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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00175
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: March 4, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00175

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
es.t growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
SA K the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEB RATE OUR 100TH ANN VERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 1938 NUMBER 20


Statewide Essay Contest



Proposed To Stimulate



Interest In Centennial


SEEK INFORMATION
OF OLD ST. JOSEPH1


There is an incamprehen
Sible lack of authentic informa
t;on regarding the early his
t, y of St. Joseph, the city ir
which the constitution of Flor
ida was framed and adopted ir
1838-100 years ago-and the
co-mmittee which is. arranging
the program for the observe
ance of the Constitutional Cen
tennial next December 7-10, is
anx:ous to ba put in communi
cation with any person having
in his or her possession books,
pamphlets, letters or other docu
ments which will throw light on
the subject.
Communications should be ad-
dressed to J. L. Sharit., Chair-
man of Centennial Committee,
Port St. Joe, Florida.'





Crowds to Apalacd

Glittering Parade, Street Dancing
Bands, Pageant and Grand
Ball Are Enjoyed

Port St. Joe closed up shol
Tuesday, by a proclamation is
sued by Mayor Joe Sharit, an<
moved en masse to Apalachicoli
to participate in the gay spirit of
carnival incident to the Mard
Gras held in the neighboring city
Main feature of the afternoon
was a glittering street parade' o
floats, decorated cars, bands, a
national guard company, ox carts
and school children, which was
followed by a skating contest
community singing, folk dancing
and band concerts. Decorated
booths lined the two main busi
ness streets where food and re-
freshments of all kinds could be
secured.
In the evening the pageant of
Money Bayou was presented in
the armory. depicting the days of
piracy along the shores of this
section. This was followed by the
crowning of the queen, Miss Mary
Carol Rice, and her king, Ed-
mund Warren. Miss Frances Wa-
ters, queen from Port St. Joe, and
Miss Virginia Clower, Carrabelle's
queen, shared in me honors.
'A masked costume ball com-
pleted the day's festivities and
brought to a close the first Mardi
Gras staged in Apalachicola since
1916.

STATE FORESTRY HEAD
VIEWS PARK SITE HERE
Harry Lee Baker, head of the
state forestry department, was in
Port St. Joe Wednesday looking
over Monument Park with a view
to beautifying it in preparation
for the Centennial Celebration.
He promised full co-operation
of the forest service in develop-
ment of the park.
-----2------*
Dr. Thos. Meriwether of We-
wahitchka was a business visitor
iri this city Sunday.


Will Help In Bringing Out
Facts of State and Old St.
Joe Now But Legends


TO ASK AID OF SCHOOLS

Believed Much; Material of
Value Stored Away In
Trunks and Desks


S In order to stimulate interest
on the part of Floridians. in the
early history of their state as well
s 'as in the forthcoming observance
of the 100th anniversary of the
adoption of the state constitution
to be held in this city December
S7 to 10 next, Mayor J. L. Sharit,
chairman of the general commit-
tee having the Centennial in
charge, proposes to enlist the aid
of the teachers and students of
the high schools of the state by
offering prizes for the best essays
covering the history of that pe-
riod.
S At the time the constitutional
convention was 'i1ldt in:ll1838, St.
i Joseph was the largest city in the
state. Legend says it had at that
time approximately 10,000 inhabi-
I, tants. It was the tidewater term-
inal of the only ra;iroad in Flor-
ida and the second railroad to be
built in the entire United States.
P Because of that railroad it en-
- joyedi a great commerce, furnish-
d ing as it did an outlet for the cot-
a ton grown in tributary territory
f not only in Florida but in south-
i western Georgia and southeastern
SAlabama, as far north as Colum-
n bus, Ga. Legend also has it that
f as many as 50,000 bales of cot-
1 ton passed through the port of St.
s Joseph each year for several
9 years and that for the accommo-
, nation of shippers and ship mas-
Sters, great brick warehouses and
Stocks reaching far out into there
bay were built.
There are stories, too, of sev-
Seral palatial hotels for the accom-
modation of visiting merchants
and other travelers of that day,
and a splendid race track where
the sport of kings could be en-
joyed. by visitors and townspeo-
ple alike.
"We can find no documentary
evidence of the truth of the fabu-
lous legends which have been
handed down through the inter-
vening hundred years," says Mr.
Sharit. "Whatever written records
there were in tne form of min-
utes of the all-impo'ranit conven-
tion, newspapers-there was at
least one newspaper published, in
St. Joseph at the time, the St. i
Joseph Times-letters, pamphlets, t
seem to 'have disappeared. St. c
Joseph at that time was in Cal- t
houn county, and it is probable
that when the Calhoun. county i
court house was destroyed by fire g
many years ago the records which a
would be of such value to us now, p
were destroyed. p
"However, there must be hun- n
dreds, *or perhaps thousands, of th
descendants of the men who made u
up the membership of the Con-
stitutional Convention scattered
throughout the state now, and it v
S(Continued on Page 5) a


PORTST OE IS Bill is trodue i

DESIGNATED AS

PORTOFENTRY Conress for nitin


1 d1


Of St JoeHalfDollrs


EXECUTIVE ORDER IS SIGNED
BY ROOSEVELT; EFFEC-
TIVE MARCH 17TH

Last December Mayor J. L.
Sharit entered into negotiations
with the United States Bureau 4T
Customs while on a business trip
to Washington, D. C., in an en-
deavor to have Port St. Joe desig-
nated as a customs port of entry.
This week his efforts bore fruit,
as he received a letter from J. IM.
Moyle, conimissioner of customs.
notifying him. that upon recom-
meudation of the bureau of cus-
toms, President Roosevelt signed
an executive order on February
17 designating the port of Port
St. Joe as a customs port of en-
try in the customs collection dis-
trict of Florida, effective 30 days
from that date, which will be
March 17.
A customs officer from Panama
City or Apalachicola will be de-
tailed, to handle the business of
the port here until such time as
traffic may increase sufficiently
to justify the employment of a
part-time or full-time customs of-
ficer.
Upon receipt of the letter of
notification from Commissioner
Moyle, Mayor -Sharit `sent the
following letter:
"Dear Mr. Moyle-I want to
thank you for your letter of
February 25th in which you
state that upon the recommen-
dation of your department th'e
president signed an executive
order on. February 17, 1938,
designating the port of Port St.
Joe as a customs port of entry
in the customs collection dis-
trict of Florida, effective thirty
days from that date.
"We certainly appreciate your
interest in this matter.
"'ery truly yours,
J. L. SHARIT,
"Mayor."
This is another big step for-
ward in the rapid progress of our
city and The Star offers sincere
congratulations to Mayor Sharit
for his efforts in behalf of Port
St. Joe.


Legion Sponsors

Junior Ball Club

All Boys Under 16 Interested In
Playing Asked To Report To
Athletic Chairman

As a part of their community
welfare program., Gulf County
Post No. 116, American Legion,
will sponsor a junior baseball t
team in Port St. Joe, and all boys
under the age of 16 years who are J
interested in baseball are asked
o report to H. B. Whitaker, e
chairman of the athletic commit- '
ee of the Legion post.
If a sufficiently proficient team
s developed, it will take part in
gamcs throughout this district,
.nd if it comes out on top it will
participatee in the state finals and, s
perhaps go into tne sectional and t]

national finals-all depending on o
he prowess of the boys making f(
p the team. d

R. E. Hartmann spent the tl
reek-end in Mobile with his wife le
ind daughter. M


PIONEERS OF WEST
PEEL AT HOME

Men of an older generation
who were familiar with the west
when Cripple Creek, 4ingston,
Tonopah, Goldfield, Sylvanite,
Telluride and many other com-
munities., all now "ghost towns,"
were in thier prime, find them-
selves very much at home in the
pioneer atmosphere of Port St.
Joe, with its hustle and bustle
and general all-around activity.
This activity, instead of be-
ing built around veins of gold,
silver or copper ore which may
"pinch out" at any moment, has
a basis of permanency in that
its main prop is, a great paper
mill with a background of a
vast acreage of pine forest,
scientifically harvested, insur-
ing many years of life', there-
fore a firmer foundation upon
which to build a city.


ROBT, JONSON IS

TAKEN BY DEATH

HAD BEEN RESIDENT OF CITY
FOR PAST 20 YEARS;
SERVICES SUNDAY

Following an illness of a week,
Robert Johnson, 43, died at his
home on Woodward avenue Friday
night of last week. Funeral serv-
ices were held at 11 o'clock Sun-
day morning, with the Rev. H. P.
Money officiating. Interment was
in Magnolia cemetery in Apalachi-
cola, with L. W. Owens, L. Mc-
Quagge, D. Davis, A. Whittington,
J. Miller and J. Norris acting as
pallbearers."
Deceased was. born in Browns-
vile, Texas, November 7, 1885, re-
siding in that city until 1918,
when he came to Port St. Joe and
was employed as a carpenter by
the Southern Menhaden corpora-
tion. Upon completion of the
plant he vwas employed as fore-
man and later as dryer-man, an d
held that ypoin!on until his death.
Mr. Johnson will be remem-
b3red as a man of sterling char-
acter, kind-hearted and a loyal
(ricnd. He married Miss Sarah
Jones of this city in 1919, by
whom he is survived, in addition
o. four children, Mrs. Dennis Nor-
is, Edward, Lillian and Marie
Johnson.
The heartfelt sympathy of the
entire community is extended the
vidow and children in their loss.

PEPPER QUALIFIES D
FOR SENATE RACE S
C
Claude Pepper, United States v
senator, last' week qualified for a
he Democratic nomination to the
office he now holds, making the n
eurth candidate qualifying to o
ate. v:
Others who have already paid ir
heir fees are Dave Sholtz, Fin- n
ey Moore of Lake City and T. C. a.
merchant of Madison. an


Ask At Least 30,000 To Be
Sold As Aid In Financ-
ing Celebration


GOOD CHANCE TO PASS

Would Eventually Become A
Rarity and Bring High
Price In Future

A move that would do more in
promoting the Centennial Cele-
bration to be held here December
7 to 10 than any other one thing,
was made last Friday by Repre-
sentative Millard Caldwell of Flor-
ida whe- e .asked congress to
approve--bill authorizing, coin-
age of 30,000i filty-cent pieces to
commemorate the 100th anniver-
sary of the signing of the Florida
constitution at old St. Joseph in
December, 1838.
J. L. Sharit, general chairman
of the Centennial Celebration
committee, states that the coins,
if minted, will be sold for $1 each,
half of the money so-.,erived- go-
ing to the government and the
remainder to be used for promo-
tional' expenses' of the celebra-
tion. This is a customary pro-
cedure in instances of this type
and has been done on numerous
occasions in the past.
"Considering the importance of
this particular occasion, the 100th
anniversary of the signing of tire
Florida state constitution," said
Mr. Sharit, "I am fully convinced
that the measure will be approved
by congress. It will surely be a
great help in aiding us to put
on this celebration in a fitting
manner."
It is the plan to have repro-
duced on one side of the coins
the monument now standing on
the site of old St. Joseph, where
the constitution was framed and
adopted in 1938.
Half dollars marring other his-
toric occasions issued in. the past
have steadily mounted in value
as the years pass and they are
taken up by coin collectors, and
within a few years, owing to the
small number to be coined, the
St. Joe coins would become rare
and bring high prices from col-
Ictors.


SHOLTZ SPEAKS

HERE SATURDAY

FORMER GOVERNOR IS NOW
ACTIVELY CAMPAIGNING
FOR SENATE SEAT

Dave Sholtz, candidate for the
democraticc nomination as United
States senator, now held by
Claude Pepper, will address the
others of Port St. Joe tomorrow
afternoon at 3 o'clock.
The former governor and im-
lediate past grand exalted ruler
f the Elks, will speak in Mill-
ille at 5 o'clock this afternoon;
n ,Apalachicolla at 1 o'clock to-
lorrow; iln Wewahitchka at 10
m. Monday, and in Blountstown
t 1 p. m. Monday.







Friday,, March 4,* mt88


THE STAR
W. S. SMITHI, iEditor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.,I Telephone 51 }2-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Th'e spoken word
is lest; the printed word remains.


CO-OPERATION NECESSARY

One of the biggest events ever to occu
in Port St. Joe, and one that will not occu
for another hundred years, is the Centennia
Exposition and Festival to be held during the
month of December next.
This celebration will mean. more than jus
a celebration to Port St. Joe-it will be ,the
means of putting the city permanently "or
the map" and bringing to the attention o:
hundreds of thousands of people the fact tlia
Port St. Joe is one of the fastest growing
cities in the state-not the state alone, bui
the nation, for where else at the present time
can be found a city being built from the
ground up, as it were, and offering to the
wise investor and opportunity for enormous
increase in value?
To put this celebration over in the man-
ner being contemplated will require months
of strenuous work, not alone by the commit-
tee in charge, but by every resident of the
city, and to that end it is urged that every-
one join in and do their utmost, when called
upon, to co-operate with the committee in
order to work out the plans necessary for
this, to us, gigantic event. :
SAlready the world is being informed of the
forthcoming centennial through the Associ-
ated Press, through news articles being
mailed out: by the publicity director, and
through 100 copies of The Star of last week,
which were mailed by the publicity director
to all parts of Florida, south Georgia and
Alabama.
SThis will be OUR celebration, and we all
must do everything in our power to put it
over in a manner that will leave no doubt in
the minds of the thousands of visitors who
will come here that Port St. Joe is an up-
and-coming city and a city good to live in.

The successful newspaper carries features,
to please every class of readers, and those
who think a snappy editorial page does not
count "have another guess coming."-Flor-
ida Times-Union. That has always been our
contention, and we have repeatedly found it
to be justified.


SIn Maryland, a man won 40 nickels in a
slot machine and said: "I'm through with
gambling." So he took the $2 and bought a
marriage license.-Atlanta Constitution,


One philosopher says we go in debt hitting
on all eight and come out riding on the rim.
-Florida Times-Union. Most of us come out
walking.


It's too much trouble to have political con-.
victions, so most people make out with
prejudices.

SWhat Charlie McCarthy has done for Ber-
geii the South's slash pine will do for its
people.-Clermont Press.

How can you sell someone what they want
to buy if you don't let them know what
you've got for sale? Advertise in The Star!

" Time, not men, solves all problems.


WHAT IS TO BECOME OF OUR NATION?


When we reflect on what has been, and
what is, how is it possible not to feel a pro-
found sense of the responsibilities of this
r public to all future ages?
The old world has already revealed to us
in its unsealed books the beginning and end
of all marvelous struggles in the cause of
liberty. Greece, the land of scholars and the
nurse of arms, where sister republics in fair
procession chanted the praise of liberty-
where is she? Her arts are no more.. The
last sad relics of her temples, the fragments
of her columns and palaces are in dust, yet
beautiful in ruin. She fell not when the
mighty were upon her. Her sons were united
at Thermopylae and Marathon, and the tide
of her triumph rolled back upon the Helles-
pont. She fell by the hand of her own peo-
ple. The man of Macedonia did not work
the destruction. It was already done by her
own corruptions and dissentions.
Republican Rome, whose eagles glanced in
the rising sun-where and what is she? The
Eternal City yet remains, proud even in her
desolations, noble in decline, venerable in the
majesty of religion, and calm as in the com-
posure of death. A mortal disease was upon
her before Caesar had crossed the Rubicon
and Brutus did not restore her health by the
deep probing of the senate chamber. The
Goths, and Vandals, and Huns, the swarms
of the north, completed only what was be-
gun at home. Romans betraye? Rome. The
legions were bought and sold, but the people
paid the tribute money.
The United States is the outstanding re-
public of modern times, and it we fall, prob-
ably the last example of self-government by
the people. We are in the vigor of youth.
Our growth has never been checked by the
oppression of tyranny-but can' we keep it
that way or are we heading for a dictator-
ship? -- a.
Within our own territory, stretching
through many degree of latitude, we have
the choice of many products and many
,neans of independence. The press is free,
Knowledge reaches, or may reach, every
home. What fairer prospects of success
could be presented? What is more necessary
than for the people to preserve what they
themselves have created.
Can it be that the United States under
such circumstances can betray herself? That
she is to be added to the catalogue of repub-
lics, the inscription upon whose ruin is:
"They were but they are not"? God forbid!


MODERN JUGGERNAUT

Suppose that, on a given day, we rounded
up nearly 40,000 American men, women and
children, herded them into a field and there
proceeded to slaughter them. Suppose that,
at the same time, we wounded, blinded,
crippled and otherwise maimed several hun-
dred thousand more.
Horrible? Impossible? More barbaric than
the barbarians? (Of course it is-but, in ef-
fect, that is what happens on American high-
ways every year. The slaughter doesn't oc-
cur on a single day, but over 365 days. And'
instead of killing the victims with shell and
rifle fire, gas and grenades, we use that
well known servant of mankind which can
also be a monster of destruction-the auto-
mobile.
If an airplane falls and kills ten people the
fact is headlined throughout the country and
millions feel a sense of horror. If a ship
sinks and 50 men die, the entire world knows
it in a few minutes, and world-wide sympa-
thy is extended to the victims and their sur-
vivors. But when automobiles crash and
people die horribly as a result, we note the
fact absently, and turn the page to the comic
strip.
Our people are criminally negligent in
driving automobiles. And America is crimin-
ally complacent in its attitude of more or less
bored indifference toward the accident toll.
Juggernaut is no more--buti .he automo-
bile more than fulfills its gory ro.pi


0

ti
ft








si






c
a
t

b


.. .. ... = -- -.

Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


We think our fathers fools, a
wise, we grow;
Our wiser sons, no doubt, wi
think us so. -Pope.
I imagine a lot of there young
folks of Port St. Joe feel that the
are vastly superior to their pal
ents in wisdom and learning
Well, perhaps they are
Twenty years ago I thought th
same thing, thoroughly agreeing,
with the first line of this in
mortal couplet. Today
smile a trifle sadly and nod ai
proval of the second line.
Life, as the famous and much
radioed Andy would say, is noth
ing but a "big business propoli
tion." When we are young we ar.
all presidents of Andrew B
Brown, Incorpolated, or the Uni
vcrsal Association of the Young
at least we feel sure we
should be. Dad has his goo(
points, of course, but after all
he is a remnant of the dark age:
and should have been put on the
shelf along with bustles and red
flannel petticoats.
The years pass, and we an
swer up-to-th'e-minute son or
down-to-the-last-garment daughter
whose glance tells us what he or
she is too polite to say-that we
too, are coasting on life's tobog
gan.
But just .take a look around
You find old codgers em.
playing these, bright youngsters
and. furnishing them with the
means to flaunt their wisdom in
our faces: We pass laws
to make their prospects brighter
thanour own, and build jails to
house those who break the laws.
e support the worthy
causes and sometimes the un-
worthy. We maintain
homes, churches, theaters and
golf clubs for the young, who can
not carry them on as yet. '. .
We take pride in our great men
who have long since passed the
wondrous twenties.
And although we agree with
Pope as to what our sons think
we are, we cannot help but put
up a feeble argument in our be-
half. .Are we, who were
once the bright and shininglights
of this grand and glorious coun-
try, after an additional twenty
years of experience, actually
fools?
Experience surely does not dea:
;o harshly with those who attain
such an elevation in twenty years.
Mathematically it seems impos-
sible that perfection plus twenty
equals puerility. ., Rather
should it equal puissance.
But Harold Teen insists that we
are wrong even as you
ind I insisted when we were
'wiser sons" and our dads were
doddering fools of forty plus.

Comes a letter from Apalachi-
ola. thusly:
Dear Oth-er Fellow-You have
a very intersecting and enter-
taining column every week, and
I read it the first thing.
You are a mystery.
Why not publish a series of
stories of your life? I'll bet you
have had a very interestingone.
I believe everyone would en-
joy "The Biography of The
Other Fellow."
A READER.


Too Lateto Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


I've been hitch hikin' around the
,state for the past two weeks in
company with "Red" Edgerton of
the Western Newspaper Union.
It's about the only chance I have
to get out and visit with the news-
paper boys. While the 90-mile an
hour pace that "Red" maintains
between towns is more or lees
detrimental to a guy's nerves and
heart, the pleasant hours spent in
company with members of the
Fourth Estate, at each stop more
than make up for it.
Starting with a swing through
the Pinellas peninsula and up as
far as New Port itlchey, we, then
turned south, covering all coast
towns as far as Fort Myers, then
east for a quick trip around the
Lake area before returning north
to catch the ridge and interior
towns.
While the weather is still an
excellent topic, "politics" is al-
ways something to talk about in
the average newspaper offices and
I find; that the information a fel-
low picks up from the newspaper
man is usually pretty authentic as
far as the local situation is con-
cerned, for no one. has a better
knowledge of the thoughts and
reactions of fellow-townsmen than
the -local editor.
Interest, such as has been
shown so far, centers on the sena-
torial race, but ior the most part
it isn't veryr keen as yet. In the
area covered, Pepper was looked
upon as the leading candidate,
with little if any opposition. Wil-
cox. next in line, was expected to
show increasing strength, particu-
larly in the section around the
Lake. I could find practically no
support for Dave Sholtz, but many
respect him as a campaigner and
believe he will show up better
when he begins actively cam-
paigning.
Finley Moore and Curry Mer-
chant are practically unknown in
the territory covered, and the av-
erage, person seems inclined to
discount them entirely at this
time. It is far too early to form
any definite opinions, however,
and most folks are waiting for
the fireworks to start before at-
tempting to decide which pyro-
technical display appeals the most.
---------r-
AN OLD ACT
Sonny: "Pop, there's a man at
the circus who jumps on the back
of a horse, crawls under him,
grabs his tail and ends up on his
neck."
Pop: "That's nothing. I did-
all that when I was learning to
ride."


The Star does all types of Com-
mercial Printing. See us.

would be interesting.
I doubt very much that Editor
Bill would grant me the space to
tell of my life the mov-
ing incidents, the chances and
mischances, of hairbreadth es-
capes, of my travels, trials and
tribulations in foreign lands ....
It would be asking too much of
him-he favors me now with too
much space for my musings and
muttterings, and at time I feel
that I am imposing on his good
nature.
I have met many odd and in-
teresting characters. I've
iiadp hnir'i n r .nfl in 11i


Dear "Reader" (or, perhaps, I I "'"u "u"'U-'.' "u r. ienu iI ana
-should say "Dear Lady," for I walks of life .. and I've seen
know you are of the gentler sex them pass ot of my life-some
for several reasons perfectly obvi- casually, some fearfully, and some
with a jest
ous in your letter), of course mywth a est
life's history would be interesting When I remember
and so would yours, or The friends, so link'd together,
the life history of anyone I've seen around me fall.
Like leaves in wintry weather;
for, if we delved into the life of I feel like one
any individual we would find a Who treads alone
story perhaps tragic, perhaps Some banquet hall deserted,
comic, or merely commonplace. Whose lights are fled,
SWhose garlands dead,
But no matter what it was, it And all but me departed.


PAGE TWO


THE STAR


RA-- A --


I







Friday, 'Marc 4, 1938 THE STAR PAGE THREE


v i LOCAL INCOME TAX
Paid Political Advertiening
Paid Political AdRETURNS COMING IN

FOR STATE ATTORNEY SLOWER TI-..:.i; USUAL
Fellow Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election Return. Must Be In By Midnight.,
.s Stat" Attorney for the 14th
Judicial Circuit, composed of the March 15, To Avoid Penalty
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, -
Holmes, Jackson and Washington, Gu.f county residents are slower
subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have than usual in getting their in-
handled the business of the office come tax returns into the hands
promptly, fairly, courteously and of the government, according to
lo the best of my ability. If re-Miln Tallahassee
elected, I will continue to do so. eny lan of Tallahassee
Your vote and support will be deputy collector of internal reve-
appreciated, nue for this district.
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr., He said that, in spite of the
Marianna, Fla. fact that the deadline is just 11
FOR REPRESENTATIVE days away, March 15, the returns
To the Democratic Voters are merely dribbling in.
of Gulf County: McMillian points out that the
In the belief that my past ex- law specifies that all returns must
perience as a member of the legis- be in by midnight, March 15, or
lature should be of value and that,
if honored with election, I may be a cash penalty will be added to
able to render some service to my the tax. Return blanks which are
County, I announce my candidacy mailed will not be exempt unless
for Representative in the Legis- they are received before the dead-
lature in and for Gulf County. The
nlI.dar roidonts nof thO rC'nntv are line,.


familiar with my past legislative
record and I invite the investiga-
*tion of our new citizens. On my
past record and my desire to be of
future service, I solicit your vote
and support in this campaign. I
assure you that your vote and sup-
port will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.

ELECT

JOHN C. WYNN


He will
Appreciate

YOUR
VOTE

and
Support
For'


State Attorney
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit


------!---
G/.RY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists

CARRIES HEAVY LOAD
Some mail carriers may envy A.
Kramer, of Houston, Texas, who
delivers mail in a single building,
but Kramer says his job isn't so
easy. He walks more than 6%
miles a day and carries on the av-
erage 207 pounds of mail.

Paid Political Advertising


JUSTICE
OF THE

Sf CSUPREMER
an.90 rwo R-
'Dc.ccrsi': Pr2 .'I, /93J
Twenty-F-ve ActiS' Yo't Experenco in the
Conr.-! 'rPtir Law


EX-GOVERNOR



















Candidate For. U. S. Senator

WILL SPEAK IN



PORET T. JE



Saturday, M arh 5

3:00 P. M.


"HE NEVER LET FLORIDA DOWN"

Governor Sholtz cordially invites all citizens of
Gulf County to attend this meeting and hear
his claims for the high office of U. S. Senator.
He has a message that will interest you.

COME AND BRING YOUR FRIENDS

Gov. Sholtz will also speak at Wewahitchka,
Monday, March 7th, 10:00 A. M.

(Paid Political Advertisement by Gulf County Friends
of Dave Sholtz)


U. S. TO REALIZE

BIG PROFiT FROM

SECUITlY FUND

UNEMPLOYMENT PAYMENTS
OF STATE TO NET $321,000
TO GOVERNMENT

TALLAHASSEE, Mar. 3 (FNS)
-The federal government will
get a profit of $321,000 a year
from its Florida unemployment
tax collections as a result of the
new cut in the state budget for
the administration of unemploy-
ment insurance ordered by the so-
cial security board in Washing-
Lon, according to, Wendell C.
Heaton, chairman of the state in-
dustrial commission.
The federal government will
collect about $400,000 a year from
Florid.ians and will return only
$79.000 to. the state under the new
order from Washington. The gov-
ernment's profit from the entire
nation will amomat, to $118,000,-
000, Heaton said, although the re-
ductions were ordered merely to
cover administrative costs.
The new reductions were or-
dered for the quarter beginning
April 1. The allotment for this
quarter was cut trom $13,500,000
to $9,500,000, Heaton said, al-
though the government was al-
ready. realizing a profit from the
tax transaction.
The state, is entirely dependent
on the federal government for
uuwr.,'- for administrative expenses
because the state act and the so-
cial security law provide n'o con-
tr;ibutions collected by the state
can bo used for anything except
the r.a.".1;'. of nci;.'ts to unem-
ployed workers.
Employers, laborers and the
public were promised that -the
federal tax would be used for the.
purpose of paying expenses of ad-
ministration of state unemploy,
:nent laws, Heaton stated, but
that promise is not being kept.
----------
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

Delaware is setting the pace as
the most inventive state, with a
-atio for the past two years of
one patent to each 870 of its pop-
';lation.


POET'S CORNER


I DREAMED
I dreamed-I saw a stern and
g'ant form,
Rolling o'er lovely earth, 'a lurid
storm;
And. like the livid lightning's
flash-y fire,
WVith more than meteor swiftness,
blazed his ire;
And while tire smokey clouds
around him curled,
His leaden bolts the hellish demon
hurled;
An:d seonless fathers .heaved the
iheartfelt sigh.
And grief gushed forth from the
,lil mother's eye-
Widows and orphans, weeping
o'er the plain,
An' nlove-r-ft maidens, formed his
heartless train;
Wide o'er the earth he wheeled
his gory car,
And death accompanied the God
of War.
I looked again-but oh! the won-
drous change!
To every limit of the eye's vast
range
The earth is robed in universal
bloom,
And flowerlets blow upon, the sol-
dier's tomb;
The peasant's cot presents a fes-
tive scene,
And Youth is sporting on the vel-
vet green;
The fields are waving with the
yellow grain,
And Plenty gives her treasures
to the swain!
S'ee yon fair form that clasps her
snow-white plumes,
She spreadsl the riches, and the
breeze perfumes;
She, by her blessings, speaks her
full release,
And mankind shouts to welcome
heaven-born Peace.
-.Anonyimous.


SOME COUNTY OFFICIALS
RECEIVE MORE PAY ;THAN
HIGH STATE OFFICERS

Numerous county officials re-
ceive more pay than high state
officials, due to the increases
granted by the last legislature,
the Florida Taxpayers' associa-
tion stated in a ouilletin sent to
members.
The association: pointed to the
pay received!, by 13 HiIllsiorough
county officials and shows that
constables and justices of the
peace receive greater pay than
the state comptroller, state treas-
urer, secretary of state. commis-
sioner of agriculture, attorney-
general and state superintendent
of education.
"If citizens want lower taxes,"
the association says, "they must
first adopt a classified salary law
based, on reasonable value for
services performed; and second,
to enforce tax collections and
place all taxable property on the
tax roll under equalized assess-
ments."


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE1


Fut c h Announces

For Supreme Court

Lake County; Lawyer Has Envi-
able Record of Service; Seeks
Supreme Court Seat

Truman G. Futch of Lake
county, whose announcement as a
candidate in the May primaries
for justice, of the supreme court
in Group 2 appears in this issue
of The Star, has 25 years of prac-
tical experience in, the general
practice of law. He has served
his district in the Florida legisla-
ture in both the house and senate
and was president of the senate
in 1933.
In 1931 Futch Ireaded, the edu-
cational committee of the senate
that sponsored the Educational
association's legislation and fought
for it through the senate to a suc-
cessful conclusion which gave the
teachers of the state their pay
and made. possible longer school
terms and better teacher pay.


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


F Protect His







with a


.t SAVINGS


^X ACCOUNT


'Vhat will the future bring for
this youngster? A college educa-
tion money to start in
business financial security?

The things you are planning for
hinj CAN become actual realities.
Your plans, however, must be
based on hard fact-not merely on.
fond hope.

Provide for your child's future now
start a savings account for
him today! You will be surprised
how the total will mount over the
years if small, regular deposits are
made.



Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member; Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation'


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready For Every House In

Port St. Joe

COOK I N G WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
o------
NO. EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

-.if A full line of gas appliances in stock }--


THE STAR


PAGE THREE


Friday, 'March 4, 1938






DAO~ FOUR THE STAR Friday, March 4. 1938
-4


Personals
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


- 4


6C THELMA ENFINGER AND METHODIST MISSIONARY E
R IN S 0.One 2 6 RICHARD RECTOR WED SOCIETY IN MEETING Enisc
SOne 10c A marriage of interest to the The regular program meeting dist ch
S SPA T or couple of Gulf county was that of of the Methodist Woman's Mis- Sunday
SPAGHETTI or Miss Thelma Enfinger and Rich- sionary society was held Monday Seco
MACARONI .-rd Rector. which took place last afternoon at the church with a union
S D A FOR Sunday in Wewahitchka with Ed. splendid attendance. The program Third
Big Box Matches C. Pridgeon officiating. Miss topic was "World Communities In 8 o'clo
POTTED MEAT Hazel Enfinger, sister of the American Cities." The meeting
TABLE SALT bride, and A. W. Pendergast ac- was presided over by the vice- J.
companies them. president, Mrs. A. I. Jones, withvisitor
2 Cas Mrs. Rector is the daughter of Mrs. George Patton tn' charge of vi
2 Carns 25c Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Enfinger of the program and mission study. -
CHARMER COFFEE ... Bainbridge, Ga., having come to Following reports of commit-
Port St. Joe several months ago, tee chairmen plans were dis-
and' is employed by the Martin cussed for holding a turkey din-
S theater here. Before coming to ner to raise money for the par-
this city she was employed by the sonage fund. Mrs. George Patton
1 n OCTG TOILET Martin-Davis theater in Bain- was named chairman, assisted by
CAKE T SOAP. bridge. Mrs. R. R. Hodges and, Mrs. J. L.
104 CONCENTRATED Mr. Rector is the son of Mrs. Sharit. The regular business
PKG. SUPER SUDS Gertrude Rector of Monticello meeting will be held next Mon-
s. and came to Port St. Joe in 1936. day afternoon at 3 o'clock at the
M 10 He was employed with the WPA church.
recreation division until several
months ago and is now advertis- GARDEN CLUB AWARDS
ing manager for the Port St. Joe ARE POSTPONED
Sentinel. Due to the recent cold spell,
This young couple has made which was detrimental to gardens
sn w many friends in Gulf county, and and lawns, the cash prizes to be
The Star joins with them in, wish- awarded for the best lawns,
ing for them a long and happy flower gardens and other forms
m married life. of planted home beautification
Can A A the latter part of April, will not
SA PTIST GIRLS' be presented at that time, but at
H AUXILIARY MEETS a future date, which will be an-
ca The Lottie Moon chapter of the nounced.
S Ca Girs' Auxiliary of the Baptist Date of entry nas also been
church met last Friday at the moved up, and anyone desiring to
church in their regular monthly enter this contest is urged to no-
business session. tify Mrs. R. R. Hodges or Mrs.
The meeting opened with song, Robert Dorsey.
GIBS SPAGHETTI followed by the 100th psalm read "
DICED CARROTS by the president, Margie Costin., WEDNESDAY CLUB MEETS
VIENNA SAUSAGE FOR his was followed with a prayer Mrs. Troy Jones: was-hostess
JIM DANDY GRITS by Mrs. E. C. Cason. The secre- this week to members of the
JI tary's report was heard and roll Wednesday Club at her home on
POST TOASTIES call was answered with Bible Long avenue. Games and sewing
ENGLISH PEAS 5 verses, were enjoyed, after which the
During the meeting it was de- hostess served ice cream and
cided to hold only semi-monthly cake to Mesdames H. Kane, D. C.
BA LLA R S meetings until school was out. Smith and Robert Haley.
BUTTERMILK Plans were made for the week- *
of-prayer meeting today. NOTICE
BISCU ITS r Members of the Presbyterian
MRS. RAMSEY HOSTESS TO church will continue using the
Ready Prepared- 0 WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB Woman's C:ub building for the
Cay pa Mrs. Ed Ramsey was the charm- present. Sunday school, Sunday
ing hostess to the Wednesday March 6, at 10 a. ,m.
Night Bridge club at her home on *
10 lbs. U. S. No. 1 Sixth street this week. The living GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
POTAT OE S ........ room was attractively decorated Try Our Fountain Specials.
with vases of larkspur and: other Miss Jewe Presnell of Talla-
P3,e spring flowers. Tables were hassee, field supervisor of music,
paced and after three progres- federal music project, was in Port
sions, prizes were presented to St. Joe last Friday and coached
M H s. Fred Curtis, high, and Mrs. the high school glee club in their
OE S J. Gloekler, cut. songs for the music festival to
it The hostess served refresh- be held at DeFuniak Springs.
ments to Mesdames J. M. Smith,
So R. Coburn, J. Gloekler, M. Tom-
-a linson, T. Owens, E. C. Lewis, H.
Can s Soule and guests, Mesdames FredI Be Sure That
s^a, t In Curtis, George Wimberly, George SPRIN G
sine Gore and Misses Ermeline and SPRINGSP
SCa's Martha Belin. th H air
SIs In the MI,
Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Kelly, W. M.
Galt and Gus Williams of Jack- or
sonville. Mrs. Barnett, Mr. and
GUARANTEED 24 Q C Mrs. Robert Haley, Mr. and Mrs.
FLOUR lbs. GHon- er Kane, Mr. J. M. Smith and
Mrs D. C. Smith attended the
M A R K E T Mardi Gras dance Tuesday night
in Apalachicola. LIB
LARD, 4 pounds...............49c Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McPhaul Pol
LARD, 2 pounds 25c and daughter Betty, Miss Avar- C
OLEO, Golden Brand, lb. 15c ..e collier and Miss Louise Solo- FIE
Fresh Fla. EGGS, doz.......23c mn were in Apalachicola shop- Le us see. that your hair Co
SLICED BACON, lb. ........28c i;s smart for this advance C
CHEESE, lb. 22c p u Spring weather. MA
Free Delivery PHONE30 Mrs. Louis Presnell il leave PERMANENTS $3 UP Wa
-mL)l De; for :Iallahassee to make a
F Efi e fIT vis of sev-ral days and willthen OIL.WAVE $3 TO $7.50
U iif ITicin Mr. :resnell in Venice where SHAMPOO and SET 50c Fre
,e s emp.':, Yar
G O E Y Mr. and Mrs. Oros Miller of CRAWFORD BE
Blountstown were guests Sunday BEAUTY SHOP W
of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Dendy and
Bloutt we g s S y B E A U Next Cooper Barber SH0p P
"Home of True Economy" Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Miller. Next CoperBarber Shop
Homer Qqf Tre E V A Operated By B.A
PORT ST. JOE, FLA. Dr. and Mrs. D. B. McMullin MARY SUE CRAWFORD Hig
.......... ... spent the week-end in Clearwater.


SPECIALS Society
FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY
AND MONDAY


HIGH BIB

OVERALLS


$1.49

LONG-WEARING

WORK SHOES


$1.98 up


RIP-PROOF

WORK SHIRTS
Standard Work Shirts that
provide roomy comfort


49c up


wenss & Murdock
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


'ECIALS FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY & MONDAY

LK 4 Small 15C lOc TOMATOES- 25c
S 2 Large ........... 3 for ................



Potatoes 10 Ibs 23c

MA BEANS, 2 lbs ....15c
TTED MEAT, 6 for 25c
berry Sauce, can....10c I
:LD CORN, 3 cans 25c TA TOILET
KING OIL, gal.....95c ICEOCTAGON S
TCHES,l Ig. boxes 10c 104 CONCENTRATED
TCHES, g. boxes PKG. SUPER SUDS
x Lunch Paper c k M 1 o .
Vas lOc-NOW ......
h E S Per 9 CHUCK ROAST, lb. ....16
rd EGGS Doz. L2 PORK LIVER, lb. ........15c
EF ROAST, lb. ......15c Oleomargarine, lb. ........15c
e Sell Only GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT

AY SHORE GROCERY
;hland View -We Appreciate Your Patronage


I


___


Friday, March 4, 19-38


THE STAR


PAGE FOUR


BAPTIST W. M. U. HOLDS
'ROYAL SERVICE' PROGRAM
C churches The two circles of thee Baptist
Missionary Union met in a com-
bined "Royal Service" program
Monday afternoon. Mrs. J. W.
Sisemore, chairman of Circle Two,
PISCOPAL SERVICES presided. The regular program
:opal services at the Metho- was carried out, after which three
lurch the first and fourth new members were enrolled.
* nights at 6 o'clock. Ten members were present
nd Sunday afternoon, com- from Circle Two andi eight from
services at 3:30 o'clock. Circle One, with one visitor. The
1 Sunday night, services at W. M. U. is observing week-of-
ek. prayer this week.

. Chapman was a'business The Star is $2 per year-sub-
in the city yesterday, scribe now!

WE STOCK A FULL LINE OF


work Clothes
for the Working Man at Reasonable Prices






Friday,~~~~~~~ Mac ,13 TESA AEFV


ESSAY CONTEST
(Continued from page 1)
is among the probabilities that in
many homes there are stored
away in forgotten desks, trunks
or attics, old letters, old n3wspa-
pers or old books or pamphlets
in which will be round the facts
and figures we need to help us
re-create the St. Joseph of Con-
.stitutional Convention days when
we hold our Centennial observ-
ance of the adoption of the state's
first constitution nere in Port St.
Joe next December.
"That is one .'f the reasons
why our committee feels like ask-
ing the aid of the teachers and
students of the high schools of
the state in bringing to light this
very important information," con-
cluded Mr. Sharit. "We feel sure
-that men and women having any
documentary matter bearing upon
the stirring history of Florida's
.efforts to set itself up as a state
will be glad to do their part in
our very laudable endeavor by
giving the young essay writers
.access to their letters and, papers
for reference."
It is the plan. to issue an invita-
tion to high school teachers and
students to begin research within
the next few weeks, although.the
essays will not be required to be
submitted before December 10.
"I want the essay writers to
have plenty of time' in which to
collect their data," said Mr.
Sharit.. "When the news goes out
that we want every fact and fig-
ure we can get. I feel sure that
iruch material of value to us
will be brought to light. It will
take time to sift out the truth.
Nine months, with an interven-
ing summer vacation, is not too
long."

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Watson were
business visitors Monday in Jack-
sonville.
Mesdames D. C. Smith, Sam
Davis, Helen Allen and daughter
Peggy, Miss Mattie Owens and
Ann Treadwell attended the Mar-
di Gras in Apalachicola.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bellows
and son Bobby, Mr. and Mrs. J.
L. Sharit and son Joe, Jr., Mrs.
P. VanHorn and children, Mr. and
Mrs. P. Lovett and daughter,
Martha Louise, Mrs. George Gore,
Mrs. B. L. Kelly and son Benton,
Mrs. D. C. Mahon and many
others attended there Mardi Gras
in Apalachicola Tuesday.
Mesdames Frank LeHardy and
G. N. Cooper were shopping yes-
terday in Panama City.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.


New Spring Styles





4 4
S'\








TO GO WITH THE
NEW SPRING HATS!
Be sure that your coiffure
will match and accentuate
the fine details of the new
hats .come to a
modern shop.
Princess Permanent
This famous special is
complete with shampoo
and wave set.
$3 to $6.50

PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOP;
PHONE 55. ..Port St:Joe


Big Used Car Sale

Starts Tomorrow

St. Jo. Motor Co. Offering Free
Gas and Tags. With All
Cars, So!d Next Week

The St. Joe Motor Company,
local Ford distributors, will ob-
serve National Used Car Week,
March 5 to 12, with a gigantic
sale of reconditioned and guar-
anteed cars of all makes at great-
ly reduced prices.
In addition to the price slash,
they are offering free license tags
and as high as 60 gallons of gaso-
line with each car sold.
This big sale week is being ob--
served throughout the nation,
and W. O. Anderson, manager of
the local concern, urges everyone
interested to drop by and look
over these guaranteed cars at
prices well within the means of
everyone..Details of this sale will
be found in their advertisement
on page eight of this issue.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.
,------0------
Mrs. Mannie Brash of Apalachi-
cola was visiting friends in this
city Monday.

Editor andl Mrs. W. S. Smith
attended the Mardi Gras held
Tuesday ii Apalachicola.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Howell and
two children and Mrs. Kate Har-
rell left today for Cottondale to
visit relatives for the day. Mrs.
Harrell will spend several weeks
with her daughter in Cottondale.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
Charles "Pop" LeHardy arrived
Tuseday from Atlanta and will
spend several weeks with Mr. and
Mrs. C. A. LeHardy and Mr. and
Mrs. Frank LeHardy.

Max Schneider of Mexico City
is visiting his brother and sister-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. T. Schneider.
*S: 1- *A*
Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Conklin vis-
ited-relatives in Panama City last
Saturday.

J. P. Coombs of Apalachicola
was a business visitor in the city
yesterday.
ft
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.


Director Dan Farmer and all Friends of Mrs. Philip Lovett
members of the Port St. Joe high regret to learn, u, ner being in
school band participated in the the Lisenby hospital at Panama
Mardi Gras held Tuesday in Apa-
lachicola. City and wish for her a speedy
a : recovery.


HaroldSmith of Dotnana was in
the city Tuesday for a short time
en route to Apalachicola where he
played in Bill Farmer's orchestra
for the Mardi Gras dance.
FOR SALE
House car, furnished complete.
Inquire at City Tourist Camp.
FOR RENT
Furnished apartm-ent, hot water;
garage. Mrs. Fred Sawyer. 219
Avenue E, Apalachicola. 3-11*

Desk Space For Rent
I have rented the building on
Reed Avenue, next Costin's De-
partment Store, known as the
"Labor Temple," and have 3
10-foot desk spaces to rent.
2t H. B. WHITAKER.


WATCHES

LAMES' and MEN'S
HAMILTON
ELGIN
BULOVA
PRICED. FROM

$19.75 to $47.50
OUR VALUES. SPELL

S-A-V-1-N-G-S
TO YOU


LILIUS JEWELRY

COMPANY
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


& E Grocery S ATURDAY AN




SPIECIALb mA-RCH 5 and 7


Specials Limited


BANANAS BULK SUGAR PAPER WESTERN
NAPKINS PORK CHOPS


5 lbs 19c 5 lbs 25c 3for25c 20c lb.


DELICIOUS SHAVERS FRESH APPLE PIE RIDGE WESTERN

APP LE i FIELD PEAS APPLESAUCE CHUCK ROAST
NO. 2 CANS NO. 2 CANS

20 doz. 3.for 25c 3for 25c 15 Ib.

NICE SWEET Justice lops PORK

POTATOES MACARONI SALAD DRESSING or NECK BONES
and SPAGHETTI SANDWICH SPREAD


5 Ibs 130 3 pkgs. 0lc 23c quart 8c Ib.



Best Line of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables



Top Line of WESTERN MEATS


at Prices That Can Not Be Beaten




Set of Beautiful CHINAWARE GIVEN FREE!!


ST. JOE BAR
FINE LIQUORS OF ALL SORTS
BEER WINES ALE
CORDIALS RUM
WHISKEY
Drop In Where Friends Gather


________________________ ______________


I o-----1i-. / :'. I ,: .1 1


Friday, March 4, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE







PAGE1~ SIX THE--r- STAR Friday, March--II- 4,i t93&-u~l-


BiRD FANCIER RETIRES to the Ozarks-all because of the
For 15 years Cecil Martin of neighbors' cats.
Kansas City, Mo., has been one
of the largest breeders of fancy There are now about 8000 miles
birds in the state. But now he has of highway in the United States
Cqit the business and is retiring with r.ore than two traffic lanes.



We Haul Anything- .
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


:orton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Commercial


Printing ...


TAGS
POSTERS
DODGERS
RECEIPTS
-PLACARDS
BOOKLETS
PROGRAMS
ENVELOPES
STATEMENTS
CATALOGUES
INVITATIONS
LETTERHEADS
WINDOW CARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
ANNOUNCEMENTS


* Any Commercial Printing
that you may require, from a
calling card to a catalogue,
can be made right here in our
plant. And we can fur-
nish illustrations if necessary!

You will find our printing
to be high in quality the
service prompt and satisfac-
tory-and our prices reason-
able.


THE STAR
"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"


CANNON 18"x36"
/ TURKISH
," 1 ,. WATER TUMBLER 50 Co
MATCHES


WATER "
PITCHER R
50 Coupons



OCTAGON

SOAP PRODUCTS
Coupons from LUZIANNE Coffee, SILVER COW
and MAGNOLIA Milks, BALLARD'S OBELISK
Flour and HEALTH CLUB Baking Powder may
also be used to get these wonderful premiums


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY


BUILDING SUPPLIES


PORT ST. JOE


ST. JOE ICE


l1 COMPANY
Manufacturers of

CRYSTAL ICE
jJ FROM TREATED WATER
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.
~a c --- ~-~-~- ,,--._


Organize Search

For Liquor Cargo

Sunk Since 1867

CHICAGO MAN TO PROBE FOR
STEAMER 'ALICE' IN
APALACHICOLA

Whiskey mellowed by 72 years
of aging beneath the mud and wa-
ter of the Apalachicola in Lib-
erty county is the prize that F.
P. Blair of Chicago will seek.
It seems that in 1865 the river
steamer "Alice," 156 feet long
with a beam of 32 feet, on its
second trip up the river to Colum-
bus, struck a snag and sank
about 50 miles north of Apalachi-
colla. According to legend on
board were 300' barrels of whis-
key-approximately 15,000 gallons
-which were never recovered.
The master of the Alice at the
time of her sinking was Captain
Hezekiah Wingate of Columbus,
Ga. He and several of the crew
were .supposed to have perished
when the boat went down in 35
feet of water.
Blair states that the boat is
now under 28 teet of mud and
two feet of water, its position
having altered the course of the
river. He plans to attempt salv-
age by building a coffer dam.
The 15,000 gallons, valued at
around $3,000 in 1865, would, ac-
cording to estimates bring about
$300,000 on the present market.
And for 72-year-old aged in the
wood whiskey that would be a
low figure.
The bureau of internal revenue
in Atl-nta said Blair had con-
tacted that office in regard to
the operation and that federal
representatives would be present.
Heirs of the owners to whom
the whiskey was consigned would
b'e due a percentage, of the salv-
age, according to Blair, who is
endeavoring to trace them before
starting work in about 10 days.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.

PALEFACES DUCK
SEMINOLE KILLING

Indicat- They Will Accept View
That Tribal Slaying Justified

Authorities indicate they will
'ccept the Indians' view that John
Osccola's shotgun slaying of a
tribal outcast, John Billy, was
iunsifi':d and that the aged Seumi-
nole chieftain probably will go
free.
"I'll have to present the case
'o the next grand jury as a mat-
ter of routine,' said State Attor-
ney G'eorge A. Worley of Miami.
"They may decided to return a
,) true bill, and I'T not be op-
posed to that.
"As a matter of fact, if they
.were to indict John Osceola they'd
have to indict the whole tribe.
After all. an Indian. must be con-
sidcred differently than a white
man. They live under their own
customs and' laws."
An inquest is scheduled for
this morning. Meanwhile, the
chief is at liberty in custody of
his attorney. The killing took
place Thursday of last week at
Musa Isle, an Indian village for
tourists on the bank of the Miami
river.
r-
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
-- A SLIGHT MISTAKE
":Lovett Mahon: "I saw Johnny
N"ones the other day."
Ben Graves: "What did he have
to .say?"
'iMahon: "Nothing. For when I.
thought it was Johnny, and
Johnny thought it was me, It
turned, out that it was neither of
CS."


MURPHY BILL

COST FIGURED

STATE IS LOSING MORE THAN
$5.,300 MONTHLY, SAYS
ASSOCIATION

An assertion that the Murphy
tax redemption act, upheld again
by the Florida supreme court last
Friday, is costing the state' more
than $50,000 a month was made
Monday by R. L. Newman, secre-
tary of the Florida Taxpayers' as-
sociation. He sai- he based his
figures on a report prepared for
his organization by State Comp-
troller J. M. Lee.
Tax, redemption collections, ac-
cording to Newman's statement,
dropped from $434,058, an average
of $78,000 a month, for the first
six months of 1937, to $153,950,
an average of $26,500 a month,
during the last six months of 1937,
when the act was ini effect. His
statement also showed tax re-
diemption collections increased
during the first half of 1937 over
the corresponding figure of 1936
and were on the upgrade when
the Murphy act was enacted.
The law permits property own-
ers to redeem property taken in
.by the state for delinquent taxes
at the highest bid. at public sale.



At the Churches

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
ym.
---
PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
Services at clubhouse Sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
r-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. Mcney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday. night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
l ay afterno:;.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.
-Sr-
FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m
Sunday Morning services at 11
o'clock.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
Evening worship 7:45.
W. M. U. 3 p. ni., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
------sl------
TWO DAM RECORDS SET
Two records were established
in construction of the Grand Cou-
lee dam at Grand Coulee, Wash.
More workers were employed and
a day's record for pouring cement
was set.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
--eStr----C
Let The Star do your Commer-
cia! Fr^Ulnt'e.


Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES,



CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
--0-~--
In Rear of Parker's; Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, F1LA.


CREDIT
,-r- -- ;
PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St; Joe, Fla.


NURSES RESENT PETTICOATS
Nurses of Sydney, Australia,
went on a "pstt'cuot strike." Un-
der rulings of local hospitals they
were obliged to i;ne up every day
and stand "petticoat" inspection
before they went to work. Other-
wise certain concessions were
docked. The nurses declared they
would rather go without the con-
cessions than wear petticoats.


I
You're Next!

There's No Waiting. In:

COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP
You're next for better service;.
Expert attention without.
waste of time!'


rF~------~n~PaaD~P~;ea~?rrrs~~l---~sW


---l;;aJ .*~at~i*~r~R~.r~r~&~I~F"~s~?~~~PPn -(Y1~ I


THE STAR


PAGE SIX


Friday, -March 4, T939,








Friday, March 4, 1938 THE STAR PAGE SEVEN


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R I G H T !

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker





Fishing...

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.

TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within t he
means of everyone.
SEE-

J. 0. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.








more



mi/k!


FOR BETTER HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods. En-
joy the benefits of the valu-
able vitamin content of fresh
milk!

Refreshing
and Economical
You'll enjoy the delicious
flavor of Solomon's Milk

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S

Dairy

Products




GULF VIEW

TAVERN


We Carry the Best Lines of

WINES and BEERS


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please Use No Profanity

W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road

Rooms for Rent
^~~~~ ~ ~ ^ .^ .m ^ .^M e A AA


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a Eeries of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(From the United States Saturday
Post of February 8, 1845)
THE GREAT RAILROAD
We have alluded to a great
railroad, for which Congress has
been petitioned to make a grant
of land; and give the reader to-
day a few details respecting the
project.
In the petition sent to Congress
by Mr. Whitney it is said that
the road would commence at
Lake Michigan and terminate at
the mouth of the ColumbiaRiver,
a distance of over 2,000 miles,
running through a gorge in the
Rocky Mountains. The cost is es-
timated at $50,000,000, which it is
calculate-d, a strip of land sixty
miles wide along the line would
pay.
The distance from New York to
Amoy, in, China. by this road
would only be 9,000 miles the
distance by ocean being now 17,-
000. The distance would then be
travelled in one-fifth of the time
which it now takes.

TREMENDOUS MACHINE
The London Mechanics Maga-
.zine describes a most powerful
machine which has been con-
structed for some society or per-
son in this country-though the
source of the order for it is not
stated.
It is a mammoth Hydro-Electri-
cal Machine, which, it is said,
will be able to produce a spark
of thirty-six inches-to coat 3,500
feet of metallic surface, in a bat-
tery of forty-eight Leyden jars, of
two feet high, by ten inches in
diameter. This shock will kill a
thousand men in an instant, if it
were passed through such a.
chain. This machine is called the
"Benjamin Franklin," and will
cost about $4,500. It wi:l very
soon be ready for shipment.

THE OREGON BILL-
The bill establishing a Terri-
torial Government in Oregon,
passed the House of Representa-
tives on Monday. Previous to the
passage of the bill, a motion to
lay it on the table was lost-yeas
72. nays, 103. A clause providing
against slavery was adopted as an
amendment-yeas, 131, nays, 69.
The amendment, requiring the
President of the United States. to
give notice to the British Gov-
ernment, was adopted-yeas 121,
nays 82.
The President is authorized and
required to establish a kne of
stockade or blockhouse forts on
the most practicable route to the
Rocky Mountains, and to fortify
the mouth of Columbia River.
Six hundred and forty acres of
land are to be granted, by law,
to each settler who remains, five
years in occupation-one hundred
and sixty to his wife, and the
same number for each child born
within the five years.
The bil! provides that from and


after its passage, all the country
belonging to the United States,
lying west of the summit of the
Rocky Mountains, and bounded on
the south by the 42nd, and on
the north by the 54th degree and
40 minutes of north latitude, shall
constitute and be organized into
a temporary government, to be
called the Oregon Territory.
But though the territorial gov-
ernment dates. from the passage
of the act, by the last section,
"the President is required to
cause due notice, to be given to
the British Government, of the
desire and intention of the Gov-
ernment of the United States to
annul and abrogate, the conven-
tion with Great Britain, relative"
to the joint occupancy of said
Territory. The bill, in criminal.
and other matters, is guarded so
as not to affect in any way any
right which any British subject
may have in the Territory, until
the expiration of twelve months,
after such notice shall have been
given by the President of the
United States.

WISCONSIN
In his late address to the Legis-
lature of Wisconsin, Gen. Tal-
madge, the Territorial Governor,
said: "To my mind, Wisconsin is
to be, of all countries, the most
desirable for farmers. Here., pre-
eminently. a small amount of cap-
ital, with care, industry and good
management, secures that price-
:ess boon of man's destiny, Inde-
pendence." The same thing may
be said of Iowa, and of other of
the new States.
From the annual reports, &c.,
presented to the Legislature, we
learn that the Territory is rapidly
increasing in population and in
wealth. It was organized into a
territorial government in 1836,
embracing 47,000,000 acres, of
which 10,000.000 have been sur-
veyed. The first sales of public
lands took place in 1835; the
amount sold from that time till
January, 1842, was 2,900,418 acres
for the sum of $2,761,762. The
assessed valuation of the real and
personal: property of all its coun-
ties, in the year 1843, amounted
to $8.077,300.

PRESIDENT'S PARENTAGE
We observe that the Scottish
papers are already claiming Mr.
Polk as a descendant of the land
of Bruce and Wallace. The Glas-
gow Courier says: The new Presi-
dent of the United States is of
Scottish lineage; and his curious
looking name is an abridgement
of a good old Scotch one. Mr.
Polk's father or grandfather is
said to have been a Lanarkshire
man of the name of Pollock. In
the somewhat peculiar dialect of
the upper ward of this country,
that name is pronounced "Poke,,"
and hence, probably, the ortho,
graphy adopted by the trans-at-
lantic branch of the family.


HOW DOTH THE BUSY B vent the alcoholic nerve troubles
Sby putting into the .liquor the
Those wlhd have lon occlasiion : vitamin with the letter and num-
seen pink elephants disporting ber indicated.
In order to Ire strictly up to
themselves in the gray of the In order to be strictly up to
date, Gelett Burgess will now
morning will rejoice to learn that have to rewrite his famous qua-
the freakish animals may be defi- train, in something after this
nitely removed from human ,ken fashion:
by a mighty hunter known as Pink elephants are steeped in sin;
vitamin B-1. I wold not care to see one.
I'd rather see a Vitamin,
Pink elephants, we learn from And, for a choice, a B-one.
an authoritative source, are born Of course it may occur to
of polyneuritis, a disease due to some folks that another and most
undernourishment when chronic effective way of escaping the
heavy drinkers neglect their pink elephants would be to avoid
meals. And Dr. Norman Jollifee, the liquor.-Washington Post.
a public benefactor if ever there _____. -
was one, says distillers may, at GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
a cost of half a cent a pint, pre- If it's Drugs, We Have It,


Gov. Cone Gets In

Dutch With WCTU

Tallahasses Woman's Group Tells
Him He Is Aiding In
Dsbasing Mankind

The Women's Christian. Tem-
perance Union of Tallahassee, in
a letter to Governor Fredi P. C9,
deplored a recent statement by
the governor, which was pub-
lished in the last issue of The
Star, that he will seek a reduc-
tion in taxes on liquor.
The letter stated, in part, that
they "deplore the stand which
you have publicly taken in behalf
of the reduction of taxes on liquor
sold in Florida, thereby tending
to increase the consumption of an
article unquestionably a habit-
forming drug, which debases and
debauches all mankind, increas-
ing moral delinquencies and
crimes of every description and
greatly increasilng the already
terrible death toll by drunken
drivers on our highways.
"To you, whom we should be
able to look to as the standard
bearer of moral and civic, right-
eousness, we implore that you


---------- -------------------.-.-T

LITTLE SERVICE STATION
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes



LeHARDY BAR

AND BILLIARD PARLOR

We Carry the Finest Brands of.
BEER, WINES and WHISKEY
All at the Lowest Price

S Cal On Us When the Party Goes Dry

, , , w ~ - - -w ~ v


J. L. KERR
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


-JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything



H, H. TAYLOR

aW .Our Work Speaks for Itself
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe




FOR RENT
6-ROOM BUNGALOW ................$14 Month
3-ROOM COTTAGE $11 Month
Wired and Inside Toilet
5-ROOM. HOUSE, with good garden
spot and city water .............-- :$14 Month
3-ROOM COTTAGE with pump wa-
ter $ 6 Month
Other Selections Not Listed
ALL IN CITY LIMITS OF APALACHICOLA
GOOD SCHOOLS

M. BRASH, Prop.
Apalachicola Florida'


consider well before you aid in
anything so destructive and de-
basing as the general use of alco-
holic liquors."
------------.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
----r------
Since erosion control has be-
come so important, a new type of
scientific specialist in soil and
_.rm -problems is coming to the
fore.











For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANIA TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
SSet we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Located at Miller's Drug Store


THE 'STAR


PAGE SEVEN


Friday, March 4, 1938





AGE~i EIH THELi~i-1W*sI~Y ~ iSTARa Friday, March 4, 1938


WE ARE CO-OPERATING DURING

THE NATIONAL USED CAR

EXCHANGE WEEK


USED CARS & TRUCKS
Renewed and Guaranteed
ALL MAKES


BEGINNING MARCH 5


FREE GAS AS FOLLOWS
$175 CARS....20 GALLONS
$175 to $300..40 GALLONS
$301 and UP-60 GALLONS


BY GIVING'


ENDING MARCH 12


20-40-60 Gallons of Gas

AND ALSO FREE 1938 LICENSE TAG

1937 FORD 1937 MASTER CHEVROLET 1937 FORD 85 PICKUP
60 h.p. Motor-Looks and Runs Like New THIS IS A REAL BUY FOR MOTOR GOOD TIRES GOOD
PAINT GOOD
WAS $525.00 $166 DOWN $$9 9 $495.00
18 Months to Pay- $A $24 MONTH $ 495
SALE PRICE ........... 9' 60 GALLONS GASOLINE FREE! Sale Price $449

1937 V-8 TRUCK L K! THIS CAR FOR 1932 Ford Victoria Coupe
1sV-TON Reposessed Only $195 New Paint New Tires New Motor
Used About Three Months Looks and
Runs Like New. 10-Ply Tires on Rear 1933 Ford Tudor edan WAS 2 95 0 .
Sale Price $445 Body Green-Cream Wheels Sae Price $249
Free Tag WAS $595 Free Gas Tires Good, Motor Good. 40 Gal. Gas Free FREE GAS

1935 FORD COUPE 1936 Std. Chevrolet Coach 1936 Chevrolet 11-Ton Truck
THIS CAR HAS BEEN
New Paint New Motor Tires Good THOROUGHLY RECONDITIONED MOTOR RECONDITIONED
New Seat Covers
WAS $445 Tires Fair Looks and Runs Good
WAS $395.00
Sale Price $369Sale Price $395 Going for Only $245
Sale Price $369 FREE GAS '38 TAG
193 For Frdr San WE HAVE MANY MORE GOOD USED WE WILL HAVE
1933 Ford Fordor Sedan CARS THAT HAVE BEEN TRADED ON S al Ter
Reconditioned Motor, New Seat Covers, THE TWO NEW 1938 FORD CARS. Ul TS L
DURING THIS SALE
New Paint, U. S. Tires
'Don't Miss This Opportunity to Get a IVESA EDIT CO.
GOING IN THIS $195.
0 REAL BUY IN BETTER USED CARS
SALE FOR .........L BUY IN BETTER USED CARS of Jacksonville, Florida



ST. OE eOrSOR MOsPAaNY

Oniy Ford Dealers Sell R n G Used Cars


POR ST. -- JOEaul~ya~ F4I~~CPLORIDA~~l;-


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR


, .Friday, March 4, 1938


PORT STP`~'H. JOEE


FLORIIDA