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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00179
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 1, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00179

Full Text





Port St. Joe--,ite of the 7,500,000 VA
.DuPont Paper MHI-Florida's fast- ;
est growing little city.. In
the heart of the pine belt.


S TA


.The Star-'-Flrida's fastest grow.
n.g -.little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1938 NUMBER 24


SPEAKS HERE


United States Senator Claude
Pepper who spoke in Port St.
Joe Monday evening after can-
celling a previous speaking en-
gagement due to an attack of
influenza at Marianna.


TAX GROUP IS

FORMED HERE

TO CUT COSTS

JOIN WITH STATE-WIDE OR
GANIZATION TO WORK
FOR TAX REFORM

Twenty leading citizens of Port
'St. Joe gathered as Port Inn Sat-
I.'ji1;.' noon to hear i -..n iii-'J a
plan for the formation of a state-
wide. organization ror ,study of
the steadily mounting tax burden
and aid in working out a system
for reduction of taxes and the set-
ting up of a more economical
form of government for the* state,
counties and cities.
The gathering was addressed
by Conrad Guerton, Gordon Nor-
croft and Nick Von Glahn, three
Jacksonville business men who
were touring the state in the in-
terest of the plan, working with-
out pay, spreading the gospel of
tax reduction as :a part of "Tax
Information Week" proclaimed by
Governor Fred Cone, March 27 to
April 2.
The purpose of Tax Information
Week, as explained by Mr. Nor-
croft, is to' make tae public tax
conscious.
"Even some of the business
men are indifferen- Lo tax prob-
lems," said Mr. Norcroft. "They
take the attitude tnat nothing
can be done about it. But some-
thing can be done about it, as
has been proven, in other states,
Massachueetts for example, where
a great army of citizens formed
local organizations similar to the
ones being formed in Florida, and
brnught about a revolution in gov-
ernment."
This is not a financial move-
n-ent. and all committee members
are donating their services. It is
not a political movement. except
that all candidates for public of-
fice will have their past records
investigated and those showing
they are favorable to reduction of
taxes and economy in government
will be recommended by the or-
ganiization. All that is being
sought is actual relief from the
heavy tax burdens.
A groun similar to that formed
in Port St. Joe. which is headed
by W.' W. Barrier, chairman, and
Horac' Soule. secretary, has been
formed in practically every city
in t'-. state, and if these units
can all work together, it is pointed
out, they can have any kind of
.tax situation they want.
Everybody pays taxes, regard-
.ess of whether they own property
or not, and residents of the city
are urged to join this tax organi-
za.tion and do their bit toward
reducing the tax burden.
Literature has been andi will be
distributed to everyone in regard
to tibs movement and an'endeavor
will be made to enlist every resi-
dent of the city 'as a member of
this tax association.


JUNIOR SENATOR

SPEAKS IN ST. JOI

MONDAY EVENING(

LARGE CROWD TURNS OU"
TO HEAR SENATOR
PEPPER

Senator Claude Pepper, resiun
in'g his state-wide speaking tou
after a severe attack of influenzE
had confined him td his bed fo
the better part of two weeks
addressed a large crowd hern
Monday evening at 7 o'clock.
The senator was, escorted into
the. city by a cavalcade of- ap
proximately 30 automobiles head
ed by Mayor J. L. Sharit, and was
met at the speakers stand by the
high school band.
Those who attended the speak
ing looking for fireworks and hop
ing that the senator would inject
personalities into his talk, were
disappointed, but what his appeal
may have lacked in the spectacu
lar, it more than made up for in
sincerity and human interest.
Reviewing his record in Wash-
ington, Pepper .pointed out a num-
ber of direct benefits gained for
the state, particularly for the
people of this section, during the
past few months, namely the se-
curing of $500,000 for the restora-
tion of the oystetr industry, $300,-
000 for the purchase of surplus
fish, and a loan.:r t 7..,li 111111 to
(.g there price o0f'-j-t' stores 'and
permit the orderly marketing of
gum rosin and turpentine.
Frankly admitting his faith in
and support of the national acd
ministration, the speaker briefly
reviewed the accomplishments of
the president and the Democratic
party in its five-year struggle to
legislate in behalf of the many
:-ather than the favored few.
Giving hope to the aged among
'is listeners who seek relief in
the form of pensions, he stated
that he hal' introduced a bill to
increasee old age pensions from
$30 to $50 a month.
Turning to the wage-hour bill,
Pepper pointed out that its pur-
pose was. primarily intended to
sid both industry and labor and
simply provided that where indus-
hry was well able to pay a living
wage, it should do so. By provide,
'.cg workers with a fair and rea-
sonable wage for their labor, in-
lustry could aid tremendously in
increasing the national buying
power to the advantage of every-
one, themselves included, he
pointed out.
The senator's listeners seemed
to appreciate this young man. a
man who had personally experi-
enced the trials and hardships
of poverty, and through struggle
and effort had advanced to a post
of trust andi honor such as is ac-
corded few individuals, but a man


NEW MARTIN PLAYHOUSE WELL UNDERWAY


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Construction is being rushed on the new Martin theater on Reid
avenue, adjoining the Miles Ten-Cent Store. Work has progressed
considerably since this picture was taken, the brickwork reaching
nearly to the roof beams. Star Photo.


SC. of C. Meets TWO BIG HITS


This Evening PLAYING PORT

Committee Reports To Be Heard 'HOLLYWOOD HOTEL'AND 'AL-
And Other Business Trans- CATRAZ ISLAND' PROMISE
acted; Attendance Urged THRILLS FOR FANS

Regular meeting of the Port St. Millions of radio fans accus-
Joe Chamber of Commerce, will timed to turn to the "Hollywood
be held this evening in the store Hotel" air show, will have an op-
room formerly occupied by the
Bargain Furniture Co. in the Cos- portunity: to see this program de-
tin building adjoining ,Quarter- picted on the screen .at the Port
man's Studio. theater next Sunday, Moriday and
A full attendance of members Tuesday.
is requested by President G. F.
Kaser as reports of committeemen For ain entire broadcast with
will be heard at this time and Louella O. Parsons as mistress of
other important business trans- ceremonies. has-been incorporated
acted, into the musical comedy, "Holly-
A new service for the conveni- wood Hotel." Appearing are Ray-
ence of the public is announced, mond Paige and his 40-piece or-
by Secretary R. C. Rector. This is chestra, Frances Langford, Jerry
establishment of a service for the Cooper, Marion Davies, Edward
renting of rooms in .private homes. G. Robinson, Bettte Davis. Olivia
Anyone having a room for rent is de Havilland, Errol Flynn, Joan
asked to leave their name at the RBondall and a host more stars.
chamber of commerce office. A The picture, an inside story of
file will be kept or these so that Hollywood, stars Dick Powell and
anyone seeking a ioom may be in'- a supporting cast including, Lola
formed instantly or just what is Lane. Ted Healy, Hugh Herbert
available, and Glenda Farrell.
Home-owners are urged to co- Thrilling Film
operate with the chamber by fil- America's most widely publi-
ing this information immediately cized penitentiary, that "big rock"
with the secretary, who has nu- in the chill waters of San Fran-
merous inquiries daily for rooms. cisco Bay, is brought to the, screen
for the first time in "Alcatraz Is-
Furniure Sto e Is land" a thrilling melodranma to
r it e Sore be presented next Wednesday and
Thursday at the Port theater.
Grim but fascinating is this
Dpen for Inspe tion story of men who live outside the
Sloa,' and of the men whose duty
it is to apprehend and convict
Chavers-Fowhand Is Latest Addl. them. Every moment is loaded'
ition To Busines Section; with thrills, but it also carries a
human story of love-both roman-
Have Large Stock 'tic and parental-and of exciting
adventure on the mainland.
The Chavers-Fowhand Furniture John Litel is featured as a
Company, with a number of stores racketeer who is, despite his busi-
in Northwest Florida, has opened ness. rather likeable. An amaz-
9 branch in Port St. Joe, located, ingly dramatic sequence of events
in the T. H. Stone block adjoining occurring behind' the walls of Al-
the St. Joe Bar. catraz bring this picture to an
They have stocked a complete unexpected and exciting climax.
line of modern furniture and ex- ---
tend a cordial invitation to the MODEL HOME TO BE OPEN
public to drop in and inspecttheir FOR INSPECTION MONDAY
store and stock.
____---


INTRODUCE BILL

FOR COINAGE OF

50-CENT PIECES

IN COMMEMORATION OF 100TH
ANNIVERSARY OF STATE
CONSTITUTION

Senator Charles O. Andrews, on
behalf of himself and Senator
Claude Pepper, last week intro-
duced in the United States sen-
ate the following bill, which was
read twice and referred, to the
senate committee on banking and
currency:


A BILL
To authorize the coinage of 50-
cent pieces in commemoration
of the one-hundredth anniver-
sary of the signing of the
Florida State Constitution.
Be it enacted by the Senate
and House of Representatives of
the United States of America
in Congress assembled, That in
commemoration of the one-hun-
dredth anniversary of the sign-
ing of the Florida State Con-
stitution, there shall be coined
at a mint of the United States
to be designated by the director
of the mint not to exceed thirty
thousand silver 50-cent pieces
of standard size. weight and
composition, and of a special
appropriate single design to be
fixed by the director of the
mist, with the approval of the
secretary of the. treasury; but
the United. States shall not be
subject to the expense of mak-
ing the necessary dies and
other preparations for this coin-
age.
Sec. 2. The coins herein au-
thorized shall bear the date 1938
irrespective of the year in
which they are minted or is-
sued, shall be legal tender in
any payment to mne amount of
their face value, and shall be
issued only upon he request
of the Committee for the Flor-
ida State Constitution Centen-
nial Celebration upon payment
by it of the par value of such
coins, but not. less than five
thousand such coins shall be
issued to it at any one time
and no such coins shall be is-
suedi after the expiration of
one year after the date of en-
actment of this act. Such coins
may be disposed of at par or
at a premium by such commit-
tee, and the net proceeds shall
be used by it in defraying the
expenses incidental and appro-
priate to the commemoration of
such event.
Sec. 3. All laws now in force
relating to the subsidiary silver
coins of the United States and
the coining or striking of the
same; regulation a-:d guarding,
the process of coinage; provid-
ing for the purchase of material
and for the transportation, dis-
tribution and redemption of
coins: for the prevention of de-
basement or counterfeiting; for
the security of the coins, or for
any other purpose, whether such
laws are penal or otherwise,
shall, so far as applicable, ap-
ply to the coinage herein au-
thorized.


Passage of the bill appears cer-
tain, and coinage and sale of
these 50-cent pieces should net
the centennial committee at least
$10.000 for the 30,000 coins, as in
the past, when such coins have
Iee n tefoc o--neo1meuca cM-


Geonge Winchester, local con- been mintea for special cormmeal-
and who had not forgotten that STATE SELLS FEWER TAGS tractor and builder, announces orative occasions, demand by col-
countless others still remained at BUT GETS MORE REVENUE that a model home, just completed lectors and others nas greatly ex-
the foot of the ladder in need of on- Sixth street adjoining the Wo- ceeded the supply, so there should
a helping hand, and many were TALLAHASSEE, March 31 man's club house, will be open be no trouble in disposing of the
the expressions of support prom- (FNS) The semi-monthly audit for public in n ginning entire issue.committee
ised him by those who gath- of the motor vehicle department Monday morning and that the Present plans of the committee
on March 15, shows that the tag neat little home is for sale. are to sell these coins at one dol-
ered around to shake his hand at onMarcies of the state sold 278 less--- lar each both before and at the
the conclusion of nis talk. tags to that date this year than GULF COUNTY USES 54,679 time of holding the centennial
Senator Pepper left this city in 1937, but that 'they received GALLONS GAS IN FEBRUARY celebration hee December 7 to 10.
for Panama City, where he was $322,754.47 more in revenue.HODGES NOT TO RUN
The increase is due to the fact HODGES NOT TO
scheduled to speak at 8 o'clock. that inspectors have been check- According to the state depart- LAKE CITY, March 31 (FNS)-
Sing weights and have found that mnt of agriculture, Guf county Chairman J. B. Hodges of the
34 TONS .FERTILIZER USED a considerable number have been residents consumed 54,679 gallons state Democratic executive con-
Gulf county farmers used 34 buying light-weight tags for heavy of gasoline and 6,648 gallons of ittee, announces that he will not
tons of mixed. ertillizersduring kerosene during the month of be a candidate for re-election,
tons of mixed fertilizers during weight trust. February. preferring, he says. "to remain
the month of February, according ----- ---- free in 1940 to assist in securing
to a report by the state depart- .Mr. and Mrs. R. 0. Roberts Mrs. Josephine Levy of the a delegation to the national con-
ment of agriculture. Total con- spent Sunday in Tallahassee. the State College for Women at Tal- vention that will nominate a real
sumption for the state was 46,- guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. lahassee, was the week-end guest Democrat for president of the
679 tons. Chapman. of Mrs. Thomas McPhaul. United States."


who possessed a grateful heart








A-1-.I. .


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-4( Telephone 51 .- .-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed '
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

ARE WE TAX CONSCIOUS OR TAX
UNCONSCIOUS?

A representative gathering ofi business
men met at the Port Inn Saturday morning
to hear words of wisdom on the tax situa-
tion in Florida from the lips of three busi-
ness men of Jacksonville who were touring
the state in an effort to organize the citizens
into a huge non-political, non-money making
association to study the steadily mounting
taxes in this state and endeavor to do some-
thing about it.
This plan of organizing taxpayers' associa-
tions in cities and towns all over the state
originated in Massachusetts, and more de-
tails of the Massachusetts plan will, be pub-
lished in the columns of The Star from time
to time. Primarily the plan is to set up a
more economical form of government .which
,will assure taxpayers that they are getting
a dollar's worth of good from every dollar
that goes into the state, county and city
treasuries.
While the proposed organization is to be
non-political, it will take all iiiterest Int poli-
tics to the extent that every candidate for
public office will have his past record investi-
gated, and if it is found that he has a ten-
dency toward extravagance the association
will urge all taxpayers to support the man
whose past record indicates that he is eco-
nomical and efficient in public affairs.
While many do not realize it, not being
property owners, the problem of taxes ef-
fects everybody. Taxes are paid on every-
thing we buy-food, clothing, automobiles,
furniture, machinery, and anything one cares
to mention-these are hidden taxes and are
passed on to the ultimate consumer, whether
he be a property owner or a renter. With a
concerted movement to curtail tax boosts
and additional new taxes, and a possible re-
duction in present taxes, the cost of living
will be reduced and taxes on real property
cut to a considerable extent.
This plan has met the test in Massachu-
setts and proven its soundness-it should
work equally well in Florida. Let's all get
together, become members of this associa-
tion and see-what can he done.
With the tax burden steadily mounting,
we must either become tax conscious or tax
unconscious. Which will it be?

Since the administration in Washington
keeps 'going around and around in a circle, it
is only natural that it should stop once in a
while to collect fares from those who are be-
ing taken for. a ride.-Savannah News. It
begins to look as though we won't be able
to pay the fare pretty soon.

It may be a coincidence, but most of those
folks whose minds become blank before they
shoot somebody, usually shoot darned
straight.-Titusville Star-Advocate.

Vice-president of the United States ought
to have a publicity man to keep him in the
limelight.-Timnes-Union. By the way, just
3who is vice-president now?

The best judgment is not to trust your
own too far.


POINTING WITH PRIDE

Long columns of figures are usually mo-
notonous and sometimes wholly non-under-
standable to the average person. But to the
trained statistician they hold a gold mine of
knowledge to be carefully, sifted and passed
along as a simple story.
Such is the story they give of the growth
of a single industry-the gas industry-in
the United States, presented to us by a re-
cent survey of natural gas and manufactured
gas. It would appear difficult to duplicate
the progress of this one single industry from
the open hearth days to the present day ef-
ficient uses to which gas is put. But doubt-
less there are many other similar stories of
growth in the United States.
For instance, it was found that $5,000,-
000,000 is invested in the gas industry to
furnish service' to 17,000,000 customers. The
gas companies employ 135,000 persons with
annual payrolls totaling $213,000,000, and
back of the job of each employee is an invest-
ment of $37,000. In 1929 the average em-
ploye in the industry worked 48 hours a
week, against 40 hours now, and the pay
level is slightly higher today.
Port St. Joe is indeed fortunate in being
served by an efficient and up-to-date gas
distributing company and daily more homes
here are being equipped with gas for heat-
ing and cooking. It is estimated today that
more than 2,000,000 homes in the country are
now equipped with gas.
Now to reach real figures big enough to
asphyxiate you-the total production of na-
tural gas alone in 1937 aggregated 2,500,000,-
000,000 cubic feet. This was an all-time
ligh, exceeding 1936 by more than 17 per
'ent.

WHY THE CONSTITUTION?

Something over eight months ago, a Ger-
man citizen, thd Reverend Martin Niemoeller,
-in outstanding anti-NTazi Pfdtestant pastor,
,vas arrested in Berlin because of his out-
spoken opposition to the dictatorship of
Adolph Hitler.
Iater he was found guilty of the "crime"
of having discussed and criticized govern-
ment measures from the pulpit. He was sen-
tenced to seven months in prison and a sub-
stantial fine. Because he had been in prison
for a longer period awaiting trial than that
to which he was sentenced, he was set free.
But-he was immediately arrested by secret
police and without trial was sent to a prison
concentration camp.
All .too often we take our own Constitu-
tion and the rights it gives us too lightly.
In contrast to Germany, tne Reverend
Niemoeller under the protection of the
American Constitution would in the first
place never have been arrested for criticising
the government or its acts; he would not
have been held for eight months awaiting
trial and then upon his,'release could not be
arrested and sent away to .a prison camp
without trial. All because such things are
forbidden by our Constitution.
Truly, we take too lightly this document
vhich guards our every right as Americans. I

Chicago hotel men are said to be planning
'o replace the word '.'hors d'peuvres" with t
the more easy to pronounce word "spiteaser,"
thus depriving Americans of the opportunity
to impress waiters with their knowledge of
French.-Hartford Courant. Wouldn't it
sound more elegant to say "salivaeaser"? t

There is no department store on earth v
large enough to supply everything a woman
wants.-Florida Times-Union. Nor no man's r
pocketbook deep enough.
y
t
An attempt is being made to bring vaude- 1:
ville back. Most of the jokes haven't been I
Inywhere.--Boston Transcript. d

Did you ever notice that the boys who t
are the most popular with the girls are those a
Awho spend something more than an evening?


his employers. I gave him. sym-
Stard t a j pathy, for I've known him for a
Sta du, A.t anTd good many years, but what I
-- 1i, | would liked tto have said was
MVlOORnsnine something like this:
"Has it ever occurred to you
By The Other Fellow that you ought to take an inven-
tory of yourself? Here you are
at 35 and the longest you've ever
The chirping of a bunch of lasted on any job is two years.
sparrows under my bedroom win- If you don't get hold of yourself
dow yesterday morning awak- soon, it will be too late. What
ened me, and while I lay there gives you the idea that your em-
half asleep, half awake, I recalled players are stupid? Why, you poor
being awakened in a similar man- fish, the only timing that makes
ner in the Sierra Madre moun- me think they may be stupid is
tains by hundreds of chirping that they hired you. In your pres-
sparrows breakfasting off the red ent frame of mind you aren't
berries on a mountain ash tree. worth a damn:. Wvke up!"
The noise is cheerful, if not And now all I hope is that he
musical, and they seem to be reads this.
holding a thanksgiving service ,
out of pure enjoyment and pass- "American women between the
ing a vote of thanks. ages of 25 and 50 years possess
They are not w~-rrying about an average of one and one-half
future supplies of berries and chins," says a New York beauty
seem utterly oblivious of where expert. .I suppose it will
the berries came from or how na- be. necessary to change Mr. Kip-
ture supplied them. ling's description .to "a rag and a
They reminded me at the time bone and a hank of hair, and a
of several professional political chin and a half."
agitators I listened to in Racine,
Wis., who held noisy meetings, And while I'm off on this tack,
discussed industries and con- here's some more:
demned private enterprise. j the motive of laissez


Such agitators have as little
conception of the sources from
which employment and daily
bread and butter flow, as have
the sparrow's of their supply of
berries.
Nature supplies the sparrows
with the berries just as stored
capital and experienced brains
plan industries and make employ-
ment possible.
The berries must grow and
ripen in spite of the elements
and the handicaps with which
;hey have to contend.
Industries music grow and fur-
nish employment in spite of the
political: handicaps with which
they constantly have to contend.
The sparrows and the agitators
enjoy making the big noise and
eating the berries which they do
not provide.
It takes more rains to raise
berries than to eat them.

Did you ever stop to think that
'ery few of us are willing to ask
ourselves: "What's wrong with
me?"
I was talking Tuesday with a'
'oung fellow who's always had
roublee in getting along. He had
been working for the St. 'Joe, Pa-
per company, but had quit. He
doesn't last long on any job. He's
good at getting jobs but poor at
keeping 'em. You know him? I
thought you did. We all do. Or,
at least, someone like him.
He sneered at the stupidity of


faire, or let the buyer beware.-
Stamford (Conn.) Advocate.
Another motive is cherez la
femme, 6r beware the dog.-New
York World-Telegram.
And' still another which might
have been mentioned is carp
diem, or keep off the grass,-Ex-
change.
Cicero, .the great Roman orator,
never lost an opportunity to
terminate one of his famous
speeches with the fiery exhorta-
tion: "Carthage must be de-
stroyed."-Advertisement of Har-
mon National Real Estate corpor-
ation.
To which item of Hitherto-Un-
known History may be added the
fact that Catiline, crossing the
Tiber, exclaimed, "Veni! Vidi!
Vici!" Or that Augustus, sighing
for more worlds to conquer, de-
clared, "Iacta a;ia es(to!"
I thank you.

TIME IS MONEY
The Scotch farmer had fallen
into the well, and, while swim-
ming around in it, shouted to his
wife. She came running to him
and said: "I'll call the servants
from the field, and they will pull
you out."
"What time is it?" he inquired.
"Eleven-thirty."
"Well. never mind," he said,
"I'll swim around 'till dinner
time."-Montreal Star.
Send Th-e Star to a friend.
Send The Star to a friend.


PAGE TWO


:r K SPTAR


FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1939







RI


Mr. Business Man, you need
business cards. See The Star Job
Printing Department.
Paid Political Advertising

For County Commissioner
I hereby announce my candi-
dacy for the office of County Com-
missioner, District 5, Gulf County,
subject to the Democratic Pri-
mary.
If elected I promise to discharge
the duties of office to the best of
my ability and for the betterment
of Gulf County.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
C. ARTHUR LUPTON.

FOR STATE ATTORNEY
To the Voters of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit of Florida:
I am~-a candidate for the Office-
of Statie Attorney, subject 'to the
Democratic Primary, May 3, 1938.
Your votes and influence will be
greatly appreciated.
Respectfully,
L. D. McRAE.

FOR STATE ATTORNEY
Fellow Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election
at State Attorney for the 14th
Judicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson and Washington,
subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office
promptly, fairly, courteously and
to the best of my ability. If re-
elected, I will continue to do so.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr.,
Marianna, Fla.
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Democratic Voters
of Gulf County:
In the belief that my past ex-
perience as a member of the legis-
lature should be of value and that,
if honored with election, I may be
able to render some service to my
County, I announce my candidacy
for Representative in the Legis-
lature in and for' Gulf County. The
older residents of the County are
familiar with my past legislative
record and I invite the investiga-
tion of our new citizens. On my
past record and my desire to be of
future service, I solicit your vote
and support in this campaign. I
assure you that your vote and sup-
port will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.

ELECT

JOHN C. WYNN

He will t
Appreciate
YOUR
VOTE
and
Support
for


State Attorney
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
*-A A ~- ^-*-------------------^


HIT-RUN LAW

RULING GIVEN

BY CHAPMAN

JUSTICE EXPLAINS, RECENT
OPINION BY STATE SU-
PREME COURT

Florida's law against hit-and-
run drivers has been. declared
constitutional by the s tate su-
preme court, the five other mem-
bers concurring in an opinion by
Justice Roy H. Chapman.
Although the law was passed by
the 1929 session of the legislature
and has been in effect for more
than eight years, the question of
validity was not raised until
CGerge Jo.Ses-'receptly asked the-
court to release him from a Flag-
ler county violation.
The statute makes it unlawful
for a driver "who has inflicted in-
jury or damage or put in jeopardy
the person or property of an-
other" to leave the scene of the
accident without stopping to give
all possible aid anz without giv-
ing his "full, true and correct
rame. The penalty for violation
is imprisonment up to one year
or fine not exceeding $500.
Jones,in his petition to the *u-
preme court, contended the law
violates the state constitution in
that it compels a person to be a
witness against himself.
In over-ruling Jones' plea, Jus-
rice Chapman pointed out that
"owners of motor vehicles accept
a ;ic'ense to operate their cars
upon the highways of Florida sub-
ject to all legal regulations ex-
s'ting or later enacted which the
legislature thought or believed
the interest of th.- general public
required. "
"The regulation of conduct of
motorists .involved in accidents or
collisions was essential to the
protection of human life. The
giving of the information required
has been upheld by courts of
31any states without violating the
:.ostitutional rights of citizens,"
'e declared.
"We do not think it necessary
or a decision of this case to con-
sider the question of the right of
citizen to use tme public high-
ways or Florida or whether the
use is a right or a privilege. The
statute called into question does
not violate any of the constitu-
tional rights of the petitioner."

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

LIGHTNING KILLS YOUTH

Hinton A. Tiptonb 14, of Bas-
com, was instantly killed last
week by a lightning boll -which
struck a tree under which he and
his small sister and several other
boys had driven for shelter five
niles south of Bascom.
Paid Political Advertising


MURPHY ACTI

UNDER FIRE


I


The Florida Educational Coun-
cil, charged with formulating a
program for schools, vigorously
attacked the Murphy Act in its
annual report to the Florida Edu-
cation Association in convention
at Tampa, and emphatically op-
posed any future so-called "bar-
gain sale tax laws."
Recommendations of the coun-
cil, which is composed of repre-
sentatives of more than a score
of organizations interested in
schools, will be embodied in a
program to -be sdbmiitted to the
1939 legislature.
Other recommendations were:
Adoption of a constitutional
amendment in. the November gen-
eral elections to ,make mandatory
a full state appropriation for
schools.
A drive by tax collectors to
collect poll taxes which are no
longer a prerequisite for voting,
but which remain a tax levy.
A program to make the teach-
ing profession attractive to youth.
A teacher retirement system.
Higher qualifications for begin-


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


We Will Build You a House To


LIST WITH


'ning teachers.
A premium on personalities and
natural aptitudes of students, not
measured by degrees and di-
plomas.
The organization was estab-
lished by former Governor Dave
Sholtz as an adv-sory committee
on schools, and its recommenda-
tions last year were adopted by
the 1937 legislature.


Ritz Theater Building
Phene 168
PANAMA CITY


Suit You


SUBDIVISIONS


(


RE-EL ECT


MILLARD CALDWELL

TO 0



CONGRESS
He has given the Third Florida
District straightforward and ef-
fective represrtation in Congress


I


Electric service is so cheap and efficient
that nothing can compete with it. For
less than 10c a day it keeps food fresh
and freezes ice cream or other desserts
without calling on you for any help.
What you spend for electric service for


one month's refrigeration wouldn't pro-
vide movie fare for two weeks for most
families-which merely goes to show that
even such low price entertainment as the
movies isn't any bigger bargain than
electric service.


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready For Every House In

Port Jt. Joe

COOKING WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
.0
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

-.f( A full line of gas appliances in stock )1---


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932

HB;rl~isl^^ffPffiHHir
11111 11111 l ~llplll~r~ ** ""*"U^11111IIIII~B--


OPENING ANNOUNCEMENT


WILSON & KERR, Realtors

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA



LOTS AND HOUSES FOR SALE


1 1


EDUCATIONAL
MANDS FULL
TION FOR


--~I~IIRIIC-SP


I I -- C-

I 1 r I


COUNCIL DE-
APPROPRIA-
SCHOOLS


El


HAD HIM TAGGED
Old Bosun (pointing to. Chinese
characters on laundry ticket): "Is
that my name?"
Laundryman: "No, him b'Long
description. Means li'l ol' man in
shining suit, closs-eyed, no teeth."
Old Bosun: "Er-thank you."-
Valdosta Times.

Send The Star to a friend.


FRIDAY, APRIL- 1, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE THREE







rR


Mrs. Joe'Whitfield of Wewa-
hitchka was visiting in the city
Wednesday.
inll lwmIr iU n I IIIIwIII; -l l' Il InillI!!, u Ni a w n 111111 1111 elps I IIIH


A MARTIN


THEATRE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

FRI. and SAT.-APRIL 1 2
THE 3 MESQUITEERS



'Purple


Vigilantes'

SAlso
DICK TRACY NO. 7

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday
APRIL 3, 4 and 5


%L. |1,-. a a -- .1-
Prances Langford. Jerry Cooper,
Marion Davies, Edward. G.. Robin-
son, Bette Davies, Leslie Howard,
Olivia, de Havilland Errol Flynn,
Joan Blondell, Brian Aherne, Ted
Healy, Hugh Herbert, Glenda Far-
rell, Raymond Paige's' Orchestra,
DICK POWELL andi LOLA LANE
Also
"NEW HOMESTEAD"

Wednesday and Thursday
APRIL 6 and 7
rih Wocis Tlil Strike Flar b Eiary.Sat In taIfecal


a.. os- : -



PRESENTED BY WA2.r,'R 1iROS.
A COSMOPOL7.TAN PRODUCTION
A First Nctional Picture
Also
'CALLING ALL CURTAINS
LATEST NEWS EVENTS
~~ji~r


JUNIOR CLASS ENTERTAINS
SENIORS WITH BANQUET
The junior class of the Port St.
Joe high school entertained the
senior class and members of the
faculty, their wives and husbands,
with a sumptuous banquet last
Friday evening at Port Inn.
The hotel dining room was dec-
orated with red, white, purple and
gold colors, carrying out the class
and: school colors, centerpiece of
the banquet table was a large
bowl of spring flowers. The place
cards were miniature witches at-
-~cichd to a long paper streamer
leading to the centerpiece and
tbwcked under 'the edge of the
bowl were fortunes for each one
present. Programs for the eve-
ning were at each place.
The address of welcome was by
Helen Baggett, president of the
junior class, ane the response
was by Jimmie Morton, president
nof the senior class. The c'as.s of
'318, of 13 members', joined their
president in singing "Thanks For
the Memories" to the teachers.
Prof. B. G. -McPherson gave an
interesting talk, "To the Seniors,"
followed by a solo. "Farewell," by
Adelaide Hardy. "To the Juniors"
was given by Florine Johnson,
"ar "Tn the Teac.ers" by Alice
Ruth Gibson, followed by the
sog. "Pals," by the junior.class.
Immediately after the banquet
everyone motored to Beacon Hill
where dancing was enjoyed to
fill out the evening.
Jfr ir


JOINT MEETING OF
W. M. U. CIRCLES
j The Baptist Women's Mission-
ary Society held its mission and
inspiration meeting Monday after-
"no:. .t the home of Mrs. -3. W.
',somore, with Mrs. Willie Ola
Martin in charge.
Mrs. Martin led the devotional,
rointin;o out somq rewards of a
Christian life, followed by prayer
led by Mrs. Holliday. The intro-
duction was by Mrs. Martin, and
other speakers for the afternoon
were Mpsdames Dendy. D. Miller,
M. Mahon, .. White, T. F.. John-
'on. The talks were in regard to
the Baptist workers in Europe and
li'e obstacles they are facing.
Mrs. Holli-day impersonated a
little gh'i from Hungary and, told
of her life.
Refreshments were served to
the following members, Mesdames
Manrt'n, T. F. Jnhnson. Durant, B.
T. Johnson, W. J. Daughtry, J.
White, R. Haley. Duke, Patter-
ron. WV. P. Howell, Hammock, D.
Milclr. ,McCormiick, S. C. Prid-
aeo'l. H. Montgomery. Hughes,
Henso'n. Cason. Holliday, J. 0.
Baggett, -J. E.. Baggett, Kemp, W.
C. Pridgeon,' Pinton, Linsey, L.
W. Owens, 'Lipe,' D'endy; J. F.
Miller, C. G. Costtin, Grogan, E.
Wages, Oglesby and! M. Mahon.
Mercer Spear spent Sunday in
Apalachicola, the guest of his par-
'ents, Mr. and Mrs,. E. M. Spear.


CHAVERS-FOWHAND


FURNITURE CO.

WISHES TO ANNOUNCE


Opening of Our


Furniture Store
R. H. OUTLAW, Manager

LOCATED IN STONE'S

NEW BUILDING

Come In and See Our Stock At Display


Ask About Our

EASY PAYMENT PLAN



Cash and Easy Terms


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.
-**-
EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:3.0 o'clock.
-f-
CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
-f-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. MAney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.
-P-
FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m
Sunday Morning services at 11
o'clock.
Sunday morning sermon topic:
"Cheap Crosses." At the close of
the service we shall observe the
Lordfs Supper.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
Evening worship 7:45.
Sunday evening sermon theme:
"The Celestial City Limited."
WV. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.
G, A., 4- p. m. Friday.

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Mar:etta. Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.
------*---
George Winchestetr spent Sun-
day in Tallahassee with his fam-
ily.
Sammy Patrick of Wewahitchka
was visiting Wednesday in Port
St. Joe.


New Spring Styles 1


TO GO WITH THE
NEW SPRING HATS!
Be sure that your coiffure
will match and accentuate
the fine details of the new
hats come to a
modern shop.
Princess Permanent
This famous special is
complete with shampoo
and wave set.
$3 to $6.50

PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOP
PHONE 55 Port St. Joe


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
IN MEETING
The Lottie Moon chapter of the
Girls' Auxiliary of the Baptist
church met last Friday with Mar-
gie and Dorothy Costin as hos-
tesses, with the president in
charge.
The meeting opened with song,
"Jesus Lover of My Soul." The
scripture, Luke 8:49-55, was read


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY
WHERE BUSINESS IS BRISK YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND
FRESH GROCERIES'

MILK 4 Small 15c TOMATOES- 2
or 2 Large ..-- 6 cans for .---



IPotatoes 10 lbs 23c


POTTED MEAT, 6 for 25c
Cranberry Sauce, can....10c
FIELD CORN, 3 cans 25c
COOKING OIL, gal.....95c
MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c

Wax Lunch Paper
Was 10c-NOW -..-


Crystal White J"
TOILET SOAP, 6 for 2
SPAGHETTI, 3 for ......10c
LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs ...15c
Milnut Milk, 3 large ....25c
Prince Albert Tob, 3 for 28c
Kill Kwick Mosquito 65C
Spray; 75c size..-....


Fresh e Per Wilson's Sliced
Yad IDoz. 23C Breakfast Bacon, lb..-
Oil Sausage, gal -........95c Oleomargarine, Ib. .-.....15c
We Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT

BAY SHORE GROCERY


We Appreciate Your Patronage


Highland View


WE STOCK A FULL LINE OF


Sthe Working Man aothes

for the Working Man at Reasonable Prices


HIGH BIB

OVERALLS


$1.49


LONG-WEARING

WORK SHOES


$1.98 up


RIP-PROOF

WORK SHIRTS
Standard Work Shirts that
provide roomy comfort


SI)49c Bup




Owens & Murdock
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


I


by the president, followed ;with
prayer by Mrs. E. C. Cason. Rolli
was called and the secretary's re-
port heard. Reports were also had
LrTom :he treasurer and various
committees. The standing commit-
tee was revised and a letter
from 0. T. Moncrief acknowledged
by the auxiliary. The meeting was
then turned over to Rev. J. W.
Sisemore for examination on the
'Girls' Auxiliary ,Ianual. The ses-
sion was then dismissed by Rev.
Sisemore.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
It pays to advertise-try it!


PAGE POUR


THE STAR


FRIDAY, APRIL 1. 1638







FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1938

BAND AND GLEE CLUB TO
ENTER MUSIC FESTIVAL Notice
The West Florida Music Festi- Lodge Notlces
val to be held at DeFuniak
Springs next Friday and Satur-
day, is promising much entertain- Order of Eastern Star
ment for music lovers of North- Meets on second and fourth
west Florida. Leo Andrews, chair- Tuesdays of each month in the
man of the festival committee,
states that the affair, will be pre- Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
sented on a much'larger scale this tors who are members are cor-
year than in previous years. Thou- dially invited to be present.
sands of high school boys and American Legion Meets first
girls from all over this section of
the state are expecting to partici- Monday in month at club house.
pate in this affair. Legion Auxiliary Meets first
The combined band of Gulf Monday in month at club house.
county, consisting of 50 pieces, Woan Cb
and a glee club numbering thirt Woman's Club meeting First
members from Port St. Joe, are and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
anticipating their entering the Port Inn parlor.
contests at the festival. -----
The program will consist of a GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
.band contest, mas.-ed band con-
quartetts, trios and other con- Try Our Fountain Specials.
certs, glee club contest, duets, -- ---
tests. Sewing room choruses, !SCHOOL PUPILS TREATED
massed glee club choruses- and TO EDUCATIONAL PICTURE
boys' and girls'.glee club choruses The pupils of the Port' St. Joe
will also be heard. schools were given a rare treat
Next Friday night "Twelfth Tues'day morning when' an educa-
Night," by Shakespeare, will.be tional picture was shown in the
presented, and Saturday night the high school auditorium. The pic-
Florida State. Symphony will pre-i ture consisted of a special feature
sent Fifth Sympho.ny, C. Minor,. by -As.nt and animal life, songs by
Beethoven. Arthur Tracy, the Street Singer,
The program throughout prom-:"A Visit Through the Holy Land"
ises much enjoyment, and a num- and "Sport Features," showing
ber from Port St. Joe have ex- .various champions. the'different
pressed their intention of attend- ;strokes in tennis, pointing out the
ing. main points in playing a game of
Stennis. Also a lesson in music ap-
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO. '`preciation, with Jesse Crawford
Complete Line of Magazines. at the organ.
S t:r About 300 pupils enjoyed this
METHODIST MISSIONARY show, and it would be well if
SOCIETY MEETS more pictures of this type could
SOCIEY be placed before the students'.
The Methodist Missionary So-
ciety met Monday afternoon at
the cchrch with the vice presi- GARYLOCKHART DRUG CO.
dent, Mrs. A. M. Jones, Sr., pre- Prescriptions Carefully Com-
siding. pounded. Phone 27.
The devotional, taken from ,a f
Isiah 9:2-9, was given by Mrs. Mrs. Laney Marsh and daugh-
Jones. Regular business was dis-:'ter, Mittie, of Dothan, Ala., are
posed, of and plans were made for ,- -iting Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Bow-
a car of ladies to go to DeFuniak man.
Springs Wednesday to attend the *I
Alabama Coonference of Womens Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
Missionary Societies. .and family spent Sunday in Tal-
lahassee.
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Bowman and
family spent Sunday in PanamAa Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper of Apa-
City. lachicole was a business visitor
S> in the city yesterday.
Friends of George Tapper are '
glad to se'e~,hinm out again after Miss Flavile 'Campbell of We-
having been, confined to a hos- ,wahitchka was visiting in the city
nital for several days. .yesterday.


SA PAG F '.


.MRS. SOULE HOSTESS
TO BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Horace Soule was hostess
to the Wednesday Night Bridge
club this week at her home on
Sixth street. Spring flowers added
to the attractiveness of the living
room where three tables were
'placed for playing. After several
progressions, prizes were pre-
'sented to Mrs. G. F. Kaser, high,
and cut to Mrs. Ed Ramsey.
The hostess served delicious
*cherry shortcake ane punch to
Mesdames George Wimberly, G.
F. Kaser, George Gore, R. Coburn,
J. M. Smith, J. Gloekler, B. A.
Pridgeon, Ed Ramsey, M. Tom-
linsen, E. C. Lewis, T. Owens and
B. Owens.

MRS. T. W. KEMP HOSTESS
TO SEWING CLUB
Mrs. T. W. Kemp was hostess,
'to her sewing club Wednesday of
this week at the home of Mrs. J.
M. Smith on Monument avenue.
After sewing and chatting was
enjoyed for some time the hostess
served refreshments to Mesdames
H. Cain, Robert Haley, T. Jones
and Mrs. D. C: Smith.

Miss Dorothy Williams of Wewa-
hitchka, was visiting friends in
the city Saturday.
Mrs. Fred Maddox and Miss
Roxie Nichols returned Sunday
from Tampa where they spent a
week taking a special course in
adult education work.
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Malone and.
nephew, Joe Carlton, left this
week for Perry after having spent
several months in Port St. Joe.
Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Gangneiux
of Boga Lusa. La., moved to the
city this week.
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Bowman
and Misses Juanita and Dorothy
Bowman, Mrs. Laney Marsh and
daughter spent Wednesday in
Apalachicola.
Miss Jewel Presnell, field su-
pervisor of music, Federal Music
Project, of Tallahassee, and Miss
,Lois Carols of Panama City were
visitors in the city yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Peters and
family left Tuesday for Atlanta.
r. P'ete rs has been employed by
,the St. Jo, Paper company.


Highland View


Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Peters and
family left this week for North
Carolina. Mr. Peters has been
employed at the St. Joe Paper
Company mill.
Mrs. Sylvester Johnson has been
ill with the flu for the past sev-
eral days.
Jack Hening is now employed at
one of the garages in town.
Mrs. Dewey Miller has joined
her husband here for a short visit.
Benton Ramsey has been ill this
week.
-----ft_____-
Mrs. Belle Land of Jacksonville
was visiting friends in this city
Tuesday.


LOTS


$75 UP


APPLY



ST. JOE LUMBER



COMPANY :


PHONE 69


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


8a~sti~s~aPe~~\'~~su~n -cl 'r -8


I U~BllUW4U1~~ B~ .ir~n- if P 1 I


Fancy

Fresh

Fruits

and

Vegetables


The

Home

of

Western

Meats


SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY and SATURDAY, APRIL 1 AND 2

PURE PER POUND BLUE GRASS GUARANTEED


COFFEE 1 PEANUT BUER Self-Rising FLOUR
QUART t 20 LBS. 5 LBS. 10 LBS.
B & ESPECIAL JAR 69c 21c 39c



J E LL 0 Octagon SOAP ,oWDER sDICAPR APPL ES TOMA OES

for 20c 5 for 10c 19c Dozen 8c Ib.

WITH THIS COUPON

CERTIFIED ALASKA PINK NAVY, GREAT NORTHERc
SUGAR CURED H SALM 0 N OR BABY LIMA Be ans


WHOLER 27c lb. 10c 2 Pounds 13c


2 WHITE BACON A

16c Pound


WESTERN /C

NECK BONES EC
PER POUND


2 SMOKED BACON A

19c Pound


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BAYVIEW HEIGHTS

.\


BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL

LOTS FOR SALE
VERY SMALL PAYMENTS REQUIRED


........ -------


PAGE FIVE


"FHE STAR


Mrs. Geraldi McGill and son of
Panama City spent last Friday ift
the city with Mrs. J. Miller.

GARY-LOCKHART bRUG CO,
Try Our Fountain Specials.


CLUB CAFE ^
-o--

SHORT ORDERS
OF ALL KINDS
-, Try Our Steaks e.--
PORT ST. JOE, FLA
'








r. .. '~ 7


Toll of Lives

'Arouses Cities

SUPREME COURT DECISION
FOCUSES ATTENTION ON
SAFER DRIVING

The appalling toll of lives being
taken by motor vehicle accidents
has aroused numerous cities, of


the' state to promote- safety drives
and has focused 'attention on a
decision handed down recently by
the supreme court, written by
Justice Roy H. Chapman, which
fixes the responsibility of the op-
erator of a motor vehicle in-
volved in an accident.
In the case in question, A. T.
Kimball, a bakery truck driver,
crashed his truck into the side of
a freight train which was stand-
ing still across the highway. Kim-
ball contended that the train had


r" LITTLE SERVICE STATION
: Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR---
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
S Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes
A > ,- tA A A A +* A A A. *. t
.- h. .- 4 .--'-l- it 4 v 4 --- f -


We Haul Anything- -

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE 4

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


LAST CALL

FOR RESERVATIONS OF COPIES OF THE ST. JOE


Progress Edition

TO BE ISSUED APRIL 8









.. .........










... .. ....






We Have Approximately 400 Copies Not Yet Taken
Demand Has Been Greater Than Anticipated, and
As the Issue Is Limited To 4000 Copies a Lot of
Folks Are Going To Be Disappointed. Don't Be One.

it will contain pictures of the development of the pa-
per mill from the beginning of construction up to the
present time; pictures of Port St. Joe as it was in the
past and as it is today; pictures of the leading busi-
ness establishments; articles on old St. Joseph, the
Centennial Celebration to be held here next Decem-
ber. In short, it will be a history of the de-
velopment of Port St. Joe.

This Progress Edition-issue will sell for 10 cents a
copy and will be mailed anywhere in the United
States at no additional cost. Send in your list_ of
names, together with 10 cents for each name, and we
will mail them out in special wrappers.
DO IT NOW!! TOMORROW MAY BE TOO LATE!!



THE STAR
Your Home Town Newspaper Port St. Joe, Fla.


been blocking the 'highway for
more than five minutes, the time
allowed by law; that no warning
of the train's presence was given;
that visibility was poor; and that
the truck was -coming down a hill
and the headlights were thrown
below the train.
In the court's opinion, Justice
Chapman said, "there was a duty
and obligation on the plaintiff
(Kimball) for his own safety
when he approached the crossing
-he knew it was a foggy night
and the visibility was poor, and
the lights of the truck necessarily
were affected thereby.
"If the visibility was poor, it
was the duty of the plaintiff to
have driven' the truck at a low
rate of speed so that on short no-'
tice the emergency brakes could
be applied and the truck stopped.
"If the plainttiff had his car
under proper control '-at' a' -prler'
rate of speed and could have
seen the train and stopped the
truck before' colliding with the
stationary train, he is responsible
for the collision."

GARY.LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.



WASHINGTON

SNAPSHOTS
By JAMES PRESTON


Aside from the intrigue of for-
eign developments, there is noth-
ing more potential on the current
Washington scene than the tangle
over the Tennessee Valley Au-
thority. The tangle grew out of
internal bickering between Chair-
man Arthur E. Morgan and his
two fellow members, Harcourt A.
Morgan and David Lilienthal.
As harsh words passed,. the cry
of "investigate" went up on all
sides.
Senator Norris of Nebraska,
known as the "Father of the
TVA" and warm in the faith that
nothing was sufficiently amiss in
the organization to warrant a con-
gressional investigation, held out
for an investigation by the federal
trade commission. Now the trade
commission can proceed with an
investigation in an annoying,
snail-line manner when it wants
to, and Norris' colleagues in con-
gress didn't seem pleased with
such a prospect. They couldn't
see the idea of one bureau inves-
tigating another.
Greatest impetus was given the
move for congress to sift the
facts in the case when the veter-
in senator from Nebraska found
himself in a minority standing for
the trade commission investiga-
tion and decided to "go along"
with his colleagues on a congres-
sional hearing.
In any event, the matter prom-
ises to re-stir the whole issue of
the merit, of Public vs. Private
Ownership.

A considerable part of the New
England delegation in congress
and Secretary Hull are engaged in
a "T'is a'nd T'isn't" battle 'of
words these days. When the ne-
g-otiations were opened for the re-
ciprocal trade agreement between
the United States and Czecho-
slovakia, the delegation entered
sharp protests on the grounds
that any concessions to Czecho-
slovakia, especially in shoe im-
ports, would produce unemploy-
mncit in America. The secretary,
however, brushed the claim aside,
saying it would not produce more
unemployment.
The delegation soon found, how-
over, that Czechoslovakia was
i'ist a little worry compared with
*he things planned for a similar
treaty with Great Britain. They
immediately set up their cry
against that treaty on the grounds
't would swell the relief rolls by
-dversely affecting business.


Oh, no, it wouldn't, replied the
secretary of state.

Publication of the official record
of the testimony of Financial
Wizard Bernard M. Baruch, re-
cently before the senate commit-
tee studying unemployment, brot
out a pungent remark mostly
overlooked by the newshawks
during the hearing. Mr. Baruch
remarked that a private study
made for him disclosed that the
price of a $1.50 shirt in Cincin-
nati included 31 cents of hidden
taxes in its manufacture and sale!

The powder-puff" clique in con-
gress-the six congresswomen-
decided without a dissenting vote
that the job is a pleasant one. All
six announced that they will seek
re-election. The secretary
of the Young Communists League
of A:riieidca"'i'efiued, before a sen-
ate committee, to answer the
question when asked if he would
defend the American flag against
invasion by Russia.



TooLate to-Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


Ambition, they say, is a great
thing. And maybe it is in' some
instances, but considered from
the standpoint of the politically
ambitious, I sometimes wonder if
the game is worth the candle. The
more I see of these poor guys
who are all broken out with am-
bition to, secure some political of-
fice, the less that particular vir-
tue appeals to me.
The senatorial melee has been
pickin' up steam the past two
weeks or so, and the three out-
standing contenders in the race
have been centering their activi-
ties in West Florida. For some
time past humble citizens of this
section, have been all but buried
under a barrage of verbal gunfire
that would make the average sen-
ate debate sound like a period of
silent prayer. Politicians and
sound wagons have been running'
all over 'em like ants over a pic-
nic lunch.
Former Governor Sholtz, tired
of unemployment and seeking to
rob Claude Pepper of a senatorial
toga, opened his campaign in
Pensacola, and w:.ile Gcvernor
Fred Cone is not listed among
the aspirants for the senatorial
post, Dave attempted to appeal to
a handful of curious listeners
with a dose of high pressure ora-
tory designed to low-rate the
record and ability of Govern-r
Fred. This may or may not be
good politics-I -rouldn't know.
But from talking' to a lot of coma-
mon ordinary folks in these parts
I find that most of 'em kind of
resented it, in view of the fact
they still think tnat Fred is a
pretty good governor right on.
Before visiting' this part of the
state I'd heard a lot of talk about
Dave setting' the wooes on fire out
here, particularly in Escambia,
Walton and Okaloosa counties,
but the only burnt-over areas I've
been able to find are a few
mighty small spots, and it seems
that Pepper supporters, came
along and stomped the fire out
before it really got a good start.
As for Wilcox, most folks in these
parts never heard of him, and I
find practically no support.
Aside from the senatorial race,
political interest in the various
communities centers upon local
campaigns rather than the state-
wide races for the supreme court
and railroad commission, and re-
action in regard to these is very
difficult to get.
The general opinion seems to
be that Judge Buford will win his
fight against Gillis, although the
gentleman from D'e.Funiak Springs
is mighty well liked in this sec-
tion, and all agree that the result
will be close. So well liked are
both men that one hears- frtliuent


expressions of regret from friends
of both who dislike the prospect
of casting a ballot against either
man.
In the race for Judge Ellis'
seat, the legal profession gener-
ally seems to favor Thomas, but
the laymen are more familiar with
the names Watson and Futch, al-
though few folks really know
either man personally and prob-
ably will be guided in their choice
by what someone else says rather
than personal knowledge, if they
vote at all.
Railroad commission reaction is
equally obscure and hard to get
and little Interest in, it is evi-
denced aside from those concerns
and 4ndivid.dals Letrectly effected
by railroad commission action.
The fact that tMle man on the
street is indirectly affected in
many ,ays doesn't.,seem to,.con-
ce(rn tie average voter in .the
least.
`-- --S------
GARY.LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions carefullyy Com-
pounded. Phone 27.


Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES



CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
---o---
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.





You're Next!

There's No Waiting In


COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP
You're next for better service.
Expert attention without
waste of time!


SUPPORT YOUR
HOME TOWN
ICE PLANT


The plant that furnishes
you ice the year 'round

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
Max Kilbourn, Prop.
Manufacturers of
CRYSTAL ICE
From Treated Water


THE: STAR


FRIDAY, APRIL 1. 1.938


PAGE SIX








FRIDAY, APRIL 1,-1938~- TH('. ~YAR PAGE SEVEN


Robert E. Lee, military engi-
neer, never had commanded more
than a few dozen troops in the
field before the Civil War.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
RI G H T I

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker


4 1





Yet Solomon's milk costs
no more than others ...
Let your family enjoy
some today.
ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S

S Dairy

Products


GULF VIEW

TAVERN


We Carry the Best Lines of
WINES and BEERS


' /








Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE
4 ~--- 4
Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road

Rooms for Rent-
'. .. ... 1. : .: ...... -


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(From The Saturday Evening Post
of March 1, 1856.)
(Editor's Note: The following
article is of local interest dye
to the fact that Mrs. Hentz is
buried in the Episcopal church
cemetery at Marianna.)


MRS. CAROLINE LEE HENTZ
We regret to announce to our
readers the death of our 'gifted
correspondent, Mrs. Caroline- Lee
Hentz, which took place at Mari-
anna, Jacksoni county, Florida, on
the 11th of February. The follow-
ing letter from her son, Dr. C. A.
Hentz, will be read with interest
by all:
Marianna, Jackson Co., Florida.
Feb. 12th, 1856.
.Messrs. Deacon & Peterson:
As you have announced in your
columns a promised story
("Hinda's Choice") from the pen
of my mother, Mrs. Caroline Lee
Hentz, it is my very painful duty
to announce to you her death,
which occurred last night (the
11th) at 11 o'clock, at my resi-
dence, in this village.
She was delayed in beginning
your story, by a visit to St. An,
.drew's, to her ifivalid husband
(my father). She was detained by
inclement weather and bad roads,
and returned on Jan. 31st, when
she intended to have. begun writ-
ing "Hinda's Choice" by the mid-
dle of January.
She was in her wanted excellent
health until the evening of last
Wednesday, the 6th, when she
suffered from a light chill. The
disease proved to be pneumonia,
of a very marked and insidious
character. She did not, however,
appear dangerously ill until yes-
terday. She commenced sinking
suddenly and rapidly at about 4
o'clock, P. M., and died, quietly
and with little apparent suffering,
.at 11, as I have said.
The blow falls with overwhelm-
ing force on all the members of
her family circle, as also upon all
who knew her. For to know her
was to love her. I need not de-
cant upon the inestimable quali-
ties and excellencies of one whose
pen has been a bright index of
what her heart was.
What was the plot of the story
which she had promised you, no
one will ever know. She had it all
arranged in her head, and ready
to write, but the Lord, in His in-
scrutable wisdom, has seen fit to
cut short her career of love and
usefulness. She will never write
more.
(Here a portion of the letter is
undecipherable, due to the hun-
dreds of times the paper has been
'old'ed and unfolded.)
Respectfully yours,
DR. C. A. HENTZ.

We regret to learn from Dr.
Hlentz's letter. that the promised
novelet of "Hinda's Choice"' had
not been even commenced by Mrs.
Hentz. We were in hopes that it


was completed, and about a week
previous to the reception of the
sad news 'from Marianna, had
written respecting it, saying we
would, like to have it forwarded
as early as possible. But man pro-
poses, while the Omnipotent dis-
poses.
In the place of "Hinda's Choice"
thus necessarily blotted out from
our list of attractions, we propose
substituting the following original
novelet:-
ZILLAH; THE CHILD MEDIUM
'A Tale of Spiritualism"
We design commencing this in-
teresting novelet in the next
number of the Post.

PROGRESS OF LIBERALITY
Queen Victoria recently gave
great offence to a limited portion
of the Established Church, by not
only attending a Presbyterian
Church in Scotland, but actually
requesting the publication of a
serm,n she hear tnere.
The Churchman, a sectarian pa-
per published in New York, is
-terribly exercised about it-and
thinks, as we see it stated, that
the Queen ought to be excom-
mun-icated. The secular press of
England, however, almost univers-
ally commend the sermon-which
is called "The Religion of Com-
mon Life;" the text being, "Not
slothful in business, fervent in
spirit, serving the Lord."

VERY PROBABLE
An interior California paper fur-
nishes the following instances of
California fecundity: "A poor wo-
man in the Sacramento Valley
procured 35 hens and two roosters
about the first of last March.
From that stock she has sup-
ported a large family of children
by the sale of 'eggs besides rais-
ing 2100 chickens. If anyone
doubts this statement, the woman
and the children will be procured
to bear evidence.
Our informant also mentions
the fact that a gentleman in the
valley started in the sheep rais-
ing business last spring with one
ewe and one ram, and that now
his flock numbers 16-fourteen' of'
them being the offspring of the
ewe and ram aforesaid.

WHISKEY FREEZING
In Jonesville, Lee Co., Virginia,
week before last, the keeper of a
grocery store broached a barrel
of whiskey to serve out to cus-
tomers, but, on attempting to
draw some of the liquid, it was
found to have been frozen into a
barrel of solid ice. That whiskey
probably was well watered.


Would Put State In Save by reading the ads!

Liquor Traffic f i

PLAN OFFERED TO ESTAB-
LISH STILLS FOR MAKING II
FRUIT BRANDIES

SEVILLE, Fla., March 31 (FNS) PATRONIZE A
-Prospective members of the
state legislature are being asked HOME-OWNED
to study a\ proposal which would STORE
put the state into the liquor dis- Our Prices Are
tilling business, decrease taxes LOWER !
and give Florida fruit growers a Our Terms
better price for their fruit, ac- EAS IER
cording to T. H. Prevatt of Se-
ville, originator of the plan.
He would have the state install Oldest Furniture Store in
100 stills over the state to make Gulf County
fruit brandy. This, he claims, -
would produce ten to fifteen mil-
lion dollars revenue each year. BARGA IN
'FURNITURE STORE
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO. P
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded: Phone 27.


LeHARDY BAR
AND BILLIARD PARLOR

We Carry the Finest Brands of
BEER, WINES and WHISKEY
All at the Lowest Price

Cal On Us When the Party Goes Dry


SH. HTAYLOR


IF Our Work Speaks
GENERAL CONTRACTOR


for Itself
Port St. Joe


Give YOUR


Family a Home


In Beacon Hill

Subdivision

Now prospective home owners with modest budgets
have an opportunity to own their own home at a
price well within their means. .



$50 down-$25 month

WH Y PAY RENT?
When you have paid rent for years, all you have to
show is a choice collection of rent receipts.
You can pay for a home'in Beacon Hill Subdivision
for the same amount, or less, that you are now pay-
ing out in rent. .

INVESTIGATE! LET US SHOW YOU!

o

COTTAGES FOR RENT





Beacon Hill


Development Company

J. S. PATRICK BEACON HILL, FLA.


r


FRIDAY, APRIL 1,. lM-


ThC, 3TAR


PAGE SEVEN.


J. L. KERR
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
-WATCHES
-CLOCKS
Repairing --JE WEL RY
A Specialty -DIAMONDS
- -- vvvvv- --------
~ , , ,- - --, : .

ST. JOE BAR
FINE LIQUORS OF ALL SORTS
BEER WINES ALE
CORDIALS RUM
WHISKEY
Drop In Where Friends Gather







Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything







PAGE EIGHT


17RUDAY hAIPR I 11'039'.


COMPTROLLER

PAYS BILLS OF

STATE TO DATE

FEARS WILL NOT BE ABLE TO
PAY FURTHER BILLS UN-
TIL NEXT YEAR

State, bills, which have been
accumulating for several months
past,! were wiped off the slate
when Comptroller J. M. Lee
.mailed out checks for $1,274,000
in payment to creditors and an-
nounced that there was little
prospect of further payments un-
til next year.
"Unless we receive large col-
lections from pending 'estate tax
sources in the nature of windfalls
and for which I am pushing with
all the vigor, at my command, I
fear we will not be able to pay
further general state bills until
next year," Comptroller Lee said.
-Payments made by -the comp-
tro'ler cleaned up the state's
bills to the first of the month for
the first time since last summer,
but left the general fund in such
straitened circumstances .that the
payment of May salaries of state
employes is in doubt.
In the absence of a windfall in
the payment of estate taxes,
there will be no large collections
until next October when occupa-
tional licenses become due, and
next February when utility and
insurance taxes are due again.
The state payroll is $250,000 a
month, and general state expenses
are about the same amount.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists

PRISON PAPER HOPES,'
PARDON BOARD WILL
SWING GATES WIDER

RAIFORD, March 31 (FNS)-
The Periscope, "On the Inside
Looking Out- and Up," is the title.
of the little newspaper published
at the "Big House" in which state
prisoners are confined.
Its purpose is to give the in-
mates an opportunity for self-ex-
pression, to provide them wtih a
medium for discussion of public
problems, and to add to their
store of information.
In the Candid Comment column,
conducted by U. C(uess Who, the
following paragraph appears: f'We
hope someone serenades the par-
don board with some 'Swing Mu-
sic'-enough to make them swing
the gate a little wider in March
than they did in December."

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.,
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
---- ---
Mrs. Ethel Lewis and daughter,
Mrs. W. M. Howell, Mrs. D. C.
Smith and Mrs. P. J. Farmer and
children'spent Tuesday in Panama
City. ,
The Misses Laurine, Emily, Ma-
mie and Sarah Kelly and Mrs. Hi-
bault of Dawson, Ga., were the
guests Sunday and Mond'ay of
Mr. and Mrs. Homer Cain.,


o Ten Dollars [

SFOR THE BEST NAME TO BE GIVEN TO THE


Beaty Subdivision

g- OF WHITE CITY

You May Make One or Two Words to Replace the
name BEATY. Anyone or any group may
submit several names. There is no charge. Just
mail or bring in your suggestions to The Star office
I THIS CONTEST CLOSES APRIL 15, 1938


HIGGS FREED 0 F

ASSAULT CHARGE

Evidence. Brings Out 'Fact That
Assault and Robbery Charge
Was Only An Argument

cA circuit court jury in Wewa-
hitchka last week freed Willliam
Higgs. 30, of Port St. Joe and
Beacon Hill on a charge of the
armed robbery of E. O. Harlow,
local contractor,
Testimony'of-a -dozen witnesses
shed a different light on Harlow's
story that he had'gone to his Bea-
con Hill home and was getting
ready to retire wnen Higgs en-
tered and as the point of a gun
took $100 from him and then
struck him over the head with the
revolver.
Higgs testified that he and Har-
low were well known to each
other, and spent the entire eve-
ning of the alleged robbery in
visiting several roadhouses and
taking several drinks together.
He stated that he accompanied
Harl.w to his home aind an argu-
ment followed, during which Har-
low' was the aggressor. He .de-
nied taking the money:
A relative of Higgs', with whom
he spent the night previous to
his arrest, refuted the prosecu-
tion's allegation, that $65 found in
Higgs' jacket was part of that
taken' from Harlow. He testified
that in the rush of the next morn-
ing, when Sheriff B. E. Parker
arrested Higgs, the young man
had put on the wrong coat and
that the $65 found in the pocket
'n reality belonged to the relative.
-Te said it was part of his salary
received from the Waterman
Steamship company, for whom he
had been working.
Presiding Judge Ira A. Hutchi-
soh's charge to the jury included
the possibility of the jury's find-
ing Higgs guilty of the lesser of-
fense of aggravated assault with
intent -to rob.
The jury, after an all-night ses-
sion, returned the verdict of ac-
quittal.
-----* -*a-----
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.
------------
FLORIDA SLATED TO
GET $1,595,820 REFUND

The United States treasury has
computed for congress amounts to
be refunded to 13 states and ter-
ritories which failed to enact
state unemployment compensation
laws prior to the December 31,
1936, %deadline for federal aid.
Employers in 13 states, Alaska
and Hawaii were required to pay
unemployment taxes into the fed-
eral treasury despite lack of state
laws. A bill passed last session
authorized return of 90 per cent
of taxes collected to states which
subsequently passed laws for co-
operation with the federal plan.
The treasury says the amount
certified for refunding to Florida
is $1,595,820.


U~CDIYIBP agy'jlp~u;1;,,~~l~III~-A~R-~


The


ST. JOE' MOTOR CO.


Port St. Joe, Fla.


has been appointed


as a


NEW FORD DEALER


To all car owners-and to Ford
owners especially-there should be
good news in the announcement of
added facilities for convenient, eco-
nomical service in this neighborhood.
The consistent policy of the Ford
Motor Company is to provide the
highest possible type of dealer repre-
sentation in each community. And
in keeping with this policy, the new
Ford Dealership announced here
today is equipped to render expert
service on all models of the Ford car.
The Service Department is equipped
with the most modern equipment
and all mechanics have been thor-
oughly trained in Ford service.


Genuine Ford Parts are used'and
labor on ordinary maintenance oper-
tions is billed at a standard flat rate.
"Drop in and inspect the showrooms
of this new Ford Dealership where
glistening new Ford V-8 cars are on
display Note particularlyy the
fact that this year there are two
new Ford V-8 cars; The Standard
Ford V-8 comes in two engine sizes
-85 H.P. and 60 H.P. In addition
the De Luxe Ford car with the 85
H.P. engine is the biggest and most
luxurious Ford V-8 ever built. We
believe you will find everything
about this dealership worthy of
your patronage.


FORD MOTOR COMPANY


S- --


"""t~~ 'p ~ )?Y


FORESTRY MEET SET

The Slash Pine Forestry associ-
ation will hold its quarterly meet-
ing at Lake City, Fla., on Thurs-
day, April 7, according to an. an-
nouncement by J. S. Elkins, sec-
retary of the association.
Prominent forestry authorities
of Georgia and Florida will take
part on the program, which will
be presided over by George M:
Bazemore. president of the or-
ganization. '


M Todel Home For Sale
ON SIXTH STREET, ADJOINING WOMAN'S CLUB HOUSE

OPEN FOR PUBLIC INSPECTION MONDAY MORNING



G. R. WINCHESTER, CONTRACTOR
Port St. Joe, Fla.


5


T44 SrTAR