditorium here Wednes-
day afternoon for the purpose of
reviewing the new text books and
methods of teaching them in pub-
lic school music for the coming
year.
Thirty-four teachers were pres-
ent, and all were greatly pleased
to know that in the next school
year much better equipment will
be provided for them, making
their work much more interesting
and knowing that the lessons be-
ing taught in such an interesting
way that the pupils will gain more
from them.


Priced at 25c, 50c, $75c and $1.00
J. L. Kerr, C. A. Tovey and T.
W. Wilson left yesterday for
Jacksonville where they will at-
MRS. W. S. SMITH tend a state chamber of com-
merce meeting.
Star Building Port St. Joe ft is *
B l || lllllllll1111|lllll||||| County Assessor Sam Patrick
was a visitor here Wednesday.


New Spring Ties at
Various Prices


TO GO WITH THE
NEW SPRING HATS!
Be sure that your coiffure
will match and accentuate
the fine details of the new
hats come to a
modern shop.
Princess Permanent
This famous special is
complete .with shampoo
and wave set.
$3 to $6.50


PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOP


PHONE 55


Port St. Joe


Stock your Spring wardrobe
NOW at this special sale!
Not only will you save money
-you'll have a much wider
selection of advance styles to
choose from!



SHIRTS and SHORTS


25c and 35c
Plain and patterned
Broadcloth, full cut.


Owens & Murdock'

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
r L^ ^ ^^, ^ ^, ^ ^ ,,.,^, ^-C -^,* "


WOOD FIBER

FLOWERS

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
FOR CORSAGES
They Look Natural and Last
for Months.


VIRGINIA PRIDGEON HOSTESS
TO GIRLS' AUXILIARY
The Lottie Moon chapter of the
Girls' Auxiliary ot tie Baptist
church met last Friday at the
home of Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon on
Monument avenue with Virginia
Pridgeon as hostess.
The meeting was opened with
song, "Praise Him, Praise Him."
The 47th Psalm was read by the
president, followed with prayer
by Mrs. Pridgeon. A talk by the
leader on the Girls' Auxilary
Watchword and Star proved very
Interesting. The president then
proceeded with the regular busi-
ness. A great interest was shown
in the personal services rendered
,by the members. The song, "Af-
rica for Christ," was sung, after
which the meeting was dismissed
with prayer by Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett.
Ice cream and cake was served
by the hostess to Carolyn Bag-
gett, Flora Mae and Hazel Cason,
Marjorie and Dot Costin, Betty Jo
Lane. Geraldine Parker, Mrs. J.
O. Baggett and Mrs. E. C. Cason.
All are urged to attend the
next meeting, May 6, at the home
of Mrs. J. O. Baggett.


4


'---'---~-" --~---~C'


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 2S, 1938)









TL 8?R OTB.JE 'OtD AEFV


At the Churches

FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
Evening worship 7:45.
W. M. U. 3'p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
H. F. Beaty, Minister
Sunday School. 10 a. m. every
Sunday.
Preaching 11 a. m., first, third
and fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.
Preaching in Wewahitchka the
first Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:30 p.
m.. central standard time.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
--ft--
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
LT. P. Mdney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
,day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta. Pastor
"Services fifst, second antl fourth
Suidays, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays,.3 p.
ii.


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on. second and fourth
Tuesday !of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in-month at club house.
Legion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Woman's Club meeting First
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
Port Inn parlor.
-----*----

crhe

att W ithi te IS e
SaiS-js


spinach and carrots as a family
-4-


Grow a vegetable garden, no
matter how little space you have.
Even a 10-foot square will pro-
duce as much radishes, lettuce,
spinach and carrots as a family
of four can consume, and twice
this area is large enough to take
seriously.
P:an for succession crops (one
after the other in the same row)
and companion crops (sown in
same row, one to mature and be
eaten before the rtiier). This pro-
cedure will double and even
treble the yield.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists


BAPTIST W'.; M. U.. IN:
MEETING MONDAY
The Royal Service program of
the circles of the Woman's Mis-
sionary Union of the Baptist
church was held Monday after-
noon at the church, with Mrs. J.
W. Sisemore presiding. The meet-
ing opened with the Year Song,
followed by the scriptures, Mat-
thew 4:1-10, 26; 31-35, 40-41, read
by Mrs. Durant.
Interesting talks were made on
the following topics: "Africa 50
Years Ago," Mrs. Sisemore; "Af-
rica Today," by Mrs. Henson;
"Golden Gleams," by Mrs. Cason;
"Hospital Lights," Mrs. Hughes;
"More Precious Than Gold," by
Mrs. B. F. Daughtry; "A Place of
Golden Hope," by Mrs. Baggett;
"The Golden Line or W. M. U.,"
by Mrs. Duke; "Africa Tomor-
row," by Mrs. Grogan; "Africa In
America"' by Mrs. B. T. Johnson;
"Golden Cord of Co-operation," by
Mrs. Dendy. The meeting was
dismissed with the Lord's Prayer.
The next meeting of the W. M.
U. will be held at the home of
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon.

Mrs. J. S. Dillard of Altha, Mr.
and Mrs. W. Prescott and Mrs.
Roland Mahon and little daughter
spent last Thursday in the city
visiting Mis. Belle Land.

Earl Rollins of Gordon, Ala.,
spent the week-end in the city
visiting friends.


pp111!1 aa ra IF l 1 14


N'W' OPERATOR- AT
BEAUTY PARLOR
Mrs. F. W. Cogsdill of Gaines-
ville has accepted a position with
the e.,awford Beauty Shoppe of
this city. Mrs. Cogsdill is a senior
operator, having had nine years'
experience, and the city is for-
tunate to have such a trained
beautician in their parlors. Mr.
Cogsdill has been in the city sev,
eral months, connected with the
Florida Housing corporation.

Mrs. Alex Ortenbach of Mem.
phis, Tenn., arrived last Friday
to spend esveral weeks with Mr,
and Mrs. B. W. Be:ls.

Miss Eleanor Floyd was the
week-end guest of her mother in
Apalachicola,

Mrs. Charles Doyle and Miss
Eva' Doyle of Apalachicola were
the Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Chester Edwards.

Miss Janet Cook of Apalachi-
cola has accepted a position with
the St. Joe Motor company of this
city.

Miss Golda Bowlin left last Fri-
day for Jacksonville to be gone
for several days.

Mrs. Belle Land spent Sunday
in Altha with her mother.

Send The Star to a friend.


SUBSCRIBE TO THE STAR-$2 PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE


--- VOTE FOR


PARKHILL MAYS
SFOR -

CONGRESS

A Native Farmer of the
Third District at Monti-
cello, Jefferson County
Farm Parity-As a dirt far
mer, from a farm area, he
stands squarely back of the
Democratic Administration
in its purpose to put farm-
ing on a parity with indus-
try, which has so long en-
joyed special benefits from
tariff protection. He pro-
poses to see that Florida
farmers get a square deal.
Forest Products-He places forests next to farms in his- 'dltrct
and will promote national policies encouraging reforestation.
Ports and Waterways-He will labor unceasingly to further de-
velop our harbors, rivers and waterways.
Old'Age Pension-He will promote improvements in our old age
pension plan that will insure reasonable pensions at 65.

Florida Is Now Represented in Congress By Lawyers-
Your Vote for Mays Will Put ONE Farmer In Congress!
TO HELP THE FARMERS: VOTE FOR MAYS!
~----- ---~~L1 ~ Z ----f------C-- --------


What Florida Needs


Is a Progressive All-Florida Man



IN THE UNITED STATES SENATE



DAVE SHOLTZ IS THE MAN


He Gave


YOU---

Dave Sholtz' record as governor proves
that he .gave the people of Florida free
textbooks, nine-month school terms, the
teachers' tenure act, workmen's com-
pensation, the mechanics' lien law,
homestead exemption, payment of old-
age pensions a year ahead of time,
creation of the citrus commission and
obtaining $65,000,000 in federal funds
without having to match a cent. These
accomplishments were attained through
co-operation with the president, federal
officials, members of the legislature and
county commissioners.



0


Former Governor

DAVE SHOLTZ


He Stands


For---

Dave Sholtz has repeatedly stated that
when he is elected United States Sena-
tor, he wili support the general welfare
act without amendment. He will fight
to repeal the Federal Security Law
which authorizes the State to take liens
on the homes of those applying for old-
age pensions. He is ror protective
tariffs for Florida farmers and favors
State advertising and the Everglades
National Park. He promises to establish
a field office in Florida for the conveni-
ence of his constituents.



0


Florida's Next U. S. Senator


Dave Sholtz Has Always Followed the Policy of "The Good Neighbor"
"A Man Who Is Sectional Is Too Small To Be United States Senator."


To Every Part of Florida. He says:
NO NORTH, NO SOUTH, NO EAST.


NO WEST-SHOLTZ FOR ALL-FLORIDA-ALL-FL ORIDA FOR SHOLTZ.


ELECT DAVE SHOLTZ U.


S. SENATOR


(This advertisement paid for by friends of Dave Sholtz)


;rP~ STAR, PORT ST.; JOE, PLORIDAb


PAGE FIVE'


FP.~ DAY. APRIL 2). 1933









PAGE SIX


STATE WILL NOT

SELL ANY OF ITS

OYSTER LANDS

WILL NOT ENCOURAGE EX
PLQITATION BY PRIVATE
OWNERS

The state administration does
aot plan to sell any of its rich
oyster lands, according to R. L
Dowling, conservation commis-
sioaner
Exploitation of these thousands
of submerged acres by private
owners will not be encouraged,
and with oyster rehabilitation
work now underway, officials are
not in a mood to invitee specula
tion.
An agreement not to offer any
state-owned oyster bottoms foi
sale is being drawn at the press
ent time and will be offered for
adoption by the slate board ol
conservation at its next meeting
"I believe the board will vote
unanimously for its adoption,'
SCommissioner Dowling said.
The -conservation department, as
sponsor, has entered into a part
,anership with the federal govern
ment -i carrying out a half-mil
lion dollar oyster rehabilitation
program directly affecting forty
counties bordering on salt water,
including Gulf county. Work is
now under way and immediate
good results are anticipated.
An agreement wliil the federal
government specifically guaran-
tees these reho.bilitated areas
shall remain open to the public,
with ample safeguards for the
newly-planted acres until mature
growth has resulted.
."I can safely say that it will net
be the policy of this administra-
tion to offer state-owned oyster
lands for sale," Mr. Dowling said.
In a recent announcement tire
conservation department explained
that oyster plantings are being
inaugurated in many areas where
private individuals and corpora-
tions holding leases nave failed to
carry out their agreements to do
the work and have allowed their
leases to lapse.
____-_____--
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

JUST PIN MONEY
Judge: "Mose. why did you give
your wife a black eye? She says
she only asked you for some pin
money."
Mose: "Dat's a fac' jedge. But
Liza wanted diamond pin money."
-Florida Times-Union.
------ ---
The Star does all types of Com-
mercial Printing. See us.


T


r-crhe |


Sic


SPEAKING OF GUYS
A guy I hate is Billy Bowers-
His backyard garden's better than
ours.
-Macon Telegraph.
A guy I despise is Cyrus Tome-
He will not keep his chickens
home.
-Florida Times-Union.
,A guy I detest is Willie Platers-
'Cause he can grow the biggest
'taters.


AN EDITOR'S PRAYER
Blessed are the merchants who,
advertise, for they have faith in
their business, and their prosper-
ity shall increase manyfold..Bless-
ed is the woman who' sends in a
written account of a party or a
wedding, for she shall see the de-
tails and names of her guests cor-
rectly reported. Blessed are those
who do not expect the editor to
know everything, but who tell
him whenever an interesting event
occurs in which they are inter-
ested, for they shall have a bet-
ter newspaper in their town.
Blessed are they who get their
copy in early. for they shall oc-
cupy a warm place in the editor's


heart. Blessed are they who co-
operate with the editor in his ef-
forts in behalf or the community,
for their town shall be known to
all men, far and .v:'e, as a good
place in which to live and do
business. Blessed are they who
do not think they could run the
paper better than the editor runs
it-yea, thrice blessed are they,
because there are so few of them
in the community.

A Viennese professor tried to
introduce soy beans from China
and Japan into Austria-Hungary
as early as 1876.
Crickets hear with their elbows.
Crickets hear with their elbows.


HEAR



DAVE SHOLTZ
ALL-FLORIDA CANDIDATE FOR THE

UNITED STATES SENATE
SPEAK OVER THE RADIO
FROM 7:00 TO 7:30 P. M. E.S.T.


Friday, April 29

Tune i on the following stations

JACKSONVILLE ............. WMBR
MIAMI ......... ...... ....- WQAM
ORLANDO WDBO
TAMPA -:. .----- WDAE
PENSACOLA ... .. WCOA
TALLAHASSEE --.....-......-.. WTAL
EVERY WPA WORKER IS ESPECIALLY INVITED
TO LISTEN IN TO THIS SPEECH
It Will Be a Message Every Citizen of Florida
; -. Shoud a -

(Paid Political, Advertisement by Loyal Friends of
Dave Sholtz)


' R E E L E CT


The vegetable marrows make
a delectable dish for the gar-
dener who grows them. They are
best cooked when very young.
Pick them when the skin is so
tender it breaks with a slight
pressure of the thumb. They like
a rich soil, good cultivation and
plenty of moisture during dry
spells. Destroy bugs as you
would on squash or cucumbers.
The bush type marrow should be
picked when only 2 inches long.
Start indoors for early crop, and
outdoors for late summer crop.

Bottled milk left in the sun for
half an hour will lose half of its
vitamin C value.


Commercial



Printing ...


TAGS
POSTERS
DODGERS
RECEIPTS
PLACARDS
BOOKLETS
PROGRAMS
ENVELOPES
STATEMENTS
CATALOGUES
INVITATIONS
LETTERHEADS
WINDOW CARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
ANNOUNCEMENTS


A .- A *

* Any Commercial Printing
that you may require, from a
calling card to a catalogue,
can be made right here in our
plant. And we can fur-
nish illustrations if necessary!

You will find our printing
to be high in quality the
service prompt and satisfac-
tory---and our prices reason-
able.


THE STAR
"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"


MILLARD CALDWELL .

TO CONGRESS

HE WORKS HARD AND GETS RESULTS---
--HE DELIVERS INSTEAD OF PROMFSI'NfG i


He Helped Make These Things Possible

for the District:


Federal purchase of surplus fish. Hospitaliza-
tion for fishermen in Marine Hospitals.
The dredging of the canal from Apalachicola
to St. Andrews Bay, costing about one million
dollars; the dredging of the canal from St. An-
drews Bay to Choctawhatchee Bay, costing about
two million dollars; the dredging of the St. An-
drews Bay channel; tire dredging of Bayou La-
Grange, Bayou Chico, and Santa Rosa Sound;
the completion of the Mobile-Pensacola canal;
the securing of the appropriations for Carrabelle
Harbor and St. Marks River; the engineering
survey of Choctawhatchee-East Pass channel,
Choctawhatchee River, Apalachicola River; the
approval of the new Apalachicola-St. Marks
canal, and other projects.
The placing in this District of the new Apa-
lachicola National Forest and the expansion of
the Choctawhatchee National Forest.
The placing in this District of two of the larg-
est Land Utilization projects, involving the ex-
penditure of several million dollars, and the em-
ployment of several thousand men.
The placing in this District of two large Soil
Erosion projects.
The placing in this District of a new Federal
penitentiary.
The securing of the construction of the Fed-
eral buildings at Quincy, Tallahassee and Pan
ama City, and the appropriations for new build-
ings at DeFuniak Springs and Pensacola.
The location in this District of a new Federal
fish hatchery.


The location of a new Army air training sta-
tion in Okaloosa County and the permanent es-
tablishment and expansion of the Naval Air'
Training Station.
The approval and alIocation of money for
rural electrification.
The extension of the Federal Highway System
and the expenditure of millions of dollars on
Federal roads and bridges.
The recent approval and appropriation of
money for three new commercial passenger and
air mail lines through the District.

AND FOR GULF COUNTY-
He has helped make possible the following
development and improvements:
Dredging Port St. Joe Harbor.
Port St. Joe waterworks and sewage system.
Fish Hatchery at Wewahitchka.
Drainage Project at Port St. Joe.
School projects, Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe.
Gulf County sewing rooms.
The people of Gulf County want C'ldwe'l con-
tinued in Congress. Let's do everything within
our power to give him the best vote he has ever
received and, in that way, assist him to help us
continue to grow and develop. His friends are
printing this and ask your wholehearted assist-
ance in their effort to he of service to our
County, District and State.


- MILLARD CALDWELL THE FRIEND OF THE WORKING MAN


His Record Justifys Your Vote and Support
(Paid Political Advertisement'


i


-----------


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 29, IM3






PAGE SEVEN?


CongratulationsG R A A T of Port St. Joe

to the D High School






T ONIGHT thirteen high school students will be graduated from the
local institution of secondary education in which they have passed the last
four years, and will go forth into the world of higher education or business,
their high school days over and done with forever. E

The parents of those students who sit on the auditorium stage tonight will
feel mingled sentiments of pleasure, pride and sorrow. Pleasure because
their sons and daughters have gone through high school and have avoided
the thousand illnesses and accidents of childhood and have been found
fitted to receive their diplomas; pride because it is no little thing to guide
a child in the way he should go so that he may reach this important mile-
stone in his path of progress through life; sorrow that their little child
has approached manhood or womanhood and must be reckoned as a distinct
human entity with thoughts, feelings and ambitions individual to him or her
only, and a tincture of regret that Father Time relentlessly unfolds the THE GRADUATING CLASS
years and their young one must leave the parental nest for a career and OF 1938
experiences of his own, apart from the watchful and protective parental
influence. MISS MARGARET BELIN
MISS JUANITA BOWMAN.
This is merely life, however, and the present regret at the departure of the MISS JUANITA BOWMAN
young people from intimate family life probably will be tempered by the MISS CARL COLLINGSWORTH
hope and prayer that the graduate from high school will so conduct him- MOORE CONNELL
self or herself that the future record will become a source of pride and
satisfaction to the parents who view the commencement ceremonies tonight ROY GIBSON, JR.
with sometimes misty eyes. MISS ADELAIDE HARDY
But whatever your record is to be in the future, we hope that you will MRS. GLADYS HUGGINS
not go forth into foreign fields to win fame and fortune. We need MISS JULIE HUGHINS
you right here to make Port St. Joe greater.
MISS FLORINE JOHNSON
Opportunities abound on every hand, and we, as your lifelong friends and MISS ELIZABETH KENNINGTON
associates, will aid you to the full extent of our ability to make a success
JEROME MORRISON
of whatever undertaking you may choose. For as you grow and
/ prosper, so will this community--our home-grow and prosper. JIMMIE MORTON
MISS MARJORIE STEPP
We welcome you, as individuals and as a class, to the business and social
life of the community.

OUR INTEREST IN THE WELFARE OF THIS COMMUNITY PROMPTS US TO SPONSOR THIS MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE
OF PORT ST. JOE AND VICINITY


CHAVERS-FOWHAND FURNITURE COMPANY TROY JONES, Chief of Police

SCHNEIDER'S DEPARTMENT STORE GARY-LOCKHART DRUG COMPANY

LeHARDY PHARMACY QUALITY GROCERY, Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.

GULF DRY CLEANERS BLACK CAT CAFE

COOPER'S BARBER SHOP HAUSER'S DEPARTMENT STORE

LILIUS JEWELRY COMPANY DRS. NEWBERRY, Optometrists and Opticians

SUNNY STATE SERVICE MILLER'S "Rexall" DRUG STORE

GULF VIEW TAVERN GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY

LITTLE'S SERVICE STATION BAYSHORE GROCERY AND MARKET

ST. JOE LUMBER COMPANY M. G. LEWIS & SONS GARAGE

GEIGER'S DEPARTMENT STORE ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION


H. A. DRAKE, Postmaster


THE STAR, "Your Home-Town Newspaper"


pI ,


THE STAR, PORT 'ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1938







FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


BUFORD ASKS

ALL CITIZENS

GO TO POLLS

CANDIDATE FOR RE-ELECTION
TO STATE COURT IS-
SUES APPEAL

Justice Rivers Buford, seeking
re-election to the Florida supreme
court post that he has held for
the past 12 years, has issued a
plea to all voters of Florida to
register, if they have not done so,
and to cast their votes in the May
3 Democratic primary.
"The time is here," he said, "for
every citizen of the state to take
an active interest in state gov-
ernment, and the supreme court
is one of the principal branches
of that government."
Justice Buford has conducted an
"in and out campaign" since he
announced his candidacy, due to
the fact that he nas refused to
leave Tallahassee in the interests
of his campaign until his desk
was cleared of court work.
"The supreme court has done
all of its work to date and is
completing every case in excep-
tionally rapid order, Justice Bu-
ford said.
The thousands of friends of Jus-
tice Buford in the state have been
assisting him in campaigning be-
cause of his -frequent inability to
leave his desk due to court du-
ties. Informal organizations have
been formed in nearly every coun-
ty in the state to advance his can-
didacy.

WILLIAMS ERECTING
SKATING RINK HERE

C. C. Williams has under con-
struction across the highway from
his store in Highland View a
modern skating rink which he ex-
pects to open some time in May.
The opening will be free and in
addition .to skating, an old-time
soun.e dance will be held.
Mr. Williams is to be com-
mended on the erection of this
rink, as it will add greatly to the
p!eep re facilities of the city and
fill long-felt want in providing
a dra-cing pavilion.


GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.

OFFERING UP THANKS
T'- other day when it was
driz:"--7 rai:'. a mr' rushed into
Coo;-'r'? ba'ber shop, grabbed an
umb-el'.I out of the corner, dump-
cd up in the air, cracked his heels
together, shook hands with three
waiting customers, slapped Mr.
Cooper on the back and let go a
laugh like a hyena. Mr. Cooper
tuincd off his clippers and asked
him why all the joy.
"Yesterday I was here getting a
shave and left my umbrella. To-
day I come back and I find it. Do
you blame me for celebrating,"
replied the man as he made for
the door.

THE RETURN
The prodigal son returned from
an hitch-hiking trip to Florida and
Ihey killed the fatted rooster.-
FIIorida Times-Union.


MAYS CONDUCTING A
VIGOROUS CAMPAIGN

Parkhill Mays of Monticello,
candidate for congress, is con-
ducting an aggressive speaking
schedule this week that will
carry him through practically
every county in tue district.
In his campaign, Mays is stress-
ing parity payments to farmers, a
definite national policy encourag-
ing reforestation and conservation
of natural resources, greater de-
velopment of ports and harbors
along the Gulf coast, old age pen-
sions at 65 years, free of red tape
and consistent with self-respect.

TWO SHIPS DOCK
HERE THIS WEEK

The steamship Eleanor, 4400
ons, of the Bull Line, out of
'ampa. Captain Lord in command,
.led up at the Port St. Joe dock
Tuesday morning to take on 1000
tons of kraft paper from the St.
Toe Paper company mill for de-
livery to Atlantic ports. It left
Wednesday.
The S. S. Dorothy, also of the
Bull Line, is expected to arrive
lere Monday or Tuesday.

ALUMNI GROUP
IS ORGANIZED

Alumni of the University of
Florida in Gulf county have joined
with six other West Florida coun-
ties in the formation of an
alumni club.
E. Clay Lewis of Port St. Joe,
h'ed of the Gulf county club,
states that the local group will be
ready for formal charter presen-
tation within the next two weeks.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
FERTILIZER USED
Gulf county used 38 tons of
mixed fertilizer during the month
of March, according to figures re-
cased by the bureau of inspec-
tion, state department of agricul-
ture. Total for the state was 39,-
450 tons.
----'-->-----
Your chance of being killed in
an automobile accident at night is
more than one and one-half times
as great as during me day. Have


CONGER EXPLAINS OLD
AGE INSURANCE PLAN

Says Retirement From Work at 65
Not Essential for Payment


Retirement from work at the
age of 65 in order to receive a
lump-sum payment under the fed-
eral old age insurance program is
not necessary, according to N. F.
Conger, manager of the social se-
curity board's bureau of old age
insurance field office in Tampa.
"In my contacts with business
and industrial workers, I have
found that there is a general be-
lief among the majority of them
that when they reach the age of
65 they will be compelled to re-
tire from work to receive a lump-
sum benefit payment," Conger



You're Next

There's No Waiting In

COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP

You're next for better service.
Expert attention without
waste of time!


-- - - -

LITTLE'S SERVICE STATION
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes


WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


SHORTON & DENDY


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


I L----------- I-L.----


your lights checked.

REPLACE YOUR FORD
OR CHEVROLET
BATTERY
with a
9-MONTH GUARANTEED
BATTERY
Fcr As A'
Low As $3.95
(Exchange)

M. G. LEWIS & SONS
GARAGE


a i 7i' i-,. l i ; I .t '1 ]i

.. s '(-iiF '- -= ; II .. -
I I" '



SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT

The plant that furnishes
you ice the year 'round

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MA.x Kilbourn, Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
From Treated Water


You can hire electric service so cheaply
that nothing can compete with it. For
instance, for tie price of the dozen cggs


you ::-:! for acn angel food cake, you can
beat 110 such cakes with an electric
beater.


F L C Y R


PAGE SIX


WILSON & KERR, Realtors

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA



LOTS AND HOUSES FOR SALE -
We Will Build You a House To Suit You


LIST WITH US


I --gum


r


said. GARY-LOCKHART DRUG 00.
"Under terms of the social se- Complete Line of Magazines.
curity act, a worker retires from --- --- --
covered employment in order to
receive the moniaIy retirement CL B
benefits which will be paid begin- CLUB CA FE
ning in 1942. However, the, lump-
sum cash payments are paid now --- ---
to workers who reach age 65 and
who have worked, since 1936, in SHORT ORDERS
an employment covered by the OF ALL KINDS
act."
The lump-sum payments amount -. Try Our Steaks }12-
to 31/ per cent of wages the
worker has received during the PORT ST. JOE, FLA
covered period.
--~~- - - -


- -


I, ,


T r77~,T.;i'Ai"P l~pa~s


SUBDIVISIONS


SASID 5c-YO Ull C Ai'N

DO IT IN 10 MINUTK.61:







FRIDAY, RKIL 41J. IF AS


24-HOUR
Phone U8


ELECTRIC
SERVICE
Port St. Joe


Ca:l u. any hour of the day
or night for
ELECTRIC REPAIRING

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker



CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
-0
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others .
Let your family enjoy
some today.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON' S'

Dairy

Products



GULF VIEW

TAVERN


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road
Rooms for Rent


WASHINGTON

SNAPSHOTS
By JAMES PRESTON


CAMPAIGN CARDS

ARE PROHIBITED

AT VOTE PLACES

1937 LAW BANS VOTE SEEK-
'ING WITHIN 100 YARDS
OF POLLS

A law of which little has been
heard and which is probably un-
known to the majority of candi-
dates, which was passed by the
1937 legislature, prohibits distri-
bution of campaign cards or lit-
erature within 100 yards of any
polling place.
In looking through the acts of
the 1937 legislature the other day
we discovered the law, which
thus far has not "een given much
publicity and which will prevent
candidates from handing out their
cards, or employing others to do
so, at the entrance to the polling
places.
It has been the custom in past
years for candidates to do a lot
of card distributing at the polls on
election day, believing this last-
minute effort to be effective in
impressing their name on the
voters' minds as they enter to
cast their ballots.
The new law, Section 9, Chap-
ter 17,899, follows:
"Distribution of Literature
Near Polling Places Prohibited:
On the day of any general, spe-
cial or primary election it shall
be unlawful for any person to
distribute any political pamph-
let, card or literature of any
kind, or to solicit votes, within
one hundred yards of any poll-
ing place. It shall be the duty
of all peace officers and election
officials to arrest any person
guilty of the above offense in
his presence and vigorously to
enforce this provision. Any per-
son violating thls provision- shall
be guilty of misdemeanor, and
shall receive the punishment
provided by general law with
reference to misdemeanors."
------r------
APALACHICOLA CONSIDERS
DICONTINUING LIGHTING
Due to the fact that property
owners are failing to pay their
city taxes, the city commissioners
of Apalachicola, at a special meet-
ing recently, passed the following
resolution:
"That street lights be discon-
tinued on May 1st, provided
taxes are not forthcoming for
their continuance."
An invitation was extended to
business men and others to meet
with the commissioners and dis-
cuss the matter of cutting off all
street lighting.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
Send The Star to a friend.








CREDIT
^}-f- _r --Na -
PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


LeHARDY BAR
AND BILLIARD PARLOR

We Carry the Finest Brands of
BEER, WINES-and WHISKEY
All at the Lowest Price

Cal On Us When the Party Goes Dry


There is a growing sentiment in.
congressional quarters to break
away from unsound, hysterical
panaceas and adopt a tried and
proven policy toward the national
problem of unemployment and
general economic illness.
Much in contrast to the "follow-
the-leader" spirit that prevailed
when the first program w a s
launched to spend, the nation back
to prosperity, the congress has
greeted the new relief-lending-
spending spree plans with a ques-
tioning attitude.
The new trend of reasoning
found budding in these quarters
can be summed up in these three
points:
1. That prosperity, after all, is
not a commodity that can be pur-
chased with any amount of bil-

lions out of the public purse.
2. That prosperity is simply a
condition that can exist only when
the normal channels of employ-
ment and public happiness are
cleared of such objectionable ob.
structions as regimentation, reg-
ulation and burdensome taxation.
3. That the 1935-36 "prosper-
ity" was a false and temporary
economic condition that did not
create public happiness neither
for those temporarily benefited
nor those who are being taxed to
pay for it.
In brief, almost everybody is
hoping for a return to the clear-
thinking early days of 1933 B. S.
(before spending).

Samples of the new trend can
be gleaned from many a speech
made in the house and senate de-
bale these -days. Here are ex-
an:ples: Rep. Hatton ku.iumers 3f
Texas: "The legislative branch of
r~,\ government i' coming to a
full realization of its costitu-
tionel responsibility in this gov-
ernment. It had to happen." .
Rep. John O'Connor, chairman of
the powerful rules committee:
"Priming the pump won't do any
good if there's no water in the
well. We should first see that
there's water in there .by restor-
ing confidence to our people. Let's
proclaim a national holiday to be
known as 'Stop Calling Names
Day'."
And one of the capitol wags,
discussing pump-priming, suggests
"Maybe we'd better create a new
office of government and call it
the office of the 'Prime Minister'."

Still on the question of spend-
ing, the treasury department has
just announced that the current
government's expenses since Mar.
t, 1933, have totaled $36,884,000,-
000. For the benefit of those who
relish statistics, that means that
$36 has been spent for 'every min-
ute since the Drrth of Christ,
nearly 2000 years ago; that the
government could have paved a
cross-country highway 2S8 feet
wide with the dollar bills spent,
and that if all that money had
been placed end to end in dollar
bills it would have reached 1,142
times from coast to coast.
That is how much $36,884,000,-
000 is.

A midwestern senator received
a letter from one of his constitu-
ents which read in part: "This
country is going to hell, so we
might as we'll have super-high-
ways on which to travel."

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

The driver of every 20th car in
the U. S. will be inan accident
resulting in the death or injury of
someone this year. Watch out for
car No. 20!


INVESTIGATE!


LET US SHOW YOU!


0

COTTAGES FOR RENT





Beacon Hill


Development Company

J. S. PATRICK BEACON HILL, FLA.


J.L. KERR
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
-WATCHES
-CLOCKS
Repairing -JE WE L RY
A Specialty --DIAMOND S



We Invite You
to enjoy the Friendly, Refined Atmosphere of Port St.
Joe's Finest Bar and Billiard Parlor
-.41 Our Cocktails Are Mixed By Experts o.-

St. Joe Bar and Billiard Parlor
ED. GEORGE, Manager
^ L - f p t ^ -- 1 - e .

.



Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything


H. H. TAYLOR

lf' Our Work Speaks for Itself
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe






Give YOUR


Family a Home



In Beacon Hill

Subdivision

Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means. .



$50 down-$25 month

WHY PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. .
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent.


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


APRIL 29 1938