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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00172
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 11, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00172

Full Text



Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
eset growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


SThe Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
T A R the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR. 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1938 NUMBER 18


EXPECT HEAVY VOTE



AT CITY'S ELECTION
.tr -----


KASER HEAD 0 F

LOCAL CHAMBER

OF COMMERCE

OFFICERS ELECTED AND BY
LAWS ADOPTED AT TWO
MEETINGS THIS WEEK

Approximately 30 business men
were present Monday nighi at the
woman's club house at a meeting
called by the newly-organized
chamber of commerce for the. pur
pose of adopting a set of by-laws.
G. Pierce Wood acted as tem-
porary chairman of the session
and presented a model constitu-
tion and by-laws secured' from the
state chamber of commerce which
was read and discussed by sec-
tions and, with a few minor
changes, adopted bodily.
As the original plan 'called for
seven directors, and as C. A.
Tovey and Dwight Marshal were
tied in the recent election, it was
unanimously decided to have the
directors' board composed of eight
members, four to be elected each
year in September. In this way
four menibcrs of the board .will re-
tain their seats ,each year and four
new members be elected. Dues
-were fixed at $1 per month, pay-
able in advance, or $10 per year.
The directors met Wednesday
morning at the office of Mr. Wood
(Continued on page 8)
-----------

Health Program Is

Started In County

Prenatal, Well-Baby and Venereal
Disease Clinics Are To Be
Started Again

The Franklin-Gulf-Calhoun health
unit, under the directiofi of Dr. A.
L. Stebbins, has developed a tem-
porary program for Gulf county.
-With the co-operation of Miss
Mathison, Cul' county nurse, and
local physicians, the prenatal, well-
baby and venereal disease clinics
are to be started again. However,
the venereal disease clinics cost
considerable money, and due to a
present shortage of funds it may
not be feasible to start these im-
mediately.
It is hoped, through these clin
ics, to inspect every' child in the
schools to determine defects, and
it is hoped that the health coun-
cils will co-operate in getting de-
fects corrected;. Immunizations for
diphtheria, typhoid fever and
smallpox will be offered to those
desiring them. Tnere will also be
a tuberculin testing program car-
ried out if desired.
Selwyn Chalker, sanitary offi-
cer, will be in charge of sanita-
tion. There is a WPA project in
Gulf county, and it is desired to
see a large number of sanitary
units installed. Hookworm is a
health menace in this section aid
the only way to eradicate this dis-
ease is to have and use a sani-
tary unit.
The personnel of the health unit
Is anxious and willing to co-oper-
ate with civic organizations and
individuals interested, in health
work.


Three In Race For Seat On
Commission;. Election
Clerks Named

TUESDAY IS THE DAY

Eells and Soule Seeking T. H.
Stone's Office; Residents
Urged To Vote

Considerable interest is being
taken in the coming city election,
Sto be held Tuesday, at which one
commissioner is to be elected for
a six-year term.
Two candidates have qualified
for the office, now held by T. H.
SStone, who is seeking re-election.
They are B. W. Eells, Sr., and
Horace Soule.
Mr. Eells, whose announcement
appears in' this issue of The Star,
_ pledges a sound and economical
business administration of the of-
fice, while Mr. Soule is running
on a platform of efficiency and
economy in administration of the
city's affairs.
Mr. Stone, who has served on
the board of commissioners for 17
years and who has established a
reputation for fair and impartial
administration of the duties of the
office, is asking .support of the
voters on his pa:"' performances.
All three candidates, business
men of the city, active in civic
affairs and well known to all,
have their staundh supporters, and
all indications point to a close
decision, when t e ballots are
counted.
The city commiseooners at their
meeting Tuesday night appointed
the following as an election board
to have charge of the polling
booths at the city hall: L. W.
Owens, clerk; Mrs. A. D. Lawson,
Mrs. R. E. Bellows and A. M.
Jones, inspectors.
The polls will be open from 8
a. m. until 7 p. m., eastern stan-
dard time, and all registered
voters are urged to cast their bal-
lots.


Four Bids Made On

New Postoffice

Masons Plan Two-Story Building
With Office Space If Suc-
cessful With Offer"

M. R. Morgan' of Jacksonville,
district postoffice; inspector, was
in Port St. Joe all last week in
the interest of securing bids and
working out plans for the new
postoffice building authorized, by
the postoffice department.
According to Postmaster H. A.
Drake, four bids for the new office
were made, being submitted by J.
L. Sharit, the Masonic lodge, Adolf
LeHardy and T. H. Stone, who
offered two sites.
It will be some little time before
the successful bidder will be
named, as a number of points will
have to be taken into considera-
tion by the department.
The site offered by Mr. Sharit
was at the corner of Third avenue
and Fourth street; those of Mr.
Stone on Third avenue; Mr. Le-
Hardy's on the lot at the rear of
his drug store, and the Masons'
on the site. of the present postof-
(Cohtinued on Page 5)


AMERICAN FLAG TO
FLY OVER CITY HALL

The city dads at their meet-
ing Tuesday night, at the be-
hest of C. P. VanfHorn, member
of the local American Legion
post, voted to purchase a four
by six foot American flag from
the post for use of the city.
A flagpole will be erected at
the city hall and the emblem. of
freedom and equality will fly
daily over the city offices.
The Legion post'is making a
drive to have every business es-
tablishment in the city purchase
a flag and pole, to be placed in
front of their stores on all pa-
triotic occasions. They will also
have a flag-raising ceremony at
the local school on February 22,
Washington's birthday.


E. CLAY LEWIS IS

CANDIDATE F 0R

LEGISLATURE

HAS ALREADY SERVED TWO
TERMS IN THAT CAPACITY;
IS FIRST TO ANNOUNCE

E. Clay Lewis, Jr., local attor-
ney, in this issue of The Star
makes formal announcement of his
candidacy for the post of repre-
sentative in the legislature from
Gu'f county.
Mr. Lewis was. born and, reared
in Marianna, coming to .Port -St.
Joe in 1923. where he was em-
ployed by the Park Wood Lumber
company, rolling logs and in other
capacities. He was assistant read-
ing clerk in the Florida house of
representatives during the session
of 1925 and when Gulf county was
created at this session he was ap-
pointed the first county judge by
former Governor John W. Martin.
He resigned from this office in Au-
gust, 1926, to resume his law
course at the University of Flor-
ida.
Lewis was elected representa-
tive from Gulf county in. 1927 and
served on important committees,
and in 1928 acted as chairman of
the appropriations committee. He
graduated from the law college
during the 1929 session of the
legislature and entered the prac-
tice of law in Wewahitchka. He
again represented Gulf county in
the legislature of 1:31 and served
as speaker of the house. During
this session legislation was en-
acted whereby Gulf county re-
ceived approximately $40,000 per
year, which amount continued un-
til last year, when stopped by
Comptroller J. M. Lee.
In 1932 Mr. Lewi' handled the
(Continued on page 8)

TWO CAUTION LIGHTS
ARE TO BE INSTALLED

Two caution lights are to be in-
stalled on Second avenue, one at
the intersection with First street
and one at Fifth street.
This move was ordered at the
city commissioner's meeting Tues-
day night as a measure of safety
for the driving public.

LEGION POST ENJOYS
SPAGHETTI SUPPER

Nine Port St. Joe members of
the Gulf county American Legion
post trekked to Wewahitchka Mon-
day night where they were joined
by 11 more members in a most
enjoyable spaghetti supper.


COW PROBLEM OF


CONCERN TO CITY
P~vJ~ yVI


FIRE LAWS ARE

PASSED BY CITY

COMMISSION

AS NECESSARY REQUIREMENT
FOR ENSURING LOWER
INSURANCE RATES

At a special session of the board
of city commissioners held yester-
day morning at city hall eight or-
dinances pertaining to fire regu-
lations and hazards were passed.
Present were Commissioners J. L.
Sharit, B. A. Pridgeon and' T. H.
Stone.
The new regulations will apply
to construction and repair of
buildings within the fire zone;
use of firearms and shooting of
fireworks in the city; regulations
for laundries and dry cleaning es-
tablishments; fire escapes on two-
story buildings; burning of refuse
within the city limits; keeping al-
leys and streets free from refuse
and debris; periodic inspection of
premises by the local fire depart-
ment in the interest of public
safety, andl the construction of
priirate garages. .. .-
This set of ordinances were
found necessary of passage in or-
der that the city of Port St. Jo'e
might meet all requirements of
the board of fire underwriters and
will assure a considerable reduc-
tion in the present high fire in-
surance rates in effect in the city.


Nine Avenues

Get New Names


Proposal Voted Down At
Meeting Is Passed
Commission


Previous
By


An ordinance submitted at a
meeting of the board of city com-
missioners on December 28 at
which Commissioner B. A. Prid-
geon was absent, changing the
names of nine of the city's ave-
nues. and which was voted down
at that time by the negative vote
of T. H. Stone, was again brought
up at the special session yesterday
and adopted by a two-to-one vote,
Mayor J. L. Sharit and Commis-
sioner Pridgeon being for it and
Commissioner. Stone against it.
The ordinance provides for the
changing of First avenue to Balt-
zell avenue; Second avenue to
Monument avenue; Third avenue
to Reed avenue; Fourth avenue
to Williams avenue; Fifth avenue
to Long avenue; Sixti avenue to
Woodward avenue; Seventh ave-
nue to Park avenue; Eighth ave-
nue to Gadsden. avenue, andi Ninth
avenue to Knowles avenue.
Changing the names of these
avenues is to do honor to those
men whose names appear on the
monument here as signers of the
state constitution in 1838.

DAVE SHOLTZ IS VISITOR

Ex-Governor Dave Sholtz was a
visitor in The Star office yester-
day in the interest of his cam-
paign for the senatoria: toga now
worn by Claude Pepper.


Deep Thought Is Given To
Eradication of Bovines
Inside City Limits

BARBECUE IS SUGGESTED

Costs Added to Regular One
Dollar Impounding
Charge

The question of how to prevent
the city being taken over by rov-
ing cows, steers and bulls came
up for debate before the board of
city commissioners at their ses-
sion Tuesday night and occupied
considerable time.
It seems that these bovine crea-
tures are becoming a public nuis-
ance and scaring the daylights out
of women and children, raiding
garbage cans (heretofore the ex-
clusive right of homeless and un-
derfed canines), destroying gar-
dens and, otherwise conducting
themselves in an obstreperous
and overbearing manner.
'Commissioner T. H. Stone sug-
gested that the impounding fee be
set at $10 so that owners would
see to it that their cows stayed at
home.
Mayor J. L. Sharit, in discussing
the matter said that'--f ,: get?
behind this heart and soul I be-
lieve we can get rid of them. I
suggest that we get someone with
a horse to patrol the city by day
and night and bring the cattle in."
"The way it is now," said B. G.
McPherson, school principal, who
was at the meeting, "we can't
keep the boys in school-they're
all out working for the city, drivw
ing cows to the pound at 25 cents
a head."
John O'Keefe suggested that if
a couple of' fe cows were used as
the piece de resistance at a public
barbecue it would be a big incen-
tive for owners to see that their
cattle did not go astray.
It was finally decided to amend
(Continued on page 8)


J. L. Redd Dies

At Home Here

Had Been Resident of City For
Past 20 Years; Services
Held Wednesday

Mr. J. L. Redd passed away at
his home here Wednesday night
at 8 o'clock after several months'
illness.
Mr. Redd came to Port St. Joe
from Wewahitchka about 20 years
ago and started a wood yard and
dray business. After several years
he operated the Gulf service sta-
tion, now known as Little's serv-
ice station, but finally had to re-
tire, as his health ecame bad, and
he again opened a wood yard. He
had been unable to do any kind of
work for some months past and
was under' constant medical care.
He was well known and well liked
in Gulf county and will be missed
by all.
Funeral services were held at 2
o'clock Wednesday afternoon at
the Methodist church, with inter-
ment in Magnolia cemetery, Apa-
lachicola. Rev. D. f. Marietta
and Rev. J. W. Sisemore offici-
ated.







PAGE TWO THE STAR Fr'day, February 11, 1938


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c


-". Telephone 51 }>--


The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


DON'T GET STEAMED UP
With elections drawing near-state, county
and city-we would like to advise our read-
ers not to take their politics too seriously.
After all, politics is politics, just as "pigs is
pigs," and there's no need to work yourself
into a lather over either subjcet. A good
thing -to remember is that regardless of who
is elected, the city, the county or the state
isn't going to the dogs.
Before reaching the age of discretion wie
thought it pretty "hot stuff" to rant and
snort about politics and to engage in heated
controversy on street corners over the merits
or demerits of first one and another candi-
date. Now it is our opinion that the easiest
way to get along in a political campaign (and
the safest) is to let the other fellow do the
talking and vote as we please.
Another good thing to remember in a po-
litical campaign is that the other man has
Just as much right to his opinion as you have
to yours. And just because you think Tom
Tinker is a fool for voting for Sam Jones is
no reason why Tom doesn't, entertain the
same idea of you for supporting Jones' oppon-
ent. Furthermore, neither of you ever know
whether you are right or wrong.
However, we do want to endorse E. Clay
Lewis of this city as our choice for repre-
sentative in the legislature from Gulf county.
.Ve believe he is one of the most capable
men available for that position, and we are
glad to see him come out for the office.
Mr. Lewis' past record speaks for itself:
He was assistant reading clerk in the Florida
house of representatives in 1925, and on cre-
ation of Gulf county at this session he was
appointed as the first county judge by former
Governor John W. Martin. He was elected
representative from this county in 1927 and
1931, serving as speaker of the house at this
latter session. In 1932 he handled the pre-
convention campaign in the Third congres-
sional district for nomination of Roosevelt
for the presidency, and was elected delegate-
at-large from the state to the Democratic
national convention at Chicago. Mr. Lewis
was appointed title attorney for the United
States Department of Agriculture in 1933,
serving until 1935, when he was appointed as
special attorney in the United St.ates Depart7
ment of Justice. He opened a law office in
Port St. Joe in 1936 and since that time has
taken an active part in affairs bf our city.
All in all, we sincerely believe that Mr.
Lewis has the best interests of Gulf county
at heart, and with his previous experience as
representative from this county we feel sure
that the majority of our readers will agree
with us that he is the logical man for the
office.
We could come out and rant and roar over
Mr. Lewis, or any other candidate whom we
favor, but getting all het up over politics
doesn't pay. Some of you have probably
heard the story of the prisoner at the bar who
told the judge: "Judge, I worked like the
devil for you during your last campaign." "I
realize that," replied the Judge, "so I'm sen-
tencing you to 60 days on the gang because
you are such a fine 'worker."
But in all setiousness--take an- interest' in
politics, but keep your shirt on. You'll find


you can, do considerably more for your par-
ticular candidate in a quiet, easy way than
you can by getting rambunctious-and it's a
lot safer, too.

ALL HEARTS BOW TO ST. VALENTINE
Lovers beware! A wealth of cheery little
red hearts and rampant cupids are flaunting
their charms from store windows in Port St.
Joe to lure even the wary into the endearing
wavs of St. Valentine.
And just what chance have young men and
their sweethearts? There's no telling when
one of these paper arrows may reach home
or a plaintive verse, as sweet as a sugar plum,
succeed in entwining itself around a loose
tendril of a wistful heart.
While girls shorten their dresses and cut
their haiir, and while fashions in valentines
come and go, the heart of the maid is gener-
ally as susceptible to valentines and their
verses as that of the hoop-skirted lady gen-
erations ago.
"What are those things?" questioned a
mystified customer in Miles' store yesterday,
pointing to a row of lacy confections. "Would
a girl really like one of them?"
Like them! She couldn't help it; they were
the very essence of the old-time valentines.
They are quite a contrast to the satirical and
humorous concoctions which were popular a
few years ago. But any older woman will
say there is nothing new about them. They
are copies of the hand-wrought and fanciful
expressions common years ago.

WHO WANTS A SALES TAX?
If the sales. tax would be such a boon to
civilization and the state of Florida as the
Tax Revision League and some others would
have.us believe, and if it is being agitated in
the interest of the poor, why is it that it is
always those who own considerable property
or depend directly on those who' are large
property owners who are the ones that are
the most anxious to force this "great benefit'
on the poor, who do not want it?
Taxation is intended to pay the costs of
government, and those who benefit most from
government should pay the costs. If a man
has no property it is evident that either
through the fault of circumstances, the in-
efficiency of the government, or his own lack
of ability he is not benefiting from being the
governed. On the other hand, if a man is
able to accumulate property and keep it, it is
because the existing government is to his ad-
vantage, and he should be willing to pay for
it If he is not willing to pay his share and
wants the man who has less than 10 per cent
of the country's wealth to pay 80 per cent
of the taxes he is, to say the least, not a good
American, and we might even follow the cus-
tom of the day and call him a communist,
because he wants something for nothing.
Any voter who is worth less than $50,000,
who will vote for a senator or representative
who favors a sales tax, is either a fool or is
more generous than any man, with a wife
and children to support, should be.-High-
lands County News.

Ex-Governor Sholtz' announcement of can-
ldidacy for the senate dropped with a "dull,
sickening thud" so far as this community is
concerned. Local lines are drawn clearly be-
tween Pepper and Wilcox.-Clermont Press.

We notice that there are a few men in
Port St. Joe who are brave enough to wear
suspenders, but we'll bet there will never be
one brave enough to wear suspenders and a
derby at one and the same time.

A drunkard is usually a miser when sober
-saving up to get another quart.-Okaloosa
Messenger. But he generally gets no further
than the price of a pint before starting an-
other binge.

High kicking and shoulder-shaking is
about all there is to the. modern dance.--
Times-Union. Did you say shoulderss ?


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


Some people are absolutely
heartless-here comes one of my
readers claiming that the ground-
hog isn't a groundhog and even if
he didn't come out, the weather
would still be just plain everyday
weather. .First thing you
know someone will be trying to
tell me there ain't no Santa Claus
-and I know doggone well there
is.
My Dear Other Fellow:
While you seem to know a lot
about some things, you know
very little about others. Take,
for instance this. silly super-
stitition about the groundhog,
and February 2 being Groundhog
Day.
February 2 is Candlemas Day,
a name, given to it early in the
Christian era. In. a churchly
sense it commemorates the pre-
sentation of the Christ Child in
the temple and the purification
of the mother. But somehow the
day got mixed with weather
forecasting.
The groundhog isn't a ground-
hog. He's just a common wood-
chuck, and he may come out of
his hibernation any time before,
on or after February 2. It all
depends on how rat he is, how
cold, how hungry, or perhaps
even on the activity of his en-
docrine, glands.
When you come right down to
it, it has been proven that the
woodchuck (groundhog to you)
doesn't arouse himself until the
latter half of February, and of-
ten not until early March. The
earliest recorded date of his ap-
pearance is February 7, and'
that was in North Carolina. He,
sometimes hibernates in sum-
mer, too. Take away his pitui-
tary glands and he'll sleep any
time of the year.
And even if the woodchuck
was a groundhog and he did
emerge on February 2 to see if
he could see his. shadow, you
wouldn't know any more about
the weather than you did before.
NATTY DUDS.
I feel humiliated absolutely
crushed. There ain't no justice!

One of the most drastic, far-
reaching and almost Prussian
pieces of legislation ever con-
ceived will come before the Port
St. Joe city commissioners, I have
been informed.. It is an anti-noise
ordinance, and reads as follows:
"It has been brought to the at-
tention of the City Commissioners
of the City of Port St. Joe that
there is altogether too much noise
and disturbances of various kinds
within the city limits, and we do
hereby ordain, resolve and other-
wise legislate the following ordin-
ance for the abatement of all such
noises and disturbances, to-wit:
"All towel rollers must be ball-
bearing. Hunting cape watches
must be wound up at home. Milk-
men must not falk to their horses.
Auto licenses must be bolted on
and not tied on. Mechanical pianos
and other music-reproducing con-
trivances must not repose in
rooms fronting on any public road
or thoroughfare.
"S'econd-hand cars mu st be
tightened up every morning. Mar-
ried couples who are not happy
must not live nearer than 200 feet
to any private residence, nor near-
er than 500 feet to any school or
place of worship.
"Motorcycles must be led thru
residence and business districts.
Lawn mowers must not be pulled
over concrete sidewalks. Round
steaks must be pounded with all
windows down.
"Swinging signs must be fully
equipped with grease cups. Can-


TABOO

There's a clause in the farm bill
that is going to create some pretty
perplexing situations if it ever be-
comes a law. In so many words it
says, for instance, that if a farm-
er's chicken eats grass or grain
from land that has been "retired"
(taken out of production by crop-
control orders) any eggs laid by
that chicken cannot be sold.
If any crop grown on forbidden
lands, such as grass or grain or
beans, is fed to livestock or poul-
try, says the clause, then "such
poultry or livestock or the prod-
ucts thereof" must be consumed
by the farmer's family, employes
or household, and must not be
sold.
Farmer Jones, therefore, is go-
ing to have a pretty tough time
of it keeping his pigs, chickens,
etc.. legally fit for the market. A
chicken that has nibbled at a
grasshopper in the forbidden field,
or a pig that has been tainted by
eating roots from the same land,
can have but one legal destina-
tion-Farmer Jones' own table, or
that of his employes or household.
We can imagine that Farmer
Jones and his "family, employes
and household" are going to get
mighty tired of fried chicken,
eggs and pork chops.

UP AND DOWN
Gymnastic Teacher: "Now, Miss
Jones, can you give me some idea
of the manner in which the blood
circulates?"
Miss' Jones (brightly): "Oh, yes,
It runs down one leg and up the
other."-Montreal Star.

didates for any public office must
do their orating indoors. Brass
bands must have been organized
at least one year before playing
in public. No piano or vocal
schools can do business within one
mile of hospitals. Autoists must
use foot brake instead of the horn
within the city limits. ,
"No throats can be cleared in
any hall or theater where an. ad-
mission is charged (churches are
exempt from this section, as the
congregation pays after entering).
"All habitual snorers must be
equipped with mufflers and must
keep them in perfect repair at all
times."
I can understand all the above
provisions, but here's the tough-
est one, and one which will work
a great hardship on -the waiters
and waitresses of our. fair city:
"All ham and eggs and other
short orders in public eating
places must. be communicated to
the kitchen through Boy 'Scout
flag signals."
*

I was driving through that
heavy fog Sunday on my way to
Panama City and it reminded me
of a fog I struck in California one
time while driving from Los An-
geles to San Diego. That fog was
so thick that the fellow riding
with me had to walk in front of
the car with an axe and chop out
hunks of it and throw them in
the roadside ditch in order to let.
m-y car through.

I was talking to a grocer here
in Port St. Joe the other day of
this and that, and during the
course of the conversation he men-
tioned "Diagonese and his lan-
tern." ., He was probably
referring to the old philosopher,
Digitalis, who, as everyone knows,
was the only child of Diapson, the
god of music, and Diaphanous, the
goddess of women's summer cloth-
ing.

Wouldn't it be a relief if the
doctors would order us to cut
down on spinach instead of always
picking on tobacco? I
don't know what I'd do for ideas
if I didn't have my aromatic weed
to draw upon. Someone's
always trying.to take the joy out
of life.


Friday, February 11, 1938


PAGE TWO


THE STAR









Frd


Paid Political Advertising

FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
I hereby announce my candidacy
for -the office of City Commission-
er, subject to the election of Feb-
ruary 15. If elected I pledge a
sound, economical business admin-
istration of the office.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
B. W. EELLS, Sr.

FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Democratic Voters
of Gulf County:
In the belief that my past ex-
perience as a member of the legis-
lature should be of value and that,
if honored with election, I may be
able to render some service to my
County, 1 announce my candidacy
for Representative in the Legisla-
ture in and for Gulf County. The
older residents of the County are
familiar with my past legislative
record and I invite the investiga-
tion or our new citizens. On my
past record and my desire to be of
future service, I solicit your vote
and support in this campaign. I
assure you that your vote and sup-
port will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.

* FO.I STATE ATTORNEY
Fellow Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election
as State Attorney for the 14th Ju-
dicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson and Washington,
,subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office
promptly, fairly, courteously and
to the best of my ability. If re-
elected, I will continue to do so.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr.,
Marianna, Fla.

FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
To the Voters of Port St. Joe:
I hereby 'announce my candi-
dacy for City Commissioner. If I
am elected I promise my best ef-
forts wi-] be directed toward an ef-
fic ie'-t ard ccbsrio'ncal i-,I,,.''rni of
administration .of the city's af-
fairs.
I will appreciate your vote.
Respectfully,
HORACE SOULE.

FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
.To the Voters of Port St. Joe:
i am a candidate for re-election
to the office of City -Commissioner,
subject to the will of the voters at
the City Election. February 15.
Having served 17 years as such
officer and 13 years as mayor, I
feel that I am qualified to give a
fair rand i-mpartial administration
to the duties of the office, and if
elected I promise to use my past
experience in conducting the du-
ties of the office to the best in-
terests of the people.
Your vote and' influence will be
greatly appreciated.
Respectfully,
T. H. STONE.


EL ECT-


JOHN, C. WNN

SHe will
Appreciate .

YOUR ,
VOTE

and
Support
For


State Attorney
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit

Election
Notice Regular Municipal
Notice is hereby givdn that the
regular municipal election for the
election of one City Commissioner
for the full term of six years; for
the City of Port St. Joe will 'be
held at the City Hall in the City
of Port St. Joe on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary'15, 1938. The polls will be
open at 8 o'clock A. M. and close
at 7 o'clock P. M., Eastern Stan-
dard Time.
(Signed)
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk.
-* '1-21 -4-11-


VETS PROPOSE

PLAN AGAINST

FUTURE WARS

SAY STOP PROFITS TO EVERY
CITIZEN DURING WAR WILL
STOP CLAMOR FOR IT

Legislation that wil: automatic-
ally draft all 'of the nation's re-
sources in time of war, simultan-
eously with man-power, is the
chief recommendation in a series
of peace insurance proposals pre-
seated to congress by the Veterans
of Foreign Wars of 'the Unitedi
States and designed to put teeth
in the campaign currently, b(ing
waged by the veterans to keep the
United States out of war.
"If the owners of industry cou:d
be told. today their profits will
cease the minute war is declared
by the United States," .declares
Commander Scott P. Squyres, "you
can be sure they will do every-
thing in their power to keep us
r,ut ol war. If Uncle Sam will tell
the farmers they will make no'
profits on their wheat, nor their
-livestock during the duration of
the war, you can be confident

every farmer will demand a vote
against war by his congressman. If
Uncle Sam will tell organized la-
bor there will be no boom-time
wages, and that labor must make
equal sacrifices with the soldier,
ve wil; then have the added force
of organized labor calling upon
congress to keep America at peace.
When we have the courage, and
the. good sense, in this country to
,adprofitize war, then the forces
wv-hich cl.aror for war will be prop-
erly muzzled. In the midst of hys-
i':-c until rict: i t.ere is nothing
l;:lt witi c-.'nce ;soher reflection
"o-? effectively than a reminder
if thl personal profit losses in-
volved.
"Legislation on our statute books
,-,c; will makn each and every
citi-en as-umoe his rightful share
in the costs and burdens of con-
ducllcng a war will make us stop
and think carefully before we let
lister-ia sweep us into another,

Squiyres, in speaking cf the vari-
ous proposals to require a referen-
u'nm of the people, by constitu-
;on7l aerendment, before the
United States could declare war,
said:
"We, as overseas veterans, are
not convinced ihis amendment
would serve to keep America at
oeace. We know how easy it is to
stampede public sentiment into a
clamor for' war. We are familiar
with the insidious influence of
propaganda, and how it can be
used by any powerful agency to
convert a group of peace-loving
people into an army of blood-
thirsty fighters. Let us.
picture what would happen today
if the powers-that-be in Washing-
ton should decide among them-
selves that this country must go
to war. If confronted with the
necessity of. leaping the hurdle' of
a. referendum, they would simply-
map 'out a preliminary campaign
of propaganda ..to make certain
that every American citizen would
be mad enough to rush to the polls
to vote 'yes' without hesitation.
.'In this modern era of the radio,
the trick could be accomplished, in
nearly one broadcast, with all the
major networks mobilized for the
purpose. In response to a flag-
waving, breast-thumping oration,
broadcast from the nation's capi-
tal, the vote for' war would be so
one-sided in a referendum no one
would even take the trouble to
count the negatives."
Thie V. F. W. leader declared
that the present campaign of the
organization is a survey of public
sentiment at a time when people
arei in full possession of their
thinking facilities.
,: "On occasions in the past," he


said, "most members of congress
have voted' for war because they
were convinced tl-e people wanted
war. MeImbers of congress have
been taught to understand they
are being sent to Washington as
representatives of their constitu-
ents. They are anxious to
carry out thu wishes of the voters
back home."
The other war preventative
measures being stressed by the V.
F. W. are controlled sale of muni-
tions and an adequate national de-
fense.
"We recognize no logic in a sys-
tem which permits armament
makers to manufacture bombs,
shells and machine guns that may
subsequently be used to destroy
American troops," Squyres ex-
plained. "We do not believe the
federal government should com-
pete with private industry. But we
are convinced the manufacture of
armaments and munitions should
be removed from the fiald of pri-
vate industry because it is so
closely identified with our national
defense.
"We have no desire to compete
in a race for armaments with
other countries, but America de-
-serves all the military protection
we can maintain without creating
unnecessary burdens upon our peo-
ple," Squyres statement continued.
"We must possess the potential
military strength that will com-
mand respect and recognition for
our rights as a free and indepen-
dent nation. We must be strong
enough at all times to discourage
the covetous ambitions of dicta-
tors who dream of world con-
q,.iesu .':
--------.--
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

DEACON IS ORDAINED IN
APALACHI-ICOLA CHURCH
Glion T. Benson became an
Epircopal decon Saturday at or-
dination services conducted by
the Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan of
Jacksonville, bishop of Florida, in
Trinity Episcopal church at Apa-
lachicola.
The ceremony, the second.to be
huld in the Apa'ac-icola church
during its 102 years as a parish,
was witnessed by persons from
Port St. Joe, Carr::'-;elle and Apa-
lachicola.
Mr. Benson, who. is a. graduate
of the University of Michigan and
the Episcopli Theological school
in Cambridge, has been made rec-
tor of the Ap.lachicola church.
minister-in-charge of St. James
church in Port St. Joe, and the
Church of the Ascension at Carra-
belle.

DEATH TAKES SECOND OF
FLOR!DA'S WINTER TRIO
Death took the second member
of Florida's famous winter season
trio Monday when Harvey S. Fire-
tsone passed' away at his home in
Miami Beach.
Thomas A. Edison, Harvey S.
Firestone and Henry Ford were
for years' three inseparable com-
panions in the Florida winter
scene. Edison died several years
ago. The death, of Firestone Mon-
day leaves only Henry Ford re-
maining of these three men who
did so much for tihe advancement
of the industrial world and the
comfort and convenience of- its
citizens.
-- C--
'BUCK' HANCOCK IN R. R.
COMMISSIONER RACE
rW. E. "Buck" Hancock of Madi-
son made his entry into the race
for Florida Railroad Commissioner
in Group 1 official Saturday, when
he. paid Secretary of State Bob
Gray the $200 qua.-:ying fee re-
quired of candidates for this of-
fice.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered .'Pharmacists
----------~-
O-r f-n.gment of a meteorite
which fell near Paragould, Ark.,
in 1930, weighed 820 pounds.


NATURAL GAS SERVICE


Available Immediately

for


WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING -RE FRIGERATION

-4*4. A full line of gas appliances in stock }--


Inquire
Gulf ,Hardware Co.
PORT ST. JOE


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


TAGS
POSTERS
DODGERS
RECEIPTS
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PROGRAMS
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ANNOUNCEMENTS


* Any Commercial Printing
that you may require, from a
calling card to a catalogue,
can be made right here in our
plant. ... And we can fur-
nish illustrations if necessary!

You will find our printing
fo be high in quality the
service .prompt and satisfac-
trv--and our prices reason-
able.


THE STAR
"YOUR. HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"


-7r
..a"
c ," *.' s







He Set OurGoal .


HONEST ABE


Tlis every characteristic stands for the
ideals of a great nation. Ideals that
have built the United States into what
is the most powerful and richest nation
in the world. Lincoln had faith in his
country and in the cause for which he
fought so gallantly he inspired
that faith into the people.

He set the goal at which we aim, so that
you may entrust your faith in us. We
strive to serve with a sense of dependa-
bility so that this bank becomes your *''
bank. We strive to serve Gulf County
so that it becomes a constantly better,
more progressive county. .



Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Fcderal Deposit Insurance Corporation


SOUTH ERN LIQIOD MAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


Commercial



Printing ..,


mummummomma m-mr.-MANNIM


THE STAR


PAGE THREE


~Friday, February It., 193E







E-' T-A3


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS MONDAY
Mrs. Ed Ramsey and Mrs. C. E.
Boyer were joint hostesses Mon-
day afternoon to the Methodist
Missionary society at the club
house. A short business session
was presided over by President
Mrs. Boyd, after whoch the meet-
ing was turned over to the hos-
tesses and all entered into a de-
lightful social hour.
The entertaining program as
planned by the hostesses was as
follows: "A Nut Contest," the
prize for the nearest correct an-
swers going to Mrs. Lovett; "Cur-
ing a Cold," a humorous reading
by Mrs. Boyd; solo, "Loves Lulla-
by," by Mrs. Murdock; "Musical
Chairs," a game in which all took
part. A poem dedicated to little
Ruth Lynn Ramsey was read by
her grandmother, Mrs. Boyer;
"Who's Who" contest; violin solos,
"Juanita," "Old Black Joe" and
"Love's Old. Sweet Song," by Mrs.
Ramsey, accompanied by Mrs.
Boyer. "Auld Lang Syne" was
sung by the assembly, after which
names were drawn for partners
and all marched to Mrs. Ramsey's
home were a delicious plate lunch
vwr served.
Those present were Mesdames
George Hill, B. H. Smith, Deglar,
R. R. Hodges, R. A. Cositin, A. M.
Jones, George Patton, P. Lovett,
W. E. Murdock, J. T. McNeill, W.
E. Boyd, Ward, L. H. Bartee, W.
L. Bragg, W. L. Barrier, Temple,
D. A. Roche, R. Swatts, 0. Ogburn,
Barnes, George Johnson and J. L.
Sharit.

WELFARE MEETING HELD
TUESDAY AT BEACON HILL
The district meeting of the wel-
fare board was held Tuesday at
Van's recreation hall, Beacon
Hi-1 with nine counties repre-
sented.
The meeting convened at 10 a.
m. and interesting and entertain-
ing talks were given by each rep-
resentative. The session adjourned
at 12:30 for lunch, and a delicious
sea food plate was served by Mrs.
C. P. VanHorn. The hall was dec
orated throughout in yellow flow-
crs and greenery, and was lighted
by tall yellow tapers.
Twenty members of the board
were present at this meeting,with
Mrs. Shirey and Ben Dickens of
Port St. Joe representing Gulf
county.

Send The Star to a friend.


THE PERFECT GIFT


for Your

VALENTINE
Real Sheer

HOSIERY
REGULAR 79c
3 PAIR

$2.00
-0--


HAUSER'S
DEPARTMENT STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


O. E. S. INSTRUCTION
SCHOOL HERE NEXT WEEK
At the meeting of the Order of
Eastern Star held Tuesday night
plans were made' for the school
of instruction to be held in Port
St. Joe on February 19 from 10 a.
m. to 4 p. m., with a luncheon
served in the building at noon.
All members are urged to be pres-
ent at that time. The following
chapters will be present to take
part in the school: Apalachicola,
Lynn Haven, Panama City and
Parker.
All persons in Port St. Joe and
vicinity who are members of the
O. E. S. are cordially invited to
make themselves known and join
in the fellowship at that time.
Several visitors were present
at Tuesday night's meeting. One
new member was received and a
petition sent 6ut to be signed. Re-
ports for the past year are being
sent to the Grand Chapter; 42
members were reported by the lo-
cal chapter for last year.
The next regular meeting date
is the fourth Tuesday in Febru-
ary.



At the Churches

FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m.
Sunday Morning services at 11
o'clock. Sermon topic: "God's
Rubbish Heap."
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
Evening worship 7:45. Topic:
"Where Do You Live?"
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
Tuesday evening at 7:45 o'clock
we shall meet for the organization
of a Baptist Adult Union, Junior
'and Intermediate Unions. It is
our request for all who can to be
present.
Friday night at 7:45 we shall
have Dr. John Lowe, former
Southern Baptist missionary to
China's leper colony, with us. All
'people from all churches are in-
vited to attend.

FIRST METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Mar:etta, Pastor
Services first, second and fourth
Sunday, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
Church school 9:45 a. m. each
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.

PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. im. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.

EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
Services at clubhouse Sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.
SFirst, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
-a-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
H. P. M'ney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning at 7:30 o'clock.


! 'ml


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


BAPTIST W M. U. IN
JOINT MEETING -
The two circles of the Woman's
Missionary Union of the Baptist
church met at the church Mon-
day afternoon for their regular
business meeting of the month.
Devotional for the afternoon was
taken from Ephesians 6:1-17, af-
ter which the regular business
was taken up. A discussion was
held as to the advisability of hav-
ing a foreign missionary and his
wife come to Port St. Joe ana
conduct a missionary program for
a week; also the selling of maga-
zines to. raise money to help build
the new church.
Members present at this meet-
ing were Mesdames D. C. Miller,
C. G. Costin, J. E. Baggett, B.
Hughes, Johnson, P. O'Day, W. J.
Daughtry, F. Maddox, K. Harrell,
J. O. Baggett, C. Pridgeon, W. O.
Martin, J. R. Holliday, E. C. Ca-
son, T. S. Singletary, J. W. Sise-
more, L. W. Owens, J. White, E.
D. Dendy, Oglesby and Hammock.
Visitors were, Mesdames Presnell
and Elledge.
The next meeting will be at the
homes of Mesdames W. Howell
(Circle No. 1) and W. J. Daugh-
try (Circle No. 2). All members
are urged to attend and an invita-
ttion is extended to all who will
join.

REVIVAL SERVICES AT
ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH
Revival services are now under-.
way at the Assembly of God
church, with Elder C. L. Duck,
superintendent of. the West Flor-
ida district, preaching.
Large crowds are attending the
services and an invitation is ex-
tended the public to hear the old-
time Gospel and enjoy spiritual
refreshment.

Mrs. Hosford of Hosford at-
tended the welfare meeting held
Tuesday at Beacon Hill.


Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Roberts and
baby spent Sunday in Fort Wal-
ton.

Misses Clara Maddox and Kath-
ryn Marshall of Apalachicola
were visiting friends Saturday in
this city.

Mrs. Mary Lovett, Mrs. Philip
Lovett and David Maddox attended
the ordination services at the
Episcopal church in Apalachicola
Saturday.












MATCHED BRIDAL SETS
Engagement Ring and
diamond-set Wedding
Ring
MANY MODELS TO
CHOOSE FROM
PRICED FROM

$23.75 to $85.00


Port St. Joe's Outstanding
.Jewelers



LILIES JEWELRY

COMPANY
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


JANELL PRIDGEON HOSTESS
TO GIRLS' AUXILIARY
The Girls' Auxiliary of the Bap-
tist church met last Friday at the
home of Mrs. S. C. Pridgeon, with
Janell Pridgeon as hostess.
The meeting opened with a song,
"What a Friend We Have in
Jesus." The scripture, Matthew
11:28-30, was read in unison, fol-
lowed by a prayer ny Mrs. J. O.
Baggett. The meeting was then
turned over to the president, Mar-
gie Costin, and the regular busi-
ness proceeded with.
Roll call was answered with a
Bible verse, the minutes were read
and reports heard from various
committees. A report was heard
from the treasurer and dues col-
lected. Mrs. E. C. Cason presented
each member with a book, 'The
Gospel of John."
Immediately after the business
meeting the members enjoyed a
social hour during which the hos-
tess served refreshments of hot
chocolate and cookies to the fol-
lowing members: Virginia Prid-
geon, Margie and Dorothy Costin,
Carolyn Baggett, Elizabeth and
Isabell Baggett, Flora Mae and
Hazel Cason, Gwendolyn Howell,
Eugenia LeHardy, Geraldine Park-
er and Willie Ola Mahon. A guest
was Onnie Louise LeHardy.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles McClellan
and Miss Erline McClellan at-
tended the funeral of Sam Leon-
ard in'Blountstown Sunday. They
returned to their home Monday.

David Gray of Panama City was
a, business visitor Monday in Port
St. Joe.

. Harold Kirkland returned to the
.city Sunday after spending the
past week in Graceville, the guest
of :his mother.
n .
M Mrs. M.BT. Siith, 'J;'M: Smith
and Miss Erie Gilledge were busi-
ness visitors Monday in Panama
City.


PHONE 55


Port St. Joe


of Your


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All sizes.


Owens & Murdock

Port St. Joe, Fla.


WOMAN'S CLUB TO MEET
NEXT THURSDAY
The Woman's club will hold
their regular meeting on Thursday
of next week, with Mrs. Robert
Tapper acting as chairman. Topic
for the meeting will be "The Amer-
ican Home." Hostesses will be
Mrs. R. R. Hodges, Mrs. B. W.
Eells and Mrs. Tom McPhaul.
All members are urged to be in
attendance and bring a guest if
possible

Mrs. W. Compton of Panama
City was visiting in the city Mon-
day. Mr. and Mrs. Compton are
having a new home built on Garri-
son avenue and expect to move to
this city i4 the near future.


New Spring Styles















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Be sure that your coiffure
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THE STAR


Friday, February 11, 193a,


PAGE FOUR








Friday,~~~~~ Febuar 11., 193 TH TA AG _i


BIRTHDAY DINNER WEDNESDAY NIGHT BRIDGE
HONORS B. A. PRIDGEON CLUB WITH MRS. B. OWENS
Mrs. Bernard Pridgeon was hos- The Wednesday Night Bridg
tess Saturday night at a birthday club met this weex with Mrs. Bus
dinner honoring her husband, at ter Owens at her home on Seventh
their home in this city. street, all members being present
A delicious dinner was served, Three tables were .placed in thi
consisting of baked chicken; with living room for bridge, and after:
dressing, potato -alad, sliced to- three progressions, prizes wer
matoes, pickles, celery, hot rolls, awarded to Mrs. Joe Hiles, high
cake and coffee. The table was and Mrs. T. Owens, cut. Fruit rol
covered with a beautiful lace cloth with whipped cream was served
of lovely design. as refreshments.
Present to enjoy the affair and Present with the hostess wer
offer congratulations to the honor Mesdames B. Pridgeon, T. Owens
guest were Mr. and Mrs. S. C. J. Gloekler, H. Soule, E. Ramsey
Pridgeon, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. M. Tomlilnosn, C. Edwards, L. Co
Pridgeon, Mr. anm Mrs. Earl Prid- burn, George Gore, and J. M
geon, Mr. and Mrs. White, Mrs. Smith. Visitors were Mesdames
C. G. Costin, Mrs. Willie Ola Mar- J. Hiles and Lilius.
tin, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake, *
Charllie McClellan, Mr. and Mrs. The Misses Kronin Marks, Phil
Jesse M. Smith. lipa Nedley, Dorothy Anderson
SC i and Alice Hodges of Apalachicola
Mrs. Helen Allen and daughter, were visiting in Port St. Joe yes
Peggy, and Miss Mattie Owens terday.
spent the week-end at their homes
in Gordon, Ala. Read the ads-it pays!


Listen


to


This!


I'm the.



SUPERSALESMAN!


PEOPLE INVITE ME INTO THEIR HOMES
Sa standing invitation in every Port St. Joe
home the old man chats with me, the
children pore over my many interesting, odd and
historical items the Misusu.shops with me.

THEY LISTEN TO' WHAT I HAVE TO SAY
I don't have to beg and go 'round in circles
looking for an audience Port St. Joe
listens to me they're anxious to hear
what I've got to say!

THEY BELIEVE WHAT I TELL THEM
.because they know that I will never de-
ceive or steer 'em wrong. They believe me 'cause
they know I'm a straight guy!

THEY BUY WHAT I HAVE TO SELL,
S. from dog food to automobiles after
they see me they're interested consumers .
I answer "what, where and how much?" about
everything that's new in Port St. Joe !


I'LL Work for YOU---and I'll

Guarantee RESULTS!



THE STAR
"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"

The MoneyYou Spend With The Star Remains In Port
St. Joe Where.You Can Get Another Crack At It! k


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PERSONALS


Morris Hauser of Marianna was
a business visitor in Port St. Joe
yesterday, bringing a stock of new
spring goods to Hauser's depart-
ment store here, operated by Joe
Hauser.

William Buzzett and son and Joe
More of Apalachicola were visit-
ing in the city Tuesday.

Ed.d C. Pridgeon, county tax col-
'ector, was in town Wednesday
gathering in shekels from recalcit-
rant payers of the occupational li-
cease tax.
*& *
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sharit were
called to Atlanta last Friday due
to the illness of Mrs. Sharit's sis-
ter. They returned to the city
Sunday night.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bellows
and son, Bobby, left Wednesday
for Jacksonville to, be gone for
several days.

Mrs. H.. D. Marks of Apalachi-
cola was the guest .last Friday of
her sister, Mrs. G. A. Patton.

Mrs. Robert Buskels of Kissim-
mce is the guest of her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. R. L. C-rter.

Mrs. Daisy Williams, W. A.
O:ive and little Billy Alto Olive
of Panama City were visiting with
friends and relatives in the city
Tuesday.

"Lefty" Woodsworth of Panama
City is the new member of the
Gulf Hardware & Supply company
personnel. Mr. Woodsworth was
fe-merly employed by the Panama
Machinery & Supply company.

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Turner were
visiting Sundlay in Panama City.

Harold, Howard, Doris and Jean
Deglar of Fort VWayne. Ind., are
guests of their uncle and aunt,
Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Deglar, at the
Costin home on Second avenue.

Mr. VanBrunt of Tallahassee,
representing Leon county, was in
attendance at the welfare meet-
ing Tuesday at Beacon Hill.

Miss Mary Sue Crawford of
Panama City arrived Saturday in
Port St. Joe and will operate the
Crawford beauty shop.

Mrs. Votie Gibson, Mrs. Jack
Williams, Miss Viola Barber and
Mirs Veras Mclvin spent Sunday
and Monday in Tallahassee.

Mrs. B..E. Pelham of Ellers-
ville, Ga., was the week-end guest
of her sister, Mrs. Votie Gibson.

H. L. Olive of Apalachicola was
visiting Tuesday with Mrs. B. W.
Eells.


Mesdames. D. L.
Eells, George Gore
hon werq visiting
Apalachicola.


KeIlly, B. W.
and D. C. Ma-
Wednesday in


Dr. D. E. Cline of Marianna was
a visitor in the city yesterday.
-
Miss Eleanor Floyd spent the
week-end in Apalachicola, the
guest of her mother, Mrs. Eleanor
Floyd.

E. N. Edwards of Cairo, Ga.,
was a business visitor Monday in
Port St. Joe.

J. E. L. Webber and daughter,
Miss Dorothy, o; New York City
and Fort Laud'erdale, spent Wed-
nesday and-Thursday in this city.

Mrs.- H. L. Oliver of Apalachi-
cola. attended the welfare meet-
ing Tuesday at Beacon Hill. She
represented Franklin county.


MRS. COYER HOSTESS
TO J. A. M. CLUB
Mrs. Peck Boyer was the charm-
ing hostess to members of the J.
A. M. club Monday night at her
home on Third avenue. The living
room was decorated in the Valen-
tine motif.
After a delightful social hour
three hostess served for refresh-
ments chicken salad, saltines,
pickled beets, heart-shaped cakes
and coca-cola.
Present with the hostess were
M'esdames B. Pridgeon, L. Gainous,
J. M. Smith, E. Pridgeon, J. A.
Connell, C. Pridgeon and M4ss
Myrtice Coody.

FEDERAL FISH HATCHERY
NOW SEEMS ASSURED

According to an announcement
received yesterday from Congress-
man Millard Caldwell, a federal
fish hatchery for West Florida
now seems assured. The depart-
ment of justice has approved the
title to the Jackson county site
and, as soon as certain formali-
ties are complied' with, the bureau
of fisheries will start work.
Experts say the hatchery when
completed will supply all the fish
necessary to, bountifully stock the
-treams of Florida and adjacent
sections of Alabama and Georgia.
-----A~------
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.

PEPPER AND WILCOX WILL
APPEAR ON SAME PROGRAM

For the first time since the cam-
paign opened. Senator Claude
Pepper, candidate ror re-election,
and Mark Wilcox, who is one of
the candidates opposing him, will
appear on the same program.
Both are slated to address the
Third Waterway Congress, which
meets at Mount Dora on February

It pays to advertise-try it!
It pays to advertise-try it!


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tu'esdays of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
idially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Legion Auxiliary Meets first
Monday in month at club house.
Woman's Club meeting First
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.;
Port Inn parlor.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.

WAKULLA 32-POINT BUCK IS
BELIEVED LARGEST IN STATE

I. N. Kennedy, secretary of the
state game and fresh water fish
commission, wants to know if any-
body in Florida ever killed a deer
with more than 32 antler points.
He wants to know the record
Florida deer.
It all started when Clark Dur-
rance of Wakulla county brought
in a 32-point antler from a deer
killed near Crawforcv;lle in 1931.
"That's the record so far as I
know," said' Kermedy. "If any-
body ever found more points on a
deer's antlers, I'd like to know
about it."

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.
----------
FOUR BIDS MADE

(Continued from page 1)
fice building. If the Masonic lodge-
is the successful bidder, they will
erect a two-story building with one
office room downstairs and two
offices and a lodge room on the
second floor. The present building
would be moved to the adjoining
lot and th' new structure built
next to the Gary-Lockhart drug
store.


PETE'S Cash A Carry

The Store Where
YOUR DOLLAR
BUYS MORE!

o------

} SPECIALS FOR
t FRIDAY SATURDAY
I and MONDAY

FEBRUARY 11, 12 AND 14

CHARMER ') for e SNOWDRIFT, 3 lbs. ....59c
COFFEE 2 2 SHORTENING, 2 lbs. -.25c
MAXWELL HOUSE ......299 GRITS, 2 pkgs. ...........-15c
Mothers Oats, 3 lb pkg. 27c S A L T ......-- ....
Apple JELLY, 32 oz.....23c S O D A ........... for 10
.* -mr^1--....... iTJ


POUNDS
(Limited)C


MILNUT MILK l 2 Large or 1
So Rich It Whips Ilk 4 Small t15
S Small 100 3 Large 18 CRACKERS, 1 lb ..........10c


Pounds 'tt tfB
L 10 U. S.N.1Po. t r latoe 9c


Guaranteed 12 lbs. 454 C ORN .........-- 3 FOR
FLOUR 24 lbs. 850; SNAP BEANS ...
Water Maid RICE, 3 lb 19c TURNIPS ..........
MUSTARD, 32-ounce....15c COLLARDS .......
Peanut Butter, quart ....25c E. PEAS ......


Cooking Oil,gal. 89c


MACARONI....... ) No. 2/2 Argo Yellow .
SPAGHETTI..... 3 for l Cling PEACHES ........10


I


Friday, February 11., 193E


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


1 110







- --- -- -- n~-


We print Letterheads, Envelopes
and all kinds of Ruled Forms.



GULF VIEW:

TAVERN


We Carry the Best Lines of

WINES and BEERS


Come Out and Enjoy an
Evening of
PLEASURE


Please Use No Profanity

W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road

Rooms for Re.t-

~~ 9^L"I~LU~d I--^ -r~*


WPA MAY SEEK TO REVIVE
STATE'S OYSTER INDUSTRY
The WPA may seek to revive
the Florida oyster industry. Rob-
ert J. Dill of Jacksonville, Florida
administrator, will present plans
for such a project to officials in
Washington next week. Employ-
ment would be given to about 1600
workers at an estimated cost of
$500,000.
Dill said the project calls for
planting 1,000,000 barrels of seed
oysters and 400,000 barrels of live
shell in some 40 counties.
Florida's oyster fisheries have
declined, Dill said, because there
has been little effort to maintain
the supply, depleted by storms and
other causes.
------^------ -
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
If It's Drugs, We Have It.

EDITOR ADDRESSES
CARABELLE GROUP
The Carrabelle Coffee club was
honored Friday night by the pres-
ence of two prominent men, Wal-
ter Harrison, managing editor of
the Oklahoma City Times, news
commentator over WKY, and one
of the few reporters-to witness
tha marriage of the Duke of Wind-
sor and Wally Simpson. The other
was Haygood "Happy" Smith, of
Q',yitmain. Ga., district commander
o: the American Legion.


SWe Haul Anything. -

SCALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE G:OD3 CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

-.. Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


RL'ILE SERVICE STARIO
f Part St. Jce, Fiorida
LET US DO YOUR--
WASHIN.G PC LE'- HiNiG LUBRICATION
SGuf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes




'1r- IT. J OE ICE



r ; fc'' -r of

IX'' I CRYSTAL ICE
TA3 FROM TRNEATED WATER

MAX KILBOURN, Prop.

,GssB^^%aza as^Ka
Eu IMU-* I* r*w iisM~nvm rrT^-^wiw(rrfPit^^ruiisiM~"n(gMBaiiR^.j~j^ja-M


WE CAN SUPPLY YOU



No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

S. Your business will be

appreciated.




Gulf Hardware &


Supply Co.

BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


WELFARE ACT

IS BENEFIT TO

GULF COUNTY

NOW RECEIVES $1,016 FROM
STATE AND FEDERAL
GOVERNMENTS

Florida counties have benefitted
both through a reduction in their
expenditures for general relief
and through added assistance for
the needy by the operations of the
state welfare act, it is pointed out
by C. C. Codrington, state welfare
commissioner, of Jacksonville.
Gulf county. is now receiving
far more through old age assist-
ance and aid to the blind than it
expended for both old age assist-
ance and general relief in June of
1937, the month prior to the in-
duction' into office of the state
welfare board. Comparison was
made of June and December wel-
fare operations, or for the first
half of the welfare fiscal year.
The. figures, as obtained from
reports to state welfare headquar-
ters, show that during June of last
year Gulf county had 29 cases,
.representing 72 individuals who
received general relief to the
amount of $144:50, and that it then
had 41 old age assistance cases re-
ceiving $307. The total amount ex-
pe med for the month by the coun-
ty for relief under the two cate-
gories was $298.
In December, 78 residents of this
county received old age assistance
pay checks amounting to $1,016
from the state ana federal govern-
mrent.
Summed up, 78 persons were re-
ceiving old age assistance in De-
cember as compared to 41 in June,
vhile the county's income from
this source was :1,016 as com-
pai:d with its outlay of $298 in
June: 72 persons were on general
relief in June and none in De-
cember.
General relief and old age as-
Fistince expenditures for the en-
tire state during June were $111,-
967.20. Old 'age assistance alone
for Dece'ber was .364,459.
Aid to the blline was not in-
cluderl in the statistics, as this
form of" public assistance did not
begin until January of this year.
----
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Complete Line of Magazines.
--____*; ------
JERRY CARTER APPRECIATES
PUBLICITY GIVEN IN STAR

Jerry W. Carter of Tallahassee,
member of the Florida Railroad
Commission, who is up for re-
election in Group 2, appreciates
the courtesies extended him by
rhe Star, which is more .than any
other candidate for state office
ias done. Read:


Tallahassee, Florida
February 4, 1938.
Mr. W. S. Smith,
Editor The Star,
,Port St. Joe, Fla.
Dear Friend-I am writing to
thank you for the preferred posi-
tion and generous space you gave
my announcement Zor re-election
as Railroad' Commissioner.
If it were not for such generous
and public-spirited newspapermen
as yourself, whose ethical desire
'to give their readers an opportun-
lity to judge office-seekers by their
public utterances and their desire
to accord fairness to the candi-
date, only the wealthy could afford
to run for office. And men of my
means would never have an oppor-
tunity to get themselves before
'the public..
It is such men as yourself that
make a perpetuation of a de-
mocracy possible.
I want to again thank you for
your many favors and kind and
generous consideration.
Sincerely yours,
JERRY W. CARTER.
We thank you for those kind
words, Jerry, and will be glad to
give you further publicity-pro-
.vided it is accompanied by a pro-
portionate amount of political ad-
vertising.


CONE TO SEEK

REDUCTION IN

LIQUOR TAXES

PART OF PROGRAM TO RAISE
STATE'S TAKE FROM
BEVERAGE SALES

Governor Cone said Saturday he
would ask the 1939 legislature to
reduce Florida liquor taxes as part
of a program to increase the
state's take from beverage sales.
He made public a statement
showing total beverage tax collec-
tions in the 1937 calendar year
reached $3,566,174-an increase of
8444,660 over the previous year.
The governor found the greater
collection disappointing in view of
a liduor tax law in 1937 which
boosted base rates from 80 cents
to $1.20 a gallon, and also hiked
wine and beer levies.
Had this liquor tax rate been
increased to only $1 a gallon, the
governor said, it would have
boosted consumption, kept down
bootlegging and .'produced more
money for the state..,
Another re(':.-.u r,.vr, ile smaller-
than-expecteid o i'i..:< in total
collections, said the governor, was
a new law in 1937 giving Florida
cities a bigger cut of occupational
licenses' on liquor dealers and de-
creasing the state-s part of the
revenue proportionately.
The governor said he had not
decided exactly what recommen-
dations he would make to the next
'e',;slature. but declared he would
propose changes in the existing
law.
-------S---i~-:---
GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.


PATMAN P A N S

FEDERAL CHAIN

STORE TAXATION

RAN:E FROM $50 PER STORE
IN CHAINS UNDER 10 TD
$1030 EACH OVER 500

Representative Wright Patman,
Texas, states thbi' ne will intro-
duce in congress a bill for federal
taxation of chain stores.
In a denunciation of such. chains
he expressed a belief "that the re-
lief rolls have been increased, if
not caused, by absentee business
in the various states."
The tax would range from $50
for each store under 10 in a chain
up to $1000 for each store over
5u0, the amount to be multiplied
by the number of states in which
he chain does business.
"We have reached the stage in
our campaign in behalf of inde-
nondent business," Patman said,
'whel we should present a clear-
:ut issue to the American people.
resolvedd : That the general
welfare of the people will be
Ircolmoi e by the locall community
owrership of retail stores rather
than by the absentee ownership
of corporations'.".
Under the bill the first 10 stores
n one state and the first five
stores in different states would be
exempt from the tax.
Patman expects to introduce the
bill on or about February 15. He
aid two years' time will be re-
luired for the law to become ef-
ective in order to allow the chain
concerns to dispose of their un-
profitable outlets at a fair price
o their stockholders.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.

Fastest flying bird is the duck-
awk, timed at 165 to 180 miles
er hour by a stop-watch in CalI-
ornia7 Recorded speed of the
oldene eagle is 120 miles an hour.


A BIG ORDER
Doctor, after examination: "My
advice is for you to eat brain food,
and I'd say eat fish once a day."
Patient: "What kind of fish?"
Doctor: "W'ell, you might start
on a couple of whales."



You're Next!

There's No Waiting In


COOPER'S
S BARBER SHOP
You're next for better service.
Expert attention without
waste of time!



S..
|!-
.., ST. JOE
CAEINET SHOP
'. e- i St. Joe Sho., Shop. .
CA1INET and
FURNITURE Malkr. ,ir
,.; Clina C : ets. K ,chen '
*,- rnittl a. Sdehoaros,
C cldair Ci.:...:l: .'d, "'
CLchs'- P.:.rcir. i,
L,. 1 F,,n'tnre
S W, R.:-p-,Fr FL.rrrliture

',' .""'.



CITY f

.CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
.. GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
-------
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.







F '- .,
; 1.., -




For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANIA TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
Set we can't make play!

ST. JOE ADIO SERVICE
Roche's Community Store






--~--r:-:





PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
'Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
S Port St. Joe, Fla.


PAGE SIX


THE STAR


Friday, February 11, .1938








Friday, February i1~ 193E THE STAR PAGE SEVEN


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R IG H T !

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker






Fishing...

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.

TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.
SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.




x \ 'o










FOR BETTER HEALTH;
Milk is an energy food. It is,
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods. En-
joy the benefits of the valu.
able vitamin content of fresh
milk!

Refreshing
and Economical
You'll enjoy the delicious
flavor of Solomon's Milk

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S]

Dairy

Products


GASOLINE
FOR ECONOMY !
You Save because you get
more miles to the gallon and
less carbon.

FOR QUALITY !
You get a pure product, fa-
mous for dependability.

WASHING-GREASING
POLISHING
--o--

WOCO-PEP
SERVICE STATION
W. COLLINSWORTH, Mgr.
ON HIGHWAY NO. 10


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(From The United States Satur-
day Post, March 8, 1845)
THE INAUGURATION
The preparations for the inaugu-
ration of President Polk were
somewaht interfered with Monday
by a cold North-east storm which
much diminished the effect of the
pageant. The crowd of people in
Washington was immense; and
the great interest taken by the
spectators was evinced by the
fact that they stood out, in large
numbers, despite the rain, the
reading of the Inaugural. The
President and officials were shel-
tered beneath the Portico.
The occasion of the Inaugura-
tion passed off without any acci-
dent, or anything farther than the
unpropitiousness of the day
(which was comparatively little
heeded) to mar its external dis-
play.
But the moral grandeur of such
an event is in the change of the
ruler of a great nation, without
confusion and.in perfectpeace and
concord, guarded and secure in
the "majesty of the people." Truly
it is an impressive lesson for the
representatives, present from some
of the foreign nations.
On Wednesday Mr. Polk sent
the following cabinet nominations
into the Senate:
James: Buchanan, of Pa., Secre-
tary, of State.
R. J. Walker, of Miss., Secre-
tary of Treasury.
Wm. L. Marcy, of N. Y., Secre-
tary of War.
Geo. Bancroft, of Va., Secretary
of Navy.
Cave Johnson, of Tenn., Post-
master General.
J. Y. Mason, of Va., the present
Secretary of the Navy, Attorney
General.
All were confirmed on the. same
day, except Mr. Bancroft; and it
was supposed that he would be
upon the meeting of the Senate
on Thursday.

CAUTION!
We perceive that a recipe is
traveling the rounds, which di-
rects a plaster sprinkled with
snuff (!) and strong Scotch snuff,
too, to be applied to the thorax.
We beseech such of our readers
as have no desire to commit mur-


LOWLY CROW SAID
TO BE MAN'S FRIEND

Is Not Responsible For All the
Bad Traits Told About Him

Under this heading a leaflet has
appeared, published by the Emer-
gency Conservation Committee of
New York. While it is true that
the crow is responsible for the
destruction of a small amount of
corn that the. farmer plants, and
even that might be eliminated by
proper preparation of the seed be-
fore it is planted; and while it
is also true that during the sea-
son of their young they do rob
probably many a bird's nest, it
has long been held by those who
have studied their life and habits
that they do more good than
harm.
In 1918, we are informed (Bulle-
tin 621, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture)
that, "The attitude of the indi-
vidual farmer' toward the crow
should be one of toleration when
no serious losses are suffered,
rather than uncompromising an-
tagonism, resulting in the unwar-
ranted destruction of these birds
which at times are most valuable
aids to man."
The committee's pamphlet says
what we believe is perfectly true,
that the depletion of game birds
now apparent has been caused
vastly more by the wholesale kill-


der, to avoid all remedies of this
sort. Tobacco is a most active
and deadly poison; and although
people become accustomed, by
habit, to this and other deadly
substances, it is not to be care-
lcssly or thoughtlessly applied,
unless the nurse be indifferent to
the life or death of the patient.

THE OREGON
It is stated in some of the New
York papers in relation to the Ore-
son matter, that in the event of a
failure on the part of the negotia-
tors at Washington to agree upon
the respective rights of the par-
ties, the British Government have
suggested the reference of the
whole question to the arbitration
of any European sovereign, to be
designated by the Government of
the United States, agreeing to
abide by his award.

MEXICO
It is considered, we believe,
pretty certain that the Mexican
Minister to the United States has
closed the Diplomatic Relations
with this country-but no positive
information has been received.
In relation to the annexation, it
is said that Mr. Polk will prefer
to negotiate a treaty with Texas.

WHEAT
We see it stated that the quan-
tity of wheat stored in the West,
to be forwarded this spring, is
much less than at the same period
last year. At Chicago, in 1844,
there were 400,000 bushels; 1845,
250,000 bushels; at Michigan City,
in 1844. 200,000 bushels; 1845,
150,000 bushels. The same de-
ficiency exists in other points
heard from.

Rich men never lack the credit
of wit. The following is a good
one: A poor German relative of
Mr. Astor's (The New York Mil-
lionaire) arrived not long since
and applied to the old man for
charity. Mr. A. gave a five dollar
bill. "Why," said the discontented
relative, "your son just gave ten
dollars!" "Well, he may," said the
old man-"the dog has a rich
father!"

Subscribe to The Star-$2 year.


ing by hunters tian by the de-
struction of game birds' eggs by
crows.
Manufacturers or guns and am-
munition, to further their own in-
terests, have maligned the crow,
calling him black rascal, pirate,
gangster and murderer, consider-
ing nothing but their own profits.
We are told that a photograph
widely reproduced to show the
enormity of egg destruction by
crows not only was "faked" by the
piling up under a tree containing
a single crow's nest, of eggs from
a large area, but the eggs were
mostly those of the clapper rail
or marsh hen that had been
washed out of the nests by an
unusually high tide, and of which
there were literally windows
about the edges of the marsh and
of openings therein, available to
any creature inclined to eat them.
These eggs were wholly waste,
and consumption of them by
crows or any other scavengers
was, if anything, beneficial.
When the ammunition makers
assert that the shortage of ducks
for hunters to kill is due more to
crows than to droughts and drain-
age put together and that the crow
is the duck's worst enemy and
that the crow destroys more
ducks than the combined hunters
of Canada and the United States,
one can only smile at such abso-
ultely absurd statements.


TRAILERITES MEET IN
18TH CONVENTION

A horde of iore than 3,000
trailerites, the modern nomads of
the road, parked rolling homes in
the municipal tourist park at Sara-
sota this week to dtaend the 18th
annual Tin Can Tourist conven-
tion. More than 1200 trailers of
all sizes and descriptions filled the
130-acre park. They represented
45 states, three Canadian prov-
inces and two foreign countries.
The convention will last over
next week and will be presided
over by Royal Chief C. C. Mc-
Knight of Coldwater, Mich.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.

TOO BAD
Smith: "Hear about Tim Neal?"
Jones: No. What about him?"
Smith: "He dropped dead in
front of a bar room."
Jones: "Going in or coming
out?"
Smith: "Going hi."
Jones: "Too bad."


Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES


Sewer Connections


We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

SEE

Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.


J. L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

0-
-------o-------

-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


--JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


^^ ._ .--l- '-' l 1 -'*_,_.-L-- -- .^ ., ^. ^^. ^ ^^ ^* --.**^-*






Your Government Is Urging You To Own Your Own
Home Through the FHA Finance Plan
LET US SOLVE YOUR CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
We Build Anything



H. H. TAYLOR

W Our Work Speaks for Itself
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe

QUARTERMAN STUDIO


I QUARTERMAN STUDIO


----

PORTRAITS
and
COMMERCIAL

--o--
0

ROLL FILMS
DEVELOPED
24-Hour Service

0- N


Next to Florida Power Corporation Office

PHONE 74 PORT ST. JOE


OUTSIDE OF HOURS
A loud knock awoke -a doctor
from his afternoon siesta. "What
is it?" he asked as he opened the
door.
"I've been bitten by a dog," re-
plied the man at the door.
"Don't you know that my office
hours are from four to six?" the
doctor snapped.
"Sure," replied the man, "but
how was the dog to know it?"


THE STAR


PAGE SEVEN


Friday, February 11., 193E






PAGE EIGHT


GAS CONCERN

PRESENTS BID

FORFRANCHISE

WOULD PAY CITY PERCENT
AGE ON GROSS RECEIPTS
FOR 25-YEAR RIGHTS

E. B. Clark and R. A. Robinson,
representatives of the Hydro-Gas
Company of West Florida, both of
Pensacola, appeared before the
city' commissioners Tuesday night
and submitted their bid for the
right to install and operate a gas
system in Port St. Joe.
The franchise as submitted was
similar in form to that asked re-
cently by the Consumers Gas com-
pany, which decided not to come
into our city when asked by the
mayor for a fininc-al statement.
The franchise would be for a
period of 25 years, at the end of
which time the city could, exer-
cise an option to take over the
system for municipal operation. It
wo'ld not interfere, with so-called
bottled gas concerns now operat-
ing here. The company agreed to
install units within 30 days after
granting of the franchise to con-
sumers requesting service.
While the franchise submitted
by Messrs. Clark and Robinson
was to be effecuve fronm'Febru-
ary 8, the commissioners refused
to be high-pressured and turned
the document over to City Attor-
ney E. Clay Lewis and City Engi-
neer W. R. Gait for their inspec-
tion and approval. The matter
will be brought up again at the
next meeting of the board.
The franchise provided for pay-
ment to the city of a percentage
of the gross revenue of the gas
company on a sliding scale based
on the. number or meters in use.
It would pay 2/%% on all meters
pp to 100; 5% when the number
passed the 100 mark, and 1% for
pach additional 100 meters.
The wording of this section did
not sit well with the board and
they asked that it be revised and'
possibly the percentage accruing
to the city be boosted.
. According to the gas company
representatives their installations,
which must be buried in the earth,
meet all requirements of 'the fire
underwriters and safety council.
The liquid gas used is a blend of
butane, isobutane and propane.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Prescriptions Carefully Com-
pounded. Phone 27.
n.
COW PROBLEM

(Continued from Page 1)
the existing ordinance providing
for the impounding of livestock,
which sets a charge of one dollar
for removing a cow from the
pound, to .read "one dollar and
costs," and T. W. Davis was
named as poundmaster and au-
thorized to secure the necessary
help in keeping the city free of
cattle.
Any residents of the city find-
ing cattle roving at large are re-
quested to phone the city hall and
ask Clerk Tpmlinson or Pound-
master Davis fo Take care of the
animal or animals, and prompt ac-
tion will be taken.

KASER HEADS CHAMBER

(Continued from page 1)
to elect officers, six being present.
G. F. Kaser was chosen as presi-
dent of the organization; G. P.
Wood and E. C. Lewis, vice-presi-
dents; J. L. Kerr, treasurer, and
RL C. Rector, secretary.
All those interested in advanc-
ing the best interests of the city,
whether business men or not, are
urged to join the chamber of com-
mneree,

JRobert Bellows was a business
visitor Saturday in Apalachicola.


PAGE EIGHT


CABINET SHOP
IS NEW CONCERN

W. T. Beard and W. E. Strick-
I land have opened a cabinet shop
in the rear of th'e building occu-
pied by the St. 'Joe Shoe Shop at
the corner of Second avenue and
- Second street.
This new concern, whose adver-
tisement appears in this issue of
The Star, is equipped with power
machinery for the making of all
kinds of furniture, cabinets, cedar
Chests and closets, porch and
lawn furgiture-In fact anything
in the woodworking line.
They ask the public to drop in
and look over their establishment.

OVERLOOKED

There has been some public dis-
cussion lately about how the post-
office department wouldn't have
such a big deficit if newspapers
and magazines. pa.d full postage
rates.
A lot of things are being over-
looked. Among them is that the
government itself mailed out with-
out any postage 73,000,000 more
pieces of literature--called "propa-
ganda" by some-last year than it
did the year before. Referring to
this and other federal publicity
appropriations, tLe house appro-
priations committee said:
"The committee views with dis-
favor the tendency to expend dis-
proportionate sums for the print-
ing of publications, often on high-
priced paper and under expensive
covers, or the preparation of press
releases, magazine articles, broad-
casts, motion pictures, etc., the
primary purpose of which is to
build up a public demand for the
services of the agency issuing the
publicity."

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Try Our Fountain Specials.
LEWIS IS CANDIDATE

(Continued from page 1)
pre-convention campaign in the
Third! congressional district for
the nomination of Franklin D.
Roosevelt for prseident, and dur-
ing the same year was elected as
delegate from the state .at large to
the Democratic national conven-
tion at Chicago, during which Mr.
Roosevelt was first nominated for
the presidency. He was appointed
title attorney for the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture in 1933, serv-
ing until 1935, when appointed as
special attorney in the United
States Department of Justice.
Mr. Lewis opened a law office in
this city on Octoqer 1, 1936, and
due to his experience as a mem-
ber of the- legislature, feels him-
self well qualifie- to again step
into the office. During his term
as speaker of the house, the legis-
lature was convened in two extra-
ordinary sessions immediately af-
ter adjournment of the regular
session, and he served as speaker
for 100. days, which is a longer
period than any other man has ac-
tually presided over the house of
representatives.
Elected speaker at the age of
28, Mr. Lewis has the distinction
of being the youngest man ever to
hold this position in Florida or in
any other state.
Mr. Lewis is the first to an-
nounce for representative, but it
is understood there are two other
prominent business men of the
city contemplating entering the
race, and one from Wewahitchka.
-------A-----
A GOOD PICKER
A kind-hearted old lady saw a
man standing in an alley, and she
noted that a number of men came
by, slipped him money and passed
on. Feeling sorry, she slipped $2
in an envelope and wrote on a
slip of paper: "Take Courage."
The next day she was thunder-
struck when the man came to her
door, handed her $40 and whis-
pered: "Here's your split, lady.
Take Courage won at 20 to 1."


THANK DE LAWD
A negro was painting a steep
tin roof when he lost his balance
and came sliding down. "Oh lawd
save me; please lawd save me,"
he pleaded, and finally added:
"Neber mind, lawd, Ize done hung
up on a nail."-Times-Union.


JUNIOR PLAY AT

AUDITORIUM

THIS EVENING

"CRASHING SOCIETY," THREE-
ACT COMEDY, PROMISES
FINE ENTERTAINMENT

The junior class of the Port St.
Joe, high school is presenting
"Crashing. Society" at the high
school auditorium this evening at
8:15 o'clock. It is a three-act
comedy by James C. Parker, and
promises much in the way of en-
tertainment for those attending.
The cast of characters is as fol-
lows:
Adam Dunnigan, the husband..
............. Ausley Stoutamire
Elsie Dunnigan, his wife ......
... ............. Leila Smith
Marguerite, their oldest daugh-
ter ............... Alice Gibson
George, their son..William Trawick
Christabel, the youngest daugh..
ter ......... Kathleen Saunders
Scruples-Scruples, the butler ...
.............. Howard Taunton
Miss Gadgett, tutor ............
............. Annie Mae Carter
Mr. Van Witherspoon, society
leader .......... Preston White
Mrs. Van Witherspoon, his wife
........... Virginia Stoutamire
Cyril Van Witherspoon, their
son ........... Harold Williams
Agatha Mulrooney, virtuoso ...
...... ..' ....... Helen Baggett
Miss Louise Miller, reporter ...
.............. Sarah Van Horn
This play promises to be one of
the best ever presented by the
local school and rs guaranteed to
send the patrons home chuckling
to themselves. Everyone is urged
to attend and help the school in
its endeavor,to raise funds.

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists. Phone 27.
--*--if------
"Mac" MacDonald of Panama
City was a business visitor in Port
St. Joe Tuesday.

Let The Star do your Commer-
cial Printing.


PHONE 69


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


WHILE VOTING ON CANDIDATES NEXT TUESDAY, DON'T FORGET TO
SPEND A FEW NICKELS AND DIMES WITH A MAN WHO APPRECIATES
YOUR BUSINESS. THE RACE I AM IN IS EVERY DAY!


See Our Selection of----


VALENTINES, CANDIES and GIFTS





LeHARDY'S PHARMACY


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


"Where Friends Meet"


I-lu l, reruar 1 1 Ivo


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St. Joe





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IGNORANT

Housewife: "I suppose you don't
know what good honest work is."
Tramp: "No, lady; what good
is it?"

GARY-LOCKHART DRUG CO.
Registered Pharmacists


..... .


.r


THE STAR


Friday .ekrrnav. 1 44 a


3