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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00173
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 18, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00173

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
ert growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1938 NUMBER 17


Ordinance Establishes



Fire Limits Within City


STREET PROJECT

IS APPROVED


Specifies Type of Construc-
tion, Provides For Fire
Walls, Flues, Etc


BY PRESIDENT BURNING OF TRASH
IS NOW PROHIBITED


PROVIDES FOR FEDERAL AP
PROPRIATION FOR
LONG AVENUE

Negotiations which have been
under way'for some time by, the
city to secure WPA 'aid in pay
ing of Long avenue formerr:
Fifth avenue) seem to have me
with success, as the following
telegrams received by Mayor J. L
Sharit indicate:
Washington, D. C.
Feb. 13, 1938
Hon. J. L. Sharit,
Port St. Joe, Fla.
President Roosevelt has ap-
nroved WPA Project, No. 20497
for improvement on' Port St.
Joe streets calling for federal
appropriation of $21,595. Will
hurry this project through the
bureau of the budget and co-
operate with all -offiials in
every way possible to have this
project expedited satisfactorily.
Would anpreciai.' vour advising
interested pa I
CHARLI.S t.' Ail_'R'rW'S,
United States Senate.
Washington, D; C.
Feb. 15, 1938.
-Ion. J.L. Sharit,
Port St. Joe, Fla.
Pleased to advise WPA street
improvement project Port St.
Joe, state application No. 20497
has been approved by the presi-
dent. Now awaits comptroller
general's counter-signature, af-
ter which it will be returned to
WPA state office. Commence-
ment of operation subject to
decision of WPA state adminis-
trator. Federal contribution $21,-
595.
CLAUDE- PEPPER.
United States Senate.
---------*M'--'-----

VAUDEVILLE TO PLAY
AT ST. JOE THEATER

Manager Bill Turner announces
that the Owen Bennett vaudeville
troupe, consisting of 16 perform-
ers and a seven-piece orchestra,
-will play at the Port theater on
February 28.
This troupe, which carries gor-
geous costumes and a galaxy of
dazzling dancing girls, comes to
Port St. Joe direct from Atlanta,
and Manager Turner backs this
show with a money-back guaran-
tee. There will be no advance in
price, as it has always been the
policy of the Martin theaters not
to raise prices for additional fea-
tures.
Among acts in the Bennett re-
vue are two comedy aces, Homer
and 'Jerry Meachum; the Holly-
wood Rockets; Brandino & Co.,
"Stylists in Magic;" Don Cossak,
"The Man from Moscow," and
many others.

SERVICE STATION IS
NEARING COMPLETION
The service station, being con-
structed for B. W. Eells at the
corner of Second street and Reed
avenue by the Albritton & Wil-
liams Construction company; is
rapidly nearing completion,- 'and
J. F. Williams, in charge of the
work, states he expects to turn
the completed job over to Mr.
Eells some 'time next week. i


- New Ordinances Expected To
Save Thousands of Dol-
lars On Premiums
na
e At times in the past a pall of
r- odoriferous amoke has overhung
y the business district, smelling to
t high heaven of garbage, old au-
g tomobile tires, charred bones and
. other obnoxious odors. But those
days are gone forever.
City ordinance No. 44X, passed
last week by the board of com-
-tissioners in the interest of se-
curing lower insurance rates here
nd complying with regulations as
Set down by the boal~ of fire un-
derwriters, states that it is "un-
lawful for any person to burn
:rash, lumber, leaves or any other
combustible material in any alley,
street or vacant lot within the
fire limits."
The ordinance provides for a
fine of -not less tharn'$"-tr more
than $25 for i~s violation. Here-
after, we deem, it will cost any
individual at least $5 for the rare
privilege of disposing of trash by
way of a bonfire.
The fire limits, as established by
ordinance No. 49X, are as fol-
lows:
"The inner fire limits shall in-
clude all the territory in the con-
gested value district, to-wit: Be-
gining at the intersection of Balt-
zell avenue (First avenue) and
Firstt street and running easterly
along First street to its intersec-
tion with Long avenue (Fifth ave-
nue), thende southerly along Long
avenue to the center line of the
alley between Fifth and Sixth
streets, thence running in a west-
erly direction along the center
line of said alley to the center
line of Monument avenue (Second
avenue), thence in a northerly
direction along the center line of
Monument avenue to its intersec-
tion with Fifth, street; thence
westerly along the center line of
Fifth street to its intersection
with Baltzell avenue, thence in a
northerly direction along the cen-
ter line of Baltzell avenue to the
point of beginning. Said area is
composed of blocks 2, 3, 4, 7 to
10, 14 to 17, 22 to 25 and' the
north half of block 31."
The outer fire limits include
all property immediately sur-
rounding or bordering on the in-
ner fire limits, the outer boun-
daries of which are specified in
the ordinance as follows:
"Beginning at the intersection
of First street and Woodward
avenue (Sixth avenue), running
thence southerly along the cen-
ter line of Woodward avenue to
its intersection with Sixth street,
thence easterly along the center i
line of Sixth street, crossing t
Monument avenue to where it in- 1
tersects, the shores of St. Josephs
Bay, thence in anortherly direc-
tion parallel to and approxi-
mately 500 feet west of Baltzell a
avenue to where it would inter-
sect with the center line of First 1
street extended wes t, thence d


JUST A REMINDER


In case our readers are not
yet fully acquainted with the
new names recently given to
the city's avenues, we reprint
them herewith:
First-Baltzell Avenue.
Second-Monument Avenue.
Third-Reed Avenue.
Fourth-Williams Avenue.
Fifth-Long Avenue.
Sixth-Woodward Avenue.
Seventh-Park Avenue.
E'ighth;-Gkdsden Avenue.
Ninth-Knowles Avenue.
Just clip this and paste it in
your hat until you have become
accustomed to the new names.


WPA DIRECTOR

CUT BY WORKER

HAROLD PRIDGEON IS BADLY
SLASHED WITH POCKET-
KNIFE BY P. McDANIEL

Harold O. Pridgeon, project
work director for the WPA, suf-
fered a six-inch cut across his
back Wednesday morning which
required 17 stitches to close, as
the result of an altercation which
took place in his office at Wewa-
hitchka.
He was seated at his desk at
7 o'clock Wednesday morning
when Poley McDaniel, of Wewa-
hitchka. WPA worker, entered
the office and attacked' Pridgeon
';-ithout warning, 'nflicting the,
wound on his back and cutting
him about the head and on the
right hand before hie was sub-
dued by other WPA workers.
It is understood the encounter
was the result of long-standing
hard feeling between the two
men.
McDaniel, memt'er of a promi-
nent Gulf county family, is being
held in jail at Wewahitchka.

WORK MAY RESUME SOON
ON SCHOOL BUILDING
It is hoped that work may soon
be resumed on the new school
building for this city. The Al-
britton Williams Construction
Company, which has the contract
for erection of the structure, is
waiting final approval of the
bonds by Chicago bond attorneys
and according to J. F. Williams
this should be received within
the next few days.

north 400 feet. thence east ap-
proximately 2500 feet to a point
north of the intersection of First
street and Woodward avenue,
thence south 400 feet to the point
of beginning."
All buildings erected or en-
larged within the fire limits in
the future must be of incombus-
tible materials and must' have the
roof covered with fireproof ma-
terial. No-permanent frame build-
ings may be built hereafter in- i
side the fire limits and no build-
ing can be used as a planing mill
or dry cleaning establishment un-
less of fireproof construction.
The ordinance also provides for
construction of walls, fire doors,
stairways, elevator shafts, fire
escapse, skylights, '.dumb waiter s
shafts, areaways, fire stops, chim-
reys and flues and all other mat- r
ters pertaining to construction of o
buildings to eliminate 'fire haz- s
yards.
With the new fire ordinances in i
effect and the recent addition of t
a fire truck and new hose, it is IB
anticipated several thousand dol- n
ars a year will be saved resi-
lents on fire insurance premiums.


WORK BEGINS

ON DRAINAGE

PROJECT HERE

W I L L DEVeLOP PARKWAY
AND BASIN FOR SMALL
BOATS AND YACHTS

Work began this week on the
drainage project which will ex-
tond from Fifth street to St.
Toseph's Bay by way of Patton's
Bayou.
A portion of the canal will ex-
tend down Sixteenth street thrt
the new St. Joseph's Addition to
the city of Port St. Joe and
thence to the bay. Where it
passes through the new addition
a half block on each side will be
landscaped and made into a beau-
tiful parkway.
A large crew of men with a
huge drag line are working day
and night on the project, and the
boom of dynamite blasts remov-
ing cypress stumps are heard
early and late.
------ W------;a- -
PUBLISHER QUALIFIES
FOR SENATE CONTEST

T. C. Merchant, publisher of the
Madison Enterprise-Recorder, a
weekly newspaper, qualified Mon-
day to run for the United States
senate seat held by Claude Pep-
per.
When Merchant paid his $500
qualifying fee he stated he fa-
vored a referendum before any
declaration of war by the United
States except in self-defense. H:e
also favored more business in gov-
ernment, and believed "our farms
and businesses should be run
with as little regulation as neces-
sary on the part of the govern-
ment."
Dave Sholtz and Finley Moore
of Lake City previously paid their
qualifying fees to seek the sen-
ate nomination.

SCHNEIDER STORE TO
BE IN NEW LOCATION

T. M. Schneider, manager of the
Schneider Department Store, has
leased the store building adjoin-
ing the Miles 5 & 10 on Reed
avenue and expects to move to
the new location within the next
ew days.
Mr. Schneider states that he
will have all the latest spring
styles in stock at the formal open-
ng in his new' location, which is
across the street from his pres-
ent store.
-----t--a---
THREE NEW CCC CAMPS
SOUGHT FOR THIS AREA

Three new CCC camps for this
election of Florida have been re-
quested by H. J. Malsberger, di-
ector of state paris and forests
if the Florida forest and park
service.
Recommendations are for camps
n Torreya park, Liberty county;
he Florida Caverns camp near r
Marianna, and the Suwanee camp I
lear Ellaville, Madison county. t
---Send The Star to a friend
Send The Star to a friend. r


T. H. Stone Runs a Close
Second With 113; H.
W. Soule Polls 93

EFFORT MADE TO KEEP
COLORED VOTERS AWAY

Close Polls at 6:30, Although
City Charter Sets Time
At 7:00 o'Clock

In one of the closest elections.
ever held in Port St. Joe, and one
which created a great dea' of in-
terest and partisanship among
the electorate, B. W. Eells was
elected to the board of city com-
missioners over T. H. Stone and
Hora(V W. Soule by a margin of
three votes. Standings were:
B. W. Eells, 116; T. H. Stone,
113, and H. W. Soule, 93.
Mr. Eells, who will be inducted
into office at a special meeting
of the commissioners tonight,
takes the seat occupied by Mr.
Stone for the past 17 years, and
will hold office for a term of six
years.
One of the highlights of the
election was a move on the part
of one faction to prevent the ne-
groes from casting their ballots.
Circulars were distributed in the
colored quarters Monday night
making no threats, but suggesting
that "as no colored people are up
for election, and as all you col-
ored people have good jobs it
is suggested that you let the
white people hold their own elec-
tion."
However, this apparently had
no effect, as approximately 40
negroes whose names appeared
on the registration books, were
brought to the polls and .allowed
to cast their ballots.
The polls were advertised to
close at 7 p. m., eastern standard
time, as provided in the city's
charter, but after some discussion
of the matter they were closed at
6:30, which was sundown accord-
ing to the almanac. It is be-
lieved that a number of voters
failed to cast their ballots due to
this premature closing.
------~l--w--
MRS. MARY L. DUFFY
DIES IN APALACHICOLA

Funeral services were held at
Apalachicola Monday morning at
St. Patrick's Catholic church for
Mrs. Mary Lovett Duffy, 76, of
Pensacola, who died suddenly
Saturday at the home of her
brother, J. P. Lovett.
She was a native of Apalachi-
cola and lived in that city until
about eight years ago, when she
went to Pensacola to make her
home with her daughter, Mrs.
Catherine Comforter.
Services were conducted by the
pastor of the church, Rev. J. P.
Littleton.
_____A._____
SPUR TRACKS ARE LAID
TO PAPER MILL SITE

Two spur tracks connecting
with the Apalachicola Northern
railroad have been laid, across the
'anama City highway west of
he city, providing entry into the
grounds of the St. Joe Paper Com-
pany.


B~y MYargin' of 3 Votes







PAGE To THE TAR Frday. Fbruar IR.1~


THE STAR I
S W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under .Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.CO Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-- Telephone 51 }I--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the, printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


NO MORE POLL TAX

Elimination of the poll tax as a pre-
requisite to voting is, in our opinion, one of
the best acts passed by the 1937 legislature.
Abolition of this protective tariff which sur-
rounded Florida's polling booths and com-
pelled every 'citizen, however poor in this
world's goods, to pay for the privilege of
performing a civic duty is a big step for-
ward and one that has been taken by forty-
one other states.
But abolishing the poll tax also means
the abolition of an evil that has been prac-
ticed all over Florida practically since the
state was admitted to the Union-that of
politicians buying votes through payment of
voters' poll taxes.
It has long been the custom of many poli-
ticians to set aside a sum with which to pay
the poll taxes of citizens too poor or too in-
dolent to pay these taxes themselves, but
complaisant enough to requite this favor by
voting for the candidates who paid their tax.
Sure, it was forbidden by law to do any-
thing of this nature, but infinite were the
ways in which the law was circumvented.
So regularly in past years, on such a large
:scale and with much precision, it was evaded,
,and in many sections of the state the capita-
tion tax of complaisant but moneyless citi-
-zens became a recognized article of political
,commerce.
Now, with no poll taxes to pay in order
,to vote, there will be no votes to buy or sell
-except, of course, in the crude manner of
,outright bribery, from which, we believe, the
refined politicians of Florida will shrink.
However, since abolition of the poll tax
has put an end to this refined form of politi-
cal bribery, there will be some other system
adopted, but regardless of what it may be,
the merchandising of votes will have to take
a form more easily identifiable as skulldug-
gery and, therefore, more dangerous to prac-
tice. -. :..


S TELLING ABOUT YOUR GOODS

In the old days of business, a man just
opened up a store, put a sign "Dry Goods,"
"Groceries," etc. over his door, and assumed
that people would waTk' in and buy his goods.
Perhaps they did-in those days.
SBut after awhile it dawned on a more en-
terprising tribe of business people that if
they would give people reasons for buying
they would buy more frequently. So if a
merchant had a fine lot of goods which he
could sell at a reduced price, he put an ad-
vertisement in the local newspaper. He could
see the results right off.
SMany of the great fortunes of today were
heaped up because of the gains people made
in that way. They got their start by that en-
terprising habit, and they kept up the habit,
and became constantly more successful.

It's easy for a woman to remember Christ-
mas Day, New Year's Day and Bargain Day.
-Florida Times-Union. Also Pay Day and
.Housecleaning Day.

The man who can. laugh at himself can
laugh at the whole world.


JAPAN EXPANDING WAR

From present indications, if we can rely
on the news dispatches, Japan is preparing
either to strike a blow at Russia or prevent
Russia from further aiding the beleaguered
Chinese. Their latest move is to concentrate
troops in a portion of north China where, on
short notice they can sever the 3000-mile
connecting link between China and Moscow.
Japan, having captured port cities and
brushed aside military forces, has discovered
that these accomplishments have not brought
an end to the war and show no signs of do-
ing so. They have discovered that so long
as supplies continue to flow into China from
Russia the war will continue to be waged.
The way to end the war, therefore, is to
dam the supplies.
It does not follow that a Japanese-Russian
war is immediately in the offing. When it is
likely to come no one can tell. The point is
that the Chinese war is becoming more com-
plicated and suggests that the world has not
yet seen the full extension and development
of a war which every day shows fewer signs
of being fought out within the circumscribed
bounds of China. Indications daily point to
another world holocaust that will make the
recent World War seem like the "Indian
and cowboy" war gaies of our childhood.


FULL OF CONTRADICTIONS

He comes into the world without his con-
sent. He goes out of it against his will. The
trip between is governed by the rule of con-
traries. When he is little the big girls kiss
him. When he is big, the' little girls kiss
him. If he is poor, he is a bad manager. If
he is rich, le is dishonest. If he needs credit,
he can't get it. If he is prosperous, every-
one wants to do him a favor. if he is in
politics, it is for the graft. If he is out of
politics, he is no good to the country.
-If he doesn't give to charity, he is a stingy
cuss. If he does, it is for show. If he is
actively religious, he is a hypocrite. If he
takes no interest in religion, he rs a hardened
sinner. Jf he gives affection, he is a soft
specimen. If he cares for no one, he is cold-
blooded. If he dies young, there was a great
future for him. If he lives to an old age,
he missed his calling. If he doesn't get
money, he's a bum. If he does get it, he's
a grafter. If he spends money, he's a loafer.
If he saves it, he's a tightwad.-American
Laundryman.

We hereby declare our willingness to pay
first-class postage on this newspaper if the
federal bureaus will pay us space rates for
the propaganda they send us to print.-Tampa
Tribune. There isn't enough money in the
national treasury to take care of such an
expenditure.

How nice to have an oceai on each side,
so that nobody can wreck our property, in-
jure our industries and impoverish us by
hateful conflict, except us.-Birmingham
News.

"The world will last at least a billion years
longer," declares a Chicago physicist. Tut,
tut, doctor; this is no time for .pessimism-
St. Louis Star-Times.

An historian finds parallels of our New
Deal experiences in Greek and Roman an-
nals.. Hence an old saw: "Rome wasn't built
by the WPA in a day."-Atlanta Constitution.

When it comes to troubles there is no such
word as subtract.-Florida Times-Union. But
if you have a good wife she will divide them
with you.

Life is a grindstone, and whether it grinds
a man down or polishes him up depends on
the kind of stuff he's made of.

The women and girls who show their gar-
ters so freely usually have elastic affections
too.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


I seldom play poker, but the
other eveningwhil'e visiting at the
home of on'e cf my cronies, I was
inveigled into a "friendly" game
-you know, a cent or two a chip,
but if two or three good hands
are out, the sty's the limit.
Late in the evening my friend
and another player each held
cards that led to furious betting,
and as I. who am a babe in arms
when it comes to indulging in
this national sport, had a king-
high hand, I dropped out.
When the eventual showdown
came, the loser had three aces
and the winner four deuces.
I have found that morals can
be discovered in all situations, in-
cluding poker games.
A deuce, all by itself, doesn't
amount to much. It is like or-
dinary ability for an ordinary
task. .... It doesn't- get us far.
S. Only when we focus on this
ordinary task other qualities,
which though ordinary are not
usually found in association, do
we achieve an extraordinary re-
sult.
All of us are aware of two and
.three-ace men who are being
beaten by four-deuce men. A
lack of dependability or an un-
controlled temper is often the
weakness,, that upsets a seem-
ingly unbeatable person in com-
petition with an apparently in-
ferior opponent.
*
This is from one of our read-
ers who recently paid a visit to
the Yerkes observatory:
Sir "' onders of the sky. Oh,
how beautiful!" and we inno-
cently stepped up to the telescope
with great anticipation.
"But there are thousands of
them!" we exclaim; "hundreds
of thousands of them!" and shud-
der with the. thought. We look
around and see a line of wait-
ing victims-"hounds for punish-
ment." We willingly step aside.
A feeling comes over us that the
bottom has somehow dropped
out. There's a sudden loss of ego
and we experience a feeling of
human insignificance as never be-
fore. A similar trip years ago
had failed to give all these im-
pressions.
Then down the long, winding
mountain in the shimmery moon-
light. We must confess, though,
old friend moon got very little
response. Whew! but it seemed
good to get home among familiar
things and folks who were close
and warm and dear. The man
who wrote "Home, Sweet Home,"
must have just had a glimpse
through a telescope. The home
life may seem a dwarfed experi-
ence to some, but in: comparison
to the study of the universe and
its "annihilating vastness," it is
happiness.
The part that stampeded us
was the fact that the stars are
evidently not put there to please
us-and here is another Interpre-
tation of "the sky's the limit."
From now on we'll have to take
the .sky "as is," but as the old
song goes: "I'll never be the
same again."-D, R. H.

Remember in our copy book
at school the line we used to
write that contained all the let-
ters of the alphabet: "The quick
brown fox jumps over the. lazy
dog"-and how we used to mar-
vel at the massive brain that.
could turn out such a master-
piece?
I just happened to run across
a few more lines of this charac-
ter, and present them herewith:
I endeavored to puzzle the ex-


PROPAGANDA FOR WAR

As one views the motion pic-
ture showing the sinking of the
United States gunboat Panay in
Chinese waters, he may well re-
flect and wonder if this does not
serve excellently as propaganda
for war. It cannot help but stir
our 'emotions against the J4ps,
just as countless motion pictures
and other events created a hatred
within us for Germany and sym-
pathy for the Allies prior to our
entry into the World War.
There is little danger, if any,
that it will have this effect upon
the generation which still re-
members that bloody and costly
conflict, but what about the young
men and women of today who
were yet unborn, or in their in-
fancy when that holocaust was in
progress?
They do not understand .the
viciousness of propaganda. They
are not to be censured for per-
mitting their emotions to carry
them beyond the 1)o!nt of rea-
soning. It is easy to understand
why they now feel tne same way
their elders felt when the Euro-
pean war was raging. It is our
duty to explain to trem just how
this propaganda machine works,
and advise them to carefully an-
alyze all of the factors and situa-
tions which enter into' any war,
and then we will have to enter-
tain no fears as to where their
emotions may carry them.
The United States is still pay-
ing for the last war and will con-
tinue to do so for a long time to
come. With almost the entire
world apparently going headlong
into another war, it certainly be-
hooves the United States to go
slowly and carefully so that we
will not be dragged into another
conflict without the best of rea-
sons. Propaganda is the war
makers' major weapon. Let's
watcht out so we are not duped.
-Palm Beach Sun.
-*--
The United States once had a
camel corps for patroling desert
regions in the southwest.


spy by quickly jumping, forward.
Heavy boxes were marked and
deftly packed with gas jets and
fuzzy quilts.
The foxy Zulu quivered while
drinking warm cups of the best,
Java coffee.
If my readers can add further
to thfii collection, I will gladly
reprint them here with due
credit.

Try thts puzzler, which is going
the rounds of Florida newspa-
pers:
Twelve guests arrived at a ho-
tel and were informed that but
11 rooms were vacant. An Irish
chambermaid stated that she be-
lieved she could give each guest
a separate room.
"Now," the maid said,, "If two
of you gentlmen will go into the
first bedroom and wait there a
few minutes, I'll find a spare
room for each one of you as soon
as I've shown the others to their
rooms."
Having thus bestowed two gen-
tlemen in room No. 1, she put
the third man in. No. 2; the
fourth in No. 3; the fifth in No.j
4; the sixth in No. 5; the seventh
in No. 6; the eighth in No. 7;
the ninth in No. 8; the tenth in-
No. 9; and the eleventh in No.
10.
Then she went back to room 1
where, you wil- remember, she'
had left two men, and -said: "I
still have one room to spare, so
if one of you will step into Io.
11, you will find it empty."
There it is-I've wasted suf-
ficient time trying to figure t
out to carve a statue of Genera%
Washington crossing the Dele-
ware, and I'm still In the dark.
If any of my readers can ex-
plain it to me, I'll surely appre
late it.


PAGE TWO


Friday, February 18, 1938


. ... j : .. .. p ...


THE STAR






PAGE THREE


r d W F ra


Advertise that Special Sale. The CARD OF THANKS
Star prints dodgers and circulars. We wish to take this opportun-
!ity to express cur sincere thanks
(Paid Political Advertising) and appreciation for the kind-
.- --- j nesses extended us by our many
SFOR STATE ATTORNEY friends, and for the lovely floral
Fellow Democrats: offerings, during the recent ill-
I am a candidate for re-election enss and death of our husband
as State Attorney for the 14th and brother, Mr. J. L. Redd.
Judicial Circuit, composed of the Mrs. J. L. Redd.
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,. J. .
Holmes, Jackson and Washington, O.J. Redd and family.
subject to the May primaries. C. A Redd and family.
As your State Attorney, I have A. M. Redd and family.
harndied the business of the office ___
promptly, fairly, courteously and
to the best of my ability. If re- Although a resident of the U. S.
elected, I will continue to do so. for 51 years, Joseph Morrisette
Your vote and support will be admitted in district court at Fall
appreciated. River, Mass., through an inter-
S JMarianna, Fla. peter, that he could not speak
English.

E L E C T (Paid Political Advertising)

JOHN C. WYNN FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Democratic Voters
of roGulf Countv:


He will
Appreciate
YOUR
VOTEd '
and
Support
For


State Attorney
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit


In the belief that my past ex-
perience as a member of the legis-
lature should be -of value and that,
if honored with election, I may be
bhle to render some service to my
County, I announce my candidacy
for Representative in the Legis-
lature in and' for Gulf County. The
nlde'-rrsidents of the County are
familiar with my past legislative
record and I invite the investiga-
tion of our new citizens. On my
past record and my desire to be of
future service, I' solicit your vote
and support in this campaign. I
assure you that your vote and sup-
port will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.


A P ENNY


Spent


ELECTRICALLY


Goes A Long Way!

IT'S A FACT! One penny does a lot of work
when it's spent for modern Electric Service. When
you divide your month's electric bill by 30 you
will find that the daily cost of Electric Service
is but a few pennies. Then consider the number
of electrical servants in the house and you can
readily see what a penny does toward solving
many of your household work problems. Turn to
the Electrical way of doing things and enjoy
economy with modern efficiency. See your Elec-',
trical Dealer.


Modernize Electrically For
SLong-Run Economy--


FLORIDA POWER

CORPORATION


INCREASE SEEN

IN RACE PAYOFF

GULF COUNTY MAY RECEIVE
$30,000 THIS YEAR FROM
RACE TRACK FUND

Indications are that followers
of the sport of kings and queens
will deposit $60,000,000 in the
pari-mutuel windows of Florida
horse and dog racing plants this
season, according to a statement
by Parks Glover, secretary to the
state racing commission. This
will be an increase of $10,000,000
over the $50,000,000 bet at the
!t.acks last year and will give
Gu:f county approximately $30,000
as its share this year, compared
to $24,000 received last year.
Figures show that up to and
including January 29, $4,410,706
passed through the pari-mutuel
windows of Corat Gables Racing
association in the 20 days it had
been operated; $6,408,258 at Hia-
leah for 16 days; $193,425 at the
Fronton (Jai Alai), and $6,161,482
at the dog tracks. The total
amount bet as of that date was
$17,173,871, which is an increase
of $2,000,000 over the same period
of last year.
Nearly half a million dollars
was bet in. one day's play at the
Miami Jockey club when 10,500
people placed bets amounting to
$463,000 trying to pick the win-
ners on January 31.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
---- *----

Diphtheria Case

Reported In City

Precautionary Measures Taken;
Health Department Urges
Immunization

A case of diphtheria was re-
ported Sunday to the local health
department. Precautionary meas-
ures were taken immediately, the
family quarantined land the im-
mediate contacts given toxoid. It
is felt there should be no feeling
of alarm, and a local physician is
to be thanked for promptly re-
porting the case and having it
quarantined.
According to local health au-
thorities, it is advisable for all
children to have the diphtheria
toxoid to prevent spread of this
disease. Diphtheria is very easily
prevented but not so easily cured,
so be sure your children are pro-
tected. It is most fatal to in-
fants, therefore it is strongly
urged that babies of five months
upward receive toxoid.
Call on your physician or the
health department and have your
children immunized, is the pies
of the local health board.
"----..
HO HUM!

A crew of WPA workers re-
cently paved a "piece of vacant
property" to connect two streets
in the city of New York.
A few days ago Frank Stankie-
wicz, with building plans and a
permit in his' pocket for construc-
tion of a home, went to property
he owned for a final survey of the
site. Lo! the property had been
paved!
A careful survey convinced Mr.
Stankiewicz that, indeed, someone
had paved his property. Un-
daunted, he hired a crew of work-
ers to excavate for his house. Of-
fifials halted the work because
someone complained that he was
destroying public property.
In curt Stankiewicz proved his
point, much to the embarrassment
of the 1rPA.

Ozone's! pungent odor justifies
its name,; which comes from the
Greek word for smell.


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Available Immediately

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING -REFRIGERATION

-., A full line of gas appliances in stock 1i-


Inquire
Gulf Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


Commercial


Printing ..,


TAGS
POSTERS
DODGERS
RECEIPTS
PLACARDS
BOOKLETS
PROGRAMS
ENVELOPES
STATEMENTS
CATALOGUES
INVITATIONS
LETTERHEADS
WINDOW CARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
ANNOUNCEMENTS


* Any Commercial Printing
that you may require, from a
calling card to. a catalogue,
can be made right here in our
plant. And we can fur-
nish illustrations if necessary!

0 You will find our printing
to be high in quality the
service prompt and satisfac-
tory-and our prices reason-
able.


THE STAR
"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"
..___ "*^ --..


Eh_~P~a


An American Patriot


Father of a Country

Builder of a Nation

George Washington, leader of a revo-
lution that won the freedom and inde-
pendence of a great nation. Took active
'part in the molding of a new country
into a government. Signer of the
Declaration of Independence. The na-
tion's first President. All these accom-
plishments make him an inspirational
figure for all Americans.
; His ideals are still reflected in this
modern world of today. Businesses
are based on his principles of honesty,
dependability and loyalty. This bank
has constantly kept the ideals of Wash-
ington in mind while endeavoring to
build a better bank for a better and
more prosperous Gulf County.


Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


1F 3193A3


II


fisuaranmg


~H~aa~-rma~il~srcnea~sP--uk:


THZ STAR


Friday, February 13a, 1938








....A.......E... FRTHE- STAR.Friday,.Februy 1


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Ed:tor
ii


Garden Awards To

Be Made In April

In a recent issue of The Star
an announcement appeared which
has stimulated the efforts of our
lower growers and lovers of
beautiful out-of-door surroundings.
W. T. Edwards offered $50 for
the year 1938, to be used by the
Woman's club of Port St. Joe for
prizes for the best lawns, flower
gardens or other forms of planted
home beautification.
In his letter he expressed a de-
sire that the ladies of Port St.
Joe, through the Woman's club
and other organizations, as well
as individually, begin now an ac-
tive campaign to make the city
of Port St. Joe one of the most
beautiful in Florida.
The contest will be open to
every flower lover in the city.
Contestants should mail in their
names to Mrs. R. R. Hodges or
Mrs. Robert Dorsey at the Port
Inn on or before March 1.
There will be three judges,
probably chosen from outside the
city, and prizes will be awarded
during the last wec-: in April-
the exact date to be announced
later.
Mr. Edwards suggested the $50
be divided into three prizes. One
cf $20 for the most artistic and
beautiful flower garden and
grounds as a whole. Remember
that a small garden may be more
.ovely than a large one. Size does
not enter into awarding of the
prizes.
A second prize of $15 will be
given for the lost artistic and
b-eautiful flower 'garden, and the
third, of $15, for the best kept
lawn, including shrub plantings.
Send in your entry promptly.
There will be many new gardens
and lawns this year and this fact
will .receive due consideration
from the judges.
We are exPectti- an early visit
from Mr. Edwards, at which time
it will be found out whether this
contest will be confined strictly
within the limits of the city of
Port St. Joe or shall extend to
the development just beyond the
monument.

Miss Hazel Register of Pan-
ama City was the week-end guest
of her mother, Mrs. Votie Gibson.

Read the ads-it pays!



Be Sure That

SPRING

Is In The Hair






"i.


4/ \



Let us see that your hair
is smart for this advance
Spring weather.

PERMANENT $3 UP
OIL WAVE $3.50
SHAMPOO'and SET 50c

CRAWFORD
B E A UTY SHOP
Adjoining Cooper Barber 'hop
Operated by
MARY SUE CRAWFORD


W. M. U. CIRCLE 2 MEETS
WITH MRS. DAUGHTRY
Ci:'cle No. 2 of the Baptist Wo-
men's Missionary Union met this
week at the home of Mrs. W. J.
Daughtry on Fourth street. Mrs.
J. W. Sisemore, chairman, pre-
sided.
The meeting opened with song,
"Rescue the Perishing," followed
with a prayer by Mrs. J. White.
Regular business was then taken
up, with reports received from
the various chairmen. Plans were
made to study the mission book,
"Fruits of the Years," the last
week in February. Bible study,
Samuel, 2nd chapter, was taught
)y Mrs. E. D. Dendy.
Following the business meeting
the hostess served refreshments
of coolade and wafers to the fol-
lowing members: AMesdames J. F.
Miller, E. D. Dendy, W. Player, J.
White, Oglesby, Hammock, E. C.
Cason, A. Montgomery, B. Adams,
.. W. Sisemore, J. 0. Baggett and
Lupe. ; i0 :.i b:j *

Mis. Nelson Haygood of Boga
Lusa, La., arrived Saturday and
will spend some time with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Belin.

Mrs. Helen Allen and daughter
Peggy and Miss Mattie Owens
were visiting Sunday in Apalachi-
cola.
f f. f
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists



At the Churches

FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m.
Sunday Morning services at 11
o'clock. Sermon theme "The Trin-
ity of Temptation."
..B. A. U. will organize at the B.
T. U. hour, 6:45. Junior and In-
termediate will organize at 6:00.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
Evening worship 7:45. Topic:
"The Last Word."
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
-f-
FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marretta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
mr.

PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.
-f-
EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
Services at clubhouse Sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.
-*t-
CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. .P. ,Mney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.,


WPA TEACHERS MEET
AT BAPTIST CHURCH
A meeting of the adult educa-
tion and nursery school teachers
of this district was held last Fri-
day afternoon at the Baptist
church. Objective of the meeting
was discussion of the work that
had been done by the teachers
and to plan future work.
William Tyler of Pensacola and
Miss Mary Coleman of the Boni-,
'ay area, supervisors of adult ed-
ucation, WPA, met with the
teachers and gave interesting
talks on the work and also helped
in planning future work.
Teachers present at this meet-
ing were Mrs. C. W. Norton, We-
wahitchka; Mrs. Ruth Coleman
and Mrs. Josie Rojerson, Panama
City; Mrs. Amanda Parker, Mill-
ville; Mrs. Minnie O. Mollison
and Mrs. Elizabeth Coombs of
Apalachicola; Mrs.; Mamie Robi-
son, CarrabelHe, and Mrs. Zola
Maddox and Miss Roxie Nichols,
Port -St. Joe.

TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
WITH MRS. VAN HORN
Mrs. C.P. VanHorn was hostess
to the Tuesday Bridge club this
week at her Beacon Hill home.
The hall where tables were
placed for bridge was attrac-
tively decorated with beautiful
spring flowers. Several progres-
sions were llayea, after which
prizes were avarce.
The hostess'!served a delicious
cold plate lunch to Mesdames J.
Hiles, R. Miller, J. Mira, T. Allen,
Treadwell, Khrone and R. Huff-
,man. .

SEWING CLUB MEETS
WITH MRS. D. C. SMITH
The ladies of the Wednesday
Sewing club met this week at
the home of ,Mrs. M. B. Smith,
with Mrs. D. C. Smith as hostess.
This club, being newly organ-
ized, has not 'et been named, and
during the hour of sewing a name
suitable for the organization was
discussed.
The hostess served for refresh-
ments ice cream, cake and. soft
drinks to Mesdames H. Kane, T.
Jones, Robert Haley and Miss
Erie Gulledge'.

Charlie Tate of Boga Lusa, La.,
spent Saturday and Sunday in the
city visiting friends.

Mrs. Lizzie Cooper of Apalachi-
cola was a business visitor in the
city Saturday.


MATCHED BRIDAL SETS
Engagement Ring and
diamond-set Wedding
SRing
MANY MODELS TO
CHOOSE FROM
PRICED FROM

$23.75 to $85.00
-:-
Port St. Joe's Outstanding
Jewelers



LILIUS JEWELRY

COMPANY
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


PAGE FOUR
r- -4--


Hosiery famous for
long wear ... that
once sold for prices
as high as $1.50 per
pair.
Every Pair High
Quality!


BAPTIST GIRLS'
AUXILIARY MEETS
The Girls' Auxiliary of the Bap-
tist church met this week at the
home of Mrs. W. H. Howell on
Eighth street, with Gwendolyn
Howell as hostess.
The meeting opened with the
girls singing' "Since Jesus Came
Into My Heart." Mrs. E. C. Ca-
son, counselor, then read the
story of "Jacob and His Vision."
Study for the afternoon was "The
Ladder That the Girls' Auxiliary
Must Climb In .Their Work." Val-
entines were then distributed by
the leader, which contained Bible
verses and were read by the mem-
bers. Several members gave in-
teresting talks on the lives of the
two great men of this month,
Washington and Lincoln. "Amer-
ica" was sung -and the meeting
dismissed with prayer. The mem-
bers then entered into a social
hour during which valentines
were presented and the hostess
served iced drinks and crackers.
Present were Carolyn Baggett,
Virginia Pridgeon, Isabell Bag-
gett, Evelyn Strange, Geraldine
Parker, Marilyn Rowan, Janell
Pridgeon, Margie Costin, Flora
Mae and Hazel Cason, 'Betty Jo
Lane and Mrs. K, Harrell, a visi-
tor' ., .

MRS. LOVETT IS HOSTESS
TO EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
The -auxiliary of the St. James
Mission met this week at the
home of Mrs. Philip Lovett on
Second street, with Rev. Benson
presiding. The regular business
meeting was held, after which the
hostess served refreshments of
coffee and cake to the following
members: Mgsdames M. Lovett.
N. Comforter, J. Gloekler, Lillius.
and T. Owens. Guests were Mrs.
K. Williams and Miss Ella Lovett.

Hught M'-esle' and Howard
Himman of Panama City were
business visitors yesterday in
Port St. Joe.


Flimsy sheer Silk Hosiery ....
flattering to the contours of the
leg . hosiery that will
wash indefinitely and hold its
springy texture to make itself a
nrost satisfactory necessity.




I FULL
FASHIONED

BERKSHIRE.


HOSE


J Silk from top to toe!




S 79c


3 Pairs $2.25


Sheer, sheer stockings
with incredibly fine
seams, dainty rein-
forcements, picot tops.
Glowing spring shades.
All sizes.


Owens & Murdock

Port St. Joe, Fla.


The Perfect Gift


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the-
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Legion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Woman's Club meeting First
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
Port Inn parlor.
____-- ----
Let The Star do your Commer-
cial Printing.



New Spring Styles


TO GO WITH THE
NEW SPRING HATS!
Be sure that your coiffure
will match and accentuate
the fine details of the new
hats come to a
modern shop.
Princess Permanent
This famous special is
complete with shampoo
and wave set.
$3 to $6.50

PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOP
PHONE 55 Port St. Joe


THE STAR


Friday, February 18, 1938


I







Frdy Ferur 13,_ 1938 THEI STAR_____I PAGEIPIIUYI--C. FIVEPI~W


WOMAN'S CLUB ENJOYS
SPLENDID PROGRAM
Mrs. G. A. Patton, president,
presided at the meeting of the
Woman's club held Wednesday
afternoon at the club house with
a full attendance. After the busi-
ness meeting, Mrs. Robert Tap-
per, assisted by Mrs. J. A. Whit-
field, entertained with a most
unique program.
Opening with a message from
the national president to all wo-
men of the Federated clubs, by
the president. Mrs. Patton. Miss
Ruby McDavid presented a splen-
did paper on home demonstration
work. An interesting play, "Bet-
t'er American Homes," was pre-
sented by the following: Miss
Avaryee Collier, the bride; Rich-
ard Rector, the groom; Mrs. Fred
Curtis, the neighborhood; C. G.
Costin, the busifiess men; W. N.
McLin, the government; Prof.
B. G. McPherson, the schools;
Rev. Marietta, the churches-
each of these, carrying out their
part splendidly.
Miss Erline McClellan, talented
member of the high school, fac-
ulty, gave an appropriate read-
ing on "Home." "Home, Sweet
Home," loved by all Americans,
was beautifully rendered by Mrs.
Ed Ramsey accompanied at the
piano by Mrs. Boyer. Mr. Farmer
delighted the audience with sev-
.eral selections on the saxophone.
The club house was beautifully
decorated for the occasion with
spring flowers. Delectable re-
freshments were served by the
hostesses, Mesdames R. V. Co-
burn, C. P. VanHorn and Robert
Huffman.
Mr. Tapp'er and Mrs. Whitfield
deserve much credit for their
novel program.

NAME HONOR
ROLL STUDENTS- -
The following students of the
Port St. Joe schools have been
reported by their teachers to
have qualified for the honor roll
for this period:
Twelfth Grade
Margaret, Belin, Ruth Connell,
Jerome .Morrison.
Eleventh Grade
Annie Mae Carter, Alice, Gib-
son.
:' Tenth Grade
Margaret Coleman, Alma Col-
lingsworth, John Lane, Susan
Saunders.
Seventh Grade
Betty Arnold, Peggy Arnold,
Myrtle Brogdon, Annie Louise
Owr, Thomas Smith, Ethel He-
bert.
Sixth Grade
Carolyn Baggett, Barbara Ed-
wards, Mary Amelia Gibson, Juan-
ita Sorrells, Evelyn Taunton,
Anne Treadwell, Peggy Allen,
Jimmie Guilford, Coleman Schnei-
der, Joe Sharit.
Fifth Grade
Mary Alice Sorrells, Malcolm
Kaser, Tom Parker, Otho Powell,
Alfred Rhames.
Fourth Grade
John Gimore, Montie Goolsby,
Jewel McMullin, Alama Larri-
More, Ernest Smith, Fred Dun-
lao, Jewel Faircloth, Alto Owr,
Ouida Martin.
Third Grade
Doll Collier, Alliel V. Whitfield,
John Allen Morgan, John Henry
Hardy, Dudey Powe:;, Wade Bar-
rier, Sarah Jo Costin, and Fran-
cis Burgess.
Second Grade
Charles Smith, Peggy Hardy,
Betty McQuagge, Doris Thursby,
Mildred McMullin, Norman Jean
Lewis, H. L. Hatton, R. S. Carver,
Tommy Owens, Howell Robrets,
Billy White, Edwin Arnold, David
Malone, Janet Scott, Onamae
White.
First Grade
Dolores Mira, Agnes Creamer,
Joyce Husband, Nadine Davis,
Myrtle Rhames, Ashley Costin,
Lorin White, Fay Radford, Fair-
lene Everett, Robert Gill,. Jimmie
Arnold.


JESS SMITH SURPRISED
WITH BIRTHDAY DINNER
Mrs. J'esse M. Smith surprised
her husband with a delightful
birthday dinner Tuesday evening
at their home on Seventh street.
Upon his arrival home, Mr.
Smith was greeted by the guests,
all of whom wished him a happy
birthday. A delicious dinner was
immediately served, consisting of
baked chicken and dressing, po-
tato salad, sliced tomatoes and
lettuce, celery, olives and hot
rolls, and for dessert, devil's food
cake and hot coffee.
Following the dinner, to his sur-
prise Mr. Smith was presented
with many nice gifts from Mr. and
Mrs. B. A. Pridgeou, Mr. and Mrs.
E. C. Pridgeon, Mr. and Mrs. H.
A. Drake, Mr. and Mrs. Homer
Kane, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Haley,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McPhaul,
Mrs. D. C. Smith and Miss Erie
Gulledge.
.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.
Thee. Nichols and L. C. Guil-
ford of Dothan, Ala., were busi-
ness visitors Wednesday in Port
St. Joe.

Patty Lovett and Miss Ella
Lovett spent Sunday in Apalachi-
cola visiting relatives.

Miss Erie Gulledge was visiting
friends Sunday in Panama City.


FRESH

FLORIDA EGGS
PER DOZEN


25c


REMARKABLE TALENT
DISPLAYED IN SHOW
The junior-senior play, "Crash-
ing Society," presented last Fri-
day night at the high school au-
ditorium, was a great success.
Remarkable talent was displayed
by the students taking part in
the three-act comedy, and each
carried out their part exceedingly
well.
Miss Erline McClellan, director
of the play, is to be commended
for her coaching, as many con-
sidered it the best high school
play ever to be presented by the
Port St. Joe school.
The audience was entertained
between acts by numbers ren-
dered by the school band under
the direction of Dan Farmer, se-
lections played by Mr. Farmer
and a solo by Miss Ann Davies.
Students taking part in the pre-
sentation were Ausley Stoutamire,
Leila Smith, Alice Gibson, Wil-
liam Trawick, Kathleen Saunders,
Howard Taunton, Annie Mae Car-
ter, Preston White, Virginia Stout-
amire, Harold Williams, Helen
Baggett and Sarah VanHorn.

The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Presbyterian church met yester-
day afternoon with Mrs. Ada R.
Jones.

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Steele of
Atmore, Ala., were the guests
Wednesday of Mr. and Mrs. R. 0.
Roberts.


CHUCK ROAST
PER POUND


Western Meat
Western Meat


CIRCLE 1 OF BAPTIST
CHURCH IN MEETING
The Woman's missionaryy Union
Circle 1 of the Ba;,'tist church met
TMo-cday at the home of Mrs. W.
H. Howell, with Mrs. Kate Har-
rell as hostess. T;he meeting was
called to order by the chairman,
Mrs. Holliday, and the. regular
business proceeded with. Roll call
was followed by reading of the
minutes. Study for the afternoon
was Matthew 16:13-28.
Following the business session
the hostess served ice cold but-
t:rmnilk, hot coffee and cake to
Mesdames F. Maddox, Pat O'Day,
D. Miller, J. E. Baggett, Pinton,
W. Wells, J. R. Holliday, T.
Jones, and guests, Mrs. W. H.
Howell and Mrs. Howell of High-
land View.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

Mr. and Mrs. Alton McKeithen
and Mr. and Mrs. C. Dickson left
last Friday for Mayfield, Ky.
They returned to this city Tues-
day of this week.

Mrs. Leroy Morman of Boga
Lusa, La., spent Saturday and
Sunday in Port St. Joe, the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Eells.

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Hodges
and little son of Marianna spent
Sunday here with Mr. and Mrs.
R. R. Hodges. ,


FRESH

PORK HAM
PER POUND


18c


MRS. C. P. VAN HORN NEW
LEGION AUXILIARY HEAD
At a meeting of the American
Legion Auxiliary Ireld Monday
night at the club house, Mrs. C.
P. Vanliorn was chosen to head
the unit in place of Mrs. W. C.
Pridgeon, resigned. Mrs. Van-
Horn had previously held the of-
fice of sergeant-at-arms, and this
position was filled by the election
of Mrs. Verna Smith.
The next meeting of the Auxili-
ary will b'e held at 8 o'clock Mon-
day night at the home 'of Mrs.
William Murdock. All members
are urged to be present.

METHODIST AUXILIARY 1N
MEETING MONDAY
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Methodist church met Monday af-
ternoon in the church with the
president, Mrs. W. E. Boyd, pre-
-siding. Subject for the afternoon
study, "What Is This Moslem
World?", was presented by Mes-
dames Ralph Swatts and George
Patton. There were 16 members
and the pastor, Rev. D. E. Mari-
etta, present.
Next week the society will
meet with the "Oaks" circle at
the home of Mrs. Patton.
S*& &
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett,
Mr. and Mrs. Patty Lovett and
little daughter, Mrs. Mary Lovett
and John Maddox attended the
funeral of Mrs. Mlary Duffey in
Apalachicola Monday.


GrocerySATDA


PORT ST. JOE FLA.
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


SWEET SIXTEEN

Oleomargarine
PER POUND


15c


Specials Limited


Charmer Coffee WHITE HOUSE WHOLE GRAIN IRISH

TWO CANS APPLESAUCE RICE P TAT 0ES
3 CANS 4 POUNDS 10 POUNDS


Z50 23C..J3c 1 c


COCOA TOMATOES PEAS GRAPE JUICE

3 -POUND 5 4 No CANS 4 No. CANS i ,. 18c
CANS 2 BOTTLE
2-POUND 40c QUART 34
CANS 25c BOTTLE

EXCELL SALTED EXTRA GOOD VAN CAMP'S

BANANAS CRACKERS
1 POUND PACKAGE CANNED CORN PORK & BEANS
17 doz c I so. .s..*
N O 3 25c 3 Sml o 25c
1 doz. I 2 3 CANS 253 Large Cans16



HAMBURGER STEW MEAT ROUND STEAK OME DRESSED
2 POUNDS 2 POUNDS PER POUND C H I C K EN
PER POUND

25c 25c 20e 97O
Western Meat Western Meat Western Meat 7c


PAGE FIVE


THE STAR


Friday, February 18, 1938








PAGE~~~L si H TRFia, eray1,13


The Star does all types of Com- STEVEDORES REFUSE
m'ercial Printing. See us. TO TOUCH JAP GOO!
When 22 bales of Japane
.----- ---- cotton goads arrived at Sout
GU LF I ampton, Eng., from New York
SVI the Berengaria last Saturds
stevedores refused to touch then
'TAV'ERIN The cargo had been schedule
for trans-shipment to Funcha
Madeira Island, and probably w
be returned to New York.
We Carry the Best Lines of -
MINE UNDER CEMETERY
WINES and BEERS
WINES and BEERS The Orongo Cemetery associ
.' tion of Joplin, Mo., has decid
to permit a mining company
continue digging for lead and zin
on its grounds. Mining engine
said that the cemetery is under
laid with a rich veIn of ore.
--- ------
Save by reading the ads!



Come Out and Enjoy an YOI'e NeXt !
Evening of
PLEASURE There's No Waiting In


Please Use No Profanity CO O PER'S
BARBER SHOP
W. E. LAWRENCE BARBER SHOP
7 Miles Out on Panama Road You're next for better service.
SExpert attention without
Rooms for Rent
waste of time!



LITLES SERVICE STATION..
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes




We Haul Anything- -

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY -HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.'


ST. JOE ICE


ll C COMPANY
Manufacturers of

Sc?'^CRYSTAL ICE

IB n =I FROM TREATED WATER
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.







SB.ii.ffi~.i.- ....,,,,
1aI1 B b


N EN#W&N =


W


E


CAN SUPPLY YOU


No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

S. Your business will be

appreciated.




Gulf Hardware &


Supply Co.
BUILDING SUPPLIES POR


T ST. JOE


se Too Late to Classify
th- By RUSSELL KAY
on
ay,
m. Every motorist at some time in
ed his life has had to contend with
al, the back-seat driver. No matter
ill how sincere the purpose of those
who would direct, but do not hold
the wheel, it usually occurs that
when they are suddenly shoved
ia- into the driver's seat they exhibit
e.d less ability and poorer judgment
to than those they so freely criti-
ne cize.
rs Psychology of this character
!r- must have influenced the presi-
dent when after long months of
criticism of his every aim and ac-
tion he saw fit to turn: amiably
to those in the back seat and
say: "All right, it's youf car-
climb over here, in tie front seat
and show me how to do it."
Congress took over the wheel
and ran the battery down trying'
to start, and didn't get anywhere.
Then at the president's invitation
Big Business. confidently took the
steering wheel, got the engine go-
ing, but couldn't figure out how
to release the brake. 'Then Little
Business took its turn, pulling
levers, pushing pedals, and mess-
ing around generally with no re-
sults.
And all this has been helpful.
Labor and Capital, Big Business
and Little Business have all been
given an opportunity to express a
view. All have been given a
chance to sit in and tell their
story as well as suggest a rem-
edy. It has created better feel-
ing all along the line. We all
appreciate an opportunity to blow
off steam. We all hold certain
opinions and it gives us a feel-
ing of self-importance when we
are allowed to express them.
While the complaints and sug-
gested remedies advanced by La-
bor on the one hand are quite
different and in conflict with
those made and urged by Indus-
try, the fact that both sides are
given a say paves the way for
eventual agreement and under-
standing. Equally at variance are
the aims and purposes of those
groups known as Big and Little
Business, yet none of -the prob-
lems presented by any group are
beyond solution, provided all-will
work together harmoniously with
that end sincerely in view.,
The action of President Roose-
velt in calling all interests into
conference and giving all an
equal opportunity to discuss our
national problems and advance
their suggested remedies has
done more than any other one
thing to restore confidence both
in the administration itself and
in the country's future.
Out of it all should come a
F ound, constructive administra-
tion policy that will make for the
welfare of all interests. Both
congress and the nation today
are better able to face the task
of determining what to do or not
to do than was the case before
these conferences were held.
Like the back seat driver un-
expectedly thrust in the driver's
-eat, these varie" groups and in-
.torests have come to realize that
we have a rough and rugged road
to travel at best, and nothing is
to be gained in trying to yank
the wheel away from an able and
experienced chauffeur or in con-
tinually bothering him with im-
practical advice and non-construc-
tive criticism.
We still have a lot or nill-climb-
ing to do, and while the road
f ahead isn't impassable, it is go-
ing to require some careful and
cautious driving to get us through
I in comfort and 'eaa:ety. We've all
had a turn at th.'wheel, and it
appears that our regular chauffeur
seems to be able to handle the
car as well, .if not better, than
anyone else in the crowd.
Now if the rest of you gays


OLD ST. JOE'S

RACE TRACK

SOME OF SOUTH'S FINEST
HORSEFLESH ONCE
SEEN HERE

By D. C. MAHON
Very few persons know that
three or four miles below Port St.
Joe there are to be found the re-
mains of what was once the sec-
ond-best race track in the South
-second only to New Orleans'
race track of 1840. The footing
of the old Saint Josephs mile cir-
cular track was not, surpassed
history tells us, by any of its day.
This track was built by Peter
W. Gautier of Pensacola, who
was a statesman and newspaper
man of those days long ago. I
am told that Mr. Gautier's kins-
men are living in Florida at the
present time,
Below is an ad copied from The
Saint Joseph Times of September
9, 1840:
SAINT JOSEPH, FLA., RACES
Colhoun Course
The Annual lMeeting for 1841
will commence on the Calhoun
Course on Tuesday, the 9th.
day of February next, and con-
tinue -five days. Free for any
horse, mare or gelding in the
U. S.
First Day-1 mile heats, purse,
$200.00.
Second Day-2 mile heats,
purse $400.00.
Third Day-3 mile heats, purse
$600.00.
Fourth Day 4 mile heats,
purse $1,000.00.
Fifth Day-Proprietors purse,
$300.00.
(Mile heats, three best in five)
The officers of the Club guar-
antee that the purses as adver-
tised shall be put up before the
horses are started.
John D. Gray, President.
Peter W.' Gautier, Jr., Sec.
This track, from all that re-
mains to be seen, must have been
circular, 35 or 40 feet wide and
one mile around.
In my rambles over this his-
toric spot I have 7ound remains
of flowers and shrubs that would
seem to indicate the lovers of the
sport of kings in those days had
ideas of beautification as is the
case with those of this day.
iMr. Goutier had .a country place
Sfew ,miles frim" .what is now
the site of the up-and-coming new
city of Port St. Joe. This place
is known to the old-timers as,
Gautier's harmnock.
Those who desire to look upon
the site of this once splendid
track will be able to do so, .but
will find little to dnCicate its
past glory. Once some of the
best horses of the South com-
peted there for gold, or perhaps
one of the old master's slaves-
for those were the days of
slavery.
One can walk the bed of this
old track by following the con
tours of its course, aided by the
drainage ditches on either side,
as I have* often done, and dream
of the past, and the joys and sor-
rows of those people of one hun-
dred years ago. Men and women
who had the blackman to do their
every chore what joyous days
they must have been. Beautiful
women, fast horses, wine of the
finest vintage imported from' the
vineyards of France, Spain and
Italy-what else could be desired?
But it was the old story: "Eat,
drink and be merry, for tomorrow
ye may die." Death was soon to

want to sit up front and fret and
worry, you can, but for my part,
I'm gonna relax and let the driver
go on like he's been doin,' If
you ask me, this ain't no time to
be changing' drivers. We been
getting' along mighty good and I'm
the kind of guy that believes in
lettin' well enough alone.


.[RBIT

PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


i


j


take its toll, which occurred one
year later, 1841. Even at that, it
might have been worth while to
have lived in those days.
Come, look and dream, if you
will, and draw your conclusions
of what was and what may have
been.
The last horse to run that track
was an old string-haltered horse
owned by G. A. Patton and ridden
by his son, Ned Patton, when he
was a very small boy.
---*--k--
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
--- --- -- -
WANTS DRAMA SUBSIDY
Subsidization is the only hope of
the American theater, according to
Dr. Glenn Hughes, professor of
drama at the University of Wash-
ington. Otherwise, he insists the
movies wilf kill it.


CITY IIEISI!R


THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED-
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER

In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.







i !l.a ii *




For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANIA TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
Set we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Roche's Community Store


eb-


I I~


PAGE SIX


Friday, February 18, 1938


THE STAR






Frdy Ferur 1398TESTRPG EE


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R I G H T !

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker


NFishing

Spend the week-end
West Florida's'test fi
ing grounds.

TROUT
BASS
BREA
BOATS-with or wi
out guide-at reasonal
rates. Hotel
commodations within tl
means of everyone.
,SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.


in
sh-


M
th-
ble
ac-
he


Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods. En-
joy the benefits of the valu-
able vitamin content of fresh
milk!

Refreshing /
and Economical
You'll enjoy the delicious,
flavor of Solomon's Milk

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S'

Dairy. '

Products


GASOLINE
FOR ECONOMY !
You Save- because you get
more miles to the gallon and
Less carbon. '

FOR QUALITY !
You get a i ure product, fa-
mous for deppndability.

WASHING-GREASING
POLISHING.


SWOO-PEP
SERVE STATION
W. COLLINSWORTH. Mgr.
ON HIGHWAY NO. 10
/ '. a ^

Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.

(Paper and date unknown) bales of cotton about 8 feet in
FITCH'S STEAMBOAT height, with a cannon in the
middle. Our forces were in the
John Fitch, a watchmaker of inside of the barricades. The at-
Trenton, New Jersey, made his
tacking party had nothing to de-
first experiment with a steam- fend them. It was pretty hard
boat on the Delaware River on work for us to keep them from
October 3, 1738, the boat being scaling our fortifications, as the
called the "Perseverance." On
calld the "Perseverance.'" On odds were much against us, we
the 12th of the same month, she y 3
ascended the Delaware to Burl- on; y ,000 an 2 pees of
non; they 12,000 and 26 pieces of
ington with thirty passengers, a cannon.
distance of 20 miles, in three The attack commenced about 9
hours and 20 minutes. She hjs
hours and 20 minutes. She h in the morning on the part of the
as yet no cabins, but runs as a
enemy, and lasted till six in the
pass-enger boat. Her speed was evening. Of-the enemy, about 300
six and two-thirds miles per hour. were kiled n wounded; on
were killed and 200 wounded; on
Her trip to Burlington was made and thir-
our side 4 were killed and thir-
at six and one-third miles anounded. Hostilities were
teen wounded. Hostilities were
hour. But Mr. Fitch had calcu- then suspended until the next
lated upon-a regular rate of eight morning, Sunday, when the at-
miles, and was therefore not sat- tack again commenced about 4
isfied with her performance. e work, and
Th 1 at d o'clock-pretty early work, and
The,success a ready, attained not very pleasant I assure you-
gives him no pleasure, but he and lasted till one in the after-
looks forward to greater results.
noon.-Killed on the part of the
He is aware that along the level enemy, 60; wounded not known.
enemy, 60; wounded not known.
roads of the Delaare, where On our side, none killed, but two
stages can make five or six wounded. We then suspended ac-
miles an hour, a passenger boat tion till 5 o'clock, when it again
of six miles will never be profit- commenced on the part of the
commenced on the part of the
able. It will be necessary to ex- m
hibit a speed which will astonish enemy and lasted till 7 o'clock.
S Killed on the part of the enemy,
the beholder, in order to induce
the publi-tofrave on a craft 43; wounded more than 200. On
the publidct-o-tavel-on a craft
our side 1 killed, 5 wounded.
that has more the appearance of The following day, Monday,
The following day, Monday,
an infernal machine than of a
i fra o Santa Anna sent another flag of
quiet, comfortable and safe con-
truce and informed the Governor
veyance. He will, therefore, lay
if he did not surrender he would
up the "Perseverance" for the
up the "Perseverance" for the send all his forces and overpower
winter.
___wn us, at the same time informing
(From The Phi a S, the inhabitants that he would
(From The Philadelphia Sun, g f
March 17, 1845) give a free pardon to all who
Should join him. Fortunately for
THE SIEGE OF PUEBLA us there was none who accepted
(From a young American Me- his proposal. On the same day he
chanic in Mexico, to his brother told his soldiers if they would
in New York), take the City he would give thpm
Puebla, Jan. 27, 1846. three hours to plunder the City
(n Wednesday, the first day of and three hours to cut the throats
January, 3 o'clock.-n the after- of the male inhabitants. So you
noon, the much dreaded Lion of see if they ha\l succeeded, I
this country, Don Antonia Santa would not have been alive to tell
Anna, lately President of the Re- you the tale.
public, :ppear.ed with a formid- Hostilities did not again com-
able army of 12,000 men, who im- mence till 9 o'clock on Monday
mediately besieged the city. Im- night when the attack on the
agoin, to yourself men, women side of the enemy was terrible.
and children, running in all di- They advanced in close columns,
reactions, seeking a hiding place. 3,000 in one column, 2,000 in an-
In less than two hours, more other and two other columns of
than 40,000 people of this famous 1,000 each; and although it was
city left their property and their a dark night, we could see as
houses to the mercy of an excited plain as day from the constant
soldiery. flashes of the musquetry. The at-
I told you that the army made tack only lasted one hour and 20
their appearance on Wednesday, minutes; killed and wounded on
the first, but they did not com- the side of the enemy, 800; on
mence operations until Saturday, our side, killed -and wounded, 27.
nine o'clock in the morning, This was the last attack made.
which gave us time to make our On Tuesday morning the enemy
streets well fortified. About one retreated.
hour before the commencement Thus with a handful of men we
of the attack, General Santa An- made as gallant defence as is on
na sent a flag of truce to the city record, and established conclu-
to inform our Governor if he did sively the advantages of Cotton
not surrender the city he would Bales as a defence. I had three
.blow it to atoms, and there very narrow escapes.-A cannon
should not a single soul escape. ball passed near my nose, and
The governor's reply was, "We had the effect of a pinch of
will defend it to a man." All the rappee. However, a miss is as
streets were barricaded with good as a mile.


ERECT FIRST TRUSS ON
BLOUNTSTOWN BRIDGE
Work on the bridge across the
Apalachicola river at Blountstown
is proceeding rapidly and the
first steel truss was erected last
week. All the concrete piers have
been completed and the west side
approach is developing rapidly.
The 8400-foot bridge is on a 5
per cent grade with an 800-foot
vertical curve in the center. The
floor of the bridge will be about
70 feet above normal water level
in the center of the river.
H. G. Jenech, superintendent
of construction, is of the opinion
that, barring high water and ad-
verse working conditions, the
structure wil be completed by
September 1.


ALTHAN FIRST PATIENT
AT STATE SANITARIUM

J. J. Peacock of Altha, in Cal-
houn county, was given the first
assignment at the new state tu-
berculosis sanitarium at Orlando,
according to J. L. Sharit of this
city who, in his capacity as state
senator from this district, aided
in placing him.
-- --- ----
WHEN IN ROME-
Stranger: "What's all the peo-
ple doing at that house?"
Native: "A man's going to be
buried."
Stranger: "Going? Where I
come from, they're usually car-


Closed Season On Black
Bass Starts March 15

The closed season on black
bass starts March 15 and no one
will be allowed to take this fish
in any manner from any waters
throughout the state until after
May 20-a total of 66 days.
Local sportsmen report that
bass are now congregating in the
spawning beds, and some, of them
-state they will release all bass
taken from now until after the
closed season, although it is al-
most a month, before the closed
season starts.
The closed season applies in
every county in the state, and
fishermen should be governed ac-
cordingly.
*-------- ------
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists
---------
McLEOD ASKS SEAT

R. Don McLeod of Apalachicola,
member from Franklin county of
the house of representatives dur-
ing the sessions of 1935 and 1937,
has announced for re-election.


Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES


Sewer Connections,

We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

SEE

Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.


L KE L KRR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

-0--o-----

-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


-JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything


H. H. TAYLOR

9 Our Work Speaks for Itself


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


Port St. Joe


QUARTERMAN STUDIO


Next to
PHONE 74


.^ ") PORTRAITS
and
COMMERCIAL

^^ ^---o---

SROLL FILMS
DEVELOPED
24-Hour Service



Florida Power Corporation Office
PORT ST. JOE


MRS. E. P. RICE DIES
AT APALACHICOLA

Mrs. Emily Pickett Rice, 94,
one of Apalachicola's most loved
and prominent citizens, died last
Friday afternoon at the home of
her daughter, Mrs. R. G. Porter,
in the neighboring city. She had
been ill for several years.
Funeral services were held
Saturday in Apalachicola.


---4-~--~---------- ----L---Llr----~r-- -----i-L. r


THE STAR


PAGE SEVEN


Friday, February 18, 1938


I






PAGE EIGHT THE STAR Friday, February 18, 1938


ROAD BOARD BUDGET POSTMASTER GENERAL
MEET SET MARCH 18 TO VISIT PANAMA CITY
The state road department will Postmaster General James A.
meet March 18 in Orlando to Farley will attend the formal
adopt its operations budget for dedication of the Panama City
1938. A tentative budget session postoffice the latter part of next
was held at Tallahassee in Janu- month. The new $120,000 postof-
ary, when county and district fice in the neighboring city has
delegations asked for road work been opened to the public for
which engineers estimated would service, but will no; be formally
cost $20,000,000 or more. dedicated until such time as will
suit Mr. Farley's convenience.
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO. --
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27. BUILDINq PERMiTS ISSUED
------~--w-
AGED CIVIL WAR VET The following building permits
were issued this week at city hall
DIES AT LYNN HAVEN by Clerk M. P. Tomlinson:
William A. Kugler, one of the Florida Housing Corporation,
few surviving Union veterans of 6-room dwelling, $4500; 6-room
the Civil War in Northwest Flor- dwelling, $4000.
ida, died at his home at Lynn Harlow & Miller Construction
Haven yesterday at the age of Company, two dwellings, $2500
years. Had he lived but six hours each.
longer he would have reached ___ ----
his 90th birthday. COURT REFUSES REHEARING
The body has been shipped to ON VALIDATION OF JOOK TAX
Okawville, Ill., for burial. The supreme court Wednesday
refused to reconsider its decision
Mrs. I. C. Nedley was a week- upholding the 1937 legislature's
end visitor in Chipley, the guest "jook" tax law which provides a
of her mother and sister. Her special $100. state tax for dance
sister returned home with her. halls.
. . .. . . . . v v v v


COMING TO PORT THEATER
rf-Tsssm'arwsrssss^smsK-m


GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO. Limes are more acid than
Try Our Fountain Specials. lemons.


PETE'S Cash & Carry
SPECIALS FOR
FRIDAY SATURDAY
and MONDAY
FEBRUARY 18, 19 AND 21
25c box RINSO
10c box RINSO 26c


10c box Supersuds
5c Oct. toilet soap


4 pounds 49 i 3 Small 10
L d2 pounds 25 II 3arge 19


110


POUNDS SUAB AR
(Limited) Q


Can. Spaghetti...) 2 FOR DILL PICKLES, qt. ....15c
E. PEAS, No. 2. Sweet Mix. Pickles, qt. 19c
Tomatoes, No. 2) 15c WAX PAPER, per roll 5c


February Sale
of


Shoes B

for


Men, Women and Children


Brighten up your new outfit!
You'll need shoes for street
wear and "dressing up."
You can find exactly what
you want at "our store.
Come in today!


* Oxfords, Pumps,
Slippers!
* Blue, Brown, Black
and Tan!
* Right styles at
right prices!
0 All sizes in-
cluding yours!


A Complete Selection for YOUR Wardrobe



COSTIN'S Dept. Store
Port St. Joe, Fla.
......................................


FOR THRIFTY HOUSEWIVES OF PORT ST. JOE
MILK 4 Small 15p 0c TOMATOES- 25
or 2 Large ...........I U 3 for .................


Potatoes 10 Ibs 23c

LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs ....15c FIELD CORN, 3 cans 25c
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 25c COOKING OIL, gal....95c
Cranberry Sauce, can....10c MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c
WHOLE HAM, b. 25
CURED i 2

Fresh PORK HAM, lb. 20c CHUCK ROAST, lb. ...16c
Stew Beef, 10c lb; 3 lb. 25c PORK LIVER, lb. .......15c


BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


One of the beautiful Holly-
wood Rockets appearing with
the Owen Bennett revue "We've
Got Everything," coming to there
Port theater February 28.


PERSONALS


Mrs. B. Kelly and son Benton,
and Mrs. George Gore were busi-
ness visitors Saturday in Panama
City.
Lucius Allen of Chattahoochee
was the guest Sunday of Miss Al-
ice Baggett.
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Williams of
Tallahassee are me guests of
Mrs. Williams' sister, Mrs. W. J.
Tedd.
Mrs. A. Dragoin and three chil-
dren of Dothan, Ala.. were guests
Wednesday of Mrs. Helen Allen.
Mrs. Charles Mahon of Apa-
lachicola was visiting friends and
relatives in the city Tuesday.
Mrs. Julia Humphreys of Apa-
lachicola was the guest Tuesday
of her niece, Mrs. Paul Farmer.
B. C. Gaillard of Panama City
arrived in Port St. Joe Monday to
take up his duties with the St.
Joe Paper company.
Mrs. Foster Talley of Panama
City is the guest this week of her
mother, Mrs. Anna Balkcom.
Mrs. Louis Presnell is the guest
of Miss Frances DeWitt at Bea-
con Hill this week.
Mrs. Emma Balkcom spent the
week-end in Panama City, the
guest of her daughter.
"ODD" McINTYRE DIES
Oscar Odd McIntyre, newspaper
columnist to whom millions of
Americans looked for their im-
pressions of New York City, died
Monday in his Park avenue apart-
ment.
One of the most famous news-
paper columnists of the nation,
he came to New York from 'a
small Ohio town, and always
boasted that he never lost the
naive curiosity of the "home town
boy." He was 54 years of age.
SURFACING OF MILL
GROUNDS PROCEEDING
An oil and sand mixing plant
has been in operation the past
ten days at the St. Joe Paper
Company mill, the resulting pro-
duct being used to pave the
grounds about the mill.


110


Pounds Pa
U.S. No.1 Pot c .


5c Pork & Beans\
MACARONI-.....
SPAGHETTI.......
Potted Meat-......
Salt or Soda.......
MATCHES -.......


STEW MEAT, lb. 10c -
HAMBURGER, 2 lbs.


CRACKERS, 1 lb. box 10c
3 FOR KETCHUP, 14 oz...........10c
Tomato Juice 50 oz can 25c
10C Salad Dresing, 32 oz.....25c
10 MUSTARD, 32 oz-........15c
Fresh Prunes, 2V2 can 17c


15e PAN SAUSAGE, 2 lbs. 35c
25c OLEOMARGARINE lb 15c


FHA




Financing


NOW AVAILABLE





St. Joe



LumberCo.


Qualified to Handle


Your Application

SUs Before Building


See Us Before Building


PHONE 69


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


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Wlsrs lienow=r-arssa~~~


14 String Broom 21e
Yt~sss;anPi8utaar


Friday, February 18, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE EIGHT


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