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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00174
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 25, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00174

Full Text




Port St. Joe-S
Duj.ont Paper
ect growing litt
the heart o


ite of the $7,500,000
Mill-Florida's fast.
:le city. In
f the pine belt. ,


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


18 3'8 H- E L P


US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1938 NUMBER 18


VISITOR HERE


Judge Elwyn Thoma of Fort
Pierce, candidate for the su-
preme coourt,. cGupl 2. wqhp Was.
a visitor in :he city Monday.



C. of C. Committee

Chairmen Named

Membership Drive Is Launched;
Housing and Bank Facili-
ties Discussed

At a meeting held last Friday
morning in the office of G. P.
Wood by directors of the newly-
formed chamber of commerce, the
following committee chairmen
were appointed:
Housing and development, B. D.
Smith; membership, Ed McGowin;
advertising and display, A. M.
Quarterman; publicity, W. S.
Smith; civic improvements, H. W.
Soule; parks and playgrounds, B.
L. Kelly; entertainment, D. C.
Mahon; finance, DeWitt Marks;
.new industries,, B. W. Eells, Sr.
A report on progress of the
membership drive was submitted
by the, secretary, R. C. Rector,
and names .of prospective mem-
bers were apportioned to those
present in an endeavor to boost
the membership.
"The matter of housing and bank-
ing facilities in the city were
taken up, and in regard to the'
latter problem Mr. Wood stated
that, a -bank would soon be under
way for the city.
The next meeting of the direc-
tors will be herd on Friday,
ivarch 4, with the place tenta-
tively set as the store building
recently vacated by the Schneider
department store.
----- ----
NEW OFFICER
Tobe Gay of Wewahitchka has
been appointed as a member of
the city police force, taking the
-place of Homer Coe, who has
gone to work for the St. Joe Pa-
per Company.
-------*-----
James H. Kelly of Wewahitchka
was a business visitor in the city
Tuesday.


Plan Erection of Imposing
Edifice With Donations
And Federal Aid

COST TO BE NEAR $50,000

Is Considered Necessity As
Aid In Conducting Cen-
tennial Exposition

At the meeting of the Centen-
nial Exposition, committee held
Wednesday evening at city hall,
Mayor J. L. Sharit presented
architect's plans and elevations
for a proposed municipal audi-
torium and general civic center to
be erected in the neighborhood
of the constitutional monument.
The proposed structure is 109
oet by 82 feet, to be. built of
brick on a concrete foundation
with cast stone front. It would
contain a 64' vy -80-foot: audi-
torium with a -.iti'ul capacity of
700 persons., At one end would
be a 25 by 55-foot stage with
dressing rooms, and at the op-
posite end an 18 by 40-foot lobby.
Seats would be movable in order
that the hall could be cleared for
dancing. r
The second floor of the build-
ing would contain a room to be
used as a museum, two 14 by 21-
foot meeting rooms and two
dressing rooms above the stage.
Cost of the building would be
in the neighfborioo(I of $50,000,
according to Mr. Sharit, which
would be taken care of by dona-
tions' of contractors- who were
successful bidders on work at the
paper mill and by a government
grant, thus securing this impos-
ing edifice for the city at no ex-
pense, to the taxpayers.
Such a building is needed here
and will be an absolute necessity
for the Centennial Exposition
when it may be used for public
speaking, dancing and various
sorts of entertainment.
It is. planned to develop a city
civic center around the present
Monument Park, and to this _end
W. T. Edwards and his associ-
ates have donated to the city a
300-foot strip of land from, High-
way 10 to the monument, which
will be developed as a broad es-
p:anade.
In order to have the auditorium
ready for the exposition, work
will have to be started in the
near future. The state forestry
department will also be asked to
co-operate in developing the
area scenically.

INFANT SON OF MR. AND
MRS. H. BOZEMAN DIES

Carlos Wayne Bozeman, infant
son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Boze-
man, died of pneumonia Sunday
at their home in Highland View.
Burial was in the Blountstown
cemetery.
Mr. and Mrs. Bozeman 1a'--" '
sympathy of the entire commun-
ity in their bereavement.


Big Project For City


SHARIT RETAINS

SEAT AS MAYOR

OF PORT ST JOE

B. W. EELLS IS SEATED AS
MEMBER OF BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS

At a special called meeting of
the board of city commissioners
held last Friday night, as pro-
vided for under the new charter
!'orm of government, B. W. Eells
was sworn in and took his seat
at the board table, replacing T.
I. Stone, whom he defeated by a
.hree-vote margin for the office.
Mr. Eells was welcomed to the
b-oard of commissioners by J. L.
Sharit and B. A. Pridgeon and
was wished all success in office
by Mr.' Stone, who. was also pres-
ent. Mr. Eells responded feel-
ingly, and stated that Port St.
Joe was his home, that he ex-
)ccted to':spend the .rest of his
life here, aid- that he would work
with all hit soul and heart to
further the best interests of the
city. "
Following the seating of Com-
:nissioner Eells, Mr. Sharit called
for nominations for mayor. After
a .brief pause Commissioner Prid-
geon nominated Mr. Sharit, which
was seconded by Mr. Eells. No
further nominations were made
and Mr. Sharit was declared
elected as mayor for the ensuing
two years. '" '
As Mr. Stone had held office
as head of the department of fi-
nance, Mr. Eells was appointed to
fill this vacancy.


CITY TO STOP

USE OF GARAGES

AS DWELLINGS

DECLARED DETRIMENTAL TO
ADJOINING PROPERTY; UP
AT NEXT MEETING

At the request of Commissioner
B. W. Eells an ordinance will be
drawn up mand, submitted at the
next meeting of the board of city
commissioners prohibiting the
erection of garages on lots to be
hsed, as living quarters pending
erection of a dwelling.
Mr. Ee:ls pointed out that at
present there are a number of
so-called double garages erected
or being erected on lots adjoining
expensive andl attractive homes,
:to be used as living quarters.
"Some of these people erecting
these garages never intend to
build a home," said Mr. Eells.
"and some of the garages being
built-one, for instance, of old
lumber taken from the shacks
recently demolished; in Blossom
Row-are or will become eyesores
and detract from the value of
adjoining proopsrty."
------------
BUILDING PERMIT ISSUED
A building permit was issued
this week to the Florida Housing
.corporation for the erection of a
five-room residence to cost $3500.

It pays to advertise-try it!


LU Apalaciicola onl lV lal; Irianu
participate in the Mardi Gras
celebration to be staged there by
the woman's auxiliary of the
chamber of commerce to raise
funds for the carrying out of an
extensive city beautification pro-
gram. -' .
Fun for young and old is prom-
ised with a big parade, skating
contests, fortune telling, street
dancing, community singing, folk
dancing on the streets, a band
concert, and attractive booths' on
the downtown streets catering.to
the needs of the inner man.
As a climax to the big day, an
historical pageant re-enacting the
legend of Money Bayou will be
presented, followed by the coro-
nation of the king and queen of
the Mardi Gras and masked ball
at the armory.
Residents of Port St. Joe and
the entire county are hrged to
participate in this affair and
make it a success, for soon we will
be calling upon the citizenry of
Apalachicola to join us in staging
our Centennial Celebration.
School children here will be
granted a half-holiday and it is
the plan of The Star to likewise
close up shop at noon on March
1 and hie us to the adjoining city
to take part in the gala occasion.
F --- --
POLICE CHIEF NABS
NEGRO BOOTLEGGER

Chief of Police Troy Jones, in
a raid on the ome of Walter
Sled. negro, last Friday, gathered
in 31 pints and half pints of
moonshine liquor.
Sled was taken to the county
jail at Wewahitchka pending his
hearing.


Speed boat racing and feats of
daring would be presented at the
waterfront, with an address in the
afternoon by Coli. English, state
superintendent of public instruc-
tion, a concert by high school
bands attending upon invitation,
free outside attractions, a per-
sonally conducted tour of the Port
St. Joe paper mill and as a grand
finale for the day a gorgeous
pyrotechnical display closing with
a presentation of the battle be-
tween the Monitor and Merrimac
on the bay.
The second day, to be desig-
nated Governor's Day, would open
with the'firing of a 19-gun salute
heralding the approach of Gover-
nor Fred P. Cone, members of the
centennial commission, which is
composed of Governor Cone, Sec-
retary of State R. A. Gray and J.
H. Kelly of Wewahitchkia, and
members of the governor's cabi-
net and staff.
A luncheon would then be ten-
dered Governor Cone and guests
of honor, with Mayor J. L. Sharit
-acting as toastmaster. The after-
noon would be devoted to a trap
shoot under direction of W. R.
Gait, and events similar to'those
of the opening day.
December 9 would be United
States Day, guests of honor being
General Charles P. Summerall,
former commander-in-chief of the
United States army, naval offici-
als from Fort Barrancas and the
naval air station, the adjutant
general of Florida, national guard
officers and county 'officials of
Florida.
A naval parade and aerial
maneuvers would be presented at
11 o'clock, followed by a luncheon
(Continued on page 8)


4-


'?


-i:K


Varied Program Is



Tentatively Drawn


GOVERNOR AND CABINET, HIGH DIGNITARIES OF
STATE, ARMY AND NAVY OFFICERS WILL BE
HERE TO TAKE PART; CARNIVAL, HORSE
AND BOAT RACES PLANNED; PYRO-
TECHNIC DISPLAYS EACH DAY


Tentative plans for the Centennial Exposition and Festival
to be held in this city December 7 to 10 celebrating the 100th
anniversary of the signing of the state constitution, were
submitted and discussed Wednesday evening at a meeting of
the Centennial Celebration committee held at city hall. The
suggested outline of events was submitted by Earl Brown,
vice-president and manager of Florida National Exhibits,
through his representative, George H. Clements, director of
publicity, who will be in charge of publicity for the affair,
and who started laying the groundwork yesterday at his of-
fice in the city hall, where he will work for. the.next twvo
weeks.
Under the suggested program, which was conceded by all
to be excellent and requiring but few'rminor changes and ad-
ditions, December 7 will e Educational Day with the guests
-of honor being boardsl of edu-
tation c. ich:ol ifaci-tie and
lan Mari. rA -cholars for m oGL lf an.l ad-
-. joini'aigta-.
At Apalaclhic la The exposition would be offici-
ally opened at 10 o'clock on that
.day by the firing of aerial sa-
Women of Neighboring City Plan lutes and the blowing of whistles.
Festival To Raise Funds This would be followed by open-
For Beautification ing of the amusement zone, fea-
: turning shows and rides of 4 na-
Ab invitation has been extended tionally known ammuementf i-
residents of Gulf county to trek ganization.
t4 Annac lnn fn1 n un 1


SAR


CENTEN L PL N


STAR:T







PAGE TWO THE STAR Friday, February 25, 1938


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

--4{ Telephone 51 }S.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


THE TYRANNY OF WORDS

You have an idea. You want to communi-
cate it to someone else. You must put it into
words. Do those words really express your
idea accurately and completely? Does the
man who hears them form the same.picture
in his mind that was originally yours?
Stuart Chase accountant, economist, re-
searcher and writer, thinks not. And there-
by hangs his latest tale, "The Tyranny of
Words." It will probably prove the most
thought-provoking book of the year.
Chase, a writer, got to thinking about
words, the tools of his trade. A word, or-
iginally invented arbitrarily to designate a
particular thing, tends to grow into a life of
its own, to have an existence aside from the
thing to which it refers. Pretty soon we are
bowing down to the words, never giving a
thought to what they mean, if anything.-
Panama City News-Herald.

At times one is at a loss to find just the
Tight -word to express a thought or describe
;an abstract or concrete object. Th.e editor
,of The Star has had this happen occasion-
:all, three in particular which linger in our
:memory.
Several years ago in a California city a
,debate irage1 as to whether an old Spanish
wall hanging was a tapestry or a drape. We
solved the problem-at least to our own sat-
isfaction-by referring to it as a "drapestry."
On another occasion, after viewing a play,
we could not make up our mind whether it
was a comedy or a drama, and ended by
calling it a dramedyy."
The third instance of coining new words
was in referring to a deacon in a church who
for years had been treasurer of the church's
funds and who one day deserted his wife
and two children to run off with a choir
singer and all of the church's money he could
lay. his hands on. Hypocrite wasn't quite
good enough, to fit him, so we referred to
him as a "hypochristian."
As far as we know none of these words
have as ydt found their way into Webster's
unabridged, but we have hopes.
Our wife has a word for use when some-
thing is exceptionally superb and beyond
description by words of three syllables. It
is "supersquendacious" and always seems to
fill the bill.
Words may become tyrannical and spread
out of their intended orbits, but there is
where an active imagination comes in and
creates new words that have not yet had
time to lose their original meaning and in-
fringe ori territory not their own.


Young wife told a group of friends her
husband never snored before they married.
Then she wondered why they all smiled.-
Florida Times-Union. Wonder where she
got her pre-nuptial information?


Federal liquor inspectors say Southern
:mdonsliine corn liquor is getting worse since
-re eail. It isn't possible.-Boston Transcript.


Did you ever notice that the man who has
no future is the man who always thinks of
the future as tomorrow?


A GOOD MOVE

The action of the city commissioners in
re-electing J. L. Sharit as mayor of the city
is, in our opinion, a good move.
Since reorganization of the city under a
charter form of government, which was prac-
tically at the time the paper mill develop-
ment started with a consequent expansion
of the city in all departments, Mr. Sharit
has held the mayor's chair and has his finger
on the pulse of the city, knowing at all times
just what is going on and exactly what is
necessary to be done at a given time. Had
a new man taken over the reins at this time
there probably would have been considerable
confusion, with a consequent loss of time in
our present rapid development.
We are gratified to see Mr. Sharit again
heading the board and know that he will
work to the best of his ability for the wel-
fare and progress of the city.

McNAMARA'S RECORD CLEARED

We are indeed delighted with Governor
Cone's revocation of the order of Governor
Dave Sholtz which cancelled the Florida
National Guard commission of Lieutenant-
Colonel John 0. McNamara, -and formally
accepted McNamara's resignation which was
submitted to Sholtz two months previous to
the cancellation order.
Sholtz' only reason for revoking McNa-
mara's commission was "for the good of the
military service," but in reality it was for
political reasons.
McNamara, who is known to the editor of
The Star as a clean, straight-forward man
with the courage of his convictions, found
what, in his opinion, was irrefutable evidence
that the guard was being used for political
purposes, and he so informed the press of
the state. That ended his career in the na-
tional guard as far as Sholtz was concerned.
Now, due to Governor Cone's action, the
official records will show that McNamara re-
signed and his record be cleared of all blem-
ish.

WE ARE SAVED $200,000

The "text book trust" which in 1933 was
the object of a fruitless legislative investi-
gation, is with us again, but for all prac-
tical purposes shorn of the political stigma
which cast clouds, upon former text book
purchases.
In other days Florida bought many times
the books it needed for free distribution in
the common schools. It was an open and
scandalous secret that piles of these texts
rotted in nearly every county seat because
of lax methods of supervising their distribu-
tion and unsatisfactory methods of select-
ing courses of. study and the books to go
with them.
New laws framed by State Superintendent
Colin English have tightened up on this sit-
uation. Instead of spending half a million
dollars this year for texts, the state will be
well supplied with less than $300,000 worth.
Book publishers are bidding solely on the
ground of price and merit, because the ab-
sence of a "pay-off" is guaranteed to them
in the operation of the text book laws.
Success of the new school book statutes
depends upon two honest officials-Superin-
tendent English and Governor Fred P. Cone.
Between them they pick the men who se-
lect the books and the courses of study, and
the opinion has been, freely expressed among
the 42 publishers' representatives that this
year politics has been squeezed out of the
school book buying-Miami Herald.

A six-year-old kid can no more keep out
of the ice box than a man can keep out of
trouble.-Avery Powell in the Times-Union.
We thought our mentality was above that of
a six-year-old, but apparently not. Every
time we go near the ice box we are tempted
to investigate, especially about ten at night,
when we generally emerge from the icy fast-
ness clutching a three-deck sandwich in our
fist.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


Many of us waste time decid-
ing questions which should de-
cide themselves.
Whether to wear a green or
blue necktie, whether to drive to
the office or walk, whether to
start the day by clearing up the
mail or making appointments,
whether to eat lunch .with a
friend or alone-we ponder these
small questions unduly.
Possibly the secret of effective
living lies largely in our ability
to judge the relative importance
of things. Certainly habitual in-
decision about small matters de-
stroys opportunity for achieve-
ment.
John Morley, British statesman
and man of letters, wrote of the
continual state of distress which
William Windham created for
himself. Windham was. a mem-
ber of the Pitt coalition cabinet
of 1794, whose indecisive conduct
kept him from the great place in
British history his abilities de-
served.
Windham, Morley wrote, "wastes
the first half a day deciding
which of two courses to take, and
the second half blaming himself
for not having taken the other.
He is constantly late at entertain-
ments because he cannot make up
his mind in time whether to go
or to stay at home; hesitation
whether he shall read in. the red
room or in the library, loses him
three of the best hours of the
morning. Every page of
his diary is a register of the
symptoms of this unhappy dis-
ease."
No do4bt' Windham would have
been greatly helped had he
possessed a poor man's compell-
ing urge to hustle for his bread
and butter. But his important
failure, and probably the source
of all his small failures, was his
inability to decide just what he
wanted in the world. Man of af-
fairs by force of circumstances,
he nevertheless spent fruitless
days yearning for the scholar's
life of retirement which he had
given up.
After all, the world seems to go
to the whole-hearted. If a man
does his job with a whole heart
and single mind,the chancesare
he will do it well. If he is driv-
ing himself .forward over a single
definite road he has chosen, he is
not likely to be destroyed by Wil-
liam Windham's "unhappy dis-
ease."
A
A couple of crooks once did
some business with each other.
The seller loaded a profit of 100
per cent on his work. The buyer
made a down payment of 60 per
cent of the invoice. .. That
was the last the seller ever saw
of the buyer.
Both came out even on the deal,
the net result being identical
with a regular transaction be-
tween honest men. The seller
made a legitimate profit of 10
per cent out of the buyer's cash
payment; the buyer got full value
for his down payment, and no
more. Observation has
convinced me that this Is the way
crooks get along. Each expects to
cheat, and be cheated, but the
net result parallels an honest
deal. The tragedy occurs when a
crook is on one side of the bar-
gaining table and an honest man
on the other. Under such circum-
stances the honest man is stuck.
The crooks' psychology re-
minds me of a golf story:
"What kind of a game do -you
play?" asked one man..
"Oh, about 115," was the reply.
"What do you play?"
"About 112 on a good day."
"Well, let's shoot at a dollar a


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


This is the season of the year
when political prognosticators
begin to break out with the itch
and assume the task of enlighten-
ing the world as to tie direction
and velocity of political winds.
Cracked and time-worn crystals
are dragged out of. the attic,
dusted off and put into service.
Self-appointed soothsayers don
robe and turban and attempt to
acquaint a more or less disinter-
ested clientele with facts, figures
and fooey.
The position of the moon, stars
and planets are taken into con-
sideration, while sun spots are
viewed with or without alarm as
these self-styled wise men pre-
tend to inform the lesser intel-
ligent.
So far, as near as I have been
able to figure out, nobody seems
to be very much concerned over
the situation but the boys who
are running. I find that Mr. and
Mrs. John Citizen would rather
discuss the price of turnips, last
night's bridge score, or Junior's
report card, than burden their
minds with political cross-word
puzzles.
Now and then, among the lay-
men, ybu will discover some guy
with a yen fbr analysis and sta-
tistics who can add up a column
of loose talk, multiply it by hear-
say and subtract with a given
number of ifs and buts and ar-
rive at a so-callec answer, but it
is a lot simpler to put all the
names in a hat, close your eyes
and draw out one, and the result
is usually as satisfactory.
Before long our highways will
be clutterd with sound trucks and
our public squares overrun with
oratois, trees and fences will be
defaced with gruesome placards
bearing the mug of this or that
aspirant. Print shops will be
called upon to paw through cut
files for the larger union labels
displayed to impress the so-called
working man. Paid political ad-
vertisments will be featured in
newspapers, financed-so the pub-
lic is informed-by loving friends
of so-and-so. Radio listeners will
find their favorite programs tem-
porarily discontinued to make
way for long-winded political
harangues delivered with niuch
throat-clearing, stammering, stut-
tering and occasional pauses for
page turning as well as station
announcements.
Hands will be shaken with
gusto and backs slapped with vig-
orous cordiality. Bull-necked, red-
faced. aggressive candidates and
workers will circulate wherever
two or three are gathered to-
gether, chucking unresponsive
children inder chins, tipping hats
and bowing to the ladies, greet-
ing old folks with charming
smiles and cheerful flattery.
"What's wrong with the coun-
try" will be explained in detail
and "what ought to be done about
it" outlined in glowing word pic-
tures. Charges and countercharges
will fly through the air with the
greatset of ease, and a good time
will be had by all.
Instead of trying to figure out
who is gonna. get how many votes,
what most of us would like to
have some smart guy tell us is
which candidate will keep how
many promises.

In 1935 there were 400 trailers
produced. Last year this new in-
dustry turned out almost 15,000.


stroke."
That night the "115" "man told
his wife that the "112" man was
a crook. "He made it in 78,"
was the complaint.
"What was your score" asked
his frau.
"Eighty!"


Friday, February 25, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE TWO







Fdt ea 2 8H AAG H


Do you need Letterheads and MANY MCTORISTS ENJOYING
Envelopes? Lot The Star print NEW OVERSEAS HIGHWAY
them.
SReports from Key West indi-
Paid Political Advertising catethat motorists from all sec-
FOR STATE ATTORNEY t o f~ o -7ho state are taking ad-
vantage of the opportunity to
Fellow Democrats: i drive over that portion of the
I am a candidate for re-election overseas hihwa which has
as State Attorney for the 14th ovees i ay wic
Judicial Circuit, composed of the been opene'l to the public and
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, which extends to the lower end
Holmes, Jackson and Washington, of Grassy Key. Many continue on
su jectu atheMatoyprimrit aves by ferry on the 15-mile trip to
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office No Na'.e Key and thence into
promptly, fairly, courteously and Key West.
to the best of my ability. If re- The entire highway is expected
elected, I will continue to do so,
Your vote and support -will be to be opened with appropriate
appreciated, ceremonies about the middle or
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr., latter part of March.
Marianna, Fla. _____
-'S -----n- Thv S t fri. d


ELECT

JOHN C. WYNN

He will
Appreciate '
YOUR S.
-VOTE
and '
Support
For


State Attorney
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit


Paid Political Advertising
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Democratic Voters
of Gulf County:
In the belief that my past ex-
perience as a member of the legis-
lature should be of value and that,
if honored with election, I may be
able to render some service to my
County, I announce my candidacy
,for Renresentative in the Legis-
lature in and for Gulf County. The
older residents. of. the County are
familiar with my past legislative
record and I invite the investiga-
tion of our new citizens. On my
past record and my desire to be of
future service, I solicit. your vote
alid support in this .campaign. I
assure you that your vote and sup-
port will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
.E. CLAY' LEWIS, Jr.


NO TEXTS ON

ALCOHOL SAYS

COMMITTEE

CABINET ADOPTS REPORT IN
FULL AND APPROVES
CONTRACTS

The state textbook rating conm-
mittee recommended Friday that
There be no adoption of .public
school textbooks' on alcohol this
year. A course of study commit-
tee previously recommended such
texts. Two books on alcohol were
submitted to the rating commit-
tee. In a report, it said:
"Both books contain some splen-
did matei'ial concerning the ef-
fects of alcohol and both would
probably be interesting to a ma-
jority of students; however, it is
the opinion of this committee that
neither book meets the expecta-
tions of the course of study com-
mittee. Neither in content nor in
method of presen-ation do these
books seIem to fit the need closely
enough."
The 33-page report of the rating
committee went to Governor Cone
and the- state cabinet. The com-
mittee made three recommenda-
tions in each field of study. The
cabinet, as a textbook purchasing
'board, adopted the" recommenda-
tions in full, approving contracts
to publishers of each book cited
"first choice" by the rating com-
mittee. Contract awards will be
made later.
The books are for elective
study courses, and do not require
any changes in the basic courses
of the public schools.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.

Save by reading the ads!


JUST A REMINDER

In case our readers are not
yet fully acquainted with the
new names recently given to
the city's avenues, we reprint
them herewith:
First-Baltz'ell Avenue.
Second-Monument Avenue.
Third-Reed Avenue.
Fourth-Williams Avenue.
Fiifth-Long Avenue.
Sixth-Woodward Avenue.
Seventh-Park Avenue.
Eighth-Gadsden Avenue.
Ninth--Knowles Avenue.
Just clip this and paste it in
your hat until you have become
accustomed to the new names.
-------T------
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

If fresh eggs are not kept cool
they wilt; that is, they undergo
changes in the white and the yolk
which affect their freshness.


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


Some glass fibers have a
strength of about 2,000,000 pounds
per square inch.


For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANTA TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
Set we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Located at Miller's Drug Store


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

: YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


MODERNIZE the light-
ing in your home this
easy,. inexpensive way.
;imply try one of the new
I. E. S. Lamps and you
will. be -c6nvinced that
Sight-Conditioning is what
you' want. Be sure the
lamp you buy carries an
[. E. S. Tag,


All 1. E. Lamps
,have a glass dif-
fusing bowl which
assures soft. glare.
less lilg t.


SOLD BIV IE;rIicl. Ha;rdware and Furniture Dealers-


FLORIDA POWER


CORPORATION


What if Washington and

Lincoln Had Been Living

During the Same Years?



WHAT would have happened if the Nation's two
greatest patriots had been living and active in politics
at the same time? Would one of them- have been left
in obscurity and the other heralded as the greatest
president ever, or would they have been similar to the
Lewis and Green of labor-rule fame?

THIS is hard to determine but the Nation
knows that both of these men did much to make this a
great country they devoted their lives to the
people in whom they had faith. It is an honor for us
to look up at inspirational figures such as Washington
and Lincoln. It is an honor for us to aim at their ideals.

THIS bank has based its ideals of honesty, depend-
ability and faithful service on these two men. We have
strived to make this bank a bank where ideals lead the
way to a better and more prosperous Gulf County!





Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


Member: Federdl Deposit Insurance Corporation


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Available Immediately

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING- R E.F R I G E R A TI ON

-.f A full line of gas appliances in stock 3-


- -- ~` -- --- --


PAGE THREE


Friday., Februa;-y 23, IMS8


THE STAR


en e ar o a ren







PG F H S


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


PO RT THEATRE'
A Martin Theatre
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


P.-T. A. IN REGULAR MEET
AT HIGH SCHOOL
The regular meeting of the
Parent-Teacher Association was
held. yesterday afternoon in the
high school auditorium, with Mrs.
Robert Tapper, president, presid-
ing.
The meeting was called to or-
C'er and the Lor.u's Prayer was
led by Rev. Mar;e;a, followed by
the salute to the flag. Three
numbers, "Old Folks At Home,"
Massa's In the Cold, Cold Ground"
and "Memories of You," were
presented by the glee club under
the direction of Mrs. Laneta Da-
vis. Miss Bernice Beaty gave an
interesting talk oi ,'The Founders
of P.-T. A.," after Which the
P.-T. A. prayer was read by Mrs.
J. L. Sharit. The school band,
under direction of Dan Farmer,
gave two numbers, "Hymn Tune"
and a march, "Headway." The
minutes were read and approved
and a report from the treasurer
was heard.
Room representatives were re-
ported and R. C. Rector presented
a p:an to the members whereby
they could raise money by selling
advertisements for a city direc-
toory to be published by The Sen-
tineL ,A nominating committee
was appointed for the forthcom-
ing election of officers for the
new P.-T. A. year, after which the
meeting was -adjourned.

Minelaying was originated dur-
ing the World War.


GLEE CLUB FEATURED
AT CHAPEL PROGRAM
The regular chapel program at
the high school last Friday morn-
ing was opened with songs by the
giee club under the direction of
Mrs. Laneta Davis. All 45 mem-
bers were present and the sing-
ing was quite a treat as this was
the first occasion the school had
had the opportunity to hear all
groups combined. The club sang
three songs, "Neapolitan Sere-
nade," "Sweet Genevieve" and
"Dat Watermillion."
The glee club is preparing to
enter r the music festival in De-
Funiak Springs on April 8 and 9
and teachers and pupils alike say
that the organization should carry
off some of the honors this year.
During the chapel program
Prof. B. G. McPherson announced
that; Miss Florine Johnson was
the winner of the D. A. R. medal
in the school this year, which is
awarded for the "best all-around
student." He also announced that
anotherr of the high school girls,
Miss Margaret Belin, had won
honors and was at that time at
Rollins College amending the
founders celebration for one of
the five best essays in the state
contest.
Port St. Joe should be very
proud of their school this year
and do everything possible to aid
it at every opportunity.

Let The Star do your Commer-
cial, Printing.


-NE LE Y'S CaS h toreG

WHERE YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE EVERY DAY
Port St. Joe, Fla.

By eliminating the last of Delivery Service, Charge
System, Clerk Hire and High Rent, we'll show you a
Great Saving on Your Dollar six days of the week.
Our prices are the same EVERY DAY and NO LIMIT
to the amount you wish to buy. Prices sub-
ject to change up or down with the market.
REMEMBER-THESE ARE EVERY DAY PRICES

CATSUP, 14 oz. bottle 10c POTTED MEAT, 3 for 10c
GRITS, 2 pkgs ...-..-...-15c VINEGAR, gallon jug 35c
Water Maid Rice, 3 lbs. 19c Safety Matches, 2 pkg. 15c



Irish Potatoes !lb 19c

PET, CARNATION or BORDEN'S
M ILK T2ll or 4 Small 15c

4 lb pkg Flake White c53 Salt. Crackers, lb. box 1Oc
COMPOUND ........... 3 DILL PICKLES, qt. :...18c
HOMINY, No. 2/2 can 10c J E LL O, pkg. .....-... 6c
CORN, 3 No. 2 cans......25c C.C. Special OLEO, lb. 15c

SEL F | | 24 pounds --.....----...
RISING L 12 pounds ...-------45S

HOME SLICED BACON-We Slice It-Pound..........35c
WESTERN STEW BEEF-2 pounds 25c
PURE CREAMERY BUTTER Pound 38c
OLEO-Churfgold, Durkee's or Nucoa-Pound-..-..-...20c
DRY SALT MEAT--Best Grade-Pound 18c
Standard Pack TOMATOES-3 No. 2 Cans 25c
MIRACLE WHIP SALAD DRESSING--Qt. Jar......39c





CAKE OCTAGON 's SE15T cI
FOR
1 100 CONCENTRATED F
-PKG. SUPER SUDS U10


The Meat Department and GroceryD tent
are Handled Personally by Mr. I. C. Nedley


0. E. S. HOLDS SCHOOL OF
INSTRUCTION HERE
S A school of instruction for all
- Eastern Star chapters in this dis-
trict was held in Port St. Joe
Saturday with 43 visitors pros
Sent from Panama City, Marianna,
I.ynn Haven, Parker, Chipley and
Apalachicola.
The day was spent profitaoly
in learning much of value about
Ith. novrk of the Order of Eastern
Star, and in fellowship with the
visitors. A delicious luncheon
was served at noon, being pro-
vided by the several chapters
represented'.
The meeting was presided over
by Mrs. Beatrice Pledger, grand
instructor of.District 3. She was
ably assisted by Mrs. Effie Jones
of Panama City, a former grand
instructress, and' Mrs. Joyce B.
Lambe of Marianna, grand in-
structress of District 4. With such
competent helpers the chapters of
this section .should prove them-
selves very efficient in the work.
Officers from the various chap-
ters took the stations during the
day and put on the work in a
very creditable manner.
Visitors present were Mrs. Be-
atrice Pledger, Mrs. Daisy Harsey,
Mrs. Maggie Whitfield, Mrs. Ma--
jorie Yon, Mrs. Anna Bartee, E.
H. Wilkerson, Mrs. Belle Har-
mon, Mrs. E. H. Wilkerson, C...H.
Rimes,- Mrs.. Johnnie. McAnulty;
Mrs. Effie. W...Jones Mrs. Barnds,
Mrs. Violet Gainer, Mrs. Jane
Parker, Mrs. Irma L. Russ and
Mrs. Louise R. Morris, all of Pan-
ama City.
Mrs. Alice Bas~, Mrs. Flornlne
Marks, Mrs. Jessie Mae Barmore,
Mrs. Jennie S9cbtt,, Mrs. Maude
Morris and Mrs. Lillian Holland,
of Apalachicola.
Mrs. Jane Bailey, Mrs. Cosetta
Rufner, Mrs. Tressa E. Kittle,
Mrs. Louise J. Smiley and Mrs.
Ann Sneel, of Lynn Haven.
Mrs. Jennie Pos-on, Mrs. Mary
A. Jensen, Mrs. rnnmma McKnight,
Mrs. A. L. Craemer and Mrs. Har-
riet Conrad, of Parker.
G. A. Lamibe, Mrs. Joyce F.
and: Mrs. Bertie McKelvain, of
Marianna.
Mrs. A. L. Rozier, Chipley;
Mrs. Mildred A. Hanks, West
Pawlet, Vt.; Mrs. Anniebelle W.
Hadfield, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Mrs.
Edith M. Banker, Schaghtocoke,
N. Y.; Mrs. Laura Blanchard,
Cooperstown, N. Y.; Mrs. Mabel
F. Rogers, Manchester, Conn.,
and Mrs. Minnie B. Scott, Colfax.

PAPTIST CIRCLE NO. 1
MEETS AT CHURCH
Circle No. 1 of the Baptist Wo-
men's Missionary Union met
Monday afternoo-n at the church
with Mrs. k. Harre'l presiding in
the absence of the chairman,
Mrs. J. R. Holliday.
The meeting opened with the
W. M. U. hymn; the devotional,
Matthew, 25th chapter, was led
by Mrs. Harrell; comment by
Mrs. VanderGrift, followed, by a
prayer by Mrs. J. 0. Baggett.
During the business session Mrs.
Vander Grift was appointed Bible
study chairman.
The next circle meeting will be
with Mrs. Troy )ones on March
14, while the next meeting will
be a Royal Service program at
the church'.
Members present were Mes-
dames K. Harrell, W. W. Vander-
Grift, B. F. Daughtry, T. Jones,
W. Wells, J, O. .Baggett, D. Miller,
P. O'Day into, Howell and S.
C. Pridgeoh.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.
Earl Rollins of Gordon, Ala.,
pent the. week-end in the city
visiting friends.


NEW: Faces, Comedy


Costumes, Gags, Gals


A SWING BAND THAT JUST WON'T QUIT

A SHOW YOU JUST CAN'T AFFORD TO MISS !


hMODAY, FEB 28





The Perfect Gift


Hosiery famous for
long wear that
once sold for prices
as high as $1.50 per
pair.
Every Pair High
Quality!


Flimsy sheer Silk Hosiery .....
flattering to the contours of the
leg hosiery that will
wash indefinitely and hold its
springy texture to make itself a
most satisfactory necessity.


FULL.
FASHIONED

BERKSHIRE


HOSE

Silk from rop to toe!




79c


3 Pairs $225

Sheer, sheer stockings
with incredibly fine
seams, dainty rein-
forcements, picot tops.
Glowing spring shades.
All sizes.


Owens & Murdock

Port St. Joe, Fla.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


Friday, February 25, 1938,


I







Friday', February 25, 1938 'THE STAR PAGE FIVE


LOTTIE MOON CHAPTER OF
GIRLS' AUXILIARY MEETS
The Lottie Moon chapter of the
Girls' Auxiliary of the\ Baptist
church met last Friday at the
home of Mrs. J. E. Baggett, with
Elizabeth and Isabelle Baggett as
hostesses.
The meeting was opened by
singing the G. A. hymn. The de-
votional, John 6:2-59, was led by
Mrs. J. 0. Baggett Topic for the
meting was "China," and the fol-
lowing interesting program was
presented by th: members:
'What is Life For?" by Gwen-
do:yn Howell. The G. A. allegi-
ance was given in unison, fol-
lowed by a prayer by Mrs. J. W.
Sisemore., "That we may be true
to our allegiance." Reading, "A
Rcse In China," by Elizabeth
Baggett. A. poem, "The Call of
Christ," by Mary Amelia Gibson.
Song, "If Jesus Goes With Me,"
followed by a prayer by Mrs. J. O.
Baggett. Reading, "Shining In
China," by Janel, P.ridgeon. Poem,
"Take Your Choice," by. Flora
Mae Cason. Questions on China
wre asked by Mrs. E. C. Cason,
counsellor, after which: an open
discussion on China was held.
Song, "I Love to Tell the Story,"
and the meeting was dismissed
by the Lord's Prayer. One new
member was enrolled at,:this time.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.

PARTY ON FISHING TRIP
Mr. and Mrs.' G. N. Cooper, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank LeHardy, Mr.
and Mrs. B. H. Graves, Mr. and
Mrs. Tom Mitchell, Mrs. Juanita
Cooper, Loren Cooper, Terry Hi-
note; and Cil'e Thomas, enjoyed,
a delightful fishing trip Sunday
to Lake Wimico.

Mrs. M. .3. Smith, J. M. Smith
and Mrs. D:.;.C. Smith .ware busi-
ness visitors Saturday in Wewa-
hitchka.

Judge Alton Den.dy of Wc-wa-
hitchka was the week-end guest
of his parents, ZMr. anti Mrs. E. D.
Dendy.

Mrs. Charles Doyle and Miss
Eva Doyle of Apalachicola were
.Sunday guests, of Mr. and Mrs.
Chester Edwards.

Mrs. George Patton and Mrs.
Dell Mahon were the guests last
Thursday of Mrs. Jerome Sheipp
of Apalachicola at a luncheon
given at the hotel at Wakulla
Springs honoring Mrs. Travis
Drennen of Apalachicola.

Mrs. J. W. Wes ,.left Sunday
for Dawson. Ga..: to .iisit her
brother, W. W. Kelly.


New Spring Styles


TO GO WIl
NEW SPRING
Be sure that yo
will match and
the fine details
hats" .. co
modern shop.
-Princess Pei
This famous
complete with
and wave set.
$3 to

PRINCE
BEAUTY
PHONE 55


FH THE
G HATS!
ur coiffure
accentuate
of the new
me to a

rmanent
-.pecial is
.shampoo

$6.50

:ESS
SHOP
Port St. Joe ,
. .


FLAG EXERCISE HELD AT
SCHOOL TUESDAY
The flag exercise held at the
school house Tuesday morning at
9 o'clock commemorating the
birthday of the Father of Our
Country, George Washington, was
the first of its kind in the schools
of Port St. Joe.
Promptly at the ringing of the
school bell the pupils fell into line
and marched out on the grounds,
forming -a semi-circle about the
flag pole. Roy Gibson, William
Trawick and Jerome Morrison,
acting as flag bearers, carried
out the flag and proceeded to
raise it, at which time the pupils
and teachers, led by Legionnaire
Proctor VanHorn, saluted the
flag. W. R. Galt, commander of
the local American Legion post,
read the history of the flag, after
which all pledged allegiance to
flag and country. The, ceremony
was closed with invocation by
Rev. H. F. Beaty.

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. T. C..Enfinger of
Bainbridge, Ga., announce the en-
gagement and approaching .mar-
riage of their daughter, Thelma,
to Mr. Richard Charles Rector of
Port St. Joe, Fla.

NOTICE
The Woman's Club will meet
Wednesday, March 2, 3 p. m.,.at
the Methodist church.


MISSIONARY SOCIETY
MEETS WITH MRS. PATTON
The Methodist Missionary so-
citey met Monday afternoon at
the home of Mrs. George Patton.
The devotional was led by Mrs.
A. M. Jones, vice-president, using
Matthew 5:1-13. The mission
.study class was taught by Mes-
dames Roy GIbson and Ralph
Swatts, which proved an interest-
ing phase of the. meeting.
The next meeting will be held
:next Monday, February 28, at 3
p. nm., in the church.
Present Monday were Mes-
C.amnes Temple, Ramsey, Ward, P.
Howell, Daglar, 1Humphries, Nei-
dig, Boyer. A. M. Jones, Swatts,


Hodges, Overby, R.
Lovett, Patton, Sharit,
burn, McClellan .and
etta.


Gibson, P.
Roche, Og-
Rev. Mari-


SEWING CLUB IS
GIVEN NAME
Mrs. Homer Kane was hostess
to her sewing club Wednesday at
her home on Monument avenue.
The club, recently organized, had
been nameless, but this week a
name was selected from a number
submitted, and Mrs.'Robert Haley
was presented( with a potted plant
as coiner of the new name, "Wed-
nesday Club."
After sewing and chatting for a
time, the members were served
with sandwiches, doughnuts, soft
drinks an.d salted pecans by the
hostess.


MRS. MONTGOMERY HOSTESS
TO BAPTIST CIRCLE NO. 2
Mrs. Asa Montgomery was hos-
tess to Circle No. 2 of the Baptist
Woman's Missionary Union at
her home on Third street. Mrs.
J. W: Sismoiare presided and led
the devotional, followed with a
prayer by Mrs. E. C. Cason. A
short business session was held,
after which Mrs. E. D. Dendy led
the Bible study.
After the business was dis-
pensali with the hostess served
refreshments of hot chocolate and
sandwiches to the members pres-
ent. Three visitors, ,Iesdames N.
Haygood of Boga Lusa, La., and
S. Montgomery and George Mont-
gomery of Port St. Joe, were pres-
ent at the meeting.
'
TUESDAY CLUB
Mrs. Treadwell was hostess to
the Tuesday club this weke at
her home at Beacon Hill. After
an hour of bridge, the hostess
served delectable refreshments to
the members present.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
------A------
Miss Ruth Jinks of Wewa-
hitchka was visiting with friends
Saturday in Port St. Joe.
FOR RENT
Furnished apartment, hot water;
garage. Mrs. Fred Sawyer, 219
Avenue E, Apalachicola. 3-11*


OLD FASHIONED DINNER
Following preaching services
Sunday at the Baptist church
there will be an "Old Fashioned
Dinner on the Ground."


WATCHES

LADIES' and MEN'S
HAMILTON
ELGIN
BULOVA
PRICED FROM

$19.75 to $47.50

Port St. Joe's Outstanding
Jewelers



LILIUS JEWELRY

COMPANY
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


S& E Grocery AURDAYAN


MR l NUiA





Specials Limited


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


New Potatoes i N. IRISH CABBAGE FRESH
o PoL S POTATOES GE TOMATOES
GROUNDS FR 5 POUNDS FOR
10 POUNDS 3 POUNDS FOR


-25cIe25c 5e



BANANAS RINSO mt wai Mr,
Large Size .......... 25cTOILET
SOne 10c Size ........c 1CAKE OCTAGON T~ s 15O ( e
4 104 CONCENTRATED FOR
7. Both for ...............26c 1 PG. SUPER SUDS 1
BsEECHNUTSF R 1E0S


COFFEE ARMOURS MILK BEECHNUT FRESH
B. & E. SPECIAL 2 LARGE OR Strained Foods CORN MAL
Pure Santos Per lb. 4 SMALL CANS THREE 10c SIZE for 10 POUNDS FOR


19c 15 25c 35c



See Our Selection of Fresh Vegetables ]




We Carry a emp lete Line of Branded




Reasonable Price Compaed to Qu ity



At .Reasonable Prices Compred to Quality


- - -


PAGE FIVE


Friday., February 25, 1938


THE STAR


Pr.C


LS!"







THE STRFiay eIuy2,13


PAGE SIX


The Star does all types of Com- MOORE HITS CANAL
mercial Printing. See us. Finley Moore of Lake City,can- OETS CORNER
didate for Claude Pepper's sena-
torial seat, said in Miami Friday
the Florida ship canal "is the sil- SOLITUDE AND HOPE
liest thing I ever heard of. It On the rim of the sea I abide,
%would cost more than $240,000,000 In the bounds of my wee small
and should it be finished no ships home;
-vwould use it." But my spirit goes with the tide
ou_ use it Way out where the white gulls
roam.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO. I am bound by the sands at its
S Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27. edge;
I am stopped were the sea
PATRONIZE A meets the sky,
HOME-OWNED But I make to my soul this
HOME-OWNED pledge-
STORE To go over the rim by and by.
Our Prices Are As the waves toss in turbulent
\SLFSo storm,
L WER! So my heart is rent by its pain;
Our Terms B As the whitecaps disperse when
EASIER OFe they form,
So my heart finds peace once
---:--- again.
Oldest Furniture Store in In the dash of the sea there is
Gulf County peace--
Gul County With its surge and its roar I
am thrilled.
SAs its ebb and its flow never
BA RGAIN So my life with its trouble is
FURNITURE STORE Dad's Grill filled.
Port St. Joe, Fla. PRICES The sea is majestic in reach,
StREASONABLE PRICES And boundless, and prancing, and
free;
As its waves lap away at the
beach
There's a message comes dancing
LITTLES SERVICE STATION There's a esage comes dancingo me
That at last I will sever my
Port St. Joe, Florida bonds,
LET US DO YOUR-__ And go where the wild waves
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION call-pat those sma puny
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes ponds,
................................ .............. I To a glad land that waits sor
d To a glad land that waits for
us all.
Then my life will be calm as the
sea, A
eI'll be happy as 'ever can be
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING With richest Ievr acan spend.
And the storms that have tossed
me about
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE Will be stilled.and vanished
away
Prompt and Efficient Service Always On the day that I'm sailing far
out
S a d D y For the things done-and not
orton and Dendy done-to pay.
S' At the edge of the sea I reside,
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA. And I am at peace with the world.
M......................... y griefs in my heart I hide;
..- My memories, like torn sails are
There is solace in sojourning
ST. JO E IC E And doing the best that I can,
Contented with friendships sin-
C O M PA Y Enjoying the handclasps of man.
S' Manufacturers of -T. W. WILSON,
Manufacturers of ort St. Joe.
CRYSTAL ICE THE MOCKING BIRD

p pFROM TREATED WATER Sweetest songster of the woods,
| 1 1 *Lives in my old oak tree;
SMAX KILBOURN, Prop. 5 He imitates 'most anything,
MAX KI. Cocks his head mischievously.
He fools me with his changing
voice


ole


CANNON 18"x36"
TURKISH
500Coupons
SATER TUMBLER s
MATCHES
PI TC H E R
CLEAR CRYSTAL 0 Coupons
PITCHER
50 Coupons



OCTAGON

SOAP PRODUCTS
Coupons from LUZIANNE Coffee, SILVER COW
and MAGNOLIA Milks, BALLARD'S OBELISK
Flour and HEALTH CLUB Baking Powder may
also be used to get these wonderful premiums


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY
BUILDING SUPPLIES .PORT ST. JOE


And soothes me with his chat;
He chirps like my canary bird
And meows like my old cat.
He fumes and fusses, scolds and
fights,
While waiting for his mate;
He gets so mad and angry-
Because, sometimes, she's late.
But when she hops up close to
him,
Looking sad and forlorn,
Its then he sings with all his
might
A dreamy old love song.
-MARY DONATO,
Apalachicola.

OLD FOGY'S GLEE
Oh, the girls that we have seen
All in their time so fair;
Now so'e are fat and some'are
lean,
So much the worse for wear.
To think I see my early flame
'In:yond'er Mrs. Grundy!
Once I was mad for that old
dame-
Sic transit gloria mundi!
-Pete, the Printer's Devil.

THE FATAL DAY
They tax our health,
They tax our wealth,
But it's "gonna" mean death
When they tax our breath.
-Avery Powell, Times-Union.
They tax our beer,
They tax our wine,
But it's gonna be hell
When they tax our '"shine."


Court Candidate

Is Visitor Here

Judge Elwyn Thomas of Fort
Pierce Calls On Members
Of Bar and Friends

Judge Elwyn Thomas, of Fort
Pierce, senior judge of the Ninth
judicial circuit anc candidate for
the supreme court vacancy cre-
ated by the retirement of Chief
Justice Ellis, accompanied by
Miles Warren of Vero Beach, was
in The Star office Monday in the
interest of his candidacy, and also
calling on members of the bar
and his friends in this section.
Judge Thomas has served al-
most 13 years on the circuit
court bench and served as city
attorney in Fort Pierce and Vero
Beach. He entered the race for
the supreme court vacancy under
the urging of outstanding mem-
bers of the bar and is the only
candidate in group 2 who has had
judicial .experience believed neces-
sary for the post.


CALHOUN SOLON IN RACE

J. Frank Adams, member of
the Florida house of representa-
tives from Calhoun county dur-
ing the 1937 session, Friday an-
nounced his candidacy for re-elec-
tion. He is a son of the :ate J.
Frank Adams, Sr., who was state
attorney in the 14th judicial cir-
cuit for more than 14 years.


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
-0

In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE FLA.


You're Next CABINET SHOP
Rear St. Joe Shoe Shop

There's No Waiting In CABINET and
i FURNITURE Makers
P China Closets, Kitchen
.CR Furniture., Sideboards,
Cedar Closets and
BARBER SHOP Chests, Porch and
Lawn Furnitnre
You're next for better service. Lawn
Expert attention without We Repair Furniture
waste of time!


Choose Your

Druggist as Carefully

As You Do Your Doctor
The effectiveness of the doctor you choose
with such care depends greatly on the
pharmacist who fills the prescription.
LET US FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS

VISIT OUR FOUNTAIN FOR SOFT DRINKS
AND ICE CREAM



LeHardy's Pharmacy
PHONE 5 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.











/ A Household


Necessity

YET IT MEANS HARD WORK
But With the Lightest Broom
In Town It Makes Work
a Pleasure


A 75c VALUE



S.


St. Joe iHardware Co.
\l~I~s a


THE STAR


Friday, Febr~fary 25, 1938







Friday~ February 25, 1938 THE STAR PAGE SEVEN


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R I G H T

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker


Fishing.


U '


Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.


TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel, ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.
SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.


FOR BETTER HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods. En-
joy the benefits of the valu-
able vitamin content of fresh
milk!

Refreshing
and Economical
You'll enjoy the delicious
flavor of Solomon's Milk

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON' S

Dairy

Products




GULF VIEW

TAVERN

* 4
We Carry the Best Lines of

WINES and BEERS
/
Ell1w


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please Use No Profanity

W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road

Rooms for Rent'


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(From Harper's Weekly of Au-
gust 10, 1861)
THE LESSON OF DEFEAT
If we are true to ourselves, the
disaster of 21st July will prove
a benefit rather than an injury.
The Great Bethel blunder taught
us the folly of going to battle un-
der civilian leadership; the Bull
Run tragedy is fraught with many
valuable lessons.
It will teach us, in the first
place. and not only us, but those
also who have in charge the na-
tional interests at this crisis, that
this war must be prosecuted on
scientific principles, and that
popular clamor must not be suf-
fered to override the dictates of
experience and the rules of stra-
tegy. We have the best evidence
to prove that the march to Bull
Run, and the ftgiat there, were
both undertaken against the judg-
ment of Lieutenant-General Scott
and solely in deference to the
popular craving for action which
owed its origin and main viru-
lence to. the New York Tribune.
The wretched result must serve
as a warning for the future.
Hereafter our generals must
not be hurried Into premature
demonstrations. Ir any portion of
the press should attempt hereaf-
ter to goad them into acting in
opposition to their judgment, pub-
lic sentiment must rebuke the
mischievous endeavor, and our of-
ficers and the Government must
withstand it resolutely. No doubt,
in the course of the next few
weeks or months, it will often ap-
pear that our armies are sluggish
and their action dilatory. We
must remember, when this occurs,
that there may be reasons for de-
lay which the public can not dis-
cern.
Again. The detailed accounts of
the retreat from Bull Run prove
that a very large proportion of
our militia officers failed in their
duty on that occasion. Some dis-
played cowardice, others inca-
pacity. This is no matter of sur-
prise. In selecting company and
even field officers, our militiamen
often attach more weight to
wealth and political or social in-
fluence than to bravery or sol-
dierly aptitude. Very many com-
missions are won Dy intrigue. Un-
der these circumstances it was
natural that, in te hour of dan-
ger, the officers who owed their
epaulets to wealth, political or
,social influence, or intrigue,
should have failed to develop the
coolness, courage and command
over their men which soldiers re-
quire in their leaders. It was to


Reopen Venereal

Disease Clinic

Is In Line With National Drive
Against Syphilis; Children
Get Diphtheria Toxoid

The venereal disease clinic op-
erated in the past by the county
health department, was started
again last Friday in this city and
will be held each Friday until fur-
ther notice from 9 until 11 o'clock.
Blood tests will be taken at this
time for anyone. All food handlers
are required by law to have a
blood test every six months. Any-
one having domestic servants are
welcome to 'send them to the
clinic for blood tests.
This clinic is in line with the
national campaign -against syph-
'illis being conducted by the sur-
geon-general of the United States
Public Health Service. It is the i
object of the drive to eradicate


Vaudeville Show

Has Big' Variety

"We've Got Everything," Playing
Monday At Port Theater,
Promises To Be Good

When Owen Bennett brings


his latest revue,
Everything," to the
next Monday, the
will be talking, for
with surprises.
Headliners are


"We've Got
Port theater
whole town
it is loaded

Homer and


be expected that they would
rather lead than check a panic.
This radical flaw in our military
system must now Je corrected.
Great Bethel emancipated us,
cheaply enough, from the mis-
chief of civilian brigadiers. Bull
Run must rid us of cowardly or
imbecile colonels, majors and cap-
tains. It is announced that here-
after the War Departmentl will
exercise the right of reviewing
the elections of field officers in
each regiment. We trust that no
scruple of delicacy or timidity
will interfere with the vigorous
execution of this rule. Better of-
fend a thousand ambitious candi-
dates for military rank than have
another flight led by colonels,
majors and captains.
And there will be great need of
the pruning knife. By means best
known to themselves most unfit
men are even now obtaining com-
missions in reglfnents fitted out
here. Intrigue, money, family con-
nections and all kinds of improper
influences are officering our new
regiments. By the memory of Bull
Run we adjure the War Depart-
ment and the commanding gen-
eral to subject all these officers
to a thorough test, and to reject
the unsuitable without hesitation.
We have plenty of bravery and
plenty of military talent in the
country; for Heaven's sake let
:someone see that it is used in the
right place.
Let no man be disheartened by
the Bull Run disaster. We were
beaten, it is true. But we were
beaten by an enemy twice as
strong as we were. They fought
in intrenchments elaborately con-
structed-we gripped our way up
to the muzzles of their guns, in
total ignorance of the topography
of the battle-field. Wherever our
soldiers met theirs in fair fight,
we beat them. They had been
preparing and drilling for the
fight for half a year at least; our
men were raw levies. And if the
battle has proved that with these
disadvantages we could not con-
tend against them, it has also
proved that our troops possess
more personal bravery than theirs
and that our people-whom the
defeat has only roused to fresh ex-
ertions-have the right stuff in
them.
A full list of the killed, wound-
ed and missing at the battle of
Bull Run, up to the latest ad-
vices, gives the following figures:
Killed ..... .. .... 280
Wounded ........... 279
Missing ..... ..... 477

Total .......... 1486

or reduce this disease to a mini-
mum.
The case of diphtheria reported
last week is recovering nicely,
and no new cases have been re-
ported to date. Many parents
availed themselves of the oppor-
tunity to have their children im-
munized against diphtheria and it
is the hope of health authorities
that all children in the commun-
ity will receive the toxoid.
An immunization clinic was
held last Friday at the Port St.
Joe grammar school at which 89
received the toxoid and 50 were
given the Schick test.
A prenatal clinic will be started
today, from 2 to 4 p m. All cases
being taken care of by midwives
are urged to come to this clinic,
also those who have not seen a
doctor. The clinic will be held
every two weeks.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists

Mare's milk is used extensively
in Russia to manufacture alcoholic
Irinks.


Jerry Meachum, comedy aces,
who have played all of the lead-
ing theaters in the United States,

and Brandino, "Stylist in Magic,"
one of the youngest magicians on
the stage today, who has been
highly praised by critics wherever
he has shown.
"We've Got Everything" boasts
of more novelties than any other
show of its kind on the road to-
day mystery, music, comedy,
dancing, beautiful girls and out-
standing novelties.
Other acts are Dottie Eddens,
Don Cossak, Lillian Mitchell, the
Hollywood Rockets, Babb's Swing-
sters, Helen Brown and others.


-J JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything


H. H. TAYLOR


DW Our Work Speaks
GENERAL CONTRACTOR


for Itself
Port St. Joe


QUARTERMAN STUDIO

--o--

PORTRAITS
i (and
COMMERCIAL


.0
S ROLL FILMS
DEVELOPED
24-Hour Service

---

Next to Florida Power Corporation Office
PHONE 74 PORT ST. JOE
^ ,... ^ -.*, ^ .^ .. ^ ^- - ----.. ^


LeHARDY BAR
AND BILLIARD PARLOR

:We Carry the Finest Brands of
BEER, WINES and WHISKEY
All at the Lowest Price

- Cal On Us When the Party Goes Dry


Sewer Conneotions


We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

SEE


Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.

. . . . . . . . .... . . .


J. L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

------o------

-WATCHES
---CLOCKS


1111--11--~-. 1- ~_


___


Friday. February 25, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE SEVEN


Repairing
A Specialty






.-u. r. nrNu, ry ,4 ,


SPECIALS
FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY
AND MONDAY

SPINACH
COLLARDS FOR
TURNIPS
BEETS
No. 2 CUT BEANS c
Cans SAUERKRAUT
GUARANTEED 24 8 ?
FLOUR lbs.


Snowdrift
6 pound can-...........$1.14
3 pound can-.....----- 584


i-i
10 lbs. U. S. No. 1
POTATOE S-.........




SCAKE TILET
10 O CONCENTRATED
PKG. SUPER SUDS



SPAGHETTI or 3
MACARONI
SODA FOR
Big Box Matches
POTTED MEAT
TABLE SALT

2 Cans
CHARMER COFFEE .

Saltine Crackres, lb. box 1Oc

~H~Z~s~am ;


6CSI W,, I





Cans
Snras I"


GIBS SPAGHETTI 2
DICED CARROTS
VIENNA SAUSAGE FOR
JIM DANDY GRITS
POST TOASTIES
ENGLISH PEAS 1


BALLARD'S
BUTTERMILK

BISCUITS
Ready Prepared--1 Dc



RINS One 2526c
R I N SI One 10c

MARKET
LARD, 4 pounds................49c
LARD, 2 pounds................25c
OLEO, Golden Brand, lb. 15c
Fresh Fla. EGGS, doz...-..23c
SLICED BACON, lb. ......28c
CHEESE, lb. 22c

Free Delivery PHONE 30


QUALITY


GROCERY
"Home of True Economy"
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


CENTENNIAL PLANS

(Continued from Page 1)
for the honor guests, a concern
by the Fort Barrancas band, an
events similar to the preceding
two days.
SThe closing day, Saturday, De
member 10, would be Constitutio
Day, with state officials and of
ficials of the Daughters of th
Am'erican Revolution as guests o
honor.
Daylight fireworks would b
featured, with aquatic sports
s.; -d boat races' and other event
at the, waterfront, a luncheon a
noon with Cary D. Landis, attoi
ney general of Florida, and th
state regent of the D. A. R. a
speakers. The day and the ex
position would be closed with
centennial ball to be held at 9:30
p. m.
This. is merely the program ii
skeleton form. and many changes
will be made before the celebra
lion. Suggestions for a' football
game, horse racing and other
events were submitted and wil
be taken under consideration
and Mayor J. L. Sharit, general
chairman of the affair, asks that
anyone who has any ideas for
the centennial to communicate
them to him or to members of
the committee immediately as a
m','eting will be held about the
middle of March to coalesce all
ideas into a complete program.
"This is not merely Port St.
Joe's celebration or Gulf county's
celebration," said Mayor Sharit,
"but a state celebration. The gov-
ernor was so directed in a bill
by the legislature to declare a
Florida day for this event, and we
feel that we should get a lot of
'o-operation not only from all the
residentss of Port St. Joe and Gulf
county. but, from all parts of the
state. This will be the biggest
celebration Port St., Joe has ever
put on or ever will be able to put
on. We want the help of every-
body."
At a previous meeting Chair-
man Sharit was delegated to ap-
point committee chairmen and
members and Wednesday evening
named, the following: G. P. Wood,
and B. W. Eells, general vice-
chairmen; Miss Brownie M. Car-
ter, secretary; M. P. Tomlinson,
treasurer; H. D. Marks, Jr., chair-
nan reception committee; W. R.
Galt, chairman of events commit-
ee; W. T. Edwards, chairman of
finance; B. W. Eells, chairman of
invitation committee; W. R. Galt,
rice-chairman reception commit-
ee; HI. W. Soule, vice-chairman
vents; G. F. Kaser, vice-chair-


man invitation committee; E. C.
Lewis, vice-chairman finance.
Members of the. various com-
mittees will be named by Mayor
Sharit and committee chairmen
at a later date and will include
practically all leading citizens of
the city for, as Mr. Sharit pointed
out, it will take practically the
entire population to handle this
event.
Mr. Sharit stated that a super-
'diorama of the St. Joe Paper Com-
pany mill now under construc-
tion for ihe New York world fr.Lt
cc(:::1i $19,000, "ll be rushed to
completion and placed on exhibi-
tion here during the centennial.
The matter of housing facil'-
ties for the visitors expected was
discussed at length and' a number
of ideas submitted, all of which
will be considered, for, as it was
pointed out, Port St. Joe is woe-
fully lacking in accommodations
for anything like the number of
people expected to come here fcr
the centennial.
J. L. Kelly, member of the com-
mittee, read a letter from Gover-
nor Cone in regard' to the cele-
bration in which he invited Mr.
Kelly and Mr. Sharit to meet him
and discuss the matter of secur-
ing money from the fund appro-
priated by the legislature. The
two gentlemen went to Tallahas-
see yesterday to convene with


rt
d
g

n
f-
e-
e
f

e
S,
s
,t
r-
e
s
K-
a
0

n
s
L-


PURCHASE OF, TRAFFIC
LIGHTS IS AUTHORIZED

The board! of city commission-
ers, at their meeting Tuesday eve-
ning, authorized the purchase of
two traffic lights to be placed at
the intersection of Monument
avenue and First street and Monu-
ment avenue and Fifth street.
The light at the First street in-
tersection will be of the warning
type, flashing on and! off, while
that at the Fifth street intersec-
tion will be of the "stop and go"
type. Cost of the two signals is
$196.23.
It was pointed ou. that some
type of signal is necessary at the
Fifth street location, as the hotel
shuts off the view on the high-
way to the south.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
---~-------
START BRICKWORK
ON MARTIN THEATER


1 Work of laying bricks for the
walls of the new Martin theater
I on Reeld avenue got under way
this week and is proceeding at a
Fast tempo. Sand is being hauled
in. to make a fill for support of
the sloping entrance and audi-
torium. From present indications
it won't be long until residents of
the city will be enjoying the com-
forts of the new playhouse.
----- -----
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.
---f-~------
J. M. Smith left Sunday for
Jacksonville to 'enter a hospital
for treatment.

Mrs. Ethel Lewis and daughter,
Norma Jean, and Mrs. W. M.
Howell were visiting friends and
relatives in Dothan and Bonifay
Wednesday and Thursday.

Mrs. M. B. Smith and Miss Erie
Gulledge left Wednesday for Do-
than, Ala., where they will make
their future' home.

Mrs. Darden Haley of St.
Petersburg arrived Saturday to be
here permanently. Mr. Haley has
been employed by the St. Joe Pa-
per Company for several months.

Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Roberts and
baby spent Sunday and Monday
in moreor, Ala., guests of Mr. and
Mrs. C. L. Steele.

Mrs. R. E. Hartmann and daugh-
ter, Miss Carolyn, of Mobile, Ala.,
were the week-end guests of R.
E. Hartmann, manager of the St.
Joe Paper Company.

Miss Onita Joiner of Wewa-
hitchka was the week-end guest
of Miss, Estelle Dickens.
'i -
Mr. andi Mrs. Pete Bernal and
Mrs. W. Conklin were business
visitors Tuesday in, Panama City.

MOVE INTO NEW HOME
Mr. and Mrs. W. Conklin, form-
erly of Panama City, moved to
their new home on Garrison ave-
nue last Saturday.

COLORED MASONS MEET
The colored lodge of Free and.
Accepted Masons, No. 468, met
Wednesday aight in their hall
in) a recepti n for the members
of the Easteri Star. Talks were
made by Rev.D. L. Battle, wor-
sbiprul master, \and Lela D. -Gant,
worthy matron.\
State Gray.
Present at Wednesday night's
meeting were J. 4. Kelly, C. L.
Morgan and Roy Connell of We-
wahitchka; Mayor J..L. Sharit,
Arthur Lupton, E. C. Lewis, C. A.
Tovey, W. R. Gait, G. F. Kaser,
M P. Tomlinson, W. S. Smith, R..
C. Rector, B. W. Eells, Sr., B. L.
Kelly, Robert Dorsey, D. C. Ma-
hon, Miss Brownie Carter and W.
S. McLin, all of Portt St. Joe, and


Mr. and Mrs. Homer Kane, Gulldege spent Sunday in Talla-
Mrs. J. M. Smith and Miss Erie hassee and Wakulla Springs.


PETE'S Cash & Carry

SPECIALS FOR FRIDAY-SATURDAY-MONDAY
FEBRUARY 25 26 28


CisAKE 1 i eaN TOILETS
w vl~ll SOAP
S10G0 cONCENTRTED
1 PKG. SUPER SUDS

o10

6 COCOA, 2 lb. 2 for-.......25c
M l 3 Small 104 Hershey's Chocolate
S3 Large 19. Syrup, 1 lb. can ...... 1



DUGAN,5 lbs. 256


Can. Spaghetti.... 2 FOR COFFEE -
E. PEAS, No. 2 SEASONS,
Tomatoes,' No. 2 15 FOUR SEASONS, lb._._19
Tomatoes, No. 2 High Grade Safitos, lb 234
Marshmallows, 1 lb..-....19c
Peanut Butter, 32 oz. ..-25c We grind it while U wait


S5 bs. Potatoes IQq

BAKE-A-CAKE KIT....31c CHIFFON FLAKES 2"
CRACKERS, I lb. box 10c with Glass--......--....
CORN FLAKES, 2 for 15c Octagon Cleanser, 2 for 9c

STEW MEAT, lb. 10c 15c PAN SAUSAGE, 2 Ibs. 35c
HAMBURGER, 2 lbs. 25c OLEOMARGARINE lb 15c
LOOK FOR SPECIALS ON OUR WINDOW







FHA



Financing





NOW AVAILABLE

o





St. Joe




Lumber Co.



Qualified to Handle



Your Application





See Us Before Building


Sthe governor and Secretary of George H. Clements of Orlando.


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR


SPAGHETTI ...(
MACARONI .....
Potted Meat......


3 FOR

I Or,


KETCHUP, 14 oz. ..-...-l0c
Argo Peaches, No. 2V2 19c
Potato Salad. 15V2 oz..-.19c


PHONE 69


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Friday, February 25, 1933


i