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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00180
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 8, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00180

Table of Contents
    Main: First Section
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Section Two
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Section Three
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Section Four
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
Full Text






THHES
- a .. a e .'? ft B> A I :S
.r s .T o i'd~ P2~Ub


Of bmdg mmmt sA4 yobul~dln

t 1411T-H AWN IVRS-AAYjkr 1#11-


1 *9- N.HE L r U 3 5 I FP 5 %0 A 1. R is v o V% a

VOLUME I pony 81. JoI, PR42A9 PRIDAY. APRAL S. IM NUMIBU 1r
mmd.


MILL


0


TONS OFKRAFT
BEING TURNED
OUT EACH DAY
MANY MINOR CHANGES AND
ADJUSTMENTS STILL
TO BE MADE
The huge $7..00000 paper mill
of the St. Joe Paner Comiany is
at. last in actual operation and
almost dailv now Is turning out
hundreds of tons of high grade
trrnet pn-nr for shipment to all
pTrt. of the world.
Evervthinr is not runnil.g qs de-
.irr1. however. for with naper-
makingjs' machinArv' installed on
,-"ch a vstt cl'q 'a4 in this p:ant,
there are bnnnd o h0 numerous
chnao.qs and ariilntmTnts nwces-
,ary fnr the -roner wo-king of
the plant. and occasionally the
*"-- rumhlb" of the hlie tnmer
rmchine stoa)s as these adjust-
rotnts ar mad l. NO Prinirlfac',*r.
;ne pstabltnimnt. no matter what
*t mnia be. is free of troubles at
+hp hzlnninne and these brief
1"'-".nwn are t o hc expected.
nPwever, be that qa it .may, the
-i'l is at last in operation. and
The Star jo'nO with the bn~ina~ps
m-an nrrid reqid-nr of P,'-rt t.. .ITo
-"4 neilhborinE ,vnm*,- niltI-s 11'
nrrnrlinr cingrrti.it;ons and
hest, wihes for s'ceCes to the St.
.Toe Paper Comnanv on the com-
.lfinht of the -,nath'a newest and
f!i-"t Iapr rmtll.
T1le St. Joe P'an-r Compatn
was oreaniazed by Ah notra Securi-
tfs. Tnc.. and th Me-F de Corpora-
tion in Mqv, q19i. and work was
started almotnt timedlstely *t
onnstniition of +he mill which
's n'"o in operation.
Estahliihmrrnt of the swer mil:
Pi SPot St. Joe wie paTrt of the
fonr-time nptn of te liet AAlfwd
T. wnTnnt. t fon'ir of Almnr'' Q.-
.rnritioe. Inc.. fr the rhiiabillta-
t'nn of Northw"'st Florida, add
wtr to bh t1' hub of a vast in-
A'strial empire.
PAOER FIIP'"UF.D BY
ST. JOE PAPER CO.
The publisherr of The Starp
aa**ful'ly arcksowlIl.aeq the
a'inc-'" c;vaen by A. P.
Wo6d. J. E. Dormev annl R. E.
Hartran nf the .t. Joe Pa.
per Cormnnv which en abla
1.1 to orraent t1his ei' atof
'Th St r. In -1 i nr, mar. of
kraft nvapr m-antftctured by
the So'ith's newest and fin-
est mill.
Copies of t' ireo of The
S'*r. of whi 4h 400 wer
nrlnte'd,. ar b,;nt nailed to
32 .states. ttl\ Di*rOIct of Col.
iirnma ia4 the C 'cat 'Zc'n
and. em heltlve. will rrn m1h
ornomting hbe best intetr.
S*,~, ff the city as well as
t'strik<*.'n a .d enole tf the
paaer helnq made by the pa-
per company.
Mrr Rella T-nid *F Jaj'ksonti1la.
fn~-porlr nof th 4 ,l.- 4"nw rnt
r'r? p of the Crawford B.nutlv
q'l,"r. 1Trq. La, d has maii
Fri'ndA la th city who will we;'.
come her return.


OPE RAT ION


ST.


PROGRESS


EDITION


S. I #o4 iw


* *. . I I .









*A-fr woWOT; PM 7AN P'RIBAY. A 4- R


SLodge Notices
-- r- sy.m. -
eOrde of Easttrnt lar
-Meets a secod d d fourth
O MRv ^f Sf h -J I k


Masonic hall, we postotfice. Visj- WOMAN'S CLUB IN
tore who are members are eor- RLGULAR IEETING
.dially invited to be-present. The Port St. Joe Woman'S Club
AGeric an Legion Meets first held their, regular meeting at the,
Monday In month at club house. aetetoiat church Weduxeday af-
Mterhoon with thle president," 'Mrs.
Legiom Auxiliary Meets first Geo:ge Fatton, presiding. Felow-'
Nonday In month at club house. ing the regular opening ceremony,
Wonan's Club meeticg First the orresponding, secretary, Mrs.
S third Wednedays, p. .iortce oaie, retd" a leer from
:nd third Wedndays, 4 p. m.; Ie (Gulf Hardware oCmpany, a-a
Port I, parlor. .. owlod.ing rtceipt of a check
----------,, sent thEm and thankiln them for
WOMAN'S CLUB PLANS tLt.r bu~l.es. RHoilts 'were
MAY DAY FESTIVAL(rc from toe various cbmmil-
MAY DAY FESTIVAL tees and a report was:read. tromi
Undcr the welfare and educa- Amer, erican Flo Show c1tm-
tion department of the Woman's iittee.
Club a Child's He:lth or May Plans were comhelted at. this
Festival will be held. May 4 on time for the May Day Festival,
the Io' n ot the suburban home of te main feature 'be.ng the May
the president, Mrs. George A. queen, who will be the healthiest
Patton, at which time, among girl in the graduating class. Other
other Interesting events, there ineresting and enterltaiing plans
a-baby show. were .ade for that day.
Those desiring to enter their Mrs. Joe Whitfield of Wewa-
bab~s .in tnis show are asked to iitichlka arnouncied that April 24
,ee Miss BEid Matthewson, coun- was the beginning or the National
ty tcailh CL-urse, Mrs. R.: F Miller jitter Homes program. The meet-
or Mrs. B. W. Eells. There will be ing was then turned over to the
two classes: two months to one program chairman and the follow'
year and one year to three ing program was presented: ,
rrontas Two prizes will be 'wo piano soios by Mrs. 'Joe
:awarded in each group. An en- rTiles. In le aL.,sa-: cof Mrs. B.
trance fee of 25 cents will be, W Eells Mr'. FreJ Curtis read
cba-red each contestant. ihe paper on "F'orida Industries."
The club is also -making plans: rs. H. Soule read a paper on the
for a fower show -o b' held on! ~", ".ubjct and Mrs. L. H. Bar-
April 22. A1l citizens are urged tee gave an interesting talk on
to enter e-.:hibits. Announcement; tle beauties of Florida life, after
w'll be.marle later as to the place Whidh the wevting was dismissed.
wr nr- t'lb show wi; :-'e held. An- whih the ti was dismissed.
ricnc r r-t of winner' '" the Al- WEDNESDAY NIGHT BRIDGE
fredr I 11Po'ot beanif'.c.tio con- WEDNESDAY E
rlert 1I e Pmat e at toe show.n GLU. WITH MRS. T. OWENS
Mrs. T. Owens was hostess- to
Sthe' Wcd:esdayi Night Bridge club
,T- -. s- this week at her home on Seventh
s.- o- t. The living room, where
i'ltree ables were placed for play,
was attractively decorated in
Spring flowers and posted plants.
Three pogressions were played
after whlih prizes were presented
to Mrs. B13. A. F,:'.-~.n. l.igh; cut
av Mrs. B. Owen l, au, v to Mrs.
A MARTIN Joe Mira.:
A MARTIN olcwing play, the hostess
Srserved d eicirods strawberry short
T: le and '' Ipt I and iced
1 ginriger al t 1' :::' :&, A .
W I :i-h. B. A: Pr-dgoon, E. Ramsey,
B. Owens, H. S-o'le, E. C. L ewis,
BILL TUREp, Mgr. .mlinson. J. G.ookler; George
BLL TUREimbe and guests Medames J.
PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA Mria, F. Curtis apd J. Hiles.
L' 7 ^


FRIDAY' AND SATURDAY
AP IL 8 AND 9

B 'L .9i2 3bf

N k~~


SUNDAY, .1ON ,Y D AND
TUESDAY
APRIL 10, 11 AND 12


WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
APRIL 13 AND 14









SELECTED SHORT SUBJECTS
EACH DAY


---- COMING SOON -

SNOW WHITE

and the

SEVEN DWARFS

fPml4B.


P.-T. A. SPONSORS
HEALTH PICTURE
SPrior to the I-.iar meeting of
,he l-'o t St. .1.. I. r r. r 'e..cher
A-ss-ciatio'n yesterday a health
pyeiure ,wits shown in the audi-
,.r i. .: Lh- ; .. -,.'o'.,l 'on the
I .,: ; ., -. i ui .. n. cure of
veneical discass. The pictures
sr.ow: nla;niy were on how syph-
i!is was contracted, pictures of
s.l hii:.i'c ptter.ts, the rava res of
s '.:is ai d 1.i: a-, h rate of
cou: tries t!:at y-. :,- ,j coniiol of
S Cisea ss aA.d those tnat did
niot. .
About 2.0, hieh sc'honl pupils,
iL.rac 'ers' anu [rd i : .~. 't:i ".il ti'he
s.. owag.
S I 7; a' a
GARY.LOCKHART DRUG CO.
'TJry our FIjarn.ia Specials.

I TO ATTEND MUSIC FESTIVAL
MI Msrane ..B. W.. ells, J. L.
.Shaiit. J. M. Smith and P. Boyer
will attend the music festival in
DeFuni.kl, Springs today and to-
r.orroiv. These ladies will. take
with them members of. the ball,,
and glee clubs. The trustees of
the school bav. donrr,-' use of a
'-us and t.he h;aijr.t-er .u commerce
'lias ol, i'n ,tcd to pny for gas ani-
Goil. t. .- r, jizt;, -- O t'r
students. Prof. D. G I i..pFh~ i
will also attend.
METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The M-ithiJdit Missionary so-
c:ety m-. :'m r :av afternoon at
I..: ... .L '_ .. ... Z ^


:. he curcn wn l 1 in at.enida.ce-.
The regular business was carried
out, after Cj,ch M rs. Ed Ramsey
and Mrs. Roy Gibson rendered a
duet, "In the Garden," accom-
panied at the piano by Mrs. P.
iBoyer. Plans were then made for
a spaghetti super at the home of
XirF. K. A. Co-tin.
The next neetng, a program,
meeting. r'll he held at the home
of Mrs. George Patton, and all
members are u-ged to attend.

The Misses Dorothy Wilnla.ms
and Flavelle Campbell and Ray-
mond Taylor of .Wevahitchka,
Fpent SBnday In the cAty visiting
trieade. .
S l ;
Mr. X. Hatmer. Mr. and Mr.m
En Hauser and chlldrfn wvre w-I-
Uom ia nFrt BL Je yesterday.


Services first, second and fourth
Surdyi, 11 a, mn. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
In.
.-------t--------
Mrs. Vo0i Gibson returned yes-!
terday from' a two weeks' -visit in
Jacksonville.

Mr. and Mfrs. Hindeirson Spence,
Mf o"atra, tpoved to this city
Monday. __


I New S


- 4

i S



: $


prinl


TO GO WIT
NEW SPRING(
Be sure that yo
will match and
th,< fine details
hats c(
modern shop.
Prnemess Per
This famous
complete w'th
and wave est.
$3 to 0

PRINCE
BEAUTY
PHONE W1


4C. I


g styles




i.








rH THE
G HATS!
our coiffure
accentuate
of the new
ome to a

rmanent
special Is
shampoo



:ESS
PSOPr
Pkrt t. Jo


.


$ALE FOR MtEN


NEW SHiRTS


$1


- $1.
.vlw5I03


All Cclizr Styles!
Checks! Stril~es! Soids!
Broadclothh! Madras!


New Spring Ties at
Various Prices Stock 'your Sp~ .wardrobe
NOW et this special sale!
!'Not only will you save money
--you'll have a much wider
selection of advance styles to
choose from!



SHIRTS and SHORTS


25c and 35c
Plain and patterned
Broadcloth, fu I cut





Owens & Murdock
PORT ST JOE, FLORIDA


LEGION AUXILIARY NJVQYS

y^er on l : : C S' BAND NUMBERS AT ME-tl"
The o'Woman'' Auiiliary +t th
Personals Churches %.. A"ItEtt
A Amterican Legion met in regular
LA*E.TA DAVCI, Eitor stmtion Monday night at the Met9
L Aodutr church. Following regular
opening ceremonies, "Open Min
Eyes," was sotly played by Mrl
-------- P..T. A. NOMINATES Lane I s. RlI all was mad
A NEW OFFICERS and the minted read and a'
The Parent-Teacher Aseociation Jioved.
A[ Ie _~_~~b held, their regular meeting in the Plans were made Lor the lur
--- -- high school auditorium yesterday. cheon to be held April 20 at Bei
PRESBYTERIAN Reports were heard from various eon Hill which will be attended
R I~T dommittees and ptana were made by auxiliary executives. The ieel
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Paetor to pay the balance on the base f" g was then turned over to th
Sunday .eoboi 10 a. ic. erery horn given to the band after the program chairman.i a rs. Paulin
Sauday at the cbbtmee. chamber o-- commerce had pre. Murdock, and the following intel
Preachint 11 third nd 6sected its donation. Mr. McCCon. e'-;i proerram presented:
Prelng ti ell asked the P.T. A. to aid in Ro.g. "Sweet Genevieve,"' b
fourth Sunday. installing a ew trinkitg foun- girls' glee club, under direction
Ladies' Aid Socety, &:&S0 p, ta-.i and plans were made to help. Mrs. Laaeta: Davis. Numbers b
every tlhidldTharsdhy. Rfpoit of the .nomlnautng onm- the school band, under. the dri(
mltteePwas heard and was as fol- lion of Dan -Farmer: ".erric
-. -ios:' P'.-eldeLt Mrs. T. Owens, :~r;'h: **light S'ar Overture,
EPi COPAL vice-preident, Mrs. C. Pridgeon; which was dedicte< to the auy
G. T. Benson, Minister secretary, Miss Avarye Collier: llar3; "Headway March" and
First, third and fourth Snday treasurer, Mrs. C. l3oyer; parlia- "The Star" Spangled :Banner."
nirht, third ad fouh S y mentarian, Mrs. Rbbert Tapper; The meeting was dismissed b:
night as 7:30 o'clock. historian,; Mrs. J. Mira. The re- the 'Mizpah and the hostease
--- port was accepted unanimously. served punch and cookies to the
CATHOLICK Installation of officers will be held auxiliary mretabers and glee clul
Father Massey, Priest April 21 instead of April 28. and bsod members,.,
Fat her t The organization voted to aid
Massfirst and third Sundays at the. Woman's Club. in staging the -' --
10-:15 a. m, May Day: program. Room reports, ""' '
.- were give sn' ad Mr. McConiell's
ASSEMLY OF GOD ^after which the mEetiA S ad- .
H.. P. Mfney, Pastor journed. ,
Full-time services. '
Sunday school 16 a. m. W. L. GARY-LOCK"ART DRUG CO. SPE IA .L
Gatlin, superintendent. Registered F;h.fma;ists. Phone 27.
Preaching service 11 a. m. MRS. JONES HOSTESS
Evangelistiq services 7 o'clock TO SEWING CLUB
Saturday nigh. The Wednesday Sewing club "
Ladies' Council meeting Tues- met this week at the home of Mrs.'
ilnv nfternon. Tro3y Jones on Williams avenue"
Prayyrmecthng Wednesday eve- yesterday instead of their regular
Payrme.t'g .iedaesday eve- day. A dilight.ful social hour,was
ning at 7:30 o'clock. enjoyed at which time the hostess
----- served iced drinks and cake to
FIRST BAPTIST .Mesdames H. Cain, D. C. Smith, ALL
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Pastor -Robert Haley and T. K0mp. Th- CROQUINOLE WAVES
club will .meet with Mrs. Haley
Sunday school 10 a. it, next wee~ Reguar u-
Sunday 'Tor-irS services at 11. $30 .95
o'clock. The local school band. nnder
Sunday morning sermon topic: the direction of Dan Farmer, en- -- :--
tertained the residents of Wewsa-
"Cheap Crosses." At the close of 'bitchka with a band concert WITH EACH $1 FACIAL
the service we shall observe the Ti-,lav morning. A FREE ARCH
Leords Supper. A M
B. Y. P. U. 6145 p. m. Wiills Rowan of the Univow'ty
Evening worship 7:45. of Florida at Gainesville. arrived
:.J,.;+,:and will spend 'thE rprii n
Sunday evening sermon theme: sen ts r CRAW FORD '
"The Celestial City Limited." Mrs. F. M. Rowan. B
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays. BEAUTY SHOPPE
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed- 'r. pT'.i'" T ,'-'-,nd of Grace- Under Management of
nesday with choir practice follow- lle was. the g st ofuher son, Mr Be ne
Harold Kirkland, last Sunday. M urs. eue Land
g. Licensed Operator
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bprnal and MISS GOLDA BOWLING
----- H.nry Brown spent Sunday in
FIPST METHODIST Panama City.
Rev Dn T arntta Paor --- --- .- --- --- ---


Pd
A-,
e


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e
Y,







Id



b




4,
r-


LYLIY- ---Y~---


+wa ~vr~~


FRIDAY, A~ntL 2, 49=c


IP


I


l


PACK TWO









Port St. Joe--Ste of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mil--Florida's fast.
Sst growing little city. In
the hart of the pine belt.


THE


ST


R


The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuliding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938

VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 8. 1938 NUMBER 25





I DUSTRY MOVING TO ST. JOE


FLORIDA'S CONSTITUTION WAS SIGNED HERE


.The old city of St. Joseph had the distinction of being chosen as
the city where delegates from all parts of the Territory of Florida
gathered in 1838 to draw up a state constitution, which was finally
signed by the delegates on December 11 of that year. On January
11, 1923, this beautiful monument was unveiled on the site where
the hall stcod in which the delegates gathered. It was erected at
cost of $10,000. Cary A. Hardee, then governor of Florida, gave the
dedication address. The monument was unveiled It, Miss Elizabeth
Jones and Miss Ola Stone. A beautiful park surrounds this marble
marker and it will be the center of a magnificent civic center to
be constructed in time for the Centennial Celebration to be held
in Port St. Joe., December 7 to 10 this year; -Star Photo.



St. Joseph Was Boom Tovwn

100 Years Ago; Port St. Joe

Hums With Activity Today


By W. T. CASH, State Librarian aeal surrounding. the place.
Title Valid Says Court
The town of Port St. Joe. where Many settlers ;;id not believe
a large kraft paper mill is being that the title of the Forbes & Co.
erected, is of particular interest to tract was valid, but on appeal to
students of Florida history, -for the united States supreme court
ar its site, decision was handed down de-
ar its site, just 100 years ago, clearing the purchase legal. Prior
stood the greatest boom town of to this, the Apalachicola Land Co.
trri'rioal Florida-St. Joseph. had been organized by the corm-
This place was unique ftor a pany holding the Indian grants,
number of reasons. Its es-tabish- to dispose of property in the new
r.:n was one of the results of town of Apalachicola, but mer-
the Forbes Purchase. It was chants and others who began
founded to ruin Apalachlcola, The settling there by.1825 paid no at-
capital expended in developing the teution to the Forbes & Co. title,
city came largely from the ':wild- thinking, doubtless. that they
(:c;" banks of tenr:Lonial Florida. could buy their land from the
Not only did St. Joseph have a 'United States at a very moderate
uti c.ue history in so far as its rate..
founding and development- were Numbers of these Apalachi-
conctrned, but we have what colians, as soon as they learned
.si:: to be excellent pioof that the decision of thu supreme court,
the first railroad ever built in determined to ruin the town by
F:orid'a was run from the city to building another 28 miles to the
Lake Wimico,.a bayou extending southwest. The St. Joseph and
from. the Apalachicola river to Lake Wimico Canal Co. had been
within eight miles of the place, formed even prior to the decision
and, we know for certain that'this of the court, possibly in. anticipa-
was thef.irst Florida road ever. to tion of. what the..decision would
uie steam locomotives. I be-but it was only after the opin-
Florida's first state constitution ion of the court .lad been -de-
was made by a convention nieet-.livered that much was done.
ing in St. Josepil Just 100. -years St. Joseph Is-Founded
ago. December. 3 of .this year, and
.this was the only. meeting f its On. June 13,- 1835, the' subacrip-
kind ever to assemble outside of tion books of the ..cpmpany. were
'Tafahasee- :; opened, and in a .short time all
S :: The Forbes Purchase .. [the stock had been taken: Three-
The Earbes Purchase -was the eighths of the stock was shb-;
.name given. to a. large body of scribed by Apalachicola people.
land sold by the -Indians fo 'Pan- .three-eighths. by .residents of..Co-
ton, Leslie" &' Co. and their' suc- lumbus, Ga., and the remainder
cessors, John Forbes & ..Co., a was taken by persons in Leon.
nlirge firm with.headquarters in county: We know the-motives of
Pensacola. The firm charged that t h e- Apalachicola stockholders;
- ot only 'were' th 'Indians diue it Those. who. held stock-in Colum-
'"lar-ge dums for purchases of goods bus seem. to have .been investors
but. were :implicated .to sor.e .ex- in Apalachicola 'stores and feai'ed
tent in .robbery of its stores by these investments would be
the adventurer, William AugII1,tus ruined. Leon county. investors
BRowles. The Spanish government were .stockholders in the terri-
was blamed, too, for not giving trial. banks, and hence able to
the property of.. the firm protec- get money easy: Three: bank i-es-
tion, and it seemed to accept re- idents and the expresident of an-
snonsibility. for it ratified the other were said to be financially
Indians' sale of their lands to the interested in the at. Joseph ven-
Persacola company. ture.
The. so-called Forbes Purch.ise Whatever else may 'be said of
lay 'mainly 'between the Apalachi- the:promoters of St..Joseph, they
Scola .and.-'St. -Marks fiters, but: ex: were_ men of action. .By ,Septem-
St"nded .;across.-the former. to. in- ber 5, 1836,,trains were running
clnl wlit 4,tyr )cam.e1 the town from Lake Wimiico to St.' Joseph,
o"'..: 'l:ac:(:rola with some of' the (Continued on page 9)'


P.-T. A. DOING

GOOD WORK IN

CITY'S SCHOOL

ORGANIZED IN 1920, HAS KEPT
IN STEP WITH GROWTH
OF PORT ST. JOE

The Port St. Joe Parent-Teacher
Association, organized in 1920 un-
ler the leadership of Mrs. Annie
Ryan Marks, with Mrs. Robert
Tapper elected as the first presi-
dent, has been and is very active
in promoting the best interests of
the city's schools and bringing
about closer co-operation between
teachers and parents. In fact, the
original purpose of the associa-
tion was "To bring home and
schooll closer together; to make
"or co-operation and to heip the
schoolss in every way possible "
Since original formation of the
group in 1920 much has been done
and the local organization points
with pride to these accomplish-
ments:
Seats purchased for school au-
(litorium; aided in securing piano
for school: instrumental in secur-
ing janitor service for school;
provided proper lighting of school
building; presented, encyclopedia
set to school library: purchased
er:taini for stag- in auditorium;
-.p'ervised landssaP-ipin of school
gro-':tds; provided much in way
,, Rpitygi'ound equinimrent.
I 'l.-.. were p ccogOillill ietnts of
S -il yeoari. In 1923 the local
I P.-T. A. became a fed'crated or-
/-,.'i iztion and yearly since then
has become a moving factor in
wronm:oling welfare of children in
the schools.
The tunit. donated $100 for beaud-
ification of the school ground in
127. and In 1934 established a
lunchroom for the benefit of un-
dernourished children, which has
been continued since that (late.
In addition to its local activi-
ties, the Port St. Joe Parent-
Teacher Association was instri-
m~ental in establishing the first
P.-T. A. county council in North-
west Florida. In December, 1937,
a bi-county council was organized
with membership composed of
P.-T. A. groups from Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe.
Present officers of this council
are Mrs. Robert Tapper, president.
Port St. Joe; Mrs. Dwight Mar-
shall, vice-president, Apalachicola:
Mrs. Joe Whitfield, secretary, We-,
wahitchka.
Too much praise can not be
given the local P.-T. A., for theirs
-is a work that is doing much in
building the character of the
youth of our city and laying the
foundation for better citizens of
the. future.
PUMPS CAN FURNISH TEN
MILLION GALLONS WATER
DAILY TO ST. JOE MILL
The 16 well units which supply
water for- the St. Joe Paper Com-
nany mill are capable of 'deliver-
ing approximately 10,000,000 gal-
lons of water per cay.
Each unit is equipped With a
deep-well turbine -arlven by an
electric motor, which' lifts the wa-
ter from the' well and also de-
livers' it through the iuge .pipeline
directly into the reservoir located
-it the mill site.
Similar automatic units are
-used by the city of Port St.' Joe
ind supply the vater used for do-
mestic purposes.-in this .city. Also
one unit is in operation at the St.
JToe Ice Company plant and fur-
nishes all water for its operation.
ERROR IN GULF HARDWARE
.AND SUPPLY COMPANY AD
Through an error on the part
of the compositor, the Gulf
Hardware & Supply Company
advertisement on page 6, Sec-
tion 2, read's "Dock and Engine
Room Stores."! It should be "Deck
and Engine Room Stores." We
are indeed sorry that this re-
arettable, error occurred and
gladly maki this belated cor.
reaction;


Paper Mill Points Way


To Greater Expansion


This Section of Gulf Coast Is Becoming Most Talked Of
District of the South Industrially Due To New Use of
Southern Pine Found By Experts As Paper Manufacturers
And Others Seek New Fields.


Opening of the St. Joe Paper Company mill is another step
forward in the march of industry which today is making the
South, and particularly the section of the Gulf coast surround-
ing Port St. Joe, the most talked-of district of the South in-
dustrially.
For the third time in the past 100 years this section is com-
ing into its own. In 1838 old St. Joseph was the largest city
in Florida and the busiest seaport Twenty years ago Port
St. Joe was again an active port, with vast quantities of lum-
ber and naval stores being shipped from here to all parts of
the world. Today Port St. Joe is again well on the way to
becoming one of the biggest seaports on the Gulf and again
ships of the Seven Seas will be tying up at the new municipal
dock to load and unload :. r:-..-, to and from all parts of the
globe. -;
Paper Industry Ushers In New Era
Movement of the paper industry to the South opens a new
era in the history of this section of the United States. In
years past the markets of the world received nothing but
lumber and naval stores from the pines, and lumberjacks cut
the towering trees recklessly, with no thought for the future.
Today that is all changed. Industry is using southern pine
in a different way and shape. Forestry has become a busi-
ness, and crops are harvested annually as are those of cotton,
corn, tobacco and other agricultural products. Jp the lnew in-
dustry of making paper from southern pine, which is :ni
ing prosperity not only to Port St. Joe but other cities of the
South, man has found an everlasting industry. Through ap-
plication of his knowledge gained in experience of the past
ears he has learned that the soil of this section will produce
trees suitable for pulpwood faster than they can be used. By
such methods of conservation the South today is producing
the hulk of the paper board produced in the world.
, With completion of the paper mill in Port St. Joe, other
industries will follow-textile mills, for example-as Port St.
Joe now has one of the finest harbors on the Gulf, landlocked,
v.with 27 square miles of water
Sfrea- ran n averaging 30 feet in depth and
Great-urandson a deep channel direct'to the
docks which does away with
Of Noted Novelis the necessity of tugs.
Served By A. N. Railroad
It is logical to assume that Port
Is Co nty Clerk St. Joe will become a large export
port serving a vast territory, as
ARTICLE IN LAST ISSUE OF it is near to Latin and South
THE STAR ELICITS INTER- America and the Panama Canal,
ESTING INFORMATION and is served by the Apalachicola
Northern railroad, which makes
In last week's Star an article direct connection with the Louis-
from The Saturday Evening Post ville & Nashville and Atlantic
of March 1. 1856, was published, Coast Line railroads at River
telling of 'the death of Mrs,. Caro- Junction, thus offering shippers
line Lee Hentz, noted novelist of low water rates 'to' the Pacific
that period, who died at her home Coast, Guatemala. Honduras, Nic-
in Marianna. aragua, Costa Rica. Venezuela,
We have been informed, arid Brazil and Cuba.
have checked with the gentleman. Also conducive to establishment
that J. R. Hunter of Wewahitchka, of various industries here is the
clerk of the circuit court df Guilf fact 'that good, competent) labor
county, is .a great-grandson of can be secured, health conditions
this famed; Southern novelist. are ideal and an average mean
Mrs. Caroline Lee Hentz was temperature of 70 degrees assures
t'he great-grandmother of Mr. year-round operation.
Hunter, and he is the proud Industrial sites of practically
possessor of an "oil painting of any size may be secured, many of
Mrns. Hintz. done by her husband, them on deep water,. which, to
Nicholas Hentz, some 112 years many manufacturers is a neces-
-go. This paintiing was done from sary requisite.
life and. is approximately three by All things. taken into considera-
three and one-half feet in size. It tion, Port St. Joe is the ideal and
has been handed down in the logical location for -many indus-
Hentz and Hunter families thru tries, and in a rew short years
the years until it finally reached the city will soon be on the way
J. R. Hunter, the youngest of the to becoming the industrial me-
immediate Hunter family now liv- tropolls not only of Northwest
ing. Florida, but of the entire Gulf
_- --6-_- section.


CLIMATE
Port St. Joe has a uniform and
mild climate. The mean annual
temperature is about 70 degrees
and rainfall from 50 to 55 inches,
evenly distributed.


A LAND SUPREME
The people of Port St. Joe and
Gulf county extend to all a hearty
welcome to "The Last Frontier," a
land supreme where the maker of
dreams causes them to come true.


I I








PAGE FOUR IHE STAR FRIDAY, APRIL C, 193S


THE STAR
I \V. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Puilding

E:'ered as Second-class ma:t r, December 10,
;!:7, a the Pos:office, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.C0 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Month.s ......65c

-. Telephone 51 }i)5 -

T!.o s oken word is g.ven scant attention;
the printed word is thou htfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


A DREAM COME TRUE

Two years aglo Port St. Joe was a sleepy
I title town lying in the backwash of a
rapidly growing state. It had two or three
stores, a couple of filling stations, a barber
snip, the usual small town garage and sev-
er;il mediocre eating places. It boasted a
p'ulation of 793, according to the 1935 state
census, which included colored people and
str::v cows. It was merely a wide place in
the road-nothing, ever happened here and
nobody fifty miles away had ever heard of
the place.
I':n:- came news ti.at _\lfred I. duPont and
;;.-onciates had chli'scn the village as the site
foa- a paper mill for manufacture of paper
from slash pine.
'['he people of the town who had stuck
through the lean years and had an abiding
faith in the future of Port St. Joe-perhaps
not for themselves, but at least for their
children and grandchildren-immediately took
heart, and when the rumor was confirmed
by an actual survey for the mill site, the town
began to spruce up. Old buildings were
painted and repaired, new construction was
started, and soon the village began to hum
with activity.
The nevs spread over this and adjoining
states. Inq;uiries as to possible business lo-
caticns began pouring in. Strangers flocked
into town, overtaxing hotel and restaurant
accommodations. New buildings began spring-
ing up in the business and residential sec-
ti.j:s, and within a short time the city took
on the appearance of a Texas oil boom town.
Today the paper mill stands completed,
the final tests and adjustments now being
underway, and that sleepy little town of two
years ago is well on the way to being the
industrial metropolis of Northwest Florida.
Modern store buildings line the streets of
the business section, a new theater is well
an the way to completion, a newspaper plant
publishes The Star, service stations are
springing up on every corner, those who de-
sire sustenance for the inner man have the
choice of a dozen modern restaurants, land
formerly overgrown with palmetto and
pine is being cleared and laid out in subdi-
visions, with beautiful homes being erected
in all parts of the city, and the population
is estimated at well above four thousand.
Port St. Joe has become a byword in not
only the South, but the entire eastern United
States and publicity is being received in na-
tionally circulated magazines and newspa-
pers. Truly a startling change within the
short period of twenty-four months.
And all of this is due to the vision of one
man, Alfred I. duPont, now dead, who
had planned to make Port St. Joe the hub of
a vast industrial empire in Northwest Flor-
ida His dreams are coming to fruition, but
he himself did not live to see them realized.

A college .education never ,hurts a .man if.
he is willing to learn a few things after he
leaves college.-Florida Times-Union. But a
college graduate generally feels that he
;i1-eR.d knows everything.

wo'ni-der why a new-born baby always re-
sembles the richest relative?


IN APPRECIATION

The most casual reader will understand at
a glance that a very great amount of work
-of labor-planning, laying out, writing,
composition, making up, press work-and
the thousand and one other details-was in-
volved in the preparation and printing of this
Progress Edition of The Star.
\ e are proud of it, and especially do we
wish to thank those readers and friends here
in Port St. Joe and all over Gulf county for
the interest shown by them in the edition
and for their friendly thought and kindest
.out-csy in furnishing us valuable material
in old papers, pictures and other information.
Not all of it could be used, but the edition
could not have been as we wanted it with-
out what we did use. And we also wish to
thank our advertisers for their generous con-
tributions in the way of advertising space
ind for their help by getting their copy in
early.
Our sincerest appreciation and thanks to
thesee good friends-we will be calling upon
you again in the near future for aid in pre-
;)aring a Centennial Celebration edition.

REDUCE TAXES BY PAYING TAXES

\Whil e we are highly in favor of the move-
nent notw under way to form a state-wide
a-niz;atlion in an endeavor to reduce the
:x burden by demanding tnat a dollar's
vorth of return he realized for every dollar
tax miney paid in, we believe a great deal
c(uil1 ie d ine in reduction of taxes by in-
paymentt of taxes is a patriotic duty.
When we stop and think about it, if taxes
,vere being paid on all property subject to
taxation the tax bill of each property owner
would be cut at least a third.
Why not start a drive on tax dodgers,
now that the tax problem is in the limelight,
and see that they carry their just portion
of the governing expense?
The Fort, Myers system of refusing all
public service to tax evaders might be put
'nto force over the whole state with highly
beneficiall results. It worked in that South
Florida city-it will work elsewhere.
Let's pat the faithful and steady taxpayer
mn the back, instead of penalizing him by
making him carry the burden of the tax
'odger, and give the evader of taxes a good
-ealthv kick in the seat of his pants.

Florida is a state where any disciple of
Izaak Walton can make a fish yarn stick.-
Florida Times-Union. It would have to be a
:loggone good yarn right now if a game war-
len were to catch you with a black bass on
your string.

Veterans of 1898 agree unanimously that
he last Spanish war was nothing like this
Ine.-Clermont Press. And veterans of
'918 agree unanimously that the next war
vill be nothing like the World War.

We were reading the other day where a
--oman claimed to have lived to be a hun-
'read years of age because she had never, al-
owed a man to kiss her. She didn't live at
ll--she barely existed.

".VWhen a girl gets married she learns a lot
,f things she already knows.-Times-Union.
\nd her husband learns that a lot of things
'e thought he knew he didn't know.

SThe only thing that makes one work on
'hose days when he does not want to is the
knowledge that he has to.-Montgomery Ad-
.-ertiser.

\e; have been told that sugar attracts
.-ore fljes'" an vinegar-but who the heck
-:-ants more" flies? ..- .

It is more profitable to burn midnight oil
'ban to burn midnight gasoline.

Conceit is what we think we are, and con-
fidence is what we know we are.


MUNICIPAL WATER TANK


'. ; .- ".. .

-
o *-'' -. ^,.
"-



This huge tank of 2?'0,000 gallons capacity supplier, the water needs
of the city of Port St. Joe. It replaced an old tank of 100.000 gallon
capacity when the city's new $194,000 water system was installed.
Water is supplied from four deep wells and according to tests by
the state health department is exceptionally pure. Star Photo.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


This was going to be an ex-
ceptionally fine column this week
to do justice to tho Progress
Edition. It was go'ng to be juicy.
And significant. I had it
all planned out in my mind. It
was going to start off with a
"no tribute to the St. Joe Paper
Company. Nothing fancy, mind
,-ou, but sound andi forceful. .
t was also going to establish me
efinite;y as an analytical thinker
if no mean proportions.
Then, along about the seventh
paragraph, it was going to get
.-cry funny. As iL is, if you feel
.'ko Ilaghirg this week, this is as
good a spot as any. So
'ave your laugh now, and then


than usual. No sooner had I
settled down to compose this
weekly diatribe than things be-
gan to happen in great surging
tiers of tumult and confusion.
First there was the woman with
the poem. She wanted to leave it,
and yet, somehow, she was re-
luctant to part with it. Just put-
ting it down somewhere and going
away again wasn't her idea of
submitting a poem. No. There
had to be a cei-emony. I could
understand how she felt. There
were times when editors have had
to pry manuscripts out of my fin-
gers so stiff that they could have
clenched no tigher if rigor mortis
had set in. Anyhow, I cajoled her
into leaving her poem-after ap-
propriate gestures of farewell-in
my sympathetic hands.
And, then there were four tele-
phone calls-all of them more or
less complicated and involving a
great deal of endless conversa-
tion.


we can gt on with thi. Then there were two men who
we can get on with this wanted to sell things. The child
Someday, maybe, I'll write the e alwas ake me a sucke
columnn I was going to Write to-
fur ihpn U Al nU3Up Pf ,,alk in,


"ay. It was probably going to be
he best column that I-or anyone
c1se. for that matter-had ever
written. The suspicion
tIrs me at this point that per-
.Rps the best columns are always
he ones that never get around to
heing written.
Anyway, apparently it wasn't
'o be.
In the first place, it's the be-
uinning of the week-and there's
no Blue Monday in this office.
Bhe is a sort of a restful color-
-quiet and tinged with a fine
shade of midnight reverie, or the
soothing wash of Gulf waters, or
'he luminous spread of these
April evening skies. No,
sir, the color for Monday around
here should be something con-
idKerably 'more lively. Say the
orange-yellow of an' explosion. Or
the angry, bright crimson glow of
locomotive firebox. Or maybe
'ust the plain, screaming red that
ncople paint on fire engines. A
-rtd. a~ it were, with a siren to it.
A-1 #-7.V WAQ P-- n mn^ an


foUr teinm. Anyone can wa m in,
fix me with a hypnotic glare and
whisk one gadget after another
out of a small black case for
hours on end. I never buy any-
thing, but I'm never strong-
minded enough to convince them
ahead of time that I'm not. And
so they get their gadgets g
removing spots, sharpening
ei;s, eradicating ink, and w t
-and this department is helt s
spellbound as a child, at its first
circus.
And then Editor Bill came
barging in and wanted to know
where my copy was, as the press
was chomping at. the bit, and
please, he didn't .want to play
games, so if I would just let him
have the copy. And a fel-
low with a good joke which ua-
acfoutflb.ly he found himself un-
able to remember now it' ended.
. It's been like that.
Anyway, that's why I didn't get
this column written, and I'm very
sorry. I apologize and hope to
tin "^ fo p-r rpt -s k


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1939-


Ard totlay was-a even More so ( o ryetter Lext weeK.






Th. STAR


BATHING PIER AT PORT ST. JOE IN 1915


GRIFFIN'S GROCERY


.AND..MARKET
Port St. Joe, Fla.

SATURDAY SPECIALS

SDRIED PEAS 3 LBS. Grapefruit Juice, 3 cans 25c
BABY LIMAS... CANE SYRUP, gal- ......55c
NAVY BEANS.... MATCHES, 2 fo 15c
RICE, 5 lbs. ...-------...25cc i c ATCHES, 3 for -...lOc






TOMATOES- WASHING POWDER 25c
No. 2 cans, 3 for ... 5c Boxes, 6 for-.......-
Honeymoon Coffee, lb. 14c CATSUP, 14 oz ........-l10c
4-STRING BROOMS -...19c POTTED MEAT, 4 can 15c
SMALL MOPS ...........----19c Vienna Sausage, 2 cans 15c

1 Lbs. NHo. 1 10
TOMATOEIRISH- AH O WDER



GRIFFIN'S SPECIAL Juicy ORANGES, doz. 20c
Pure Santos Coffee 2 CRACKERS, 1 b. box lOc
Per pound .-.. 23.c SPAGHETTI, 3 cans ....25c
CORN, 3 cans ....-.......-- 25c
5c SALT, 3 Boxes l.......10c SARDINES, 4 cans .-....15c



ABA lAS 5 Ib. 19c



STEW BEEF, lb ...-...10Oc OLEOmargarine, Ib ....-15c
HAMBURGER, 2 lbs...25c CREAM CHEESE, lb. 20c
Sausage Meat, lb ....... 15c PURE LARD, gal. -....75c


a/On


A.-14


Time to Dress Up

and Be Pretty
That's the theme song this Spring! And
Lillian Kilpatrick brings you lovely, fem-
inine fashions for this "Be Pretty" season!
Fashions you'll love on sight Fashions
appealingly young yet sophisticated
pretty in color very figure-flattering in
line. See the new suits, the young frocks,
the darling bonnets, the most clever acces-
sories and see them NOW!


New Easter

BONNETS

Delightfully pretty Easter I.on
nets! New poke bonnets, sailol:
tip-tilted watteaus, n e \v ",i.-i
brims .... your choice is c::."'
Caily trimmed straws and I(1r-

By GAGE, KNOX, WE' IMAN


Mermaids and mermen disporting themselves in the warm water, of St. Joseph's Bay
in th- "gay '!5C." This elaborate bathing pier was destroyed rome years ago by ai
heavy ctorm. Not'ce the "cover-all" bathing suits of both the men and women.
SIN OLD ST. JOSEPH CEMETERY
FUTCH IS IGNORING
FIRST PRIMARY TALK


Trun-an G. Futch, candidate for
justice of the Florida supreme
court, continues to pursue his
travels over the state, consulting
as many people as possible to se-
cure firsthand impressions of su-
preme court activities, and ignor-
ing spoken assurances and an in-
creasing volume of correspond-
ence which insists that he will be
elected in the firn: primary.
He is less conc,-rned with the
actual progress of his campaign
than he is in meeting personally
the thousands of t:tizens whom
he Will serve if they see fit to
elect him to the office for which
he has offered.
---- ----
Roselle "r'c'key" Stone arrived
Monday to spend the spring holi-
days with his parents, Mr. and,
Mrs. T. H. S one.
----- ---r------
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
I 'c:er. d Pharmacists. Phone 27.


il I


SHOES
The 'vely new shoes are sure
to give you a feeling of fashion
security when you slip them
r -n Fo the Easter parade .
'lED CROSS. PARIS FASHION
NATURAL POISE



ACCESSORIES
New Fabric Gloves, all colors
by
F)WNES & STETSON
New Spring Bags, all colors
by
TUCKTITE
GOLDSMITH'S SURTITE

7.
FROCKS
Newest of the nevw! Crisp dark
sherrs. brief boleros, rwirly-
skirt"d crepFs! Lovelv jacket
rrd cane sheers. vivid prints.
Models for Every Figure


Tombs in the old cemetery of the ancient city of St. Joseph. These
sarcophagi are said 't have been built of brick brought from Italy
ac. ballast in ailing vessels. Be that as it may, the bricks are of
clay not found in this section of the country. All of these tombs
have been broken open-believed to have been the work of grave
robbers seeking jewelry and gold. The latest, date inscribed on
.-bst:o'-r' t C t y i-, 1 5. The n-od'ern city of Port St.
Joe. which lies vwec' f ,, h cemetery, has ro burying ground, due
to the fact. a 'r.:jig ti 'he -ChI'm'hr of Commerce, that nobody
ever dies here. -Star Photo
A BEAUTIFUL HOME IN PORT ST. JOE


,*


r
t


R~a~r~



i 'I
~zt~- ..-za~
r
)P
'" r"


Beautiful Southern type home belonging to B. W. Eells. Sr., in Port
St. Joe. Moder.i homes like this are being constructed here as this
fast-growina city rtep- to the fore in home-building activity to keep
pace with the industrial progress here.
WHERE THE STAR IS PUBLISHED r


Lillian Ki patrick's Smart Shop


"Northwest Florida's Leading Fashion Salon"


PANAMA CITY, FLA.


And here we have the modern building which houses The Star
printing plant, where this Port St. Joe Progress Edition was turned
out. Yes, those are palmettoes in the foreground, for tle publisher
was one of the pioneers on Williams avenue, just recently opened
up by the city, and we have not yet had time to lay a sidewalk in
front of the building.


C-M1v l rfLi o IrOC


FR DAY, APrnL o, ibUo


PAGE FIVE


--


I







~H-E STAI' IrRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1938


THE NEW AND THE OLD IN MOTIV


i. Pr 'ER ON


THE A. N. RAILROAD


Series of Cooking

Schools to Be Held

Home Economist of Florida Power
Corporation To Demonstrate
Electric Cookery

Miss Fairclotlf, home ceonomist
fr'im the Ocala division of the
P:orida Power corporation, will
b in Port St. Joe within the next


few days to conduct a series of
cooking schools to demonstrate
the efficiency of electric cooking.
Date and location of the schools
will be announced later. These
demonstrations will be free and
,every owner or prospective pur-
chaser of an electric range is in-
vited to attend.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.
----A-i
Misses Jean Smith and Bernice
Ferguson of Memphis, Tenn., are
the guests of Mrs. J. R. Holliday.


Here it. Old "Number 121" which pulled passenger trains on the Apalachicola Northern Railroad in
bygone days. She was a wood burner and it took a good man to keep the steam pressure up.
- i pcture v'is 1,ken in 1914, and shown standing near this mogul of the rails is Baker Smith,
engineer, (second from left); B. H. Graves, conductor (in white shirt), and the negro fireman at
the right. We were not able to identify the brakeman, standing at the extreme left.


QUALITY GROCERY
The Store Where Service Is Prompt and Courteous
CLARENCE PRIDGEON, Manager
PHONE 30 FREE DELIVERY

Congratulations and Best Wishes to the People of Port
St. Joe and the St. Joe Paper Company for a
Happy and Prosperous Future

We Carry a Complete Line of
HIGH QUALITY GROCERIES AT LOWEST PRICES

III I t I llll ll I li l l I I ill I fii n '' I tii, 1 1



Ten Dollars

FOR THE BEST NAME TO BE GIVEN TO THE


Beaty Subdivision

OF WHITE CITY

You May Make One or Two Words to Replace the
name BEATY. Anyone or any group may
submit several names. There is ro charge. Just
mail or bring in your suggestions to The Star office
MiW THIS CONTEST CLOSES APRIL 15, 1938
^ ini M iiiiiiii ~ iiiii]iii i!.iiiiii iiiii!iii


Here is the modern, all-steel gas-electric train operated by the Apalachicola Northern Railroad
Company today to provide fast passenger and mail service between Port St. Joe and River Jund-
tion. It is powered with two 220-horsepower Winton engines which drive a large generator to de-
velop electricity for four 150-horsepower motors which drive the train. The front coach contains
the power plant and passenger accomn-odations, and the rear coach is devoted to mail and express.


LeHar y's Pharmacy
The Oldest Drug Store In Port St. Joe
\Vhen ou buy drugs from us you can i)e siu-e
of g-ettiuo the purest ,)hltain:ihlle. All
Prescriptions filled with accuracy.
Don't forget to try our We appreciate your busi-
FOUNTAIN DRINKS ness and support, and
hope to continue serving
the best in town at the you in the future as in
lowest prices, the past.
SEE OUR SELECT LINE OF EASTER CANDIES

----------------,,,,-------..-.------------
WE COMPLIMENT THE

ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
Upon Completion of the
SOUTH'S NEWEST AND FINEST PAPER MILL


St. Joe Cabinet


Shop


Cabinet and Furniture


Makers
China Closets, Kitchen Furniture
Sideboards, Cedar Closets and
Cedar Chests, Porch and Lawn
Furniture of Every Description


-.WE REPAIR FURNITURE--
Located At Rear of The Leader Shoe Shop
-------- --------------


REGISTRATION

BOOKS OPEN

AT COUNTY COURT HOUSE
FOR VOTERS PARTICIPAT-
ING IN MAY PRIMARIES
;.- ,r .,, books opened Tues-
day at the court house in Wewa-
hitchka for voters who will par-
ticipate in the May 3 and 24 pri-
maries. The books have been in
the various precincts for registra-
tion since the first Monday in
March. I '_
Voters have jnitil Saturday
night, April 30, to register. The
first primary is the following
Tuesday. Usually a nonth 'elapses
between final registrations and
,the actual voting., ut this year
the primaries were moved forward
to May and the registration time
lwa:, left unchanged.
SThe supervisor of registration
is required to keep the books
open from 9 to 12 a. m. and from
2 to 5 p. m. daily, except Sunday.
Apalachicola Catholic
Church Is To Sponsor
Fiesta, April 21 to 23
The Easter fiesta, sponsored by
St. Patrick's Catholic church, and
which has been an annual event
in Apalachicola for over 50 years,
will be held in the armory at
Apalachicola, April 21 to 23. Miss
Erline Browne has been elected
chairman of the event, with Mrs.
A. R. Marks, vice-chairman. Com-
mittles have been appointed to
handle details of arrangements.
Important historical events will
be portrayed in the pageant,
"American Memories," dating back
to the time of Columbus. This
will be presented Friday evening.
April 22, with a cast of 150, un-
der the supervision of Mrs. Ned
S. Porter. A dance is scheduled
for the closing night of the fiesta.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.
Mrs. W. O. Lee of Apalachicola
Swas the guest Tuesday of Mrs
Wilbur Wells.


CONGRATULATIONS TO

ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
and to the

CITIZENS OF PORT ST. JOE

Long May They Profit From Their Eforts

0

YOU CAN DEPEND ON


FRESH



Bay Cream Bread

From
QUALITY INGREDIENTS
CLEANLY BAKED
At All Times

o0



BAY BAKERY
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


VELVET CAKES


CREAM BREAD


Now Under New Management


VISITORS WELCOME!


PAC7F. SIX
i.


'


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1938


TH-E STAR


b








FOOLPROOF SAFETY DOORS make the city famous. St. Joseph's Bay! the town, causing the population
SSaint Jo Cpl We can w e l believe the When the 46 members, who first to decline, through death and emi-
.Foolproof safety doors on the "Saints," as the inhabitants were arrived for the constitutional con- gration, to 500. A hurricane fo;-
craneways of the huge Port St. T called, were a pleasure-loving peo- vention-either late Saturday, De- lowed in September and, helped
.Joe Paper Company mill are one Wa o D om 0WI ple, so much so that St. Joseph camber 1, or Sunday, December finish the ruin which the fever
.of the mechanical features of the got the name of being the wick- 2. 1838, they saw a sprawling ,started. The few remaining in-
plan, according to engineers in e-,'est city in Florida. The latter city with many wide open spaces, fiabitants were gone by 1845 or
-charge of construction. (Continued from page 3) charge-from the evidence we for the town was said to have 1846, and the county seat of Ca:-
and the shoals in Lak Wimic have-seems unjust, and must been built over all out-of-doors, houn county was changed in 1844.
Paid Political Advertising d e Wimico have been made because the in- They found probably at least a Population Highest In 1839
had been dredged sufficiently. it habitants of St. Joseph did not dozen places where irey could get The population or St. Joseph
o was thought, to enable steamers want to deny themselves the good such drinks as they desired. They was probably at its peak in 1S39,
For County Commissioner o navigate the bayou. things of life. They determined to heard boisterous sailors showing but it almost certainly was never
r hereby announce my candi- Many Businesses Start have ice for their drinks. They the effects of too much rum. They as muh as 2000. Yet in a growth
-dacy for the office of County Com- i hes to ws wel lid ot uc ames a meant to have St. Andrews Bay found a general gayety, doubtless from nothing to' this number in
m owner, Dtrct 5, Gulf County, Commerce, ay, Palmetto, Pine oysters and advertised the fact. exceeding anything they ever met less than 10 years exceeded any-
in,-s'oner, District 5, Gulf County,! Commerce, May, Palmetto, Pine 'rney had their dances and other before. !thing. which had ever previously
.subject to the Democratic Pri- and Magnolia. Soon many mer- social occasions. Sailors freent- Much Timo thing which had ever previously
rary chants had located in St. Joseph, y cial occasions. Sailors fbeatusent Not Much Time For Pleasure happened in Florida.
ary. c am ong whom were John St. Joselik y B'ecame boisterous because of But the members were men of Space and time forbids more of
If elected I promise to discharge Co., Woodruff & Cavert, E. J tlu. plentiful liquor supply. A roa such unusual greatness that they an account of this interesting ter-
e duties of office to the best of ood. Street & Thompson, Cai il Geogia by way of could not take much time for ritorial town by the beautiful bay.
:my ability and for the betterment & Dalffin, IKimbrough & Smith, j in w as cmpeted t S leasur*e. Among them were a Mention should be made of what
nof f Cunty Geoe tewart & o., and o. H. over hs in 1839 and many came former governor; William P. Du- some Florida editors thought of
of Gf County. Sepherd, all selling groceies; s a ie a een t val; Robert Raymond Reid, soon the place. Editorials and adver-
our vote and support will be arcus Trumble, clothing; H. owns varied amusements. to become governor; Thomas tisements from the St. Joseph
appreciated. Wood, cotton broker; Amos Brown Sport of Kings Enjoyed Brown, only state governor ever Times, and council proceedings
C. ARTHUR LUPTON. & Co., dry goods; J. N. Crane, St. Joseph had its race track to be elected by the Whigs, and published in the same paper,
furs. hats and caps; George Clark, at which races were run one week William Marvin, provisional gov- would be interesting. But if the
furniture, and Henry Hodges, of each year. In the St. Joseph arnor of Florida in 1865. reader, through this article, be-
FOR STATE ATTORNEY liquors. Practically every gro- Times of September 12, 1840, the Three future United States sen- comes interested in the history of
To the Voters of the Fourteenth cery store advertised liquors as following announcement appears: ators, David L. Yuiee (name was Florida's boom city, it will not
well as food, and at least, one "This track will be in fine or- David Levy then, but he later had have been written in vain, and
Judicial Circuit of Florida: merchant advertised groceries, der for the races. The track is it changed), J. D. Wescott, Jr the writer will believe he has
I am a candidate for the Office hardware and liquors. level and the soil firm. yet and Jackson Morton were men performed a useful service.
*of State Attorney, subject to the One of perhaps several who ca- snongy enough for good run- bers. In the convention sat John
oftate Attorney, subject to the tered to contractors was Edward ning. We have seen a letter C. McGehee, to become president GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Democratic Primary, May 3, 1938. Hamilton. who carried a full line from Col. James J. Pittman of of the state secession convention Prescriptions Carefully Com-
tour votes and influence will be of builders' supplies. There were Marianna, a turfite favorably in 1861; E. Carriugton Cabell, to pounded. Phone 27.
greatly appreciated, a number of commission and for- and extensively known to the become representative of the state --
warding merchants, who doubt- proprietor. He will be here at in congress a few years later;
Respectfully, less sold cotton and other exports the races with four horses- five later members of the stateS HANDLE FIFTY
L. D. McRAE. On coi-mission. among g thesewere Francis Marion at the head. supreme court, Walker Anderson, CORDS OF WOOD AN.HOUR
E. J. Hadin, J. L. Smallwood & "We hope our friend, General Benjamin D. Wright, Thomas The huge barking plant of the
FOR STATE ATTORNEY co. and D. B. Wood & Co. Thomas Brown of Tallahassee, Baltzell; Leslie A. Thompson and St. Joe Paper Company, where
FeOR Sw AE ATorNas Some of the best lawyers in is not too much engaged in pol- Albert G. Semmes; and Cosam bark ard dirt is removed from the
Fellow Democrats: Florida lived in St. Joseph for all itics to neglect rubbing his Emir Bartlett. Lzen the ablest logs before they go to the chipper,
I am a candidate for re-election or part of the time between 1835 horses, and we offer a fair field newspaper editor mn Florida. Rob- .ill handle 50 cords of wood per
as State Attorney for the 14th and 1841. Perhaps the most promi- to al competitors, as we hope .,.t f',vmond Reid was elected as hour
Judicial Circuit, composed of the nent of all was ex-Governor Wil- the best blood and muscle of president of the convention, beat- The barker consists of two
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, liam P. Duval, but there were Alabama, Tennessee and Geor- ing William P. Duval, former large drums, each in two sections,
Holmes, Jackson and Washington, many others. gia will be here to go off at the territorial governor, by one vote. with one 150 horsepower motor
subject to the May primaries. Education Not Neglected t,'p of the drum. As our races The convention continued its driving the two sections. The
As your State Attorney, I have Education was not neglected. ,nmie off in proper time after sittings until January 11, 1839. drum shells are built of longi-
handled the business of the office In 183S, and probably earlier, the those in Mobile and Tallahas- when it adjourned. At times there tudinal U-bars welded to channel
promptly, fairly, courteously and St. Joseph Times carried an ad- see. we bespeak full stables were such differences of opinion rings, and each section is sus-
to the best of my ability. If re- vertisemtent of the Academy, with 1ro-' e;ch of those' cities. We that the body came near breaking pended in four heavy alloy steel
elected, I will continue to do so. Robert Beveridge, John C. YMaclay shall have the cash up and no up, but it is said fhat the skill chains and driven by a similar
Yor- vote and support will be and E. J. Hardin as trustees, and grumbling--the only difficulty .,nd diplomatic ability of Presi- chin from a common drive shaft.
appreciated. Amizie A. Beach A..sI., as princi- ill be in running fast enough (llont Reid did mue- to hold it to-
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr., al. In 1S3S Mrs. Stuart adver- to take it out of Florida." gether. -
Marianna, Fla. isce-i a school for young ladies. Money and Politics Build City Decline Begins
and in 1840 Mr. and Mrs. Elder All the time bain-ers and busi- I :-ss tht a nIea-, although its
FOR REPRESENTATIVE announced the openinuc of a Fe- ness men were spending money 20-mile railroad had been cou r
To the Democratic Voters m1-ale Academy on the 6th of April. 1 ii ton boost and build St. pleted, St. Joseph began to de-
of Gulf County: The first newspaper was the St. Joseph. Peter WV. Gautier. J.-. cline. The population of Calhoun
In the belief that my past ex- .Tosephl Telegraph. first issued in r,'n" tlhe influence of his y, by a territorial census There's No Waiting In
perience as a member of the legis- November. .S835, by D. Dinsmore newspaper i itts behalf. But Ire tken in 1838, was 1,642. but in
nature should be of value and that, Wrf-tcott. who nad previously (id not stop there. He continu- 1S40 it had declined ;o 1.142. The
if honored with election, I may be polished the Apaiachicola Adver- lly played politics in behalf of "tinl panic of 1837 was having CO O P
able to render some service to my tier. In July. 1836. Peter W. Gau- ,i, city. The representative of .its effect and many Floridians
County, I announce my candidacy tier, one of the most remarkable Franklin county at the time the were going to Texas and else- BARBER SHOP
fo: Representative in the Legis- men in the history of territorial St. Joseph development first got where. No longer could St. Joseph
lature in and for Gulf County. The Florida, took over the Telegraph ,inder way was E. J. Wood, who get money for its development. You're next for better service.
oller residents of the County are ad th e following November later became a St. Joseph mer- Steps were now taken to make
familiar with my past .legislative chanted its names to The Times. chant. In 1836 Wood got the it a summer resort, and many Expert attention without
record and I invite the investiga- During 1836-37-38-39 St. Joseph legislative council to pass a bill Floridians were there in .841,
tion of our irew citizens. On my exported much cotton, but appar- changing the county seat of when one of the severest yellow waste of time!
past record and my desire to be of ently never reached as many as anklin county from Apalachi- fever epidemics of our history hit
future service, I solicit your vote 40,000 bales in any one year, while cola to St. Joseph, but the Na-
and support in this campaign. I its rival city, Apalachicola, was" 'onal Congress, which had the
assure you that your vote and sup- shipping from 50,000 to 75,000 power to review ail territoriall
port will be greatly appreciated. bales annually. act:,, refused to allow the change. NA TURA L G A S SERV ICE
Sincerely, Railroad Is Constructed This was because of the influence NA TURA L GA S SERV ICE
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr. One reason why Apalachicola of Joseph M. White, then terri-
seemed to have the greater com- trial delegate representing Flor-
Vo En mercial prosperity was because ida in Washington, who was also NOW Ready for Every House In
VOE FOR the vessels plying Lake Wimico a member of the Apalachicola
D. STUART G Lu ,were often running aground. To Land Co., and hence greatly in-:
D. S R G make transportation more certain tereste.d in Apalachicola. Gautier.m Port St. Joe
CANDIDAttiE another railroad was built-a line who became representative in
.- .... *extending from St. Joseph to ola, Fanklin county in 1838, used K I G WATER H ATIN
: r a point on the Apalachicola river more diplomacy ttan his predeces- I A R H A
"-' i- ome 30 miles dotantn. This line, or. Seeing that he could not REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
Jv-hich began operation in October, change the county seat to St.
OF 1839, made Columbus. Ga., nearer J,-,.ili. he got a bill through the o- ---. -
Sto St. Joeph than to Apalachicola, .C.hil creating t:e county of
S-..t SUcP b bi,,t the ship lines operating from i Calhoun and maa;ng St. Joseph NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
C"o' \'rnalachicola cut tneir rates so the county seat. But he did more. NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
much that to compete the St. Geto Constitutional ConventionST PAY FR
Grmw' Joseph & Iola Railroad had to do He actually got Florida's first JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS
its transportation a a loss. Thereconstitutional convention for his
One is good reason to believe' that the city. Talk about nrluence. That -- { A full line of gas appliances in stock te.-
line never prospered. Some of it. of Peter's must have been great
rates advertised uponcomletionto pull the convention away from Inquire Ritz Theater Building
E L E C T B care given below: the territorial capital to.. a town Gulf Hardware Co. Phone 168
E L E T Bale, of cotton, 15c. Salt, pep- incorporated less than five years. PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY
sack, 10c. Hogsheads barrels, Joseph was the Miami of its day.
JH NN boxes, half and quarter casks of The delegates to the convention SOUTHERN UI GAS COMPANY
mdse.. not over 5 ft., l0c. 1000 would want to go to a place where L
He will B' feet of lumber, $2.50. 1000 brick, good food was served. They would
$3.00. Per cord of wood, $2.00. want to relax at times, and where YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932
Appreciate Ce.dar logs, per' lineal ft., 1 c. would they find a place so much
Horses and oxen, per head. $3.00. on pleasure bent as the city on _
YOUR Pleasure-Loving People
Let us take a picture of life in
VOTE St. Joseph in its ney-day-say in
1838 and 1839.
and Ships arrived and departed each
week. A regular line from Mobile
Support to Charleston stopped over at St.
Spor Joseph and direct shipments of
For goods were made to Liverpool.
Vessels from New Orleans also
topped at the wharves of St. REAL EST TE and INSURANCE
SJoseph. Three hotels, chief of ESTA TE an
State nAtt which was the Mansion House,
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit served such appetizing food as to PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
...----- -,- -...- Paid Political Advertising

LOTS AND HOUSES FOR SALE
We Will Build You a House To Suit You


LIST WITH US -:- SUBDIVISIONS


PAGE SEVEN


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1938


THE STAR








PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR


I, ,n~-I,


.. ,,* *'
.V.-."'


,rap


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':

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P':' :,T
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BARGES WILL UNLOAD CARGO HERE
Hundr. : of I- r.ts vll unload their charges of pulp %%ood
in t'.., spre:Iall, i :,r .:rtcted basin whe.'e pro section from
high *,.' r d 3 feature -, i t''t tr-Lctura.l p'an. A c.:' 3l, now
bei.nri d'edOed .: .S.'.een St. Jojepn's Ba. and the Apalachicola
c:r.al .i. ''li.t: Ci: ,.. 1 furnish a valuable arter;al v.' er\ ay
!ic* ir-.- .. I:g to the i II. Completion of otle canal link
* 3,I g.. P:rt St J-.e d'recT inland w aerv\ ay connection with
-,!i r. : 1 h i.lf Co-'-' bet- een lere and i-houston. Texas.
and inllan du ,ni Istrial centers as far north as Cincinnati and
Plttburgh.. Cut courts> Panama ieAs.Herald.


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1938


Florida Admitted To
Union 93 Years Ago

Florida was admitted to the
Union on March 3, 1845, 93 years
.ago, when President Tyler signed
the controversial Florida bill on
the last day of his administra-
tion, despite a protest from north-
ern congressmen that its little
population of 35,000 did n:ot en-
title it to the dignity of statehood.
The peninsula territory bought
from Spain for -'5.000,000, became
a state immediately, and the fol-
lowing, D]eco~ember its three-mem-
ber congre-sional delegation was
seated in the senate and house.
i'hey were Senator David Levy
and Jnames D. WVscott andj Rep-
resentative Edward C. Cabell.
Both Levy a;ld Ca;bell signed the
state constijntit'on w h i c h was
ri-pown up at old St. Joseph in
183S.

BENEFITS SEEN FOR
FLORIDA IN RFC BILL

Tt is believedi i-." our local rep-
resentatives in Washington that
the RFC amendment bill which
passed Monday vilii De a great
stimulation to Florida business.
The bill provides for loans to
public agencies a nd provides
credit facilities for business en-
terprises.
Under this amendment and ex-
isting law, the RFC will have au-
thority to do practically every
kind of banking business except
to accept deposits. It is expected
that a largee public building pro-
g:ra" may follow.
Municipalitis. counties and
other subdivisions will be able to
obtain long loans for public im-
provements. The usual RFC rate
of interest is 5 per cent.

Send The Star to a friend.


FIR5T SHIP TO TIE UP AT P3RT ST. JOE'S NEW DOCK


a.-: .:, :






Here is the steamer "Tropic Star," out of Chili wI th a cargo of 3000 tons of s-lt cake for use of the
St. Joe Paper Company mill. Officers aboard the freighter, the first to use the new dock at Port St.
Joe, declared facilities here are unequalled anywh -re in the world. The ship-to-warehouse arrange-
ment of the St. Joe Paper Company mill is being r cognizedd by shipping interests and exporters as an
ideal arrangement for the rapid transfer of cargo. Cut courtesy Panama City News-Herald

LOGS PILED HIGH ALONG TP.CK FOR USE OF ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MILL


Here is the raw material, slash pine cut from forests maintained by the St. Joe Paper Company in
Gulf. Franklin, and Calb un counties, which is bei 1g used in the production of kraft oaper at the
newly completed $7,4QQ0,0Q pap-r m;:i at Port St. Joe. Hundreds of workers are employed in the pro-
duct'on and cutt'ng of pine timber :or paper-making. Cut courtesy Panama City News-Herald.


A scene snapped on the Apalachicoia River from Alum Bluff, north
of Bristo', in Liberty county. -Courtesy State Forestry Service.

FEW COPIES OF PROGRESS EDITION'STILL ON HAND
The Star har, on hand approximately 250 copies of this edition
which we will be glad to mail out at 15c per copy or two
copies for 25c. We cannot mail them out at 10c per.copy after
this week*, as our second clas., mailing privilege will not permit



We Can Arrange

FHA TITLE ONE LOANS
It will pay you to consult us if you wish to make a
long-term loan to build or modernize

We Carry a Complete Stock of


GENERAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES
RADIOS COFFE MAKERS
TOASTERS PERCOLATORS
WAFFLE IRONS MIX MASTERS

Also

Ranges, Refrigerators, Washing Ma-
chines and Hot Water Heaters



The past perform-
ance an- reputation
of G. E. eliminates '
you: electrical
troubles




GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY
PHONE 2 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.








FRIDY, ARIL8, 138 AGE EVE


HIDDEN WEALTH

Nature, always generous, has
made the section surrounding
Port St. Joe a land supreme,
waiting only the touch of human
hands to bring forth its hidden
wealth.


,Look Us Up0!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R I G H T

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker



CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
vVE CALL FOR and DELIVER
0'
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.













I4!


I




Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others .
Let your family enjoy
some today.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S

Dairy

Products
I'O 110 4


- ./* T-.F'^. -. - -_


GULF VIEW

TAVERN


We Carry the BeSt Lines of
WINES and BEERS











Ce-re Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE

P'east Use No Profanity
w. E. I WItENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road

Rooms for Rent
a A*C

C
4







Evening of
PLEASURE

P'eas- Use No Profanity


7 Miles O'.t on Panama Road 4
Rooms for Rent
" C L & .


TYPICAL HOMES


-; *: -


BEING ERECTED


LeHARDY BAR
AND BILLIARD PARLOR

We Carry the Finest Brands of
BEER, WINES and WHISKEY
All at the Lowest Price

Cal On Us When the Party Goes Dry


-V.


Homes of this type are bein3 ~o'structed in all sections of Port St.
Jo:; to care fc.- the -ap rily increasing population. Ai year ago their.
plot oo ground was rc.vered w t'1 palmetto. Star Photo.

NEW GRAMMAR SCHOOL GOING UP


"~~t~~a~ j.i

th" ca roo present structure which may be seen at the--
.high school at the lef. -Str P o.



c' 'Ocare for :the large increase in enro;lmen'. .a new elementary
school building has keen found necessary to relieve congestion in
the clas roo'-nr, of t4e present structure which may be seen at the
right. The new building is i.i the center of the picture and -he
high school at the left. -Star Photo.

nin' 'round the woods looking' at
Marianna Caves ingopher holes."
"Gopher holes," he snorts, "wait
A'till you see 'erm!" And since he
Appeal To Kay was a lot bigger than I am and
had a kind of determined glint in
his eye, I figured maybe I'd bet-
ic R a.y o B lieve Anything In ter go along and avoid trouble.
I Now I have visited the Maim-
R ad to Wonders of moth Cave in Kentucky, the Cave
Florida of the Winds in Colorado, and a
lot of lesser caves in other parts
By RUSSELL KAY of the country, but folks, I'm
.tellin' you, this mess of .caverns
You krow, just about the time up in Jackson county can hold
I am ready to form the crazy idea their own with any of 'em.
that I know all about Florida, I. Now it seems this guy Yancey
is a kind of cave man, not the
usually slumb-e on some amazing' type you 8ee in the movies
aogw feature or attraction that I'd wearing' a leopard slkin sports suit
never dreamed of before, and and carrying' a slab of a pine tree
for a cane, but a sort of 1938
.nat's just what happened to me odea ne,a buness srt of 19and
Ien I visited Marianna a few car'-vin' a flashlight.
dua s ago. Well, he took me about three
If anyor.- had tried to tell me a miles from town for a motor trip
through a portion of the new
mont ago that thereae re aves' Caverns State Park. a 1400-acre
and caverns ia this state that can reservation being developed as a
r-old their own with anything that national playground by the: Flor-
ntuck, ennee Virginia a board f forestry and state
.entuckyi renneskee, Virginia or park service. Among the features
'clorado have to ofier, I would planned are a golf course, na-
a.-vc li't-iLed attentively while I tural bridge, athletic area, mu-
was figur'n' out in my mind scum, aquarium and fish hatch-
ery. Bridle paths :; roughout the
whether to call a cop or an alien- re ill ivie athe isrhout while
iEt. But after my exper;onae at excellent swimming and boating
.Mariana,. ....brother,. I'm about will b' available.
.ea-y ;o believe anything anyone But.the big feature will be the
underground caverns where thh
mal-iht tcil ne as to-the waders, armased visitor v-'; be. crrie'l
?.'u.rs, beauties or advantages of through a maze of passageways
"l' r"sa. into 14 separate roon-s or com-
oest, if om guy stepped up apartments, each of tm a verit-
able fairy place, w!th fantastic
:o me right now and tried to com- vevr-ehangirg sr---r at every
rince me that there was a moun- 'i~.- irre ,'1rr hb- r'rstered stal-
.ain peak somewhere in Florida ast9i"- ar"l stil"-.tr' woven I
,,.. ,irart!e mv(-trprieces by Mother
with a glacier running' down one e i art~ m o one T by MoS how
Elde and a flock of polar bears 'Ier .h ha- be n at the task.
play:n' leapfrog on the other, 1 While sirnl,- in. character to
might b, a bit skeptIcal, but I'd !h,e ,s foni' '-- o".'-" P'ct;orS.
hesitate before I called him a lar. fh c -f Caverrs P-tf Prk rneir
If these archacologlcal WPA MHrinna oevsr,- menv feature'
workers were to ur.cover a mess fovnd nowhere else pnd when th,
of Eg- tia.7 pyramids or a leaning' dev(lop"-ert in opering them for
tower o' Pisa somewhere between oub c inspection, row under way.
the Alabama line and the Florida jis eo nnl',1 r '-o ,'e,'f'
Straits, it wouldn't surprise me in o.l.~, ..n: i ,trr-.- tnu-'si ar"'
S st. visitors fo' the fcur corners of
But getting' back to my story: V thiorl.
Over in MaTranna I ran into a _____ -
chap named Yancey. who is sec-
rettiry of the chamber of com- rARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
merce. and' right: away' 'e i sitss Priscriptiors C-"refully l om-
that I let him take r-e c'; to s'ce pounded. Phoife 27.
the caverns. '-
"T i-trn I 'ays. "you're a nice
,uyv ,rd I like you ;nd all that Maple furniture is both inex-


, ut I a';'- go no iime to be run-


pens've and easy :o care for.


J. L. KERR
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
-WATCHES
-CLOCKS
Repairing -JE WEL RY
A Specialty --D IAMONDS


Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything


H. H. TAYLOR
giSg Our Work Speaks for Itself
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe






Give YOUR


Family a Home


In Beacon Hill

Subdivision

Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means. .



$50 down-$25 month

WHY PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts. ..
You can pay for a home in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-


ing out in rent. .

INVESTIGATE!


LET US SHOW YOU!


COTTAGES FOR RENT
0


Beacon Hill


Development Company


BEACON HILL, FLA.


J. S. PATRICK


- --- -- --- 1p


h,",. STAR


PAGE SEVEN


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1938








PAEEGTTESA RDY PI ,13


AUTOMATIC WEIGHING from 600 to 2500 pounds per hour.
MACHINES HANDLE PAPER The sat cake is handled to the
INGREDIENTS AT MILL bins by a pneumatic system.
INGREDIENTS AT MILL
___ I-----rS------
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Automatic weighing machines Complete Lie of Magazines.
are used by the St. Joe Paper -- ----
Company in their mill here. One' FIRST PAPER MADE IN U. S.
machine weighs wood chips before -
they go to the storage bins above The first paper manufactured in
th'e digesters. the United States was made in
Another automatic weigher is Philadelphia in the early 18th cen-
installed under the service bins tury. Sheets were made separ-
which feed salt cake to the mix- at'ely and only rags were used,
ing tanks of the recovery units, pounded into pulp in stone mor-
These deliver salt cake at a pre- tars. Several days were needed
set rate which may be varied to dry the sheet of paper.

~it s--------------
LITTLES SERVICE STATION
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes
---- --------------- --



We Haul Anything- -
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Scenes Around the City of Port St. Joe


1-Ships from the Seven Seas 2-View taken on St. Joseph's Joseph.


discharging and taking on car-
'o- at the clj wooden wharf in
Port St. Joe, which was de-
stroyed a number of years ago
during a storm.


Bay.
3-A beach cottage near Port
St. Joe.
,-M.)nument marking site of
Florida's Constitutional Conven-
tion, held in 1838 at old St.


5-Port Inn Park, located Qp-
o ,'te Part Inn and bordering
on beautiful St. Joseph Bay.
6-Port St. Joe high school.
Pictures Courtesy A N Railroad


WE COMPLIMENT THE



St. Joe Paper Co.

And Congratulate the CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
On Acquisition of the South's Finest Paper Mill


With completion of the Paper Mill, Port 'St.
Joe is well on the way to becoming the

INDUSTRIAL CENTER OF WEST FLORIDA

The City is up-to-date in every respect with
modern water and sewer systems, a rapidly
growing Business District and beautiful Resi-
dential Sections. .We join with our Fel-
low Businessmen in extending an invitation to
the World to

COME TO PORT ST. JOE
'. "Florida's Fastest Growing Little City"


EVERYTHING IN READY-TO.WEAR
PIECE GOODS, SHOES, MILLINERY
' ., Port St. Joe, Fla.


FIRST FLORIDA EARLY OUTPUT SMALL
W ASHING T ON From the original paper mill o,
P RD IMARY William Rittenhouse in Philadel-
G OAP. S T phia in 1688, with a year output
of from 1200 to 1500 reams of pa-
S TO BE H Tper, the papermaking industry in
By JAMES PRESTON ISD America today includes about 800
By JAMES PRESTGN mills ith ani annual production
-f over 11,000,00Q tons of paper of
SECOND REPUBLICAN CANDI- all kinds.
\ car-eful bit of behind-the-scene DATE QUALIFIES FOR U.
strategy has come to light in don- S. SENATE RACE Lin._ is :.I-de by heating linse-
L'Cction with the increasing talk de e
of an early adjournment of con- e to 100 degreel Centigrade,
gress. And if thle strategists do For the first time in the his-
,. c,*r work effectively, the wage- tory of Florida the Republican
'o,:-r b 11 ho;es of .he adn.inistra- party will conduct a state-wide
t.ion imty not-as had beei, ex- priim:iry. due t) ;ke fact that n
a.- .i l 1,xp1 i I n ,I conigressi:)nal :.:ditdjates iare- s king the p;.ty's
,pigeonhole,- rai'il.tionp to ti'p Trnited Stqat ii '
Instead, the stage is being sei seale
for a "pressure" passage of such 'homans E. Swanson of iori' I i
a 1'1:l in an el"veiith hour fight. Lauderdale and Allen E. Walker
strategy began when it re- nf Wint "r H-aven are the two gen-
cen!ly becanll' apparent than most ti.tleen who have qualified with B: I
all members of congress are the. secretary of state for the Re-
anxious to get back home as early 1'ul'iican senatorial nointtii.oni". '
as possible-what with most of An'u that, dear readers, is levw-'
.lienm facing hard campaigns be-I According to State Librarian W.
fore next November s -reckoning" T. Cash, there- has been no oppo.
at the polls. sition for nominations antong Re- SUPPORT YOUR
_nublicans s i nce Reconstruction
B:';iy, the strategists .are ad- Days in the 1870's whenE the party HOME TOWN
,ancing.along this line: was in control of. the state--be- ICE PLANT
1. Let congress proceed with fore primaries were the thing..
the plan to clear the slate of all' The party carried Florida for
current measures in the belief ad- Herbert Hoover in 1928 against The plant that furnishes
journment can then be effected. Democrat Alfrei .E. Smith, and you ice the year 'round
journnen ca th n be e pold substantial.-votes for staei
2. Limit additional presidential candidates who had been noiri- OE I
messages and requests to recom- nit ~ without a contest. ST. JOE IC
mendations for studies of prob- Primary ballots contain only
ems for which legislation will be the names of opposed candidates. C O P
sought next year. Usually the Republican party pro- COM
Sy. When the slate in b o t h poses not more tan one man for Max Kilburn, Prop.
lossess is clean of all other mat- each state office.
ters and adjournment is near, There are 'five candidates for Manufacturers of
,-ui ab w-.-,-,ur l)ill into the the- Demnocra tic senatorial romi-
homs floor and throw all hands nation C R Y STA L I-C E
to work to drive it through. I -FromTreated Water
._- From Treated Water
Tie pian is to have the wage- GARYLOCKHAR DRUG 'CO.
hour measure so "illnocently" Registered PharmaCists. Phbne 27.
crafted that the house won't hesi- -
tate to pass it. Then a conference SOUTH SEA ,PAPER
committee would be appointed
and given only a brief time to N'tives of the South Sea Is-
ieconcile the "innocent" house Tinds s.triT off the Inner bark
bill and thie more drastic 'wage layer of the mulberry tree and
"lili: pissed a year ago by. the. seh- with mallets--beat it into the- form .
ate. of paper. This they color with
SThe- result would be--and-.this vegetables juices. making sheets I
is the finall catch-that the- con- of 'beautiftil color.
terence committee would -almosV '
certainly reconcile' the bills to -. Advertise thift Sp6cial Sale. 'The ,.
confo.1.. witlih -th original, wage- .Star prints, dodgers and .circulars. ATRONIZE A
.hour regulations' proposed.: JY the PATRONIZE Z A
"administrati'dn. "' ---- ---- ....
.... -.t .. .n riculturi-l Adjistmeint 'Administra- HOME-OWNED
'After reading -n announcement tion is gaoiig' to do a'. little 'STORE-
that a" 'special government- 'comn- "ar:ial. policing."' ...- ..
irittee hlis bejn t'apporited- to' find" Tlhe AAA'.has' contracted with O'"-' Prices Are
out' what 'is wrong with 'and 'what an aerial suirVey fifnn to photo- L O W ER r
can be e dne to i-eve the -wahing graph 108,854 s square miles of ur Terms
$26,000,000,000 i'ailroa'd 'industry, -farm lands a's "a start' toiwardi ems
qne of the capitol' side-line spec-''"chcking ithe *pertorinance of Its EA S I ER !
tators dryly' observed: conservation i progran:.
';it's refreshing' to hear that
we've come around'tb realize an Uidauntte y crtcism o ts Oldest Furniture Store in
abused goose won't lay golden earlier" movie""' production, "The Gulf County
eggs, but it's astounding that its Plow That Broke the Plains," the
going to take a special. .cqmmit- government has released anotherr .
tee of experts to decide it office .$50,000 cineipa.- 'The tiver."
ally." .. This .'one,is .destined' to show us BA RG AIN
that a lot of"tax dollars are be-
Just to be sure that Farmer .ing .spent. for .,the' "iupkeep" of FURNITURE STORE:
Jones lives up-to the rtrany rul.s 01' .Man River ., As if we tax- Port St. J~e Fla.
prescribed .by the eyerpmeneqt f6r payers' hadn't 'kow. "it' all the
the operation of his farm, the Ag time!''' -; .....*. .. ... .


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1938


K










Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
er.t growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


STAR


SECTION TWO
PORT ST. JOE PROGRESS
EDITION


1838-HELP US CELEB RATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, Port St. Joe Progress Edition


"The Blod Strain"

A Narrative of Port St. Joe


By HAIDEN MILLER


( Editors Note:


Th's story was's The Apalachicolla Northern


vwri'ttn some ten or twelv' years railroad. which has been co1m-
an"o, and the writer is now dead. pieidt about 16 years, extends
This is the first time it has ever from River Junction on the north
belen published.) to Port St. Joe, a distance of
_about 130 miles.
Experience a n d observation The pI)es'ent village of Port St.
have saitsfied me tiht no one man Joe consistss of a postoffice, two
or woman can escape his or her or' three general stores, the usual
predestined fate. and that which 'aroage, a hotel, and a building.
is "bred in the bone will out in p'rt depot and part general of:
the flesh." fices, of the railroad company.
cntly business rqir an The village contains a population
Rccntly business uir an in all of about 1000 people.
a.sociate of mine and myself tol
make a trip to Port St. Joe, Fla. City Sleeps For 80 Years
Port St. Joe, as this ancient port The signs of business, develop-
is now known, is what survives lment are good at this time,
of St. Joseph, settled by the mainly owing to the acquisition
Spaniards in the 18th century. and proposed development of a
Authentic record c'oes not give grSat body of virgin long-leaf pine
the date precisely, but it is well and cypress timber by a lumber
established that it is one of the company which has ample capi-
many places n:1cd by the pirates tal for these purposes. It is gen-
of the Spanish Main as a rendez- rally believed that prosperity in
vo1ts for rest and refilling their a11l io its m1o:lern forms has now


vex sels at necessary intervals
while engaged in, their joyous
tral e of Irurder and rapine on
:he high nees.
The town is situated on St.
.Jo eph Bay, one of the most beau-
tiful bodies of water on the Gulf
of Mexico. Even now the depth
of water in this great natural
harbor at points where docks
:;:-ht be placed, is f:o:n :30 to 401


conL to old St. Joe after a long
:'..l dia:hl-1:k sleep o1 f about SO(
ye'sis. All I hiigs considered, this
a.:s a gn"ol, sound siesta four
tiines as long as that of old Rill
Vin Wii kie. Thie good old Dutch
tchir.app.s which put Rip to sleep
were nothing as comnparpd to the
Ih thal cniius', that di"pos'.d of St.
Joe for 80 years.
In 1845 a combine l scuirge of


cVe Jc:n n Ccngrata':;:ng

ST. JOE P."PER CO.

On Comlleticn of Their iMVill

SWe Stock An Unexcelled

-- Line of


Fine Groceries
ORT ST. 1I0 Z ad
EOPLEan
ROSPEP EChoice Meats


Our Prices Are the Same
EVERY DAY and NO LIMIT
to the Amount You Wish to Buy



ledley's Cash Store

"WHERE YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE EVERY DAY"


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


yellow lever and Asiatic cholera
literally wiped out the population
of St. Joe and fire destroyed the
buildings. When we visited the
site of the old town, nothing re-
. ained lbut a few scattered bricks
:an1 stone foundations. When it is
considered that in 1S38 there were
at least 10.100 people living there,
with all the comforts of the civili-
:,ation of that day, even including
a onc-mile race track, the immen-
sity of the calamity will be clear.
Now it is but a waste of scrub
palm, pines and. sand, and the
home of the rattlesnake and the
moccasin. About a mile from the
old townsite is the old cemetery,
and on the stones and monuments
appear the names of some of the
families that figure in this legend.
St. Joe Had Railroad
In 1838, St. Joe had a railroad
of its own, named the St. Joseph
and Iola Railroai. extending in a
northerly direction for about 30
miles and crossing a part of the
Dead Lakes along the Apalachi-
cola river. More than 30 years
ago the writer was a member of
a hunting and fishing party from
Montgomery, Ala., to W'ewa-
hilchka, and saw a part of the
ttecstling of this railroad. No dMirbt
it is standing today. So great was
the despair of the few survivors
of ihi great calamity of 1815, that
tiLn r:il of this road was taken up
Ind tile whole enterprise Ubai-
'I.ol:d, the lrottin trestle in the
swamp and some remains of the
;oadway foundation being a pa-
hictic reminder of what once were
'reat human hopes and aspira-
'0ons.
This roadway, however, was
..n all in vain, because it is used
'y the ubiquitous flivverr" and
its driver, the Apostle of Com-
S-'i;, anld. bcing in a land that
;:in:ost all swamp, it is an open
nilltioln as to whether the origi-
al railroad. which apparently
.hi.s gone Ihe way of all things, is
:irl i)nw a common carrier after
I. :! .'t subject to the "slings
I' *rroTs" which bIeset the real
0: (0:1 cir1rior of today.
A\ i;i:'!liul marble and granite
,.']!. 11 c:]mn1e"or'atinlg the
: o t liic ';Irs consitti i onall
Si,. :it:on of Foirida ini DIce:ni-
", 1'. w;s 'r' ted upoln the
'o'. ito oldl St. .lo where the h;1ll
el)d inl' which tlhe cnilvntlioUl
Svas held. This monlument shows
1lie names of all members of this
convention and other appropriate
dialn.
Following dedication of this
(:cillument in 1922, old St. Joe, its
',ioriie'. ghosts, "ha' lts," etc..
wrn Ileft,' joined Iby the rcw moi-
II!cellt. to thle tender mercies of


.eory las::inating to ine. as I have
I natural leaning toward the his-
'ory of bygone people and events.
Find Oldest Inhabitant
After isoM' l inquiry we located
"'ye oldest inhabitant," who turned
out. to be an ancient shrimuper
i ;:1 fisherman named Paul Bigot.
We found him in his shackl lo-
''t'd about half way between old
St. Joe and Port St. Joe,. He was
engaged, in repairing his nets, and
Il'oni introducing ourselves and
telling him that we had come to
'im for some information as to
oast history of the vicinity, he
became very friendly and talka-
tive.
Hle told us that he was born in
St. Joe in September. 1839, and
was, consequently, in his 84th
year. Beyond the fact that his
face was a mass of wrinkles and
that he apparently had but two
teeth left, he showed little sign


of his advanced age, being thin, able ways. Grandfather Bigot
but strong and active. My atten- married a young girl of St Joe
tion was at once attracted to a in 1816. One son, the father of my
most singular and prominent historian, was born of this union
>irthnark. It was of a vivid scar- in 1817, and this son was conse-
let hue, triangular in shape. and quently 21 years of age at the


locatedd on his neck about half an
inch below the lobe of his left
ear, th'e mark being nearly an
nch in size. His varying moods
seemed to have no effect on its
color, it remaining at all times a
bright scarlet.
Upon my alluding diplolmatic-
ally to this mark, he told me that
the first male child in each gen-
eration of his family, beginning
with his grandfather and on down
to his own great-grandson, had
borne this mark. each exactly
alike and appearing only on the
oldest son. This unvarying birth-
mark appearing regularly from
generation to generation was the
foundation of his belief in hered-
ity, of which more anon.
Grandfather Sailed With LaFitte
He told us that his paternal
grandfather, also named Paul Bi-
got, was one of ihe "merrie com-
pany" who sailed with Jean La-
F'itte in his voyaging back and
forth on the Spanish Main, en-
,aged in the honorable pursuit of
relieving Spanish ships; and
others. too. of their surplus riches,
and almost as frequently their
lives. Indeed, h i s grandfather
n'ust have stood high in the good
iOSces ol that celebrated pirate
and gentleman of .fortune, Jean
LaFitte. His tale confirms that
part of American history which
:Cys that LaFitte and about 100
members of his crew were given
a full pardon by the United
States government after their
brave and successful serving of
C'enera' .lacks:n's great guns at
the Battle of New Orleans, this
eilng an' instance where skill ac-
quilred I'or iilfariois purposes was
pu; to a good ianl patriotic use.
SoIm o' ILaFittpe's men availed
of this amnesty and lived and
1;cd honest lnen. Some others,
including their lender, return ed to
their old ways and met various
Sttes. Among the former was
P-aul Bigot II. who, after wander-
ig arou il in the 1arratarit a see-
':in of .Louisiana for a linto, fin-
i'ly scttlled at St. Joseph, earn-
ing a m:' agro livelihood in fishing
:,; perhaps s oliher iImore question-


time of the constitutional conven-
tion in St. Jo'e in 1838.
It appeared, in the course of
our conversation with old Paul.
that he was an ardent believer in
heredity, and he cited his own
family history in support of this
belief. Eliminating any attenipt
to imitate his language, inter-
spersed with characteristic shrugs,
and grimaces, his story was as
follows, and, as he evidently be-
lieved it implicitly, you can un-
derstand his belief in the law of
heredity:
The Story of Paul Bigot
In the year 1791 there lived in
the Province of Brittany, in
France, an ancient and long-de-
scended family named deArm-
gnac. At this time the family con-
sisted only of the count, a young
man about 25; his wife, who was
about the same age, and one child,
a little boy of three years. De-
Armgnac was naturally a Royal-
ist in politics and, inq addition,
was unusually bitter and out-
spoken against the Revolution,
its practices, and object. Hitherto
he had enjoyed immunity from
the harsher methods of the Revo-
lutionists, mainly by reason of
his comparative insignificance and
the remoteness of his residence
from Paris.
Unfortunately, in 'the summer
of 1791 he became possessed with
there idea that his duty to the
Royalist cause made it necessary
for him to make a trip to Paris.
His devoted wife absolutely re-
fused to be left at home, and ar-
ranged to accompany him, despite
his better judgment to the con-
trary. The confidential serva::t
antd general factotum of i1he


count was Panl]
grandfather of
old fisherman
This Bigot was a
u )loIs n1 i1 of)
own age. Raise
gnac estate, his
servants of the
for generations


"'igot. the great-
our historian, the
of Port St. Joo.
a shrewd, unscrn')-
ahourt the count's
d on the dc-Arn-
forbears had boon
deArminac family
and with a long


record of faithful devotion 1o the
family interests.
(Continued on Page 4)


VIJ ICM & KERR


REALTORS


I

We Congratulate the

CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
On Its SPLENDID PAPER MILL
And Extend Our Best Wishes to the

ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY






REAL ESTATE and

INSURANCE



PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

r-- ..... _......--.--


J_ ,






PAGE TWO

FOREST OWNERS

/ ENCOURAGED BY

PAPER MAKING

ST. JOE MILL GIVES MARKET
AND PERMITS THINNING
OF YOUNG STANbS

Establishment of the huge pa-
per mill at Port St. Joe does not
alarm forest owners in this sec-
tion who are growing timber
crops. Instead, it is encouraging
then; because a pulpwood market
'lrits thinning in young stands
and improvement cuttings in older
ones.
Such forest culture operations,
which are required of owners
luirm whom the St. Joe Paper
Company purchases wood, not
on y return sole income to forest.
owners in advance of the final
harvest, but also greatly speed up
l-. growth of the best trees
which have been reserved.
The paper mill and the lumber
mills can both obtain their re-
quirenments from tie same forests
when the owners treat their for-
ests as crops of trees and cut
them to obtain diversified prod-
ucts.


Pulpwood Is By-Product
In common with most other en-


THE STAR


during a commodity actually
needed by industry, but also in-
creases the quality of a forest cut
by ordaining t at oney prime
trees will mature to saw-timber.
Furthermore, the trees reserved
will reach a merchantable size
much sooner than would be the
case in an unthinned forest.
Greater Returns
If pulpwood is treated as the
principal crop, however, and all
trees in young s:,ands are cut,
then there is no opportunity to
practice diversified forestry and
l; row a n':l Ilang'e of forest prod-
ucts, including saw-logs, posts,
poles, piling, ties -nd stave bolts.
Sonle of these are 'nor'e valuable
than pulplwo od.
Greatest roIlnens lfrom tiimlber-
rowing therefore, will come i
fronil manlagini timinjer crops so asj
to take advantage of the markets
afifoerded by all the woo'd-using in-:
dutisries, inlslcad ol' making tall
the trees into i Iby-iproduct, such
as pulpwood, whiile ic'ey are only,
half-grown.

WATCH SEEDLINGS I
little two inch seedlings of
i euhernc pine can be destroyed
by the millions by an ordinary
forest fire, according to advocates
of gre-at r 'fo'c:;t fire control, and
these grass-like plants need the
greatest protection possible, now
that the paper mills have invaded
the South.


terprises, timber growing yields
both products and by-products.
MOR
Pulpwood, because i need not be
of .arge size, nor obtained from Production o
straight, perfect trees, is a forest during 1937 tc
by-product. 325,600,000 po
It can be obtained from stands record. This fi
of young timber in need of thin- 277,000,000 po
ning and from those trees or por- industry, a
tions of trees too crooked or one, has beer
knotty for first quality saw-logs mcnt to mo
or piling. Cutting pulpwood, so as bince its begi
to improve a forest by removing
defective and crowded trees, not Help prevent
only returns an income by pro- save the pine.



MIIIIM _mive u |


;E RAYON
f rayon in the U. S.
otaled approximately
unds, a new high
gure compares with
unds in 1936. The
comparatively new
I providing employ-
re persons yearly
inning.

t forest fires and


Part St. Lie Pmgrnss Edition


THOMPSON'S BAKERIES


APALACHICOLA


-o-


PORT ST. JOE


: W'1.:-~'
.wt t -p
~- .-, .


- a,-- --


CONGRATULATIONS TO


ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
0

Boost Port St. Joe-BUY
Thompson's Bread and ST
ORT ST. JO m SOns. ARTT
EOPLEi EOPLi
ROSPE Cakes ROSP,
AT YOUR FAVORITE GROCER'S


We Compliment the


St. Joe


Paper


Company


Quality Grocery




St. Joe Hardware Co.

Costing Dept S-tore.


Port

R.


C. G. COSTIN, Prop. ,




t. Joe FT S rida
St. Joe ROSP loda
nf, Florid


- a ii


Illl~ensi


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~Be~e~,,~rrr~s~arase~P~i~W


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Per-ti St. Joe Prgrs EIto H S RPG TRE


SOUTHERN PINE Ships of the A

SERVES SCORES


OF INDUSTRIES

PROBLEM OF INTEGRATED
USE INCREASES IN
IMPORTANCE

Southern pine forests are the
source of raw materials for sc .. .'.
many industries that the problem
of integrated use is one of in-
creasing importance. Our forests
are admirably adapted to diversi-
fled utilization.
When tlis is the general prac- .---
tice, all industries dependent up-
on forests will find their require-
ments met without depriving an-
other of essential raw materials.
It frequently is impracticable
for lumber companies to own for-
ests for growing only sawtimber, SHIPS
because ot the costs involved and From the Seven Seas dis-
the delayed returns. Also, it is charging and taking on cargo
not feasible for forests to be at the old wooden wharf in
managed solely for the production Port St. Joe harbor. Scenes
ut po.-s, piling, veneer logs, ties. like th:s will again be seen
and similar products, here-but on a m ch larger
Wide Area Needed scale.
Such forest prucucts industries P y &
must draw their timber require-
ments from a wide area, much
too large to be owned or con-
:.. "'d'i :i' i,-3 e o i'orp.r cicts ao'a;e.
Aihouli paper mills are ac-
quiring forest land tributary to
iteir pL'nt fo the production of gardless of what business a nar
pulpwood, yet it Is probable that ticular forest owner is engaged
;.,. will find it more economical in, he will have forest products
to manage their properties for the ;o sell to a variety of wood-using
,:'*cuc it ti- t imlber for other plants.
uses as well. Vorist-owning lumber companic:
More aud more the forest, rather an:l other forest land owners are
than a particular type of mill. is i;oinig it advantageous to make
:.'-oi.hi:a ihe .eteriininig Lactor t'cir forest properties as produt-
i i::;::;.tion. and rgariess o3 tire as possible by the applice-
viat iusi",n'cs a norcuhil- type ~ h~ n f ot1id ll in: r culture.
:' mi, is beoo' ii;g he i 'dcL'or in- :";; s ;nid firee prottfion- '-lo
;i:- '' "r "' until m.l',on. r, ri'!- ,n i 1o ? ui ly 1 heir ow1 i nc(lh,


ir and Ships of the Sea Make Use of St. Joseph's Bay


NAVY'S PRIDE
U. S. Los Angeles moored to
the S. S. Patoka in Port St.
Jo2 harbor. The Los Angeles
used the landlocked harbor at
Port St. Joe as it., base while
making flights over the South
in 1929.


...-

I I(Z~~t sB
'-,,. '. "'I"
.u'
; .r.
".; ..' q ..& !.. ',. '. '- '. ....


but also for specialized products e;it c be remonve:d from saw-limber 'OLD FIELD PINE'
;!a1(1d hy-products for which there forests without r;oa-erially rednc-
s a growling Idenma-. iig saw-log production, bIecause "Old field pine" is the term
Pine Adaptable only a relItively few trees will be commonly used throughout the
Soit n ine rests are read- soutern pine region to denote
,o l(rin pine -)rests Iare read- :reliable for such purpose.
I-- lptable to teatent tha for such purpose. timber that is growing in fields
will yield a variety of fore: The cutting of al products, i that hav belen abandoned for
products. Pulpwood. small poles however, should be carefully co- farming. Some "old field" stands
:' p, ls c-ilbe p-roduced rom i-Uiinatod for each tract to assure are 60 to 70 years old and co'1-
t'h!iniJns ilcidenial to growing Ihat lte forest will be maintained tainl ilee1s of large size. Onier .
lair-r ltr! for sIV,-t!inibe. :' a i highly f roductive. condition, of course, are much yolnnler.
;'na]u, pilirg, v -eer log'; a1 "l1 :"' th'l lihi l1tiliate crop ofi saw-
oif'el' specialized products usually ilt will not l)e jeopardized. 1, !) provc t forest fires.


lieP~~~~T. .OE b,'1 .I,; ~T-t ~

I"WATCH TWO NEW FORDS CO BY"

C~l;'J':lGRAT/-ii FU 'UL ES. ST. J P, E .XPEP C; .-A P;Hi -, i P2 G CY T<


.-: -'P


'I.


_.. .. .. -- .-


W. 0. ANDERSON, Manager


PORT ST. JOE. FLA.


pp ---p --- -, -' .-'-,-..----- -. ----.--_________ ~ YP "~


Iki



bii& I


PAGE THREE


Port St. Joe Progress Edition


I


r '-:lhD'
" _~


--
-
c~p


THE STAR







PAGE FOUR IHE STAR Port St. Joe Progress Editio.o


FORESTRY HEAD


HARRY LEE BAKER
Harry Lee Baker has served as
,Florida's state forester and
park executive ever since the
board of forestry created the
Florida Forest and Park Service
almost ten years ago.
**------1-----


The Blood Strain
A Narrative of Port St. Joe


(Continued from pase 1)


much as one of his cold and cal-
lous nature could bi and he had
used every effort short of a posi-
tive refusal to prevent his .wife
accompanying the party. Perhaps,
even then, he had a presentment
of the future, although he had no
fixed plan except that he intended
to lose no opportunity of advanc-
ing himself in the counsels of the
paramount party.
It is unnecessary, and indeed
it would be impossible, for me to
-ven attempt to portray the ter-
ribe3 con:llitions existing in France
generally, and in Paris especially,
at this time. The trade of the n-
former and the spy was universal
and woe betide the unfortunate
even suspected of being an aris-
tocrat, let alone one who was
known to belong to that perse-
cuted class.
Sells Out Master To Authorities
After only a short deliberation,
Bigot decided to sell his master
and his wife and child, to the au-
thorities. This. he did and they
were arrested about a week after
their arrival and taken to prison.
DeArmgnac and his wife were at
once condemned to the guillotine.
The child was delivered to Bi-
got's wife upon her promise to
take it away from Paris at once.
News of the fate of her master
and mistress had the most dread-
ful effect upon Bigot's wife, and
she passed from one terrible at-
tack of hysteria to another. Fin-
ally she became quieted suffici-
ently to be removed, upon Bigot's
promise to take her and the
count's child back to Brittany.
_..er their arrival Bigot, in his
rage at not being able to profit


Congratulations St. Joe Paper Company!

*s-.^.awmmms -wsvs' .


However, this unworthy de- by his unspeakable treachery,
sce:ndant of the B:got family, no said enough for his wife to under-
:oubt influenced by the mad ideas stand that the count and his wife
c; liberty and equality and self- had met their death through his
seeking coming from the Revolu- act. She went into violent con-
tion, had long resolved to avail vulsions and, in a lucid moment,
of the first opportunity to ad- just before her death, she cursed
vance his fortune regardless of ob- Bigot and his descendants for all
E ,.cles. IH, therefore, hailed the time.
trip to Paris as likely to give him In the midst of this catastrophe
the chance, and urged his master, and when it became evident that
who needed little urging, on the she must die, premature child-
desirability of the trip to Paris. birth was indicated and the com-
When the deArmgn.ac family plications were such that the at-
tart:e on their tip, th'e party tending physician decided to per-
consisted of the count and his form the Caesarean operation.
family, and Bigot and his wife, a During this the mother died and
young girl about 20 years of age. the child was born. It was a boy
She insisted on going with Bigot, --perfect physically, except that
although at the time expecting it had a triangular birthmark be-
to become a mother at an, early low the lobe of its left ear, the
date. shape being exactly the same as
Count Gaes To Paris the knife of the guillotine.
The party reached Paris in Bigot Is Killed
July, 1791, after encountering' Rendered desperate by his well-
:ather less than the usual ob- deserved misfortunes, Bigot ar-
stacles attendant upon traveling ranged for the care of the little
in those rough lays. Having deArmgnac child with one of his
settldc his family with an old peasant neighbors and in whose
Royalist friend in the Rue de la care he also placed his own boy.
IHarp. th:e cont proceeded about He then enlisted in the army and
his business, exercising all due was killed at the Battle of the
fr'eczuio'. to prevent attracting Pyramid-,
attent;on of the Revolutionary The fate of the deArmgnac
gov en,-meit. child is unknown. Little Paul Bi-
It a.ppa:sas that Bigot's wife was got. II, developed into a strong,
(.-.-,s-e'ly attached to her mis- active boy of violent passions and
tress and especially the little boy. headstrong nature. At the age of
She arrived, in Paris filled with 17 he ran off to sea and finally
glcomny forebodings and in a high- found his natural element as a
:y rervous state, perhaps owing member of Jean LaFitte's. pirate
partly to her physical condition, crew. As outlined already, he
Bigot himself was passionately finally drifted to St. Joe. One day,
attached to his wire, certainly so about three years after he came


BEACON INN


SON THE GULF


Drive out and enjoy a
Bottle of Beer or
Fine \Vine


9 Miles West of Port St. Joe


PETE IVEY, Prop.


1




1



I


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


WITH OPENING OF THE MILL BY THE



St. Joe Paper Company

PORT ST. JOE WILL TAKE HER PLACE IN THE SUN


HIGHLAND VIEW


We Appreciate Your Patronage


LI ii' iI'


____


I


S ILLER'S S-T-R-E-A-M-L-I-N-E
.DRUG STORE


to St. Joe, in stepping out of his IV, was killed by the bite of a
boat, he got into quicksand and rattlesnake. In turn, his son,
perished miserably and alone. Paul Bigot. V, died at San Juan
Paul Bigot, III, his son and the Hill in Cuba, and his son, in turn,
father of our historian, was Paul Bigot VI, gave up his life at
stabbed to death by a drunken Chateau-Thierry during the World
Indian in a tavern brawl in St. War.
Joe. Curse Never Failed
Knowing the family history, our Thus it was that the curse had
Paul made up his mind to do never failed in. any generation ex-
everything possible to avoid the cept in the case of the Paul Bigot
consummation of the family curse we had met. Not only had violent
and to such good effect that he death pursued this unfortunate
had reached the ripe old age of family, but the oldest son in each
S4 years. The curse, however, generation had borne the scarlet
did not stop at him. Paul Bigot, guillotine-shaped birthmark.


WE INVITE EMPLOYES OF THE MILL TO TRADE WITH US.
We Carry a Complete Line of


Groceries and Select Meats





BAYSHORE GROCERY
Where Bu;ineEs Is Brirk YOI Will Alwa)s Find Fresh Groceries


Our interest in his tale had evi-
dently given old Paul .a kindly
feeling for us, and we could not
get away from him. The next
night we went to take the seven
o'clock train for Apalachicola,
and Paul went with us to the de-
pot. We stood around waiting for
train time and Paul went across
the street for some cigarets. Just
as he came back. an automobile
ran over him, killing him in-
stantly.
I do not attempt to explain the
whys or the wherefores of this
narrative-but all of it happened.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


Port St. Joe P'rogress Editivi







ro ____T


Variety Is the Keynote In Gulf County


ANGLER'S PARADISE


Act5-a)
a-.-4b


Upper left-A ilew of the shEre Irne along beautiful
St. Joseph's Bay west ol Port St. Joe. Upper right-
A fruit laden Satsuma tree in the northern part of
Gulf county. Lower left-Scene on the Dead Lakes,
24 miles from P.:rt St. Joc a water area of 80 square
mrrls where fishing at its best may te found.


'.:, I,: n"i',.- iuto products.
----L ----pe.
j'c iiithe pine.


[I. I11' : ,- l.,:. n i ,- 'i r'i r i" tI o a r -i r ;-i?
under co operative protection
with the Florida Forest and Park
Service. They do not include the
results of protection on the four
national forests in Florida and
other federal projects in the state.
Forest areas not under protection
hy either the state or federal
government are almost completely


FOREST FIRE LOSSES turned. an actual loss of 1.57%. burned over annually.
SThere were 2,293 fires accounted -
HELDfor. Only 2.09% of the fires were CLEANING PULP WOOD 1
Sdue to lightning, all others being Cleaning pulp wood involves
Losses by fire on lands under man-caused in some manner. Over removal of the bark, knots, gum
protection in Florida were re- lf, almost 55%, were incendiary and defective seams by tumbling
duced to a new low during 1937,i fires, deliberately set. Damage is drums or barking machines, by
according to figures released by estiir1ated to total $62,112. The knot drills and seamers.
the Florila Forest and Park Serv- average, area per fire was 21.4
ide. The report for the past year acres. FARM CUSTOMER
shows that approximately 3,128,- Assistant State Forester Earl A single large eastern chemical
000 acres were protected and that Porte., in charge of the branch of firm last year purchased 35,000,-,
approximately 49,000 acres were fire control, points out that it 000 pounds of farm vegetable oils


WHEN YOU


Tarpon like this make be caught in
the coastal waters off this section
from Panama City to Apalachicola.

A starfish has spines mainly to
protect the gills, which are ex-
posed.


FISH


STOP AT


~4




'A'


WE CONGR ATULATE THE



St. Joe Paper Company

ON OPENING OF THEIR MILL

1'


'4r, -
..Wjv


. .1.'


'4,,. r .1- 'I


to,. -


Ard We Will Soon Be Receiving Congratulations On Opening
Of Our New Theatre Now Nearing Completion
As Shown In the Above View




PO RT
A MARTIN F -., D r.iARTIN


THEATRE


BILL TURNER. Mgr.


PORT ST. JOE. FLA


r 4 I


Your Ice Company
EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS TO THE


St. Joe Paper Co.
ON OPENING OF THE SOUTH'S NEWEST AND
FINEST PAPER MILL


-L


........ .....


SUPPORT YOUR HOME TOWN ICE


ST.


PLANT


JOE ICE


COMPANY
'YOUR ICE COMPANY SINCE 1920"


MAX KILBOURN


MIDWAY PARK
THE COUNTY LINE CAMP
o Post.offce Address
o WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

On the Famous Dead Lakes. Center of
~ Florida's Best Fresh Water Fishing.
1 80 SQUARE MILES OF WATER-

DILLON LINTON B. F. CROCKER
Master Fisherman
Owner
Chief of Guides

S^h^ftBMh^E^^a^fc^iW^iiMMirNr drL *.1L*~~~A~1


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


-It~


jzwvsWWWcB


.w


~sece~- +-~IL~ne~4-ruh-L---a~aarrr~n*la~*~*~ ~d~Z(j~dlL4~ ~ ~C


Rort St. Joe Progress Edition


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


4
..-e ne~ i
r..
~: r-
r,.-


' t, "


to




Port St. Joe Progress Editioi


T ARDWAR/


SUPPLY


CO.


Offers Congratulations to the
St. Joe Paper Company


Hardware, Building and Mill Supplies, Plumbing and


Electrical Supplies,


Phone 2-


Dock and Engine Room Stores N
WtRTST 10,F
PEOPLE!
ROSPER'
Po-rt St. Joe, Fla.


THE STAR


PAGE SIX


AmAMAg







Port St. Joe Progress Edition TH~Z SAR PAG~ SEVEN


St. Joseph Abandoned

Due To Lack of Trade


By S. H. McPHAUL
The approaching Centennial at man who went to work and
Port St. Joe creates considerable cleared up the river between
interest in the history of old St. Iola and Apalachicola, and follow-
Joseph, the center of the site of ing that, a cotton compress was
which is about a mile and a hadf built at the latter place. Then the
from tire present business dis- owners of the St. Joseph & Iola
trict of Port St. Joe. Railroad built a short line from
When I first entered Port St. their main line to Depot Creek, a
.1Jo in 190,, it was destitute of distance of about eight miles.
inhabitants, with the exception of T'hi: connected then with Apa-
S f oi,- I lachicola by water, and after the


-,Ve looked back at that time on
oldl St. Josephl as raving been de-
sitroyed 70 ye::'.s ibfore, Iut silch
is the flight of tino that we now
look back more than a century.
There is some misunderstand-
igl and m y:dery as to the cause
of the abandonment of St. Joseph.


cotton was compressed it was
shipped by this route for a lime.
Of course, there was now lno
further us'e for tile main line to
Iola. Soon thereafter the idea
was conceived that as the cotton
had to be loaded on lighters, it
was just as well to handle it but
onceF anrl ainso savP tlh Pex1PIlPe


We have sowme records and the .
Sof the railroad rates, so arrange-
cates of some happenings in and
ments were made :o have tilhe
in regard to St. Joseph while ithis ce loe to Ap
w\as flourishing, but after the yel- hips oe i as le to
lacl'iool'a as the cepth ot water
low fever cane and the railroad cola a te ceth of wter
failed it seems that in the de- permitted and lln.er the cotton
direct to the ships. This was a
moralization 'that followed no one to te i a
death blow to the railroad, and it
took the trouble to record the., det o to te
true facts. soon discontinued service.
true facts.
The object of building a city on Yellow fever had already taken
:St. Joseph's Bay at that time (the its toll, and the stagecoach, over
latp 1820's) was to have a deep ragged country roads, was the
water "shipping point. The river only means of commerce with the
from Iola to Apalachicola was un- inland world, so there was noth-
navigable at that time, mainly ing left for the -natives of St.
due to overhanging branches of Joseph to do but vacate, which
trees in narrow places. So a rail- they did in an orderly manner,
road was built from Iola to St. many of them dismantling their
Joseph, known as the St. Joseph homes and moving them to Apa-
& Iola Railroad. lachicola, where some of them are
Unfortunately, the dates are not standing today.
in existence for each move of the When I first came to Port St.
shuttle in this loom of history, Joe it was said that many tomb-
or if so, I am not aware of them. stones were hauled to inland
From what I have been able to towns, reworked and sold-this
gather, there was a steamboat' because of the nigh price of


marble at that time.
There never was a tidal wave,
as many old legends relate. Inci-
'antally, believe it or not, St.
Joseph's Bay is almost the shape
and not more than a mile's dif-
ference in size zrom the Sea of
Galilee in Palestine.
The present Port St. Joe has
unbounded possibilities. The con-
struction of the short canal will
connect it direct by -water with
Columbus and Albany. Ga. Its
railroad already connects with
three major railroads of the
South, the Atlantic Coast Line,
Seaboard Air Lin'e and the Louis-
ville & Nashville. It is located
1upon the most, "(-autiful bay
known, and is a place where if
you live you never have to go to
a health resort.


LeHARDY DRUG IS

POPULAR PLACE

!.iHard.v's Drug Store. centrally
located at the corner of Reed
avenue and Third street, is be-
coming an institution in the life
of Port St. Joe, and their motto,
'-Where Friends Meet," seems to
be well taken, for the soda foun-
tain and tables are crowded at all
times of the day and night.
This drug store stocks a full
:ine of drugs and proprietary med-
icines, as well as druggists' sun-
dries. These are, all secured from
the leading pharmaceutical houses
and are pure and tested and kept
fresh and up to specific standard.
This store is operated by Adolph
LeHardy rnd his cheery greet-
ings to his customers and .:miil-
1:', :*'. rtesy min him new (.'l-
thti.ors ontinualiv.
-----I--t-
iThe United States Bureau of
Forestry, a division of the depart-
ment of agriculture, was formed
in 1901.


r I


PAGE RIPLEY-

PORTST. JOEHAS

NO CEMETERY

CITY'S BOOSTERS AVER THIS
IS HEALTHIEST SITE
-IN NATION

Believe it or rot, as Bob Ripley


is won't to s.ay Port St. Joe is per- have been worn away by the ele-
haps, the largest city in Florida ments and there is no means of
-vithtout a cemetery. It has but determining the names of those
lhree doctors, and two of these whose bodies were consigned to
are newcol;ers, blrouglit in on the them. From the fact that the
wings ol' the little boom started strongly built overground vaults
when the big paper and pulp lmill must have been costly, the con-
began to be mooted some eighteen clusion is jumped at that they
mon-ths ago. must have contained the remains
n.theof men. women or children from
Ardent boosters of the town, in- of men. women or children from
eluding officials of the newly the families of wealth w
o t co e c tlmade o!d St. Josep-. their home.
formed chatliher of commerce,
Altracts Many
point to the above L;cts as an evi-
The old cemetery, though rather
dence of the extreme healthiness
e o the extreme hethiess far from the beaten paths of to-
of the community and consequent day, attract many travelers
little need for doctors or ceme- terested in the history of pioneer
terest'ed in the history of pioneer
tcrics, averring that Port St. Joe w
days, who wander around among
is the healthiest spot in the entire ,
the trees which have grown up.
nation. Bodies of citizens who during the intervening century
die of old age or incurable mala- trying to decier inscr .
s b h i f trying to decipher inscriptions.
:'.ies brought in from elsewhere,
s b t in f e One of the striking things to be
are taken to Apaiachicola, Wewa-
hitchka or Panaa City o in- learned from those inscriptions is
hitchka or Panama City for in-
terment. that the one-time occupants of the
graves died young, ranging in age
Ancient Burying Ground from one to 55 years.
But, 'way on the outskirts of The fact still remains that the
the city, close to the site of the newer city of Port St. Joe, with
ancient city of St. Joseph, in its population of 3500, has no
which Florida's constitutional con- cemetery.
mention was held in December, Boy! Page Mr. Ripley!
1S38-more than 100 years ago-
on a little rise of land. may be
found an old burying ground 36 MILLION FEET
dotted with monuments or mark- The Choctawhatchee National
ers bearing the names of men Forest has today approximately
and women who :-:ed at the time 36,000,000 feet of long-leaf pine,
old St. Joseph was making his- and is one of the few remnants
tory. The earliest date decipher- of the original stands of virgin
able on the time-worn headstones long-leaf pine to be found in the
is 1837. the latest 1845. TTnited Statpes todav.


Beacon Hill



Development Co.


Offers Congratulations to the


ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY


$50



Down





$25


Month


St. Joe Bar



and Billiard Parlor

"Drop In Where Friends Gather"


and Urges


MILL WORKERS
to


BUY YOUR LOT
for a

SMALL DOWN PAYMENT-
--SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENT





WHY PAY RENT?





INVESTIGATE!


BEER


WINES


CORDIALS


J. S. PATRICK
BEACON HILL, FLORIDA
mue| m


SE. GEORGE, Manager

J. E. GEORGE, Manager


ALE


WHISKEY


Vandals Desecrated Tombs
In this ancient and neglected
pantheon is found eight or ten
.sarcophagi solidly built of brick,
said' to have been brought from
Italy in ballast by trading vessels,
which would have defied the rav-
ages of time had they not been
broken open by vandals, probably
in search of treasure which they
believed had been buried with the
dead.
Unfortunately all traces of in-
scriptions, if there ever were any,


a g--- -~s~e~BP~ tq~


Port St. Joe Progress Edition


- ". -


ULLILU OLL LUU .Y


TH-' STAR


PAGE SEVEN







-----------------------Y^YUU^~~~
PAGE EIGHT THE ... .I III 51 .s STAR Port1,.I II 1 S. Jo rges dto
la m


Northwest Florida's Coming Metropolis


INVITES


WORLD!


SU NSET O. N .BE '*.' -J
SUNSET Ol' BEAUTWFJL


S


With opening of the St. J.. "--.- Company mill t1iere
aYe many ne. businesses needc d in Port St. Joe to care
fcr the e-:TL; '.:eRts of ct r sidly increasing popula-
Cicn, arnd Eth City cf Pert St. Joe, with a shining future
head, exien.ds a gled hand of welcome to all.
Port St. Joe, nestled on the shore of beautiful St. Joseph
Bay, now destined to become one of the major seaports
of the South, is modern in e',ery respect of the word,
having just completed a sanitary sewer system, a $150,-
000 water system and a $125,CO municipal dock. In
addition, a new elementary school building is under con-
struction and several street paving projects are now un-


FLORIDA


J. L. SHARIT, Mayor
B. A. PRIDGEON, Commissioner
B. W. EELLS, Commissioner


.4.





i I% JOSEPHI:S _1111,L



v'sr:rc~. s eli 'z .om csie &'J e~lrcnis i and ad-
hzr. e City.
k i deal to a-.average
;:;c.,l ~c~zah-e f YO d-I.-;!:es, is fi-e nao n~alr
r:.-..3:~i ec;~n in i the rnc of eifisig
of 2Ss !e axce!en. s as L atfIn g a c 1 t %
i.: !-e -warm wvaters of the Cah" of iiex~co at nearby
beaches. The schools are eaceflent and there are
ch;~~c of '.'rtiaons c3enclc; .tCZO Oic ce, a casm-
her cl commerce and2 ot~or orgcy nizmatins i thai tre con-
c~v~civc tto the best o d-l developments o a community.
. Here you wvill fird aniatmosphere of nigghborli-
nets mnlcg a friendly people.


W. R.
M. P.
TROY


GALT, City Engineer
TOMLINSON, City Cler
JONES, Chief of Police


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Port St. Joe Prosgress Edition


THE STAR


PAGE EIGHT


*^s/*.


I 'W


PORT


J 10


CITY







Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
S est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


STARSECTION THREE
PORT ST. JOE PROGRESS
EDITION


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938

VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, NUMBER 22


Gulf County Is One of Florida's Last Frontiers


Boasts Endless Waterways, Fresh, Salt and Brackish, Where
The Sportsmen's Finny Friends Lie Waiting; Forests
Abounding With Deer and Turkey; Swamps and Ham-
mocks Where Leaps the Agile Squirrel and Within
Whose Fastnesses Still Lurk the Bear and Panther.

(ulf county, now coming to the fore due to establishment
of the huge duPont-1\leade paper mill at Port St. Joe, is
withal, still one of Florida's last frontiers. Here may be found
the wealth of Nature primeval-endless waterways, fresh,
salt and brackish, beneath the surfaces of which the sports-
men's finny friends lie waiting. Large mouth black bass,
bream and shell cracker court the anglers' further acquaint-
ance in the Dead Lakes, Lake Wimico, various canals and
the county's smaller lakes and streams. Salt water trout,
redfish, pompano, crevaille,-
mackerel, kingfish, grouper two miles north of Wewahitchka,
blue fish, tarpon and countless yearly frees fingerlings by tens
other varieties abound in coastal of thousands into the lakes and
streams.
streams. St. Joseph's Bay and the
glorious Gulf of Mexico. From Wondrous Waterways
shady bank, from boat, from dock Port St. Joe, the outstanding
or pier, fishers for fish and health city of Gulf county, is surrounded
can complain only of the swift- by mile after mile of wondrous
ness of time that makes the day waterways and lakes which may
all too short. They can measure be traversed by canoe, bateau or
their catch by years of added life, motorboat.
as well as by inches or feet of One can explore the ever-fasci-
fighting flesh. nating recesses of the Dead
With the help of her citizens, Lakes, then proceed down the
Gulf county is successfully pre- Chipola and Apalachicola rivers
serving her game, fish and for- to Jackson's river, west on that
ests. The fruitfulness of her wa- winding stream to the enticing
ters draws thousands annually, and fish fruitful waters of Lake
and to guard against any possible Wimico, up the canal, then up
depletion. a state fish hatchery, Wetappo creek that waters and


HUNTING SCENE IN THE PINEY WOODS NEAR


PORT ST. JOE


Good hunting is found in the woods and swamps the primordial magnificence of this section is
of Gulf county, and with help of the citizens being maintained in all its splendor.


drains the northwestern portions Corn and the forage crops, hogs,
of the county, and back to East cattle and poultry do exceptionally
Bay, St. Andrews Bay and, if you well; cane grows in prolific
will, to Panama City. Where else abundance. Pecan groves flourish.
can be found such profusion of as do grapes and the smaller
nature's variety? fruits, except those of semi-tropi-
Farming cal. origin.
General farming can be suc-- Gulf county is the birthplace
cessfully followed in Gulf county. and home of "Tupelo honey,"


that far-famed table delicacy and
medicinal product t h a t never
granulates and never ferments.
Myriads of untring bees carry
the nectar from tne blossoms of
the tupelo gum to sanitary hives
in modernly equipped apiaries,
bringing to the world a product
(Continued on Page 4)


t A A A A A A A A A A


wVVVVwrwwOw'


We

St. JoE

SOUTH








D


SOI


Join In Congratulating the

e Paper Company
On the Opening of the
'H'S FINEST PAPER MILL





ur Business Is Operating
Port St. Joe's Busiest

RUG STORE
and

)A FOUNTAIN



I .


!HARDY'S i


pharmacyy
"Where Friends Meet"
ORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


vv ~V Y"YV V ~~r~V V w-VVV VYV


v- it


WE COMPLIMENT


St. Joe Paper Co.
AND ITS PERSONNEL
On the Opening of Your
MODERN PAPER MILL


GAS Is Ideal
for
Cooking
Refrigeration
Water heating
'Room heating





ORT ST.
PEOPLE
ROSPE


We are endeavoring to do our part to make
Port St., Joe MODERN with a reliable

Natural Gas

Service

See Our Display of
MODERN GAS APPLIANCES
at the
GULF HARDWARE COMPANY
which is maintained for your convenience.
-o-
COOK, REFRIGERATE and HEAT WATER
with GAS. It is the best fuel known. .
Our service is reliable-reasonable, and we
stock all appliances for immediate delivery.


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS


COMPANY
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


GULF HARDWARE CO.
Port St. Joe


RITZ THEATER BLDG.
Panama City


I


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I & & & A, A,






Port St. Joe Progress Edition


PAGE TWO THE STAR


me -"- .. ..

WE COMPLIMENT THE

Port St. Joe Paper Company
Upon the Opening of the South's Newest
and Finest Paper Mill



B A RORI EI 'S
5 AND 10 CENT STORE

Port St. Joe -- Florida
...___________ _.__ -. _a


0
S(
ji


c

tl

C:~


Your Druggist
t
EXTENDS HEARTY GREETINGS TO THE e


Port St. Joe Paper

Company

ON THE OPENING OF THE PAPER MILL





Gary-Lockhart


Drug Co.

PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA

I A li
l ^ 1


VALUE OF NATURAL
RESOURCES TAUGHT
ENROLLEES OF CCC

The value of forests as one of
our most treasured natural re-
ources is one of the many sub-
ects taught enrollees of the
:CC camps scattered throughout
he South today.
Young men and veterans on
'uty at the various CCC camps
ire taught modern methods of
ariing for forests which annually
produce thousands of feet of lum-
it'r for sawmi:ls, thousands of
gallons of material for naval
stores stills and thousands of
young trees for the production of
paper.

LEADER SHOE SHOP
IS BEST IN SECTION

The Leader Shoe Shop, under
he efficient management of Aus-
in Huggins, is one of the best-
equipped shoe repairing establish-
ments in West Florida and the
quality of work they turn out is
unequalled in any of our large
metropolitan centers.
Mr. Huggins is the soul of cour-
esy and always has work done
it the time promised. Port St. Joe
s indeed fortunate in having a
modern and up-to-date establish-
nent of this character.
-------------,--
KERR JEWELRY CO.
MERITS PATRONAGE

The Kerr Jewelry Store merits
the position it has attained as
ne of the leading jewelry stores
n this section, and because of the
nequa'ed service during the time
t has served the public, merits
'atronage it receives.
Particular attention is given to
iine watch repairing and there is
o1 watch too complicated for Mr.
L. Kerr to adjust or repair.


I- - - --


CALENDERING MACHINE DURING ERECTION


The above picture is a view of the calender rolls of the huge pa-
per-making machine located on the second floor of the St. Joe
Paper Company. This view was taken while the machine was in
process of erection on January 7., 1938. Here the paper is fin-
ished as it comes from the drying cylinders, which may be seen
to the right.

Princess Is St. Joe's Yield Tax Is Opposed
Leading Beauty Shop After Federal Inquiry
The Princess Beauty Shop, op- Yield tax laws have failed to
rated by Mrs. Votie Gibson, is overcome the forest tax prob-
Port St. Joe's leading beauty es- lems and have drawn opposition
tablishment and here the majority by the forest taxation inquiry
of the city's women go to, secure of the United States Forest Serv-
their permanents, finger waves, ice in its report, issued this year
acials, etc., all of which is done by the United States Department
under the direct supervision of of Agriculture.
Mrs. Gibson. It is concluded that the yield
They specialize in the most ad- tax might have been a satisfac-
vanced system of beauty culture, tory levy during the era of "tim-
and merit tie tremendous patron- ber mining." but that it is wholly
:e they enjoy from a discrimi- inadequate for application to the
nating public. sustained-yield, integrated-use for-
estry of the future.
OPERATORS INCREASE
Modern facilities make it pos- Wife: "I want you to under-
sible to harvest timber much dif- stand that I never ran after you."
ferently today than formerly and Husband: "Maybe not. A trap
L:any operators are now taking dosen't chase a mouse. but it
advantage of truck logging, catches it just the same."



HEARTIEST GREETINGS TO


Port St. Joe Paper Co.

UPON THE OPENING OF ITS MILL

-_--- from





Hauser's



Department Store


0O


Opening of the paper mill means
the future prosperity of Port St.
Joe and this section of North-
west Florida.


O




Visit Our Store, Buy Our

Specials and Save


THE ENTIRE


B & E Grocery


THE


EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS TO


ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY


UPON THE OPENING OF THE SOUTH'S NEWEST AND FINEST
PAPER MILL IN PORT ST. JOE


'iI _


THE STAR


PAGE TWO


PERSONNEL


OF THE







TI-lE__1 STAR_ Pt~I


r-" S'. J~a F ri"'c~ Ecdtion


F~oria


S CMPI-MENTS AND BEST WISHES lI
FOR THE FUTURE SUCCESS OF THE



SPORT ST. JOE PAPER



0 -
^ COMPANY.





STHE LEADER


SHOE SHOP
"We Sole the City"
S PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA

L A---------^---^** -


We Congratulate the


ST. JOE PAPER CO.

On the Opening of Their New Mill
0
The prosperity of Port St. Joe means greater
prosperity for Panama City
o




Cary Wilson



Furniture Co.

PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA

- --- - -


It is with great faith in the future
of Port St. Joe that I extend

CONGRATULATIONS

to the


St. Joe Paper Co.

Upon the Opening of Their New Mill
0-



J.L. Kerr


--'4 Jeweler }3f-
WATCH REPAIRING
A SPECIALTY


PORT ST. JOE,
FLORIDA


ia s Fore.

Be Protae


IS ADVICE RECOMMENDED BY
DIRECTOR OF SOUTHERN
EXPERIMENT STATION

By E. L. DEMMON
Director. Southern Forest Experi.
ment Station, U. S. Forest Service
Florida's tremendous forest re-
;ouirces are like capital which can
ern i interest, or which can be
lissipat'ed by too heavy with-
.i'rawals.
To bring about a balanced
budget in capital withdrawals and
reinvestments, it is necessary to
choose between reducing the cut
or increasing the tiniber yield.
The first course would necessitate
a decrease in employment and
payrolls. The second course, there-
fore, is the wise and sound policy
the state must follow in order to
preserve its asset and provide
steady income to uts people.
Determine Amount of Resource
The first step in adopting a
budget balancing policy is to de-
termine the amount of the re-
source on hand, the rate of its
:ise and the degree to which con-
'ervation can be employed to per-
mit continued use without dinm-
inishing the supply.
Ships loaded with forest prod-
ucts leave Florida ports bound for
every port on the seven seas. At
home trees are cut and pass thru
plants to be made available for
:,'.: construction of homes, build-
'ngs of all 'kinds, and to crate the
.itrus and vegetable crops which
Florida produces annually. A rela-
tive;:. new industry, the process-
ng of wood into pulp for paper-
making requires its percentage of
!he timbered lands.
Since the earliest settlements
:n Ihis -tatc, the forests of Flor-
ida have been a major source of
income and employment to Flor-
idians. How long and well these
forests will continue to supply
material for local and far-flung
markets will depend in a large
measure, upon the care and man-
.tgeenent provided timber lands.
Previous figures concerning for-
est resources in Florida could be
classed as estimates. An accurate
inventory of forest resources is
now available, however, from the
survey of the U. S. Forestry
Service, made in Florida as one
if the first states so surveyed.
The study was made on a basis
of 4.722 miles of cruising lines
spaced regularly across the state.
More Than 23,000,030 Acres
The survey reveals the fact that
Florida's forested area is. more
than 23,000,000 acres, or approxi-
mately two-thirds of the state's
entire landed surface. Over 1,000,-
000 non-productive acres never
will grow timber commercially.
while 2,000,000 acres are covered,
with scrub oak, which is practi-
cally worthless at the present
time.
The productive forest area cov-
ers almost 22,000,000 acres and
includes the scrub oak aeas. Of
this, 78 per cent is dominated by
*pine (mostly long-leaf and slash
pine), 15 per cent by hardwood
and 7 per cent by cypress.
About 3,000,000 acres, or 15 per
cent of the productive forest land,
can not be classed as old growth,
with the characteristics of virgin
timber. Following 'the harvesting
of the old growth, however, na-
ture has benevolently provided a
new second growth forest on a
large part of the cut-over land.
Our survey reveals that 13,000,000
acres, or 60 per cent, now are
clothed with second growth for-
ests. On 4,000.000 acres of this
are trees already grown to saw-
timber size. On 7,000,000 acres,
trees of sapling or pole size are
predominant. On 2,000,000 acres
are found only trees in the seed-
ling stage. The remaining 6,000,-


!w -- -


present time, at least by private
owners.
Forest Inventory
Our forest inventory showed
that Florida still has over two bil-
;ion hardwood, pine and cypress
trees on her productive forest
land, most of which were of the
smaller sizes. Of the pine trees,
6,000000 long-leaf and slash pine
trees were being worked at the
time the survey was made in
1934-35, and 56,000,000 were rest-
ing or had been worked .out for
naval stores. In addition, .there
are more than 700,000,000 round,
unturpentined long-leaf and slash
pines one inch or over d. b. h..
i.e., diameter at -reast high, or
41/ feet above the ground, nearly
10 per cent of which are of tur-
pentine size. 9 inches or more
d. b. h.
Flori.a's forest wealth includes
?3 billion board feet of saw tim-
ber, based upon the international
/4-inch kerf log rule, which close-
ly approximates green lumber
talley. Pines and cypress, 9
inches and larger d. b. h., and
h.'rdwoods 13 inches and larger
are included.
These volumes, in live, sound
trees, total 23,422,000,000 board
fcet saw timber volume.
Total Pulpwood Timber
As a sidelight on Florida's
rapidly expanding pulp and paper
industry, it is interesting to note


Congri


that over half of the pulpwood is
in the trees under 13 inches in di-
am'eter breast high.
Another important finding is
that 9 per cent of the pulpwood
resources is in cull trees and is
suitable only for such products
as pulpwood or fuel wood.
In 1934, forest resources' sup-
ported a variety of Florida indus-
tries and provided employment to
the extent of 7,230,000 workers in
910 establishments.. This is equiv-
alent to the full-time employment
of 36,000 laborers in the woods
and plants, because many work
on a part-time .basis. The actual
number of laborers employed is
much greater.

CHEMICAL 'COOKING'
Reduction of pulp material to
Small, uniform pieces is neces-
sary to thorough cooking in the
chemical pulps, and to good felt-
ing in the ground wood pulps.
The machine commonly used for
ground wood pulp employs a
grindstone that revolves inside a
three-compartment iron casing. At
the top of each compartment are
hydraulic cylinders, whose piston
head forces the wood blocks
against the grinding stone.

Is your supply of Letterheads and
Envelopes low? Let The Star
print you a new lot.


atulations---




to the





St. Joe Paper



Company


Upon the Opening of the South's
Newest and Finest Paper Mill. We
Know They Will Be Successful, and
Upon Their Success Depends Our Live-
lihood, for We are In the


TRUCKING and HAULING

Business In Port St. Joe








Horton & Dendy

"We Haul Anything"


Phone 70


Port St. Joe, Fla.


BEST WISHES FOR THE FUTURE

SUCCESS OF THE


St. Joe Paper Company

IT MEANS GREATER
PROSPERITY FOR ALL
WEST FLORIDA

0
----------



Gulf View Tavern
W. E. LAWRENCE, Prop.


~_~_~


- -


PACE,7*'R--


THE STAR


Sni. t -o timiIt tl total ,volume
4tS -fS 7.;;!. 1,,Dooi' Lillber amounIts to
11;,O000,00 standard cords, 4x4x3
feet of rough wood, including bark.
cted for J ut e T'his comprises all treess over 5
N inches in diameter and includes
000, or 25 per cent of forest lands, trees of saw log size. cull trees
has been cut over so closely and and usable tops to a minimum 4-
burned over so frequently and se- inch diameter. Of this total vol-
verely that it can be classed only umne, pines-the only species now
as clear cut or idle forest land. used locally for pulping-make up
It should be pointed out, too, 61,000,000 cords, the remainder
that inadditio oithe 3,0o,00 oo being in cypress and soft-textured
that in addition to the 3,000,000
hardwoods, such as red gum and
acres of non-productive and scrub ,
l d .110n-,n odu black gum, which eventually may
oak land, part of the remaining lack g which eventually may
20,000,000 acres may be subpar be of interest to the pulp makers.
20,000,000 acres may be sub)margi-i
nal for growing timber at the Here again the importance of the
sntll tr'PeC i uhnwn hv the fact








PAGE FOUR THE STAR Port St. Joe Proaress Edition


Gulf County One

Of Last Frontiers

(Continued from pag3 1)
unsurpassed.
Climate Is Asset
Gulf county has en asset of un-
told value in the uniformity and
mildness of her climate. There
are no extremes of heat or cold.
The mean annual temperature is
70 degrees and rainfall 50 to 55
inches, evenly distributed, all of
which gives almost 365 growing
days to the year. Something can
be and is grown all the year
'round, temperatures being just
low enough in winter to give zest
and enthusiasm, and summers
made delightful by breezs from
the lakes and Gulf of Mexico.
The County Seat
Wewahitchka, Indian for "Wa-
ter Eyes," the county seat, with
a population of about 1200, is es-
sentially a general farming and
trucking center. The town lies in
the midst of a section that pro-
duces the necessities and luxuries
of life in vegetable, fruit and
livetsock in abundance.
Geographically it is ideally situ-
ated for distribution of its prod-
ucts. Millville, home of the Kraft
paper mill, lies only 30 miles to
the west, while Port St. Joe. site
of the duPont-Meade paper mill,
the largest and finest in the
South, and Apalachicola, neither
one with appreciable agricultural
areas immediately surrounding
them, also offer good markets.
Port St. Jo2
Port St. Joe, the coming in-
dustrial metropolis' of Northwest
Florida, 24 miles south of Wewa-
hitchka, has always been a fa-
vorite residential and recreational
point. It is the terminus of the
underway bI the Allfred I. du-
Apalachicola Northern railroad,
and now with the developments
underway by the Allfred I. du-
Pont interests, the latent advant-
ages it possesses, the certainty of
greater accessibility, with its
deep and safe landlocked harbor,
the new municipal docks, wonder-
ful climate and highly progressive
citizenry, it bids fair to outgrow
her rival sister ports-Panama
City and Pensacola.
Beacon Hill
Beacon Hill, nine miles west of
Port St. Joe, on a well-paved
highway bordering St. Joseph's
Bay, is situated' directly on the
Gulf of Mexico, and here one may
splash in the surf, gentle and in-
vigorating, or loll on the white
sand and allow the Southern sun
to slowly and gently paint on a
fashionable tan.
Here are playgrounds for the
children, or, if the soul desires
communion with nature, there be-
fore one stretches miles after mile
of scenic beauty, where nature's
voice alone is heard.
SCottages may be rented by the
day, week, month or year at Bea-
con Hill or, if one desires to lo-
cate permanently, snug beach cot-
tages and homes may be pur-
chased for as little as $50 down
and $25 per month. There are a
number of small stores, service
stations and inns located here,
and it is an ideal spot to spend a
week, a month or a lifetime. It is
within easy commuting distance
of Port St. Joe and many workers
at the paper mill make this their
home.
Overstreet
Although Port St. Joe and We-
wahitchka are the county's only
incorporated towns, there is a
steadily growing farming section
in and about Overstreet, lying on
the canal and near Wetappo
creek. This section is reached by
a graded county road and State
Highway No. 6 just south, of We-
wahitchka, and from the Gulf
Coast Highway at Beacon Hill.
With establishment of the pa-
per mill at Port St. Joe, this sec-
tion promises to Deeome one of


the principal farming districts of
the section.
Common Carriers
Besides the highways that en-
ter the county, State Highway No.
6 from the north and the Gulf
Coast Highway (U. S. No. 98)
from the east and west, Gulf


county is served by the Apalachi-
cola Northern railroad at Port St.
Joe. Regular bus and mail serv-
ice by Lees Coach Line connects
Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka
with Marianna on the north, Pan-
ama City on the. west, and Apa-
lachicola and Tallahassee on the


A PECAN GROVE


General farming can be successfully followed on the rich
soil of Gulf county. Pecans flourish, a. do grapes and
the smaller fruits, except those of semi-tropical origin.


east.
Rich In History and Legend
Gulf county is rich in the fasci-
nation of history's lore, Indian
legend, Spanish and early Ameri-
can settlement and development,
and further interesting facts along
these lines will be found on other


pages of this Progress Edition.
-------------
From the CCC camps, Florida
has inestimable benefits, both in
a material way and in the
strengthening of character and
wholesome habits in the young
men who have participated.


-~ ,-m .%t-.. N- C ~ -~ -. -- -- 4~ -


SCENES LIKE THIS COMMON


a .- a .. :_-..;.*j;.e .,'- ..._. .:..'- .- r.._*, .:, _'" .N'_-, e. i "
Fine milk herds and beef cattle grazing peacefully in
the pine Woods are a common sight, for Gulf county is
a large producer of dairy products and beef.


From the PINE TREE Comes a


NEW


FUTURE


THE Pine forests of Northwest Florida provided the cargoes for
the sailing ships of a hundred years ago.


TODAY the pine trees supply the raw materials for 'the rebuilding
of Port St. Joe as the new Paper Mill turns the wood into pulp to supply
the ever-increasing market for paper products.


FLORIDA Power Corporation is spending thousands of dollars for
lines and necessary equipment to furnish modern electric service to this
community and adjacent rural areas. And the Company feels that its in-
vestment is secure in Port St. Joe's future and that it will receive from
the people the same co-operation and good will this Company is extending
to the citizens of this area in thd development of their common interests.





FLORIDA POWER


CORPORATION

Western Division Office: Apalachicola, Florida


c_ ~


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


Port St. Joe Progress Edition


I






PAGE FIVE


PortSt. oe Pogrss Eitio THESTA


Jackson's Invasions Result In

United States Buying Florida


BATTLE OVER PENSACOLA IS
SHORT BUT FIERCE; ENG-
LISH DESTROY FORT

By E. V. W. JONES
Generol Andrew Jackson three
times invaded Spanish Florida at
the head of his army, and his ex-
peditions led to the purchase of
the territory by the United States.
The War of 1812 was being
fought when the fiery-tempered
general determined upon military
action to break up what he be-
lieved to be an alliance between
West Florida and: England.
Word reached him that three
British warships and several
smaller craft were at Pensacola,
the flag of Spain and the Cross of
St. George flew side by side over
the town and, even worse, arms
had been landed for 15,000 men,
and 1000 Indians already were
drilling at Fort Barrancas.
Jackson negotiated with the
Spanish for a time, but when
Governor Manrique declined to
order the British out of the ter-
ritory or to stop warlike activi-
ties, Jackson acted.
Arrives At Pensacola
On November 6, 1814, Jackson,
after a swift march from Mobile,
arrived before Pensacola with a
force of 3000 men. The com-
mander sent one of his officers
under a flag of truce to inform
the Spanish that he was ready to
negotiate for occupation oof the
town's forts. The emissary was
fired upon.
Despite this hostile act, Jackson
sent another ambassador who
reached the Spanisn governor and
laid the proposition before him.
It was refused. Governor Man-
rique informed Jackson he was


powerless to res:si the invasion
,)f the British.
This was the word the Ameri-
can commander a-waited. Without
further ado he d:Lposed his troops


the Spanish governor at Pensa-
cola, Callava, still smarting un-
der the indignities Jackson had
dealt thie territory. Jackson re-
mained outside tile city, demand-
i': that CallavR, as cdplomatic
usno.'r required, cr:all upon hinm and
invite him into the city, but the
Spaniard, a:thourgh seen upon the
streets of the city every day. sent
IJacl-:,n word tha; :is illness pre-
vented hinl from leaving Pensa-


in three columns, massed two of cola.
them on the east and sent the M h l
other to the west sile of town. Mach Ito Cty
Strategically, the assault was Finally, on July 17, 1821, the
opened from the .west. When the united States troops marched
city's defenses were concentrated into te city Many Spaniars
there, the troops to the east wpt openly as their last hope
stormed the town. ended with arrival of the soldiers.
i The Americans, ::ands playing
It was a short battle but a The Americans, ands playing
and banners flying, lined up in
fierce one. The Spanish batteries nt vernme House.
were taken at bayonet point. ,
When the hand-to-hand fighting The pan soldrs marc
finally ended, victory belonged to from their barracks and took po-
the Americans. However, the Brit- sitions opposite the Americans.
'Generaln Tacso-n then rrlo into


ish, object of the battle, blew up
Fort Barrancas and sailed away.
Jackson remained in. Pensacola
two days. He greatly enjoyed the
chagrin of the Spanish at their
dcsertion by the British. He felt
the city had been punished suf-
ficientlly, so he marched hurriedly
to New Orleans where two months
later he crushed the British
army.
Jackron's Third Trip
General Jackson returned to
Florida a third time in July, 1821,
and' this time he came to receive
the territory from Spain for the
United States.
Spain had agreed in a treaty
signed February 22, 1819, to trans-
fer Florida to the United States
for the sum of $5,000,000 plus in-
demnities to families who would
move out because of the change
of flags. It was t;e second great
land purchase by the United
States. The treaty was ratified in
Washington on February 22, 1821.
Jackson came as military gover-
iior of the two Floridas. He found


town with his staff officers, dis-
) ourited and wal::ea between the
American and Spanish lines to
Government House, where Callava
received him.
A few minutes :ater Jackson,
now governor of Forida, and
Callava, now only a citizen of
Spain, stood together in the cen-
ter of the two lines of soldiers.
At a signal from Jackson the
United States flag ascended half-
way up the staff. Callava sig-
naled, and the banner of Spain
was slowly hauled down to a level
with the Stars ant Stripes. There
they rested for a moment.
Spanish cannon roared a salute
s their country's banner slowly
ascended and was removed. The
stars and Stripes mounted up-
' ard. After 308 years under
''urnp an r,''. s, Florida became
i territory of the new republic of
the west.
Ceremonies in St. Augustine on
the east coast, took place seven
days earlier. General William O.
Butler acted for the United States


there. MILLS WILL TAKE UP
Jaclkson remained as military THINNED-OUT TIMBER
governor of Florida until March
30, 1822, when Wvilliam P. Duval P mills, creosoting and chem-
was appointed first civil governor. ical plants and various other in-
ITH held office until 1834. dustries wil solve the problem
-of the forest owner as to the dis-
PINE CROWDS COTTON position of thinned-out timber,
which he ci min:uts in order that
In many cultivated cotton t,:,. l. !iing inber may be de-
fields, surrounded by southern veloped to lumber size.
pine forests, the r-icroachment of
timber into the fields may be
noted. Under steady progress of
-preading by the p:nes, the square The United States Forest Serv-
or rectangular cotton field gradu- ice ergages in building roads and
ally assumes a --ound or oval trails, telephone lines, recreation
shape as the timber becomes es- areas, f i r e protection, timber
tablished in the corners and along sales, grazing, game administra-
the edges. t'on and many other activities..
*


Greetings
and Salutations
to the

ST. JOE PAPER

COMPANY

We are looking forward to a greatly in-
creased business due to opening of the
South's NEWEST and FINEST paper mill
0

We Carry a Complete Line of
ATLAS TIRES and TUBES BATTERIES

o


MALONE'S STANDARD SERVICE
Port St. Joe, Florida


h 1.. 1 11111 1I 1 .


N ORGE LE


The only Refrigerator that gives

you a ten-year warranty and

sealed-in ice compartment at no

extra cost.


A


Norge Leads Again in every fea-

ture.... Come in today and see

them at---

ROCHE'S


Port St. Joe's ONLY Complete Elec-

trical Appliance Dealer and Only

Service Department


Buy Your Next Appliance Where You Are Sure of Getting

Prompt and Efficient Service


and the place is --





ROCHE'S


Port St. Joe, Florida


I I
so


-prI


I


OWN-r


THE STAR


Port St. Joe Progress Edition


AMIL


ADS







DAGE SIX THE STAR Port St. Joe Prograss Edition


Little's Is Dist:ibutor preference. Here one may pur-
Of Firestone Products chase every tire ::eed with the ut-
most confidence, which is pro-
Little's Service Station, man- tected by the highest quality at
aged by Lovett Mahon, is one of the lowest possible cost.
ihe most modern in the city and Your comparison of the charges
handles Gulf gasoline and oils and for various repair work, the extra
Firestoneproductsstandard quality of tne. Firestone
Firestone products.
tires and tubes with a complete
Strictly adhering to a policy of [ a t i
style range carried in stock, will
quality always, the firm has fulfill every need at a price sat-
carved for itself a niche in public isfactory to your purse.
f

CONGRATULATIONS
to the

PORT ST. JOE PAPER CO.

MAY YOUR SUCCESS
BE CONTINUOUS

0


PRINCESS BEAUTY SHOP
Port St. Joe's Leading Beauty Parlor
J


COMPLIMENT ING-


St. Joe Paper Company
On the opening of their
NEW PAPER MILL-
the finest in the South!


Smore
GA I LX o

\\\


Always Call For

SOLOMON'S
DAIRY PRODUCTS


Solomon's




Dairy


Little's Service Station

CONGRATULATES



St. Joe Paper Co.



















WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
FIRESTONE TIRES AND TUBES


Gulf Products --- Port St. Joe, Fla.

f.


UNITED STATES

MAINTAINS 157

FOREST AREAS

NATIONAL FORESTS REPRE-
ENT OVER 211 MILLION
ACRES OF LAND


Scattered throughout the United
States and Alaska are 157 na-
tional forests having within their
established boundaries approxi-
mately 211,500,000 acres of land.
Of these 157 national forests,
four, known as "The Florida Na-
tional Forests," the Apalachicola
in Liberty and Franklin counties
southwest of TallahAssee, the
Ocala lying in Marion, Lake and
Putnam counties in south central
Florida, the Osceola in Co 'Ambia
and Baker counties In east Flor-
ida, and the Choctawhatchee in
Walton, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa
counties in west Florida, have a
combined area of 1,278,216 acres
within their boundaries.
These forests are administered
by the United States Department
of Agriculture.
For purposes of administration
the national forests of the United
States have been placed in 10 re-
gions. The Florida National For-
ests are in Region 8, with offices
of Regional Forestef Joesph C.
Kircher being in Atlanta, Ga., and
the office of the forest supervisor,
Frank A. Albert of the Florida
National Forests, in Tallahassee.
Two of the four Florida Na-
tional Forests. the Ocala and the
Choctawhatchee, are in their re-
spective order the oldest national
forests east of the Mississippi
river.
In 1905, when the United
States Forest Service was estab-
lished, there secretary of agricul-
ture. in a letter to the forester
under date of February 1, 1905,
defined the forest service policy
as, "the most productive use for
the permanent good of the whole
people."

SOUTH LEADS NATION
IN FOREST ACREAGE

The South is the greatest for-
est area in the United States,
containing 190,758,000 acres of
commercial timber land, accord-
ing to the U. S. Forest Service.
The next largest is that of the
Pacific Coast states, with 66,685,-
000 acres.
Southern forests comprise 38
per cent of the total forest areas
of the United Statcs and are
growing 58 per cent of the total
ar:inual growth of saw-timber in
the entire country. Of the for-
.sts of the South, 150,570,000
acres are in pine.
Even after many years of saw-
:illing, the forest service statis-
tics show that 28 per cent (1930)
of the pine forest area of the
South is in saw-timber; that 28
per cent is in cordwood size
trees; 36 per cent is restocking,
and only 8 per cent is deforested.
-----------
HAUSER STOCKS
LP.RGE VARIETY

The Hauser Department Store,
one of the latest businesses to lo-
cate in Port St. Joe, stocks a
large variety of clothing and
shoes for men, women and chil-
dren, and here one can fill almost
any need in these lines. It is op-
erated under the supervision of
Mr. Joe Hauser.
All articles are bought with me-
ticulous care, tempered with an
almost uncanny ability to secure
just the type of merchandise that
will please the most exacting
tastes of the people of our sec-
tion-and they are priced within
the reach of everyone, bearing
out their claim to a most experi-
enced and intelligent buying
policy.


r


I deem it a great privilege
to be a resident of Port St.
Joe at this time, and extend
congratulations to the
PORT ST. JOE PAPER CO.
upon the opening of the
South's newest and finest
paper mill

o

DR. D. BYRD McMULLEN


Best Wishes for the
Future Success of the


PORT ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY

It is through their
coming that we are
enabled to be in busi-
ness in Portt St. Joe

o--




GEIGER'S



Department Store

"Clothing for the Entire Family"

PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA

I-I - -


r


Pl
THE STAR


Port St. J:)e Progress Edition


AGE SIX


Gary-Lockhart Co. One stocked with a full line of drugs,
Of Leading Pharmacies sundries and practically every
proprietary medicine known.
The Gary-Lockhart Drug Co- In addition they carry candies.
,he Gary-Lockhart Drug Com-; ,
Scigars and specialties, as well as
pany, because of the wide variety operating a soa fountain and
of nationally known merchandise lunchette which is well patron-
carried plus the courtesy extended ized by the busy businessmen of
customers, is an institution in the the city.
life of the people of Port St. Joe Mr. Carver, the manager, is one
and a popular place for securing of those genial and wholesouled
drug necessities at consistently personalities, wh(. dispense good
low prices. The store is well- cheer on all occasions.


CONGRATULATIONS TO

Port St. Joe Paper Company

If it weren't for
you we wouldn't
be here.
0-




Bargain Furniture



Company

"The Oldest Furniture Store In Gulf County"
PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA


-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - -







Port St. Jo~ Pro~rc~s Edition THE STAR PAGE SEVEN


PORT ST. JOE WILL TAKE HER PLACE
IN THE SUN WITH OPENING OF THE


Port St. Joe Paper


S Company Mill I
AND WE EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS '
TO THE COMPANY
I^ -----,
We Are In the Business of Selling


Office




OF ALL SORTS

And we know that with opening of the
South's newest and finest paper mill that
our business will prosper with the in-
creased prosperity of Port St. Joe due to
the opening of the mill.





SC.A.Tovey

Next Florida Power Corporation Office

PHONE 74 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
1i ni 71 'ii 1iii 1 11ii i i1ii ii mi Eii11 mil]111111 ii ili lI ll


h~~la~C~;II111111!11II)Y~IIWIIIIIIIII~II


**4444444444~444444#~


\Xe Take Pride

In


Congratulating

the


St. Joe Paper


Company

UPON THE OPENING OF THE SOUTH'S

Newest and Finest Paper Mill


L


5 & 10 Cent Store
Port St. Joe, Florida



NO STORE CAN TAKE THE PLACE OF THE
5 AND 19 CENT STORE

A A. A. A A. A. A A. A. A. A. ^. A. jk A. A.


4.









4








i



4.

4.P

A.


-'4,


We Congratulate the

Port St. Joe

Paper Co.
On the Opening of the
South's Newest and Fin-
est Paper Mill and know
it will assure the future
growth and prosperity
)f Port St. Joe.

We are working, in our
own small way, for the
future growth of Port
St. Joe by manufactur-
ing the finest
CONCRETE BUILDING
UNITS
that we knew how to
make, at a price that as-
:lrIes economical build-
ing costs.







BAY CONCRETE


COMPANY

PHONE 47 :- Port St. Joe, Fla.


~--~ Ib~ar C ~ ~~L ~i~C~~~Yr -r~II~r~r L lL -L-~- -c~11uIt


ql


T O~T S M O t "Go, from the creatures thy in-
(Paper World's Most fstruction take."
S* And so man looked upon the
UseJul Commodtty woik of the wasp, making its
home of paper manufactured from
\ ood fiber, and as a result we
By W. S. SMITH ;fying to the craft of these an- have the huge kraft paper mill in
Every country boy has had ex- cient paper makers. this city today.
periences with wasps and hor- A king in the ancient country ____
nets, but m o s t boys have of Asia Minor, unable to obtain A AT IN
probably never looked upon these papyrus, returned to a former cus-
;'oublesome insects as the first toni of preparing the skins of NATIONAL FOREST OF
paper-makers. However, a careful goats, sheep and calves as "writ- STATE, AIM OF GREEN
examination of a wasp's nest will ing paper." This material was
-ounvnce one of this fact, and it called parchment, and is still in The chief of the Federal Forest
is said that the study of one of use today. Service has been urged by Con-
these nests first suggested to the The Chinese manufactured pa- gressman R. A. Green to give
Chinese the possibility of the use per at least two centuries before consideration to the construction,
of wood for making paper. the birth of Christ, and passed on equipment and maintenance of
Paper is so common in every th:-ir secret to the Arabs, who in- landing filed and airport facilities
household that we seldom con- produced the art into Spain in the in each of the national forests of
sider its value, yet what would we middle of the 12th century. This Florida.
.lo without it? If we were deprived irly paper is referred to by In making the suggestion to
of paper, the printing industry writers of the period as cloth Chief Silcox of the forest service,
could not continue and you could parchment. now known as "vel- Green presented a resolution from
aot receive your weekly Star; we lum." the aviation division of the state
would have no more newspapers, By the second half of the 14th road department of Florida urg-
books or magazines, and some tury, crude hand-made paper ing that this service be performed
substitute would have to e foundfor literary purposes had become by the federal government.
for wrapping parcels; you would genralin western Europe, and Green suggested that the de-
have to carry your market basket valluni was gradually driven out. apartment give consideration to
:o the store to bring home your The earliest preserved English the utilization of the services of
groceries instead of having them manuscript bears the date of 1309 the CCC camps for this purpose.
conveniently place in paper bags. but paper was not manufactured He suggested that if construction
Paper, which has become one
Paper, which has become neon the tight little isle until the could be done by CCC enrollees
of the world's most useful cor- beginning of the 16th century. In and superintendents,-the material
modities, is the result of-centuries Anterica a mill was set up near cost would be negligible.
3f study, experiment and inven-
S study, experiment n Philadelphia in 1690, but a good -
ton. It has always been associ-
many years elapsed before paper- DIFFERENCE IN CORDS
ated with man's intellectual de- DFE NC I CR
i n-'aking machinery was perfected.
velopment, and ts invention is
elopmen ien And today Port St. Joe, as a re- A cord of rough wood cut of 6-
due to repeated attempts to pro- A cord o rough wood cut o -
duce a substance on which ma sut of al this research and ex- inch loblolly pine trees contains
tougtsand achieveens cod periment over several hundreds about 66 cubic feet of solid wood
thoughts and achievements could
riorded. The first of these at- of years-or perhaps we should fiber, but a cord of rough wood
'iP recorded. The first of these at- p naps
tepts of which there is any say thousands ,when we consider cut frm 12-inch loblolly trees
record ws that of the ancient e efforts of the Chinese-is tak contains about 80 cubic feet of
Egyptians. who prpzred froni the ing her place in the sun with the solid wood fiber, or 21 per cent
stems of opening by the St. Joe Paper more solid wood. It is evident
m o thed the Company of the South's newest then. that 6-inch trees should not
-lie on which they recorded the d finest paper mill
Jeeds of their rulers and of royal :? flmest paper mill. be cut for pulpwood, except in
,ersoags. Many of these ancient P his "Essay on Man," cases where thinning is. necessary.
ersonagts. Many of these anientsaid
records, called "papyri," have sad:-
been found in Egyptian tombs Thus then to Man the voice of Help prevent forest fires and
several thousand years old, testi- -Nature spake- save the pine.


I I II I I I IJ)I IItH Ir" ll ) III IIIIIi IM I II II I I r.Nll Iii1111111 r)Ifx 11 fI f HI I I I K lik li 1111111111111 1111111111111 flll )11 11 -,1 S


z wq -r~c-- -~ -- - - - - - --


ri"I I I I I I .,:z MI, X .2-M, t"M. Z"ML


6j


'Port St. Joz Projr,:3s Edition


THE STAR


PAGE SEVEN


_____







E II


Florida Power Corporation

Keeping Pace With Rapid

Development of Port St. Joe


The word "new" is the most
frequently used word in The Star
and on the streets of Port St. Joe
as the news travels of additional
improvements which are started
every day. Florida Power Cor-
poration, sensing the immediate
growth that would follow the an-
nouncen:ent of the erection of o
r ew paper mill by the duPont-
Meade interests, sent itts engi-
neers into the territory to map out
plans for growth of the city.
Inimediate insul.ulation was made
at Apalachicola or a new 500-kw
generating unit to supply the
needs of Port St. Joe. A new 22,-
0('c-volt stepdown substation was
bull' in Port St. Joe and $15,000
went into the construction of rnew
lines, representing a total invest-
ment of almost $100,000.
The commercial plants of the
duPont-Meade interests set the
pace and will attract to the city
o:hcr industries of various types
providing an ever-increasing list
of inhabitants and steadily mount-
mig payrolls.
To Provide For Future
As this modern city will d'e-
mand completely electrified in-
dustries, business establishments
and homes, additional facilities
will have to be provided, and the
Florida Power Corporation plans


PORT ST. JOE

HAD SECOND

.R. IN NATION

WAS TIDEWATER TERMINUS
OF ST. JOSEPH & IOLA
RAILWAY

At the time of holding Florida's
'irst constitutional convention in
1S38-100 years ago-the old city
of St. Joseph, on tie site of which
a portion of the present city of
Port St. Joe is built, was the tide-
water terminus of the St. Joseph
& Iola railway, the first railroad
to be built in Florida and the sec-
ond in the United States.
At Iola it connected with boat
lines navigating the Apalachicola
and the Chattahooc:ee rivers and
not only brought down. their car-
goes of cotton and other agricul-
.tural products for delivery to
,ocean-going vessel which carried
them to the mills of New Eng-
land and Europe, Dut also carried
up cargoes of merchandise needed
by the farmers, cattlemen and
others living far in the interior of
southwestern Georgia and south-
(eastern Alabama, as well as in


are already well under way for
more generators and equipment.
When the Centennial Celebration
takes place, next December 7-10,
modern Port St. Joe will show to
its visitors a deep-water harbor
with splendid docks, a new $200.-
000 water system installed by the
progressive city administration,
improved railroad facilities, new
elelphone system, a new theater,
new banks and new homes.
The Florida Power office is
working with .the electric dealers
in supplying the citizens with new
electric ranges, refrigerators, wa-
ter heaters, washing machines
and the many other labor-saving
(-',ctrically operated appliances
which free the housewives from
drudgery and give them the time
they will need in doing their share
as members of various women's
organizations to help in building
the city and making it a more
desirable place in which to live.
Already the ir;iuence of the
women of the city is making it-
self felt in plans for new parks
and the beautification of the en-
tire section. In all of these plans
electric service plays an import-
ant part and is essential for con-
venience, comfort and safety. The
cost of electric service is one of
the smallest factors in the family
budget.

northern Florida in th'e fertile
valleys of the streams traversing
that section.
Line Is Abandoned
Because of the Gecay of old St.
Joseph, due to an outbreak of
ihe dreaded yellow fever in 1841,
followed by a disastrous storm
which destroyed cocks and ware-
houses, according to legend, the
old "stringer and strap" railroad
with its inadequate motive power.
and probably too because of the
development of newer and better
rail outlets to market, the St.
Joseph & Io:a line' was aban-
doned. For many years what was
left of old St. Joseph was a "ghost
city" without transportation fa-
cilities of any kind except almost

impassable sand roads along the
Giff coast and into the interior.
Then, about 30 years ago, came
a little band of far-sighted men
of means who had vision, and re-
alizing what the future had in
store for this section of the state,
bui:t the Apalachicola Northern
railroad running from Port St. Joe
via Apalachicola to River Junc-
tion, where, connection was made
with the Seaboard Air Line, the
Atlantic Coast Line and the Louis-
ville and Nashville railroads. It
was an independent line then. and
sti:l retains its independence,


ICONGRATULATIONS-

ST. JOE PAPER CO.


We invite employes of the paper
company to gather at

WILLIAMS'PLACE
PALM POINT INN
for an enjoyable evening

----o

REFRESHMENTS--
DANCING


Proprietor


p---------~",


though it co-operates in the mat-
ter of through rates for both
freight and passenger traffic. It
refuses to be absorbed, but gives
its patrons the benefit of the com-
petition afforded, by its many .con-
nections.
Port St. Joe also has an inde-
pendent telegraph line which con-
nects with the Western Union
and Postal Telegraph lines at
River Junction. Its telephone line
is also independent, but patrons
of both telegraph and telephone
lines get the benefit of through
rates through advantageous ar-
rangements with connections at
River Junction and Panama City.


HODGES LUMBER

MILL IS LARGEST

IN THIS_ SECTION

MANAGED BY. R. R. HODGES,
WHO IS MAKING PORT ST.
JOE HIS FUTURE HOME

The R. R. Hodges Lumber Com-
pany, located on the Wewahitchka
highway just on the outskirts of
the city of Port St. Joe, is one of
the largest and most modern mills
in this section of Florida. It has
all the latest machinery and em-
ploys a large force of men.
The mill was opened here in
Janua y, 1936, by R. R. Hodges,
who came here from Marianna,
where he has a mill under their
management of his son. He likes
Port St. Joe and is making it his
future home, having constructed
a beautiful home here.
Mr. Hodges, who has made a
host of friends in the city, says
that "the people of Port St. Joe
have a prosperous future ahead
of them, and I extend besh wishes
to all for prosperity, good health
and abundant happiness."


R.


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


R. HODGES


Port St. Joe Progress. Edi';iqi


WE COMPLIMENT THE

St. Joe Paper Company


PEOPLE
ROSP~


OUR BUSINESS IS
SELLING



GROCERIES

and


MEATS





With opening of the paper mill i
antici '-:c an a cr;-r.e b::sine:
and we are looking forward to
era of prosperity heretofore u
dreamed of in Port St. Joe.


Griffin Grocery


and Market


Lumber Company


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE

ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
ON THE OPENING OF THE SOUTH'S FINEST PAPER MILL

See Us for Your Building Supplies
R. R. HODGES, Proprietor


C. D. WILLIAMS


r


-~i-a~
s a ~


THE STAR


PAGE EIGHT







Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,5,00000 TION FOUR
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's. fast-
es.t growing little city. In PORT ST. JOE PROGRESS
the heart of the pine belt. EDITION


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938

VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, Port St. Joe Progress Edition



Centennial Celebration To Be Held Dec. 7 To 10

aIrly of this section, will be de- 1
Elaborate and Comprehensive, Program Has Been Outlined p ed, even down the p sent Sto e A cti e
era. tlhe last one dealing with the
For Entertainment and Edification of Visitors; Park and rise of the industrial center of to-
Beautiful Civic Center To Be Laid Out; Governor Cone t. Jonse iph of th te crowfll Part In D evelopi g St. Joe
And Other Notables Will Be In Attendance and Partici- ing event in the history of which
is bhing celebrateC. -
pate; Committee Working on Housing Problem. s the n writing of t'he script, PI R RES
the the training of the men and wo- PIONEER RESIDENT T. H. Stone. one of the pioneer
the training of the men ond wom-
en who wi'l represent historical residents of Port St. Joe, has
By GEORGE H. CLEMENTS characters, andl in: arranging of ... taken an active part in the de-
the incidental music for those ve'opment of this section.
The spectacular celebration of the 100th anniversary of the stirring tableaux, the committee Upon finishing college in 1894,-
holding of Florida's first constitutional convention, -which is will have the help o1, me'nbrs of Mr. Stone opened a general store
the Florida Division, Daughters in Wewahitchka, which he oper-.
to be held in Port St. Joe next December 7, 8, 9 and 10, is of the American Revolution, and B ated until 1904, when he moved
calculated to serve a two-purpose--attract the attention of other patriotic organizations, un- .to St. Joseph (now Port St. Joe),
the people of the state and the world to the glamorous past der the direction of Mrs. E. M. where he engaged in the naval
of the old city of St. Joseph, near the site of which Port St. Brevard state regent of the D. tores busihessn m a
A. R. ., conducting a general merchandise
Joe is built, and to the rise of the present city as one of the Many Forms of Entertainment ibusriess. During this period he
great industrial centers of the commonwealth. In addition to the proposed '' ., acquired considerable real estate.
In order that the Centennial pageantry, the program commit- i During the depression years of
tee is arranging for rrany forms 1928-31 he lost $10,500 in his. mer
be in consonance with the import- celebration. In this connection it tee snt rain nt form te tou- '' 1928-31 he lost $10,500 in his llme
ance of the occasion-the birth of may be well to point out that the sands of guests who are expected '. his land holdings were sold for
a new star in the galaxy of the natural beauties of the park will during tle four days of revelry. b- taxes, but didi not bring anything'
American Union those citizens be preserved, with such artificial Tlere will be s r:os occasions but tax certificates .
when speakers of renown and Financially incapacitated but un-
-not only of Port St. Joe, but of aids in the way of plantings as recognized ability will dwell upon daunted, he watched for his op-.-
the state of Florida, having th'e will make it one of the show the historical events which caus- portunity and gradually red;eenred.
iratier in charge are bending places of the state, attracting ed the leaders of a century ago his land, paying all the indebted;
every effort in the direction of visitors to the city of Port St. to resolve toi o e a codeutiStonaS 'ness by 1937with the exception.
convention and to decide upon St. i by 93 with the e
general excellence and' historical ,oe for many years to come. .osel)h as the place in which to .I Through the efforts of Mr.
accuracy, with a view toward The propose d "Constitution hold it. Others will tell of the .rStone, J. L. Sharit, B. A. Prid-.:
making the occasion one long to Park" will be slightly more than troubles which beset the would- geon, B. W. Eells, thie county:
be remembered, not only by the half mile ong, leading from the be builders of theproposedne T H. STONE commissioners and others, te
state ande how they met them. m pade paper interests were in-
present generation, but by genera- shores of St. Joseph Bay on the Still others will go into other fea- duced to locate in this city, thus
tions yet to be born. west to Long avenue on the east. tures of that epocen:-narking pe- enterprise that would
It is covered more or less densely riod' in the history of Florida jnd.ustrial activity caused; by the assuring an enterprise that wrouldr'"
Elaborate Program witl growth of pine trees, form- Iich will throw light on the building of the St. Joe Paper com- justify the faith of those who had
An elaborate and comprehen- ing a beautiful setting for the reasons for the remarkable growth Dany mill and the preparations struggled through e lean yea rs
sive program has been outlined monument, and .will furnish an and almost mysterious decline of which are being made to operate that Port St. Joe had a great fu-
and committees under the leader- equally beautiful setting for the wi'hat on-e wvas the largest and it Oi1 a scale calculated to con- ture.
and committee under throposed civic ener buidigs most progressive--some legends tinue indefinitely-why should it Day Breaking Through
ship of competent chairmen have when they are erected. The latter, say .the most wicked-city in not spend time or money on the pro- "Now seeing as I do the day-
been named by General Chairman by the way, are to conform in ar- only Florida but in adjoining posed celebration of the c'enten- breaking through the dark clouds,--
J. L. Sharit to carry out the de- chitecture, so far as possible, with i states. ial o an event which brought I can realize that my dreams are
ts. Stes have ee take the monument, in order that there Governor Cone to Speak fame to a dead anta gone city, coming true," said Mr. Stone.
ta. Steps have been taen to may e no glaring incongruity Governor Fre P. Cone and even though it did flourish on a "We are only at the beginning of
p"?'.are a setting for the celebra- fronm an artistic point of view. many others of tire present-day site adjoining the present com- the break of day. We will con-
tion which will meet every re- Streetn To Be Widened, Paved leaders in government, in law and : unity? tinue on and on, now, until all
c',irement from every point of Streets leading from Port St. in business and professional The effect of the celebration on lare dreams are fully realized."
vipew. Joe to the park will be widened circles throughout Florida. will be the sc:le contemplated by those When Mr. Stone came to what,.-
Shas bee planned, h- nd paved so as to facilitate ap- present and will be heard at and men and women who are behind was then St. Joseph there was.
A poa al, andl amlple, parking space during many of the meetings, or 'he movement will be to put practically nothing nere but a;
ing the constitutional monument, vill ,e provided in order to obvi- at the lunche s. dinners and other Port St. Joe in the limelight and postoffice, known as Indian Pass.
erected in 1922, as a focal point ate the encroachment of veiics ocasios i plannedrto attract thousandof visi- In 1 the Apalaehicoa Nr
and near which a beautiful build- 'pon t1 1 Iark space, which will in addition to the entertainment tlrs to whom the name Port St. 'ern Railroad extended their line.
nd ner which a beutifl build- made available to pa edestrias bri efly outlined above, the pro- Jne means nothing, and who and in 1910 people began buying.
ing wilberected the festivities incident to gram committee w ill provide would not have dreamed of visit- lots and building homes.
hold some of the Centennial cele- thle celebration and' in future, amusement aplenty for the young- ing the spot had it not been for I A public school and' church'
bration .exercises, this building to 'The committee cntr'usttet d vith l" and perhaps the less thought- the celebration. They will be de- were built and in 1913 the city
be used in after years as ua civic he working ot of details of the ill amolg the expected visitors, lighted with what they find. While was incorporated an, the name
be used in after years as a civic -he working out of details of the e w 1 be football games. (Continued on Page 4) (Continued on page 8)
center. The park is to be beauti- program for the four days to be Th'ere will be football games. (Continued on Page 4) (Continued on page 8)
ed by expert landscape engi- voted to the Centennia Cele- horse racing in which cowboys
fid by expert landscape engi- I i ie ea t
b)ration of the gTeatest event inl nd woods riders may try the
neers and architects, who already he history of old St. Joseph--the speed! and endurance of their pet

details with a view toward' having 'utinna: convention-have in mind frete act.s calculated to thrill be-
n series of pageants in the course hlolers. s'eerlled flom amolln the
everything readiness y De- present of which the h traveling arnvals and irer s Style Shop
member 7, the opening day of the. history of the state. and particu- .ses lhich will have closed
tleir smnerater tours by the time APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA
Wil1 eas'v to induce-to do their
WE EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS rirt toward making a holiday long
And Invite Employes of the to bee ri'0memhered.
AndST. JOE PAPER CY Housing and Feeding READY-TO-WEAR LUGGAGE MILLINERY -
ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY and feeding of the
ePS hoHsing an 8 SHOES For Every Member of the Family
To Drop In To Our Shop for Their Tonsorial Needs visitors who it is hoped will beor very emer o the ami
attracted to Port St. Joe for th'e
Cent ennial Celebration, is in the o
hain'ls of a peciail comm'lllittee
.T which already is !ying plans for GOD LUCK TO ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
ihilng cam', of tJho:pei' who cann D LUC T ST. JE PAPER CMPANY
IH II H l i I i 1: 'i* t tY :1 .': u hot.els or il
1hle 11ho1: o if'i"t cnlrd. (Foored and And Remember Your Friends Close By
2- ,t1wallei i n i 1 n n g 1 .lucused
.... ... .. ......... .' 1 .- r; anl d Id l rev' iS
cr111e 1:0lk of a ieow hol ci. SIep,; : -
d.'.1o have been I ken t' mterest
citizens GMnernlly in tbo matter L .
q"f I"e i,!tI'i!r toilr sm r!"e roolms
in their himines wifh the commit- ...-
t. tee so as to reduce the P1roblt! '
q b of honsig theIl ovelflow.z
.While tlre new notel is being 40
talked of, it is inot being stressed,
as it is doubiltedl that the inivest-
mlent for al four-lcIay ctlirowr( could
"b~eho1111 mate t pay, and the colmit-
tee will do nothing which might
Sl hve a reflex inl the foril of an
f"cmi,''ler m tim of' ,0lressionl or rel es- ; ', ,,.
"il 'iolj w 'hl woildd throw a dalilmrper ..
t 'i tilonl thle whole enterprise after'
it was all over. "We want noth- 11. 1. ,.
inma" lilce that," said' Chairman ."' -
Shmarit, "so we will be careful to -
.avoid anything like overml'bilding
S or overdoing."
Why the Celebration? One of the many beautiful floats seen in the parade at
What will be the effect of al: the Mardi Gras held in Apalachicola, Fla., March 1, 1938.
COOPER'S BARBER SHOP o, o?
Wlhy should the community Sponsored by Cooper's Style Shop
PORT ST. JOE -- FLORIDA wiich i .w r di n 11 m on te
tide of prosperity which is rotn-he
___..__- ,__ __ _l"____ ____ ___- :'__ _, t0" l. v'a'1 i' t r'esllt of the







PAG TW H TRPr t o rgeoEo


WOMAN'S CLUB


TAKES PART IN


CIVIC AFFAIRS

STANDS READY AT ALL TIMES
TO DO ITS PART IN IN-
TEREST OF CITY

After a period of several years'
inactivity due to loss of interest
in civic affairs by members, the
w-c::_-n of Port St. Joe in 1937
felt it was an opportune time for
r:3:ganization of the Woman's
Club, as there was, and is, a large
feld in which to work in the fast
Ctaveloping city.
In September of 1937 a mass
meeting was called to which 18
responded, and at that time it
was voted to reorganize. An elec-
tion of officers was held, with the
following result: President, Mrs.
G. A. Patton; vice-president, Mrs.
Nick Comforter; recording secre-
tary, Mrs. E. C. Lewis; corre-
Esponding secretary, Mrs. H. W.
Soule; treasurer, Mrs. Joe Mira;
critic, Mrs. T. A. Owens; parlia-
mentarian, Mrs. Fred Curtis.
At the second meeting, held
October 6. twenty-eight members


were on the roster, and today 70
members belong to the organiza-
tion.
The c.ub, having become affili-
ated with the Federated Womens
Clubs of Florida, is functioning
under ihe following departments:
An.mc'ican Citizenship, Mrs. RiEb-
(rt Lollows. chairman. Mrs. J -
Mirt; Education, Mrs. R. F. Mil-
,r. c!-air:an, Mrs. ,B. A. Prid-
-ic(,n: Amnorica.1n Homi:s, MrRs. Roll
crt 'itapper, chairman. Mis. IJ )
Whitfield; Conservation and Na-
tural Resources, Mrs. R. R.
Hodges, chairman. Ars. Robert
Dorsey; Fine Arts, Mrs. Joe Hiles,
chairman; Public Welfare, Mrs.
J. T. McNeill, chairman, Mrs. J.
L. Sharit; International Relations,
Mrs. J. P. Lovett. chairman;
Legislation, Mrs. E. C. Lewis,
chairman; Press and Publicity,
Mrs. B. W. Eells; Foundation
Funds, Mrs. Harry Saunders.
Under the leadership of these
capable chairmen much has been
accomplished and the public is
urged to- call upon them at any
time for help in making this, our
city, a place whose homes and
yards will be so attractive they
will say to visitors: "Come in";
whose hospitality will be so cor-
dial it will .speak: "Stay awhile";
the prospective business man will
say: "Looks good to me"; the


club program so interesting you
will hear: "I wish to join"; all
will say of Port St. Joe: "So glad
I came-Hope I never have to
leave."
The Woman's Club stands ready
to help accomplish this and more
-so call upon them.

PORT FACILITIES
Port St. Joe, located on the
east shore of St. Joseph's Bay, a
deep water, landlocked harbor
said by mariners to be the safest
harbor on the Gulf Coast, offers
unparalleled port facilities. The
city has just completed a $125,-
000 pier where ships from the
Seven Seas will soon be taking on
and discharging commodities to
and from various routes of the
world's trade.

HUNTING
Game, such as deer, wild tur-
key, bear and smaller game are
abundant in season in the vicin-
ity of Port St. Joe. This section
is one of the few natural game
sections remaining in this coun-
try.
-----*------
Men's luggage differs from wo-
men's luggage in that its corners
are square, while the corners of
women's luggage are rounded.


PAPER-MAKING MACHINE


This is a general view of the huge paper-making machine in the St.
Joe Paper Company mill. The pulp is fed upon a wire screen to the
right in this picture, where most of the water is removed. From
there is goes to the dryen, which is under the hood, consisting of
enormous steam-heated cylinders around which the sneet of paper
is carried in an endless strip. The paper then leaves the far end
of the dryer to enter the calendering rolls (shown on page 2, .tc-
tion 3). where the final smoothing is accomplished before it is
wound into huge rolls of varying widths.



DIGESTOR TANKS FROM GROUND LEVEL


VIEW OF CITY AND MILL GROUNDS AND CITY TAKEN FROM MILL CHIMNEY


This picture was taken from the 160-foot level
of the 255-foot smokestack of the St. Joe Paper
company mill. In the foreground may be seen
the roof of the main mill structure, temporary
office building, and the huge hydraulic fill back


of the steel-piled dock. In the distance may be
seen the city of Port St. Joe with the oad water
tank (left) and new water tank (right) domi-
nating the skyline. At the upper right is a por-
tion of beautiful St. Joseph Bay.


These huge cylinders, or tanker, two stories high., known as "digest-
crs," are where the vood chips are reduced to a pulp before going
to the paper-making machine.


GENERAL VIEW OF ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MILL FROM ST. JOSEPH'S BAY


a


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rm~
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141
Alt
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PAGE TWO


THE STAR


Port St. Joe Progress; Edit'on


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P__rt St. Jo_ Progresa Edition THE STAR PAGE THREEwc~


Y~;E I4
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b~,

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B L W U~IW ~BtB
...
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Is the most important agent in


the development of this section.


S. Past endeavors speak for


themselves.


THEN---


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OLD WOOD-BURNING


LOCOMOTIVE "121"


---AND NOW


NEW A. N. GAS-ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE


The industrial eyes of the entire South are focused upon Port St. Joe.
. Co-operate with YOUR RAILROAD in holding this attention.


1p


RAILROAD COMPANY


Il-


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THE STAR


PAGE THREE


P:.rt St. Jo Progress Edition


j. U


MR =


liorinern








PAGE FORTESARPr t JePcrsEiin


MILL SITE BEFORE BEGINNING OF CONSTRUCTION


This view of the location of the St. Joe Paper Company mill was
taken on January 24, 1937, from the old St. Joe Ice Company plant,
which stood on the site now occupied by the present temporary mill
pfficeir The paper mill occupies a fill where water shows here.

-AND HOW IT LOOKS TODAY


I i iiz
j- ;a.e. i~


This is hov the namse sit- shown above looks today. This picture
wac taken ffomi i'cntcsaliy the same scot as fiat above. On the
cppos p::.;: '.' paper "l fro thle waterfront as


%T'hl T 7 Iaced on lca;- ind takc-u
-~"~-~M W ;:!1 .,ts or tile workl.
'h- c'i;t- f-tliurisiiodl. a huge ship
S1A'7C ,TI 'i T W'a' ocs located on w'tat is now
A Y o i i ,- A ,- .' o 1r 1 Port Inn. large
buh':?;e h :il ,in:s were built, as
'eall as pDlm atiail residences. Then,
FATHER CF LOCAL MAN WAS ii s" a,' i; SS, the year
La s (,. conltitlr1l.ional conrver-
RESIDENT OF OLD CITY; t en ss h elt ii St. Joseph, be-
TOLD SON OF EVENTS ;In:1 the decline
l iielp, i : t'cd firs: ny a depres-
The legends being told that s3to. v.-'ic>. let nothing for the
the ancient city of St. Joseph in'hbiants to 9 to secure a
livelihood, the rails of the rail-
was erased from the fice of the road were taken up and moved
earth by a ti:al w..v- are not true, o : ; e oi:,"r s'te. In 1S5(i came
rccorditng to T. H. Stone, one of sio:m-not a cycl!'ne--but the
Sthe pioneer setllers of Port St. high wind blew down great quan-
Jo-. v.-ose father was. for a time, titles of large trees. But there
a "silrp: of !he old city. was ino tidal wave to destroy the
In 1812, according to ithe rory city. This tale, according to Mr.
to'"- :.: Stone by his father, SI'-ne. has been told by people
heree s0r:'-rg up on the shores of who were rot here in the storm
iP.nt!1 ISt Joseph Bay a little and was tol'-i for other and dis-
s-t len-ant called St. Josenh. It linct reasons. Many of the old
O-',ra'lvl increased in size. until buildings were torn down for the
it boasted an estimated popula- salvage they would produce, while
tion of 17,500, being the largest some were moved to Apalachicola,
city in Florida. where a number are still standing
The city became one of the today.
largest seaports on the Gulf and "No tidal wave ever hit the old,
large docks and warehouses were town of St. Joseph." says Mr.
constructed to handle the various Stone, "and no tidal wave will
products' brought here from the ever hit the new city of Port St.
i) uo n known tite Apa- Joe."
lachicola river to Iola, from where And that seems to debunk the
a railroad, the Iola & St. Joseph, old story that for lo, these many
the second railroad to be built in years has been going the rounds
the United) States, brought them by word of mouth and in the pa-
S.oenph where they were pers.


)OMS


MEAL


CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION !how the celebration will affect stitution, to recount the deeds
TO BE HELD HERE DEC.7-10 Port St. Joe and why its citizens deemed worthy of being remem-
should co-operate to make the lyered.
celebration as elaborate and as --
(Continued from Page 1) attractive as its historical merits A ,
they are here they will spend warrant that it should be. Amelia Bloomer early advocate
some money. When they return, But there is another angle from of woman suffrage, is remembered
as many of them will, they will which the obesrvance ot the 100th chiefly for her advocacy of the
spend more money, and thus add anniversary should be considered. "bloomer" costume, originally de-
to the commercial wellbeing of Memories should be kept alive, signed by Mrs. Elizabeth Smith
the community. It is among the and the best way to keep them gne
possibilities that many will be alive is to commemorate them by Miller.
attracted to make their homes getting together on stated occa- -----
here. sions like 100th birthdays to Let Thpe Star do your Commer-
That is the coldbloodied, corn- honor those who di'dl something
mercial answer to the question of like the framing of a state con- cial Printing.




NELSON CHEVROLET CO. Inc.
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA

JOINS IN CONGRATULATIONS TO


St. Joe Paper Company

UPON COMPLETION OF THEIR NEW MILL
0
WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR SHOWROOM AND USED CAR LOT
All Used Cars 100% Reconditioned and Guaranteed
0


CONGRI TU LAT IO S! .


I--


St Joe LumberCo.


S-


All Success to the


ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
And We Extend a Glad Hand of
Welcome To Its Employes



WIMICO LODGE
On Highway No. C., Six Miles North of Port St. Joe
W. A. ELLEDGE, Prop.


The Hu
Wimico

t aO

Na3UoW


inter's and
is one of
ing reports.


Fisherman's Paradise. Lake
Florida's ideal fresh water
Willis Swamp, nearby,


abounds in game.
Postoffice: PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
Vua!uQAUo0


We Carry a Complete Stock of

LUCAS PAINTS


Exterior and Interior Paints


Varnishes


Flats


Enamels
Oil Paints


SEE US IF YOU CONTEMPLATE BUILDING

WE CAN ARRANGE FHA FINANCING FOR LUMBER AND BUILD-
ING MATERIALS FROM THE FOUNDATION TO LOCK AND KEY


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


k ?JV3!)--


SALES AND SERVICE
PHONE 89


;I


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Port St, Joe Progress Edition,


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


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Port St.' "Je' Prb-reb-c EdtitFon H. E STAR PAGE FiVE




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.. R ST. JOE, FLORIDA
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On the Properties From Vhich This

Company Is Purchasing Pulpwood
Cut Your Timber Conservatively. 4. Plant Where There Is No Hope for Natural Reproductions.














2 Preserve and Protect Yotng Thrifty Trees. 5. Prevent and Suppress Forest Fires.
2. Preserve and Protect Yourng Ti~r[ ty Trees. 5. Prevent and Suppress Forest Fires.


3. Leave Vigorous Trees for Re-seeding Your Lands.


6. Ask Your State Forester for Assistance in Forestry Problems.


_ __ _______ ____ _- *i iiTfin-rI---










THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE AS SEEN FROM AN ALTITUDE OF 3000 FEET


'FW*4~ pt.. ..;8~~r




--I
'j-"* .4r'. .- .
*-* $." L*X -


p* .~ro '.- : about three weeks ago by a UJnitd States Navy
:::.r;r.- :'O3i ,:. -coi:'. gve our rcadsera a mIuch better idsa ofM
!. :'.': :;'.';:!y o, the W Cit' of Port St. Jo, than a thousand
v "c;'r s 'r dc iv:::, ;ive t:xtC col;! do. At t:ie .xtr'rim?2 upper left nm.y
Ii.:e ;:' ,:4; !0 :ice ri-'l of the St. Jao Paper Comnany located on the
I:: :~i:mi'c il b.ilndi !:he I city' : 1';'5.000 municipal dock. At the ex-
trn:e upp--r r.' hi is 'he mril of Lhe R. R. Hod js Lumber Company.
'h- pai,! i,;-:H; .)! Northern Ra;!road right-of-vway c,'os-es the Wewa-
h ii'.:!A,:, h:, war. p?-scs in front of the Hodges mill and enters the
Sc:ty, with a "Y" leading off to the paper mill at Garrison avenue.

A BUSY DAY IN PORT ST. JOE-1937


The dEr:-L. I 'ne sartinr; at the Wi wahitc' hka hig'livay. e:tendi;: past
'. n :.:: t h; pic'.:'. and m i' q right-angi turn to :e left,
:s t:he rccn:t!y-;om'n;let-d ca ni for the d-aining o' swampland. Their,
is 0 -be w:xc.ed, par:-:'.aya created o both ::s. esnd whor
it a-te.': St. Joseph Bay,, 'will b'e ,wiil;-- ard d.epoend for use as
;i yact harbo-. The vide bucievardc at the r:ght ia Garrison
A'c r ,. wn\. c' *' -. :n : : 'i c'a','d. oaning up a ::;now s -
dential section. Manyb beautiful homes are being !Lilt in itis srj-
di\iion. New ;or;nes arc springjing up Wi al'l parts of the city .0
c:"e fcr the rapidly iAcreasing, population which in 1935 was 798,
accordin' t to he state c-'sues, and row is estimated at 4200.

A BUSY DAY IN PORT ST. JOE-1938


t.n~
.4.1. .
41?



.~~_ *
4,-


7Th;c. picture of Third Avenue (now Reid Avenue) was taken on
January 2z, 1937. flom the Fourth Street intersection. Compare it
with ththe picture to the lijht.

REID AVENUE-1937


And this is how Third Avenue (now Reid Ave- loac
iue) !ooks today. This picture was taken about steel
hali a block below that shown to the left, which cer:
war. taken f.om a spot occupied by the truck con


ded with vegetable crates in this view. The
el girders showing beyond the B & E Gro-
y is the new Port Theater, rapidly nearing
,pletion. Parking space is at a premium.
ST. GEORGE LIGHTHOUSE


GULF COAST HIGHWAY AT BEACON HILL


Reid Avenue (Third Avenue when the picture was taken) looking
south, January 24, 1937. This view was taken in front of the Apa-
lachicola Northern Railroad depot.


Thi:, is one of many bathing beaches along the 35-mile shore-
line of St. Joseph's Bay, affording safe salt-water bathing.
To those who love the roll ,of thi surf, the Gulf beaches in
Sih vicinity of Port St. Joe offers it at its best.


Cape St. George lighthouse, lo-
cated on the western end of St.
Georges Island, off Apalachicola


I' -


;-; --


THE STAR


Part St. Jwe


Plugrass Edition


PAGE SIX









ti:e vwoods and uncertake active FISHING OFFERS WIDE 365 GROWING DAYS
Pulpwood M markets W ill n'masures to suppress such fires VARIETY TO SPORTSMEN Port St. Joe has 365 growing
s occur, to the crd that all ex- I days in each year. Something can
Benefit Timber G rowers istinL: seedl:-g.; and saplings to In the vicinity of Port St. Joe be grown the year 'round. There
be saved to mature at an early wi be found iEal fishing of any are no extremes of heat or cold
By A. E. Wac erman .-. --."'-" sge 'into h:per timber cros. pe that may b esre. -temperatures just low enough
,BA. E.... ._ ".. type that may be uesireci.
Industrial Forester. Seaboard A'r Rairo Aists The faous Dead Lakes, Lake in winter to give zest and enthu-
Line Railway The Seaboard Air Line railway,- Vimico and innumerable fresh siasm, and summers made pleas-
Sbecause it serves many wood- wat ea aon i every ant by Gulf breezes.
NNtcr s`1e as nboun i
tt Especialyf icr Tlve Star) _________
-itta. Especially for The Star) ". ': using industry and is eager to variety of fresh water fish-bass,
Pulp and paper mills recently assist in cv.ery way possible in bream, trout. Hundreds of fisher- Ielp prevent forest fires.
established in the southeastern building up industry and agricul-I men from a:l sections of the South
established :n the southeastern
stares nmean much to the entire r, lats rc$C'-tly inaurated a sh these waters annually.
region, not alone from the greatly i i radio those who love the thrill of
increscd industrial and business ith 1 ild owei;s, fo-est inlus- a battle with the silver king tar-
r.ci t ,,t they have created, but ~ .i :, ,i public agencies for bet- pn or the tug and pull of the
ra;.o because their nee: l for wood ''. ,,. ,; -- ': 1P oecticn: and tihe wise 1ing mackerel, redfii- ,. speckled 1 -
has given timber growers in this ... :,,;... o' n te southeastern trout o pompano, the waters of I
reg:cn another important market iS sites. eliautiful St. Joseph Bay or tire '
for heir timlbefl. The greater the e s ":- S :'o:' '110oe its co-op"r- famous Indian Pass offer an o-
variety of markets for wood, es- .;. :ttion in forestry wilI be of ma- portunity that will realize that
peclailly from trees o- small size, .,' 'erial benefit to the wood-using thrill of a lifetime.
the better the opl.ortunity to grow industries, forest owners, and tile
timber as a crop for a wide public generally in assuring per- The art of paper making
variety of products. Without saw tt nanenUt timber supplies for all seems to have ben known to the
miills, paper mills, naval stores op- present and prospective forest in- Chinese and Japanese in very
rations, treating plants, a nd i dustries. It is realized that the early times.Dad's i
other wood-using industries that very large benefits accruing to __ L/ l_
convert timber into useful and A. E. Wackerman this region from the wood-using America has the healthiest REASONABLE PRICES
necessary commodities, our for- industrial development and e::- farm animals in the world.
ests would serve no particularly tine timber presented a very real pension are due not only to the
useful purpose other than to pre- problem in practical timber grow- large amount of timber at pres-
vent soil erosion and climatic ex- ing. Too small for saw logs and ent available but also, and per-
tre.nes and to furnish cover for unable to grow much because of haps primarily, to the great po-
birds and animals, the old faces, such timber occu- tential wealth of wood in all forms gs-
Destined To Serve Mankind pied large areas and prevented or that will be available perpetually
Southern forests, however, were greatly retarded the development from southeastern forests when to the
long ago destined to serve man- of a new stand of trees. Now, as forestry measures are in effect
kind in many more important rapidly as trees are worked-out designed to produce continuous
ways. For years they have fur- and the ground is reseeded they marlketable crops of trees both t JOe ap
nished excellent naval stores and can be cut and sold and other large and small. To obtain full: '.
timber products to shelter and trees will be ready to take their benefit of these excellent timber /'^
provide comforts and necessities places. potentialities, it is of prime im- -. Lpany
for the citizens of our own coun- New Acres For Trees portance that all forest owners\
try and for export to many for- Over 11,000,000 cords of worked- harvest their standing timber for C m .'
eign lands as well. Now they are out turpentine timber had, in a continuous yield of diversified o"n
destined also to supply much of 1934, accumulated in the south- products, and protect it well'/
the needs of the nation for vari- eastern naval stores region alone, against fire. '; '
cus kinds of paper and paper according to data supplied by tlra-
boards, and an era of intensive forest survey of the South. Each Church and state in France have_ ...
woo: utilization is beginning in year one and one-half million been separated by law since 1905.,
the southeastern states. Forestry cords of such timber, having "'


P-- S'. !o.I, 7m tT-es-, EdItion


measures by private owners will
natura-ly follow.
Because it is obviously impos-
sible for a pulp company to own
!sad enough to grow all its own
wood requirements, much depend-
nrce must be placed on neighbor-
lug land owners for permanent
:--lpv-ood supplies. There will be
-,,rmanent markets, therefore,
f,r' all timber grown in the vicin-
-i of permanent pulp and other
w ood-using mills, and all forest
owners, including farmers with
only a few acres of timber land.
will benefit materially from the
g-owing and harvesting of timber
as a permanent crop. When pulp-
wood can be sold, young growing
stands can be thinned, small
worked-out turpentine trees can
be cut, and trees harvested for
other purposes can be completely
utilized.
In the past, worked-out turpen-


yielded fully of its resin, is aban-
doned by naval stores operations.
The us'e of this accumulated
worked-out timber as rapidly as
possible together with that aban-
-loned annually, wil! release tre-
:ie:nldous areas fo' new crops o'
.rees and thereby serve to in-
creeps rather than decrease lth
productivity of so utheastern for-
ests.
Native timber species r.ep.o:luce"
readily and grow rapidly in tihe
absence of woods fires, and since
young seedlings and saplings we'll
soon mature to the size where a
partial cut for pulpwood can be
made, it is in the i-tercst of al:
to eliminate fire which annually
kills the small trees on millions
of acres and destroys the natural
productivity of the forest. It is
of utmost importance, therefore
that everyone co-operate to dis-
curage carelessness with fire in


Lyle Talbot's real name is
Lysle Hollywood.



CLUB CAFE i



C SHORT ORDERS
OF ALL KINDS

..- Try Our Steaks J}, :

,F PORT ST. JOE, FLA
t ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 'I


-0------------------------------------- ----------.


LeHARDY'S BAR
AND BILLIARD PARLOR
Extends Best Wishes To

ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY


WE STOCK THE FINEST ERANDS OF

LIQUORS
ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE


------------------------~ ".--.---~"-."" I


1, 1. ,

''., /. OPTOMETRISTS-

S : --OPTICIANS

i o-

[, ; EYES EXAMINED

S:.-. GLASSES FITTED

Offices
PANA..,I CITY -:-- PORT ST. JOE
> ~~'.aGT


PAGE SEVEN


"h' 3TAR







PAGE EIGHT


Postoffice Operated Efficiently


Under Drake's Supervision

Port St. Joe is growing at a ST. JOE POSTMASTER
rapid rate, and one of the best in-
dications of this growth is the
fact that postal receipts, since an-
nouncement of establishment of a
Daner mill here by the DuPont-
Meade interests, have n:ounted .
steadily. Postmaster H. A. Drake
stating that receipts of the local. I'
ctfice have increased 170 per cent
:'ljing the calendar year of 1937
over 1936. As far as we canl
earn, this is the largest increase .
shown ily any postoffice in the .
roai.e of Florida for a similar pe-
1i od.
Ard iwe must take our hat off
to Postmaaster I rake for, in onur a
opinion. to him must go a great
deal of the credit for this phenom-i
enal -expansion of our city. His
duties have increased three-fold
during the past 18 months, as the
population has jumped from ap-
proximately 1000 to an estimated H. A. DRAKE
4200 today.
Mr. Drake has been not only quarters will be provided, and it
postmaster, but has acted as a is anticipated that the steady in-


one-man chamber of commerce,
answering queries of hundreds of
persons seeking informationn in
regard to the city-in fact, the
editor, previous to coming to Port
St. Joe, wrote him for information
in regard to securing a building
and other information as to the
number of business establish-
ments, etc. In sprte of all this
increase in his duties. Mr. Drake
has been drawing the same sal-
ary, pay being fixed' upon the
basis of receipts for the preced-
ing calendar year.
However, that will be remedied
after July 1, as the postoffice de-
partment has taken cognizance of
conditions here anc through the
efforts of Mr. Drake and' Con-
gressman Millard Caldw-ell, new


crease in receipts will soon re-
sult in elevation of the office to
second class rating.
In adUition to the duties out-
lined above, Mr. Drake has
handled the veterans' adjusted
-ervice bonds, there census of the
unemployed. the sale of savings
hond's and registration of workers
under the social security act.
In spite of thIs rush and the
inadequate office space. accurate
servicee has been maintained at
ith postoffice, and Mr. Drake in-
'ormns us that no claims for losses
on: mail matter have been paid
by the government a.s a result of
mishianiiing at this office. Again
we remove our chapean to the
postmaster adl his assistants for
i e efficiency under abnormal


THE STAR


Port St. Joe Progress Edition

PORT ST. JOE POSTOFFICE AND PERSONNEL


and trying working conditions.
A greater burden is placed on
the office here by the fact that
Port St. Joe is not yet eligible for
city delivery service, and the
number of lock-boxes in use is in-
sufficient to care for the demand.
As a consequence, hundreds of pa-
trons must use th'e general de-
livery window service which is
inten;'.ed primarily for transients.
To take caue of this, the po1tmas-
ter has, tr-.n extent, ignored the
o',ullat.ion is provided restriction
o, of boxes to one patron, aml
;;r allowed multiple use of boxes
in.stames which appear jnsti-
fiable. However. when the office
o- l0 o new Oqul'rters it. is ex-
pected there will be a sufficient
amiiber of lock-boxes to care for
vworyole.
Mr. Drake came to Port St. Joe
in 1914 from Iron City, Ga., to
t!take a position in the accounting
deplartmlnoent of the A\ialahcliola
Northern Railroad. lie was later
promoted to chief clerk and in
May, 1926, was appointed auditor


Above is the Port St. Joe postoffice, which is to be moved shortly
to modern quarters. Reading from left to right: Postmaster H. A.
Drake. Mrs. H. A. Drake, Mrs. Je.se Smith and Ben H. Graves, Jr.


01 ote railroad cnmpanly ad a-
sociated companies, which posi- ) tihe n.atter-ci-fact, manner in and lands and houses were sold
tion he held for ten years, when, which people make use of the 'by the state for taxes. Now, af-
ter the lean years, Port St. Joe
in May, 1936, he resigned to ac- io.t:l fac cities, expressed the is at last oming nto her own.
cept the appointment of postmas- on'nioni tiat a wit'er and more Mr.,Stone's Public Career
ter, having held several previous .ho:oughi teaching in the publicI Mr. Stone has' always taken an
appointments dually with his rail- schools of the functions of the active part in public affairs. In
1918 he was elected as county
road position, witi the aid of his postal service would be a good commissioner from this district.
wife as assistant at the. postof- iC'ea. He believes that if this and in 1922 he again filled) this
fice. were done, it would acquaint peo- office by appointment to an un-
Mr. Drake is well qualified for pie with operation of the service, "expired term. He was elected to
S D i ll l the board of city commissioners
the office he now holds. At the thereby promoting its efficiency in 191.6. which position he held
age of 16 he was a bank cashier and having a tendency to provide for 18 years, serving as mayor
in Georgia. and was said to be greater benefits to all. for 11 years of that time.
He was active in the creation
the youngest in the state. In ad- -of Gulf county rom a portionof
dition, his accounting and audit- T.H. STONE Calhoun county in 1925, and
ing experience he rlnd.s stand hinm fm a 1 worked untiringly for completion
in good stead in the postal work. 'of Fghway No. 98 and, state
Sclihan-ed to Port St. Joe. A rail- road No. 6. In 1963 he was elected
Our postmaster, who is a prop- road dock was built, extending representative to the legislature
trty owner and is deeply inter- into the bay for three-quarters of from Gulf county, and from 1928
ested in the future development a mile, at which large ships tied to 193S he served as congressional
of this city. was at one time an np1 to loald mostly large cargoes committeeman from this county.
of export lumber. All in all. Mr. Stone is to be
outstanding played on the Port St. In 1914 came tl- war scar. with commended forl hs etii-.:" in be-
Joe baseball team. and many were a conseqiuent lull in business. half of the development of' Port
the games won by his ability as 'Then. from 1922 to 1927, came the iSt. Joe and Gulf county. and it
a pitcher. boonl n d'vs when everyone who is through the efforts of such
onvnred anything was a millionaire men as he that Port St. Joe is in
Postmaster Drake, in speaking --on paper. The boom collapsed the position it is today.


Owens & Murdock

CONGRATULATES THE




St. Joe Paper Co.


ON OPENING OF THE PAPER MILL





Clothes for the oknMan
* "































ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY TO
TRADE AT THIS STORE



PORT ST. JOE : FLORIDA
* 8


















S***.** ARI.Y a COM****E ***E *^
* 1
Q 6sahs oF he Pokin M4 :


- .-- -'-


,-------~._- ------
--.-----
I-- _-
------
--r-- _r~~l~ .----
-c-
-------
----- -
-------


" II Al &


A Ah AL .. A, AL





E..tra
Fancy
F;uits
: ad
Vegetables
',,o-
n ge
Variety

Port St. Joe
Florida


Fancy
Western
Meats
and
Fresh
Dressed
Poultry

Fort St. Joe
Florida


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY and SATURDAY, APRIL 8 AND 9


AA BALLARL-3ROBELISKA LN 0AJUICY


4 pounds 21 c 5 pounds 31e 15c Dozen

ETTUCE LEAFwTOS TrI WHOLE GRAIN

TA PO TOASTIES Bath rom T isasE
SALED 2 for 15c 3 for I E


S3 FBEECHNUT 4 lbs



23c Qt. COUE FR Ib. 3 Pounds 57c 17c


SHENS FR 27clb.
mRSE27 b


Pork Chops 20cl b.


SBacon 33o lb.


-.1 I_ -I- -- -~N.


I-


L~PWBB~P~''"I~B~P~IIP~I~J~:~Q~~~jlE;e~jY Hi ~EZ~ti~:'~ke.~.~lGR~a9e~;k~glCB~PnlB~a~p


THfE Twro


PAGE ELEVt.N


rql~l A ,AAVWL 2, MM~3


1' 1" ..L ..... .
SIer t of F P m a y 14 RAILROAD UNIONS .. RECEIVEE FINAL PAYMENT'
SBrothers recent of i .r a n ENDORSE PEPPER'" ON SCHOOL BONDS HeftI
AP0s ,The buineess. f making aper' Wholeheartted e dorsement of Trustees of the Port St: Joe
4r o in wh;ch the nl'1 is located. A re-election to a full term in the final payment on the bonds sold
C lfig to Port en's Ho 0 modern paper mill lihk that or the United State senate was given some time ago for completing the
.c 1;.Per Compa h.'mplo in Jacksonville last week by rep- new elementary. school building.
-i' @-- .--':.hnndreds of workers Who never Udi.
0 irE BECIN6 IN COLLEGE" IS LEGION POST VOTES TO AID see the mill. They are those who resentaties of 21 railroad unions. Work wil b tred ired-
S RRY MUSICAL;HRILLPPL CILRENork n gathering the logs used Several hundred delegates, in stely by the Albrftoo Wi s
RRY MUSICAL; TRILLS CRIPPLED CHILDREN; rn the manufacture ot paper and all.day session at- the Roose-. Construction' company on flnsh-
IN FAR EAST FILM ENJOY PICNIC caring for the forests in whih velt hotel, cheered and shoutedas Ing the building. work on which
ge batt er addera the trees are grown. Pepper was gtven their aj-nirrous was held up pending sale of the
)] ,get and battler, madder a I I aking bd.
r legr those three comedy.mtx At the regular meeting of .the -- baking. s.
5 Brothers are starred for the Amerioan LAr-on post, held Tles- G OARY.LOCKHART DRUG CO,
ii time i'( "Life Begins In Col- day night at thbe club house, it f Ic's Drugs, We Have It.
Smus l hit featuring Joan was voted to give 10 per cent of ---- -----
T;o, Ton Martin and Gloria the proceeds from the boxing ex- Mrs. W. M. Howell,.Mrs. D. C. U UH L
.a I', ~ak-h plays Sunday and hfbitions being presented by the Smith and Mrs. P. J.,1armer s ent
.doti y at ite Port theater. al, p os0t th e Crippled Chil- ;unday in Panama City, PO R T ST JO E O
A hiblaron, ituneswept jam- dren's Home at St. Petersburg. C i V
t.ore.-Ithe picture contains all the Fighters participating will take *'Lety" Wadsworth was a bus-
11hi gi ots. fo a04 y, ea LDptr cent of t gate and the ts visitor in Apalachicola Sun-
Utanisg h it--;ddy gaRgs, gor-' Legior will get 30 per cent 1
rO _iris nd frenzied fun. A crippled cbilaten's clinic will day.
a who ttain new heights of and the loaal, post requests that[ Pete Tramxell of the Dothan
lh.ial 1y as 4 love-struck ,irl on a all who have crippled children to Eagle, Dothan, Ala., was a visitor
t a .bunt or an Inlian, of a ll get in touch with the county Sunday in Port St. Joe.
t ii s. To unassuming Indian, nurse or any members of the Le-
S-itl only $f0,000 a day to spend, gion beforethat date in order that A v ".
j dubbed by all the fraternity the proper arrangeripnts can be |,A A
nres until the Ritz Brothers made for transportation, which V Ai.. D SJ
l him in; and then the fun be.- 'wi 'e furnished by the AmericanPO 0. Y-
a( 'in a riotous frolic of mirtl Legion.
1 merriment. A number of local Legionnaires FEMALE HELP WANTED
"Thank You, Mr. Moto" nmotored to Apalachicola Tuesday TWO additional ladies wanted to 1 I
Current'conditions i the Par right to attend a picnic dinner sell the famous MAISONETTE
-E:zt set the atmosphere for givpn by the Apalachicola post, Frocks and Lingerie. New line, .M d
*Th.ank You, Mr. Moto, starring which was held across the bay greatest ever; just released. Large
Peter Lorre and playing Wednes- from Apalachicola. oysters and earnings assured. Ladies over 30
dy and TIhu'sday at the Port.' shrimp were enjoyed, as well as years only need.apply. Write Box
Vivid exciiement prevails thru- arbecued p'g, which was done to 12, care The Star. It
out the entire action and con- !he ru'een's taste by Bob Collier
ilnues thc iLd.'entur- of 1Mr. Moto of the St. Joe post. ROOMS FOR RENT
a he I l's. untold dangers to fer-l Ar '"terapting talk on "Ameri- If you have a room for rent, why /
r t out hie ancient secret to the ca'ism" and the pride in our his- not place an advertisement in
Sudden to'tb pf Genghis Khan. tory and system of government ot plae an at
---- -- was riven I- Ihe Apalnchicola at- The Star. The cost is low and
-VHITAKER NOW GIVING 24- fq'r b' D'st'rit com-mander A. D. returns are gratifying. Try it to-
HOUR ELECTRIC SERVICE P r"kns of Greenwood, and was day.
greatly, enjrnyed by all. __- _--
~ **iFOR RENT *
.B. :Whi taker has opened an FOR RENT
We sric shep in the old hrh.'r ter- Mr-s. Sally Montgomrry aRnd FOR RENT-Two furnhshed beach
il' rldou,,r Costin's department Mrs. Joe 'Tompson srent yester--,ottolges at .'acon H:ll. 'Elec-
,T, and -r ,. that he is able dalt in T .lrh.-r M .rs:,Gertrude tric lights, running water. H, A.
:t do any' kind of electrical re- McNeil returned with. them. Dra' 'Port St. Joe, Fla. 1*
.P 'wrk,'; nd has established a -; GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
41 our F' tric tIonI"-. service Mr. ard Mrs. T. M. Schneider 'f Tt's D i.s. V.'e Have It. -
a.dd fan ;,7.y sent Shnday in Pan-
Ss. '-. c'o er, Miss Juanita aRa City viiting relatives. T250 C"'PIES of thiqi Progress Edi-
i $ r a Toni Mi'chell were tion are still available. The Star
; ig r'-,loeslay in Wewa- will ma il tiem out at the zare of
ka. S .e ecran.I returned to the two copies for 25c, or one c ol0
S. :ity Saurday after spending the ,r 1i.( Send, oe to your rela-
Lj pars j ....t! pP.ft -w +h ITr Tmpa. the pnlet "..'. nr frinrl---it v,'1 -qre yolu
p Iars o adveretise--lfry it! ,.1 1 ~i :. t,;":'-s C. Poe. ,tl1,rrg a letter. fh- FStar. t. u mP: nar,~, grywr upggy.pggql







- -- C -~-C-s-II----- me s-A FtWAY,, AfIA,. I


PAGE TWELVS


esoie: S4oae andi Cirllio MAL-
tb.w sllied TL It. Salib Is tWe
fstawl City hoipllid 3!Lnlary;:
k it. id Uri BVl .Tur' r were
'vilztg- with friende oSunday l
Psalma City.


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a'-ire
Sold a Paartm
Been Arrested
Been Your Cuei.t '
Started in BuSinrss -
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New HIome
S .:ipl Your Chickens
Met With An Accildnt
Had a Visit From the Storlk
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR


Phone 51-The Star
S l'9MlMP-' f .
--


JUSTICE



S0 re COURT
eggmlv.c AiOary. /931
pC~.rgI PrlkA o La*

REPLACE YOUR FORD
OR CHEVROLET
BATTERY
with a
9-MONTH GUARANTEED
BATTERY
For As
+ $3.95
Low As $3
(Exchange)

M. G. LEWIS & SONS
S GARAGE


Chas. Dome Wiliiiam. Comedian
'onies.'- t), PortSt. Joe op Thrirs.;
it. it nnC nlcht only.
.ipi H-n r i.' ro in roditi.-
;ion Up ,iint. a rew mao- a
thik 3bow w.iq hroalca.old Yvtry
w -Lk from cot to COw. The .Ist
:illil4 ar -~ ral o vo sid gerr
I -.i a r r rTnr Iba a ev'fninfg', en-
tfrr!qlnfl.nt long to b3 remetfl
h..o~d.
Ti.e doori of the tent heaterr
will open at 7: 15 and the cli;-
T~in vvill, ri- pi omptly at elbt

GARY.LOCKHART DRUG Co.
Regivered Pharmacists
Mrs. Troy Jones spent l'edner-
day in i-V,!13 Ciy on buatacs3s.
The 'trq is $2 per year-sub
ciCT-- no v


LILIUS JEWELRY

COMPANY
SExtends Conratulatioos to tihe


St. Joe Paper Company

Upon Opening of the South's Finest MMi

SW Appreciate

Your PEOPLE
ROSPE
Patronage sE





E. G. Lewis & Sons


GARAGE
Eztenod Congratulations to the
ST. JOE PAPER CO,
Upoa Campletion of the South's Finest Mill
-0

SEE US FOR YOUR CAR
REPAIRING
( PEOPLE
WRECKER SERVICE VROSP
PHONE 8 : Port St. Jo, FIe -


- ~-~TF-~---


CAPT. HENRY IS

COMING TO CITY

Famous Rae Srai& A Wd Hig Siow
Beat Follift Will 3goSeen
I14 To-it Theater
rnir -,-r I-." "n I~ii 'ovord pus in
MllAmI. Cri:o Tl -nlJ will bring
;jis radl-t s e-s .4how. t"how Boat


Candidates File

First Campaign

Expenditures

SHOLT2 LEASS LIST: MANY
"CONTRIBUTIONS"' TO
WAR CHESTS
Candidalea uir a itm and district
office' tihan week ODCgaaU lportiug
to SereIt.ry of Stats Robert A.
lriJy the ammountas they rtavo
apelt in LaiWpiign,- and where
they got the maonay.
Dl.,u Sihl.z, Ki_.ucratic sena-
tuoia candidate, s I he aad re-
I.e-ted 44.5.;r5 m contl .itutiiona. fie
Il.,d a $l.,0Ou from ahi ftithbr,
Milchel Sholtz:; $ 1) each from
J. E. B. (nludette, J.- Jordln
and Joe Metiler; 2-'52 from V.
LdIn, $al.) '1 (trumn M. J. .l,--rs.
Hi- i luii e.Lt itLa of expIIAe v A.
,',; oi oui.jud Irt l: e. Li, Lipc ll
4i 15d6I l..r I.-o tagi ar,,i k4uu or'
Stis qu'jlil Itt llun f e.
T. C. MNleiant of Madilon, an-
other D-?mociuaie seaatoiTIal Mtta.
did,4. listed $1 2i67.is of ?Apuse,
c0f icll t -.iu .ll hi 6 hi 'luallryl ll ,
it-e anajd iluti.5 ror i jso lud eriliip-
nicetL H. owedwd no iontributiousi
txvc-r'l 0i.-- n-wspper space.
.Al.on i.. WA lker of Wminer H.-
vty, Hepublicau -nttnor3ll :spir-
.ilt, shoeiJ eIprveea of $J3o.7o,
ut *hi.-h iSai.i p ., f r qualifying.
I, s .- ir ed co.o ijiur' ,loAu 0 oi 1.0..
Clhairuisn .iIt ij V'.. Carter of
The railroad co.nin:. ion ri.ortEri
lit- ,Pi-_n i,-'. ,. ;2 tp.I nl d TerlJiiln ,
priut n. p il.k a-Ze, 4t.i 1 if) ling I 'fte
and included i2 for his poll tax
on the list. He showed contribn-
lions to it, .inmpairn u $-'I'u each
from A. E Poosa.-' .1d .i.Lrtv VW.
.,.r.r, .Jr, anid 2.3 each from
,.i;ht iIlu, fruit c..mpJaniei.
JiuswIi.t -i ivei ut rdl of t he
sniplt'rne court said he had p~-nt
ri ., ., ;.,i itt-i, or ira v lih and
prepla i;i priiir.d wa.it er. He said
oul['thdil or2 Cime to 4 ; 7!, of
which 65t0 t is a bank loan.
Justice HR.v H. Chai.idan re-
port.d .Fil61; l expease. Lcverping
qualifying tes., travel and direct
um il diJv..-iizing No conllilbutionsI
PJrkbil M\lays of i!Ionl!cillo,
ian.lijit itLOr congress. e'pen -.',
xt': cautl ibutions 1, f, rom "a
friend."
:-:.,u S. M4ttlLhew., railroad
'omm;ni '.. r. exp. ane Fl.Odl, of
ba 'h.i'ng ;t o4t $52..65, no
,ontiburion i .
Manyi o'h.r candidates li ted
expeiin e dlCoutI : 3anl contribui-
tous,. ht they would not be of lo-
cal inlt'-- l .
Ca'nddte for both 4 sta and
.,outur.:, I.:. 1e.3 Iad1 until Ilst eve-
oing to ni. ik the first of three
Pxpensel 'raements to the seure-
tary of sTate.
I-L
ON THE BLUE LAGOON
A Catewiy Between Apalachicola
And Port St. Joe
By MARY DONATE
Ther-'as magic in ;te bi-rhr.ty
'That leads you on a3d on;
There's nil.'s of fragrant flowers
And birds that sing a song.
There's rhythm in the dancing
W IV'--
Pounding ith. beaches low;
'b .-:e'ri mu-'i. in every 4soaud
Of thi G.ilf of M, ico
The'ro' atn to give yoa S'tUshiv'
V.'.th a sky that's white lnd
bliuP:
And if you bnag your sw-tiheart
You'll li id a place ta w.o.
Ther.-'3 niglrs just made ta order.
Some lhive a i:ver moon;
Then there are naght with pur-
pie dusk
Ut'on the blue lagoon.
Please bear in mini this little
hint--
It you're to be married soon:
here'ss a cottgEo &nmall,:just built.
for two.:
To spend your honeymoon.
U.--r----
FELT BELTS ARE IMPORTANT
ITEM AT ST. Jo= PAPER MILL
One of the items which play an,
important part In the manafacture
of paper in MtBa St. Joe Paper
(Compnny mill are tho hage end-
;eas blankets of wool which make
it possible to carry the soft. we.t
web of 'pulp through the presa
sections of the paper machined att
speeds in exces of 1000 feet per
minu .e,
These blanket, not only. gt as
a ooneTyor for- the wet web,- bet,
also as a Illtering i elirm or wsr


APPLY


ST. JOE LUMBER


COMPANY-


PHONE 69


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Congratulation to
PORT ST. JOE AND ITS NEW AND MODERN
PAPER MILL


Reforestationin will make to-
morrow brighter for all A:t us.











AUSTIN'S
(FORMERLY MONTGOMERY'S)


Apalachicola, Fla.


New and, Modera
SPRING AND SUMMER FASHIONS

PALM BEACH SUITS $17.75


HOPKINS HATS
BOTANY TIES


SUMMER SLACKS
JARMAN SHOES


AND THE STURDIER WEAR FOR ROUGH GOING

Snap, Style and Quality la

LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR




Mfak Our Store Your Headquarters While in
Apalachicola


T. E. Austin


AUSTIN'S


Jolae A. Nedley


BAYVIEW HEIGHTS



BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL

SLOTS FOR SALE
VERY SMALL PAYMENTS REQUIRED


LOTS


11 V 3 Ln-Ug3 WO t24 IS &L


1910 2l


I I. r. 0,:! .1 '( H, -
60L, lrLl


.Fslarv 3~Rlt. ioni5


TNGI STAN.


~erefi~soj %gemt. Tti arl U. 09 P. $TUDwtYs eXpRFS.
prn.ied our of the shooe at t 1 PREFERENiCS FOR PEIPPEf
prsqa.. rolls mvicit dra'a. thresogt
hJis wo...- -o sm fatbr1n. While QANEVELL, &prit I tNS1
it pormita ib nrr."4 Pa" trt.;, v7td taken At athe nl-
*,*-'4't.. it brt ~ verty of blorida in Connection
'In.. tlrf orm oi a ma'entlaounjs wi, .1 7q 5th'drt body *~llO4. .
1. -;P t. Wbt3a3 i*. th tromrnm- detorratas preteoace of atudeft&
d-qiq -4 pr-4 .gur x. r t t,4 t for candidates offering to the
lr.-.r.m rolbt wo'ild dsr1ip4 -the slotf UnYsed Siates a ernAi. gave Claude
lp)ti-atln tas o! lateriarnt-d fibers, P1Ppew 1.41 4of a tWall ot .164
')IT-Vaklubi IV J-yw1voteo C &L 14ioltg aIowa4 tU.
dud Wilcox 464.
Maple lurolliiei i both Iz-IL- KH RUQ CO
rinivaA. n 5tl RaIY e i.so re for. I f ICA L Ar13 DW G CWO. It.


1. Llv M.


$75 UP