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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00171
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 4, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00171

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
ec.t growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1938 NUMBER 15


Movie Studio For Miami
Max Fleischer, producer of an
mated cartoons and other short
film subjects, plans erection of
$300,000 studio at Miami, and ha
already awarded contracts fo
construction.
-- ----

CHOOSE C. OF C.

DIRECTORS

WILL HOLD ORGANIZATION
MEETING MONDAY NIGHT
AT CLUB HOUSE

As a result of the ballots sen
out last week by the committee
of five in charge, of organization
of a chamber of commerce fo
Port St. Joe, the following mer
were elected as a board of direct
tors for there new civic body: E
Clay Lewis, Jr., G. Pierce Wood
W. O. Anderson, G. F. Kaser, T
M. Schneider, and. J. R. Dorsey
C. A. Tovey and Dwight Marsha
were tied for the seventh seat o
the board, and' it has been suggest
that they toss a coin for the
coveted position.
The voting was close and all of
the 14 names on the ballot re
ceived a goodly number of votes
indicating that the names selected
by the committee met with higl
approval.
G. F. Kaser, acting for the
board, states that an organization
meeting will be held Monday night
at th~ Woman's clubb house, 'and
-urges all elected board members
to be present.


FURTHER MIXUP

IN SCHOOL BONDS

MISPRINT AGAIN HOLDS UF
COMPLETION OF
BUILDING

The inquiring editor, seeking
the why and wherefore of delay in
resuming construction on Port St.
Joe's n'ew school building, yester-
day was informed by W. E. Mur-
dock, member, of the local school
board, that the holdup was due to
the fact that the company print-
ing the bonds had inserted the
names of the county commission-
ars on the papers instead of the
county school board. This .necessi-
'tated reprinting of the bonds. Ye
ed suggested that it might have
been a good idea to let The Star
commercial printing department
priht future bonds, where a proof
could be submitted before final
printing. And -besides, it would
keep that money it home instead
of enhancing the spending ca-
pacity of the city of Jacksonville.
As soon as the reprinted bonds
are returned, the state, and the Al-
britton-Williams Construction com-
pany will take tuem up and the
construction company will then re-
sume building operations.

TAPPER BREAKS ARM
George Tapper suffered two
breaks in his arm Wednesday eve-
ning while engaged in playing
basketball. He was knocked down
during play by Jimmie Morton.

TO ENTER MOVIES
Mrs. Norma Elderkin and daugh-
ter, Barbara, left Monday for
Hollywood, Calif., where Miss Bar-
tbara expects to enter the movies.
They carry with them the best
wishes of their, many friends.


SM. B. SMITH IS

a CALLED SUNDAY


r BY GRIM REAPER

HAD BEEN IN ILL HEALTH FOR
SOME TIME; INTERMENT
1 IN CAIRO., GA.

Mr. Manning B. Smith, Sr., 67,
N quietly passed away at 11 o'clock
Sunday night at the family home
on Eighth street. He had been in
delicining health for some. time,
and a fall from the porch of his
home on December 26 hastened
Sthe end.
S After a brief service Tuesday at
rthe home the body was carried to
nCairo, Ga., where a short service
Swas held at the'graveside. Funeral
sermons were delivered by Rev. H.
' F. Beaty of this city and Rev. Mc-
Kinnon of Caiiro. Rev. J. W. Mar-
. shall of Chattahoochee was called
Supon to assist but was unable to
d be present.
e The floral tributes were the
most beautiful ever presented and
showed the high esteem in which
Mr. Smith was held by thdse who
knew him.
, Mr. Smith was born September
h 29, 1861, in Coffee county, Geor-
gia, and on September 2, 1891,
e was united in marriage with Mary
e Lina Graves at Dothan, Ala.. He
Sand his wife were charter mem-
Sbers of the Dothan Presbyterian
s churcli and he was also a deacon;
After moving to Cairo, Ga., he was
elected elder and was the main-
stay of that church. When the
Presbyterian church was organized
in Port St. Joe he was the only
elder and was faithful to attend
and to contribute in every way to
make the church and Sunday
school a success. He will be great-
ly missed, both in the religious
and civic life of our city.
Mr. Smith had lived in Port St.
(Continued on Page 4)


FORD AGENCY

IS NOW OPEN

ON CORNER FOURTH AVENUE
AND SECOND STREET WITH
LARGE FORCE OF MEN

The St. Joe Motor Company,
operated; by W. O. Anderson, who
also has the Ford agency in Apa-
lachicola, opened its doors Tues-
day in its new building on the
corner of Fourth avenue and Sec-
ond street.
This newest addition to the
business district was completed
Saturday by the Albritton-Williams *
Construction company and houses
a modern and up-to-date repair
shop, parts room where large
racks and bins hold a complete
stock of replacement parts, and a
beautiful display room where the
latest model Fords are now on dis-
play. The company handles United '
'States tires and that Good Gulf d
gasoline and. oils. t
Personnel of the new concern
consists of P. J. Lovett, collector;
S. P. Jenkins, salesman; Victor t
Anderson, station manager; C. F.
Garbrough, parts manager and t
bookkeeper; W. M. Howell, service I
manager; Harold Chitz, mechanic;
"and Sylvester Tarntenia, painter p
and body nman. p
----------- g
Sam A. Patrick of Wewahitchka, D
county assessor, was a visitor in
Port St. Joe yesterday.


Building Permits Issued
The following building permits
were issued this week at the city
hall:
Florida Housing Corporation, 6-
room dwelling, $4,500; 6-room
dwelling, $5000; 6-room dwelling,
$4000.
A. M. Jones, permit to make ad-
dition, $200.
St. Joseph Land & Development
Company, permit to raze cottages
on Highway 6, known as Blossom
Row.


W0 R K RESUMED

ON NEW THEATER

HUGE CRANE ERECTS STEEL-
WORK ON MARTIN'S
PLAYHOUSE

Work was resumed Wednesday
on the new "Ritz" theater being
-erected on Third avenue. by R. E.
Martin, part-owner of the Martin-
Davis theater chain, although this
playhouse will not be a part of the
chain.'
A huge caterpillar crane was
run on the lot Tuesday and Wed-
nesday began the work of erect-
ing the large steel beams and
girders forming the, framework of
the structure.
As soon as the steel is all in
place, under the able direction of
L. C. Thompson, foreman, work
will begin on the walls and floor-
ing. and it is anticipated that the
new movie. palace will be open for
business within 60 days.


SAM HUSBAND TO

SEEK JUDGESHIP

COUNTY OFFICE IS NOW HELD
BY DENDY., GOVERNOR'S
APPOINTEE

The editor of The Star has
been informed from a reliable
source that Sam P. Husband will
seek the office of county judge of
this county at the coming May
primary and will make his an-
nouncement next week. We were
unable to contact Mr. Husband for
confirmation.
The judgeship is now held by
R. Alton Dendy, former represen-
tative, who was appointed to the
office by Governor Cone upon re-
moval of Judge M. H. Chafin.
It is believed that Judge Dendy
will seek re-election to the office,
and there are, rumors that a third
candidate will file before long.
----I---------

BIRTHDAY DANCE

NETS NEAT SUM

$126 RAISED FOR FOUNDATION
FUND AT WARM
SPRINGS
----- i
Gulf county's president's birth-
lay dance, held Saturday night at p
the Port Inn, netted the neat sum r
of $126.40, according to Horace c
Soule, vice-chairman'in charge of
;he affair, which sum was sent to A
Warm Springs, Ga., for the Na- c
tional Foundation for Infantile
'aralysis. C
According to Mr. Soule, 225 peo- (
ple attended the affair and all re- a
ported a most. enjoyable time. The tc

Randd march was led by Sally and A
)eI Mahon. r
------A------ h
hS
Send The Star to a friend. n


ST, JOE COUPLE

DIE IN ACCIDENT

AT PANAMA CITY

HUSBAND KILLED IN WRECK;
WIFE PASSES IN
HOSPITAL

Coy Porter, 30, of Port St. Joe,
formerly of Marianna, employed at
the St. Joe Paper Company mill,
and his wife, 23, are dead as the
result of an automobile accident
last Saturday night near Panama
City when their car crashed into
the south end of the East Bay
bridge abutment.
Sheriff John Scott of Bay county,
who investigated the fatal crash.
said evidently the car had left the
highway and in endeavoring tto
bring it back on. the pavement
Porter had crashed into the bridge
abutment. The car was turned
completely around by the impact,
and headed back toward Port St.
Joe. The couple, thrown from the
machine, were found by passersby
who rushed them to a Panama
City hospital. Porter was pro-
nounced dead and'his wife uncon-
scious, suffering from a fractured
skull, serious face injuries and
possible internal injuries. She died
at midnight Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Porter were going
to Panama City to visjt Porter's
mother, Mrs. L. L. Porter, when
the accident or:':urrEid., ,
Mrs. S. Blaicnard of Blounts-"
town. mother of .Mrs. Porter, the
former Miss Daisy Blanchard of
Blountstown, arnvec in Panama
City Sunday to be at the bedside
of her daughter. Two sisters, Ari-
zona and Elma, of Blountstown,
were also at the bedside.
The bodies of bo-n Mr. and Mrs.
Porter were taken to Marianna
Monday for burial in the Porter
family plot.
------i------

RAILROAD BUYS

GAS ELECTRIC

NEW TRAIN WILL SPEED UP
MAIL SERVICE; IS NOW
MAKING TEST RUNS

With a view to speeding up the
present mail and express service,
the Apalachicola Northern Rail-
road Company has purchased a
modern gas-electric motor train
which has been making trial runs
this week and is expected to go
into regular service next week.
The two-car all-steel train is
powered with two 220-horsepower
Winton engines which' drive a f
huge generator to develop elec-
tricity for four 150-horsepower
motors which drive the train. It
gets approximately one mile to the
gallon of gasoline, which is con-
sidered as much cheaper operat-
ng cost than a steam locomotive.
The front coach contains the o
)ower plant and passenger accom- i:
nodations, while the rear coach F
carries mail and express, .
A test run was made Monday to n
Lpalachicola and the new train e
arrivedd as passengers G. P. Wood,
Mayor J. L. Sharit, Robert Bellows, b
George Gore, M. C. Edwards, Miss a
)pal Thomas, Miss Lyle Carter,
Miss Brownie Carter, Richard Rec-
or, H. D. Marks and J. A. Smith,
All reported th'e new train as easy n
iding and apparently capable of v
igh speeds. A second run was d
lade Tuesday to River Junction. S


Schools Get $1,267,000
The state distributed $1.267,000
to the 67 counties Tuesday to help
meet January teachers' salaries.
It was the full allotment under
state law. Sale of automobile li-
cense tags on the January 31
deadline produced the money.
---b---

SOULE AND EELLS

TO OPPOSE STONE

THREE-WAY RACE IS UNDER
WAY FOR SEAT ON CITY
COMMISSION

B. W. Eells and Horace Soule
this week filed their intention to
be candidates for member of the
city commission. The term of T.
H. Stone, incumbent, expires this
year, and he has already an-
nounced for re-election.
Mr. Soule, whose announcement
appears in this issue of The Star,
pledges himself, if elected, to a
program of economy in administra-
tion of the city's affairs. Mr.
Eells has not yet made his of-
ficial announcement.
Incumbent Stone, who has served
on the board for 17 years, 14 of
which he held the mayoralty, has
pledged himself, on his past ex-
perience, to- conduct the office in
the best interests of the people.
The term is for a period of six
years.
Each of these prominent citizens
has a strong following, and it- is
anticipated that-th6 race-' rill be 4
close, with the best man winning
by but a slight margin.


CANDIDATES,

FEES ARE SET

HIGHER THAN USUAL OWING
TO SMALL NUMBER
S IN FIELD

At a meeting of the Gulf County'
Democratic Committee held in this
city yesterday, qualifying fees for
county candidates were set. The
fees set were slightly higher than
in past years due to the small
number of entries in the field.
Fees are based on a three per
cent assessment on the yearly
salary of each office, and were
fixed as follows: County judge,
$45; representative, $10.80; county
commissioner, $15; member school
board, $6.
Members of the committee at-
tending yesterday's meeting were
L. W. Owens, chairman, T. R. L.
Carter, Mrs. A. D. Lawson and
Mrs. A. H. Cook, Port St. Joe; J.
C. McQuagg and Mrs. J. C. Eu-
'ord, Camp Parkwood precinct;
Miss Minnie Kent, Ewing Still;
Miss Della Ward, White City, and
S A. Patrick, secretary and treas-
irer, Wewahitchka.

Will Arrange FHA Loans
Ed McGowin, local attorney, has
opened offices in the Costin build-
ng on Second avenue to handle
federal Housing Administration
oans through the Charles Com-
nander Company, mortgage brok-
rs, of Jacksonville.
Mr. McGowin states that he will
e glad to give information to
anyone interested.

ATTEND S. S. CONVENTION
Rev. and Mrs. J. W Sisemore
turned yesterday from Gaines-
ille, where they had been for four
ays attending the Baptist Sunday
school Convention.







PAGE WO TE STR Frday ebrury 4 193


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

--4{ Telephone 51 J}]--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


SPACE FOR SALE

The only source from which any .newspa-
per may hope to derive revenue is from the
space in its columns, and generally at least
half of that space is devoted to live news of
interest to its readers. Contrary to general
opinion, the subscription price of the paper
is not considered as a source of profit, for
it barely covers the actual cost of paper, ink
and delivery charges.
Last week one of our local business men
sent in a small job to be printed by our com-
mercial printing department, at the same time
sending a two-inch advertising mat announc-
ing a nation-wide radio program to be pre-
sented by one of the million-dollar corpora-
tions whose line he handled, which he re-
quested be run as a matter of news. The job
amounted to two dollars and the value of the
space to be occupied by the mat came to fifty
cents.
We immediately phoned the gentleman,
telling him that we would be only too glad
to run the announcement as an advertisement,
but that we did not consider it as news of.
general interest. He informed us that if we
did not run the mat he would take his job
to a paper that would run it. He was in-
formed that this would be perfectly all right,
so his mat and copy for his job work were
returned .to him.
We do not know whether the opposition
paper secured the printing job, but we do
know that his free advertisement did not ap-
pear in its news columns last week.
We would class such a matter as the above
as intimidation, or whatever you care to call
it, and we refuse to be intimidated.
Now just suppose the editor went into this
business man's store to buy something to the
value of two dollars and before making the
purchase told the proprietor that unless some
other article valued at fifty cents was given
to him without cost he would not purchase
the two-dollar article. The storekeeper would
tell him that he was sorry, but if that was
the way he was going to do business he could
go. to some other store Whose owner had
softening of the brain and would -trade on
.such a basis.
The goods, on that merchant's shelves are
his stock in ,trade-in order to stay in busi-
pess he must sell those goods at a sufficient
profit to purchase new goods and meet his
~csts of operation, besides making a fair re-
turn.on his investment.
The columns of The Star are our stock of
goods-we must realize a profit from them
in order to continue its publication. We are
always willing to give our advertisers small
puffs, and generally do so without being re-
quested. It creates good will. But when
someone tells us that we MUST give them
free advertising in order to secure their busi-
ness, that is a horse of a different color, and
we balk. We receive vast quantities of pub-
licity through the mails from concerns and
individuals who are seeking to use our news
columns to promote their varied schemes,
and if we used it all we would have to double
the size of our paper and leave out all adver-
tising and news matter in order to accommo-
date it. But they do not feel offended--they
keep right on sending it, because they know


that many publishers are foolish enough to
use it.
The publisher of The Star endeavors to
devote every available inch of space in the
paper to live news which we consider of in-
terest to our readers who, when we come
right down to it, are the ones who can make
or break the paper, for without readers the
paper would be of no value to the adver-
tisers, and without- advertisers there would
he no paper for the subscribers, and without
subscribers there would be no paper for the
advertisers-and so on, around and around.

SHORTEST POEM?

Bob Ripley, whose "Believe It or Not" car-
toons have made him a rich man, offered a
few days ago what he said was the world's
shortest poem. Ripley was wrong. Here is
his offering:
The Song of the Flea
Adam
Had 'em.
It's poetry all right, because it has the
metrical form. Yes, it has, too. Lay a yard-
stick against the left end and every line
touches. Also they rhyme. But as for being
the world's shortest, Bah! and Bosh! Listen
to-
The Road Department Epic
Go
Slow
Why, Ripley is positively verbose, tauto-
logous. Utterly unrestrained.-Lake Wales
News.
While the verbosity of Ripley is unques-
tioned, the News' poem is likewise pleonastic
and redundant. Here is our contribution:
Song of the Aviator
I
Fly.
There can be no question as to the short-
ness or rhyming of this masterpiece. But to
this all-important subject we would like to
add the shortest poem-or story, whichever
ydti' chbose'to call it-ever told:
Fly Leaves




MODERN SALESMANSHIP
In the old days anybody who had the busi-
ness instinct, and a whole lot who did not,
thought they could make a success of busi-
ness. That was before the present tremen-
dous competition, the development of mod-
ern,, high-speed methods, we are informed.
We are told very earnesly about "Customer
Research," and what a study of customers
and their wants has revealed.
Yet, when one comes right down to it,
there isn't a single new-fangled idea that
can take the place of old-fashioned courtesy,
kindliness, friendliness, sincerity and genuine
interest. These are the qualities that the
business man of other days displayed and
used. The present model of streamlined ef-
ficiency may use all the new-fangled attri-
butes he wishes to help speed his selling
records, but unless he uses the old ones, too,
he will not be able to get very far.
The old-fashioned methods are still good.
They may be dressed up and marketed un-
der new names, but they are quite as import-
ant as they ever were. People respond just
as they always did to cheery friendliness and
sincerity, but they are quicker than ever now
to resent the gay pretender who is endeavor-
ing to rush sales and get the customer signed
on the dotted line.-St. Augustine Record.

Ancients used to believe that if a man laid
his head against the head of a young girl it
would cure the headache. After all there is
nothing like the old remedies.-Times-Union.
A lot of young men in parked cars seem to
acquire headaches suddenly.

Put a brindle heifer in a clover field and
she would hop the fence to get at the oil-
soaked grass beside the highway.-Florida
Times-Union. What fence?

He laughs best whose laugh lasts. ,


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


I have kept a careful check on
the groundhog for lo. these umpty-
ump years, and I am ready to say
the poor animal is incompetent
and deluded. It is a great deal
like human beings in that it is as
apt to be wrong as right.
I have often wondered whether
the groundhog may not be having
a lot of fun at our expense ..
Who, for instance, started this
story about his seeing a shadow?
Who asks us to believe it?
. Surely not the groundhog.
If we are willing to use him for a
weather prophet, can you blame
the groundhog for making the
most of the opportunity?
I arose early Wednesday morn-
ing and, heavily iaden, invaded
the fields. I had under my arm a
number of pieces of black card-
board cut in irregular shapes,
scarcely more than a foot long
and half a foot wide. In the fields
I sought out the habitations of the
groundhogs and beside each I
placed. one of my cardboards.
"These are artificial shadows,"
I explained later to a friend.
'"WVhen the groundhog comes out
he sees the board and thinks it is
his shadow. He runs back-"
"And we shall have six weeks
more of winter weather!" ex-
claimed my friend.
"Not a bit," I replied. "It is be-
cause the groundhog makes a mis-
take and looks at my substitute
that he misses seeing the shadow.
I am going to patent the scheme
for ensuring goon weather."
SThe plan worked perfectly, ex-
cept for one thing. .. I ar-
rived a bit late at the home of the
boss groundhog of them all. 1 was
placing my patent weather-shade
in position when the animal poked
its nose above the ground.
"Um!" said the groundhog. "En-
'deavoring to put something over,
are you? Well, for two shakes I'd
go right back in and give up this
job of prog- prog- prog-"
"What's a prog?" I inquired.
"It's a prognostication, only 'I
can't say the worc," replied the
groundhog.
"You just did!'-
"And you are arguing," retorted
the marmot.
Obviously there was nothing to
be gained, and I, with one eye on
approaching clouds, decided upon
a more tactful course.
"Let's call it 'predicting'," I
said, "and let it go at that."
"Let what go where and at
what?" was the reply. "It seems
to me you are determined on ruin-
ing my day."
"Now listen," and the ground-
hog by. this time had: seated him-
se:f comfortably 'on the edge of
the hole. "Suppose you had an im-
portant piece of weather forecast-
ing to do- and half of the world
was waiting for you. What would
you think of a nosey individual
who came around to interrupt?"
"Meaning?"
"Exactly!"
"Well, just one more question,
and then I -will leave you to your
prognostications.- .. How do
you do it?"
"It is all a matter of calculus,"
the little fellow replied. "One
must reckon the angles, observe
the sun, bring in a piece of rela-
tivity the size of a walnut and
stir well over a slow fire."
I politely tipped my hat and de-
parted. If the weather is
fair you shall know to whom to
send' the medals and bouquets.

Apparently Editor Bill's fish
story a couple of weeks back was
read by other ardent fishermen,
for I am in receipt of the follow-
ing poem from Henry Poole of


IS THIS FAIR?
Here is a man who has held
sorne kind of state job for several
years, much of t-.: time drawing
the salary of a high state official.
He was defeated in 1932 for re-
election to the office of state
comptroller. Afte:-r-;wads he was
given a place with the state par-
don board, whatever that is, at
$100 a month.
Now the legislature of 1935
passed an act which permits a
state employee to be retired on
half-pay under certain conditions,
length of service with the state
being the chief requirement.
It seems that iy adding up all
the times Mr. Ernest Amos has
worked for the state in various
capacities, :he had about reached
the mark which qualified him for
half-pay retirement status.
But he was drawing only $100 a
month, which would give him only
$50 a month under the act. So
what happens? Why. he was "pro-
moted" to a $350-a-month job in
time to make his half-pay pension
$175 a month, instead of $50, on
the day he reached the half-way
mark of service longevity.
In the meantime, what is the
chances for other citizens of Flor-
ida who, too, have rendered hqn-
est and faithful service to society
over the years? Oh, they are en-
titled to old-age "assistance" IF
they have no other visible means
of support. And what does this
"assistance" amount to? Why,
from $5 to, in rare cases, $25 a
month.
Is this fair?-Okaloosa Messen-
ger.

HEALTH-GIVING WARMTH
One person in 21 is unable to
work, go to. school, or pursue
whatever his njr:-:al activities
may be, on every single winter
day, according to an announce-
ment by the United States Public
Health Service. To put it another
way, the average person is laid
up an average of one day every
tnaee weeks all winter long.
What do these figures mean?
X\ ry simply, that cold weather, de-

spite nonsensical talk about its
invigorating, healthful effects, is
bad for the health.
It follows that Florida, which
official records of the federal wea-
ther bureau show has foewr cold
winter days than any other par:
of the United States, :sa g oo0
place to spend the winter. As if
our readers didn't know that al
ready! St. Petersburg Indepen-
dent.

Wewah'tchka:
THE TRUTHFUL FISHERMAN
'Twas down in old Gulf county,
Florida, that beautiful state,
The land of sunshine and flowers
Where winter is a popular date.
There are no oranges here,
But fishing we have galore.
A skiff and a pole, we sail
As our forefathers in days' of yore.
New fishing is a modern art,
It's simply grand, they say,
To play a trout on a slender line
On beautiful St. Joseph Bay.
Now we fish here for a livelihood
While sportsmen fish for fun,
But one thing we have in common
We've always caught a bigger one.
No matter how large the one you
catch,
Nor how much with pride you
swell,
You always hear a fisherman say:
"You won't believe me when I
tell.',

I've fished for nigh on forty year;
I've caught fish after fish, galore,
And. the largest fish. I ever caught
Sold for sixty cents in a country
store.
So be proud of the fish you catch
And listen not to the stories they
tell,
For if telling lies about a fish is
sin-
All fishermen are bound for hell.


THE STAR


Friday, 1--abruary 4, 1938


PAGE TWO








' 4


S MAY MAKE UNCLE SAM PAY TAXES TOO


ACTIVITIES OF NIMRODS OLDEST FRESHMAN IS 75
NOW RATHER LIMITED: Mrs.'Jennie F. McGahan, 75, re-
tired school teacher of Springfield,
With. closing of the dove and ii: ;i'; a.lcnd Brenau College at
other migratory game hunting Gainesville during the next four
es'asons Monday, activities of nim- years on a scholarship awarded
rods are now materially curtailed, her by the National Patriotic
Between now and' February 15, Council. She has been active in
only quail, squirrel and other do- obtaining students for colleges on
mestic game may be hunted. behalf of the council, and recently
The seasons on duck, geese and decided she, too, would like to go
snipe closed December 26, and the to college. A letter stating her d'e-
deer season ended December 31. sire brought the offer of a scholar-
ship from the council.
Jam'es S. Coolen, a sailmaker of She will proba'by be the oldest
Portland, Me., believes he must be college freshman in the United
the world's knot-tying champion. States.
He claims to -be master of 760 -- --
varieties of knots, splices and One-third of tne. world's raw
bends. : rubber supply goes to Akron, O.


NATURAL GAS SERVICE


Available Immediately

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING -REFRIGERATION

-.-.{ A full line of gas appliances in stock }'--

Inquire Ritz Theater Building
Miller's Drug Store Phone 168
PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


f-, r 7: I I I I 1
-3--,.- '. "S*
OLLOWING action by Florida taxing authorities, federal agencies are already
studying the possibility of paying bond taxes levied against lands purchased
S by the government subsequent to issuance of improvement bonds against ar'as
S involved. Forestry authorities, part of whose huge holdings in Liberty County
have been subjected to levies for school bonds, have approached State Comptroller J. M. Lee foi facts an.I
figures. the result of a year's study of the problem, upon which he based his recommendations and County Tax
Assessor It. 1H. Dcason based his tax levy. Data will be supplied by Comptroller Lee.
Should federal agencies not be able to work out a plan and have congieas enact legislation to provide fe
payment of such bond levies, the levy will eventually reach the U. S. Supreme Court where that nugiust
body will be called upon to upset at least one of its two most notable "golden rules" and decide wlcethir r:lila:-
era! behind bond issues can be impaired by the mere act of federal purchase of lands in thnnl,!d rraeans or
shali Uncle Sam pay taxes to state and local authorities under certain circumstances. Dangr--' po.sst-~:iies
facing bond holders eventually might reach a point where Uncle Sam would buy all the land in a bond district
except one man's farm and thereby not only bring confiscation of the farm- a doui'tful expodint-- bi1t a~,ir
practically wipe out the bond holders. So the irresistible force meets the immovable object at law.
Refusal rf the government to assume its share in the area above shown means that in one bond dcitrict
of 225,000 acres owners of half the acreage left in private ownership would have to assume the entire bo'r'e-n.
or more than $1 per acre aggregate potential levy against lands assessed at 50c per acre except in few
exceptional cases. The entire county is -ural with not a dozen business buildings in the county.


A Bank

for

Business

Men


HE CRAWLED
He (during spat): "Now I know
why women are called birds."
She: "Why is it?"
He: "Because they are always
chirping."
She: "That's on account of the
worms we pick up."-Montreal
Star.

Arthritis of the spine has been
found in many skeletons of early
Egyptians who lived before the
first kings.
I----- --- --


RE-ELECT
JERRY W. CARTER

TO
Florida

,Railroad

Commis-
sionR
GROUP Z


While Jerry made only one
Promise to the voters-that
he'd "be there" on pay day
-yet he was instrumental
in saving people of Florida
more than

$3,1009000
in Telephone, Freight and
Refrigeration Rates in his
first term of office.
Paid Political Advertisement
-'-~~~~ 1 --- --


The little principality of Liech-
tenstein, between Austria and
Switzerland, is smaller than the
District of Columbia.

Paid Political Advertising

ELECT


JOHN C. WYNI

He will A
Appreciate
YOUR
VOTE

and
Support
For


State Attorney
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit


Notice Regular Municipal
Election
Notice is hereby given that the
regular municipal election for the
election of one City Commissioner
for the full term of six years, for
the City of Port St. Joe will be
held at the City Hall in the City
of Port St. Joe en Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 15, 1938. )-The polls will be
open at 8 o'clock A. M. and close
at 7 o'clock P.' M., Eastern Stan-
dard Time.
(Signed)
M, P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk.
/ 1-21 4-11


The Sansevieria, one of the most
common house plants, is variously
known as the snake plant, leopard
lily, mother-in-law's tongue, and
bowstring hemp.

Paid Political Advertising

FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
To the Voters of Port St. Joe:
I am a candidate for re-election
to the office of City Commissioner,
subject to the will of the voters at
the City Election, February 15.
Having served 17 years as such
officer and 13 years as' mayor, I
feel that I am qualified to give a
fair and impartial administration
to the duties of the office, and if
elected I promise to use my past
experience in conducting the du-
ties of the office to the best in-
terests of the people.
Your vote and influence will be
greatly appreciated.
Respectfully,
T. H. STONE.

FOR STATE ATTORNEY
Fellow Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election
as State Attorney for the 14th Ju-
dicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
.Holmes, Jackson and Washington,
subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office
promptly, fairly, courteously, and
to the best of my ability. If re-
elected, I will continue to do so.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JOHN H. CARTEtR, Jr.,
Marianna, Fla.


An institution with
the ethics of good business as a basis. Here
the business man knows he has an invisible
partner .. one that he can depend upon
when he needs support most. This Bank is
the unquestionable choice of successful busi-
ness men of Gulf County!






Bank -

for the

Family


It's the friendly bank
where Junior's savings account is considered
just as important as Dad's! It's the bank
which protects and handles family affairs
the bank that carries on after you
are out of the picture. This bank has be-
come a Gulf County family institution!



Wewahitchka State Bank
"A Courity Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


PAGE THREE


THE STAR


Fri-:ayv. February 4, 1938


g


p








ENTRIES FOR COURT The recent decision sustains the Ga., were Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Mrs. C. G. Costin made a busi-
P RS 0 N A L S POSTS ARE CLOSED contention that "the law does not Pridgeon, Mrs. Phillip Lovett, Mrs. ness trip Tuesday to Apalachi-
require nor public policy permit Ethel Lewis, Lamar Gatlin, L. W. cola.
the government to waste the
For the first time in Florida's the government to waste the
S. For the first time in Florida's power resources thus captured." Owens, B. E. Parker, W. S. Mc-
Mrs. Bob Dorsey and Mrs. Mar- history, three justices of the su- This much graed, the incidental Lin and W. J. Belin. Save by reading the ads!
gie Barnett returned Monday af- prme court face opposition to activities of the TVA against
ter spending several days in Tus- their renomination. which the private utilities com-
caloosa, Ala. Tuesday was the deadline for plain are held to be legally valid.
SQ candidates to qualify for the two Sone observers are of the opin-
"Hop" Hopkins, Peter Mahon six-year terms and the two-year ion that the decision paves the
and Billy Neal of Apalachicola unexpiredway for. "a rational, businesslike
were business visitors in the city twice Fred H. Davis' term. adjustment" between the Tenne.s-
Wednesday. Justice Rivers Buford qualified see Valley Authority and the
W d a in Group 1 and will be opposed by power companies. First, however,
Miss Erie Gulledge of Panama D. Stuart Gillis of DeFuniak there doubtless will be a prompt
City arrived Sunday and will Springs. appeal to the supreme court and,
make her home with her grand- In Group 2 will be Circuit Judge also, it is hoped, an early and
mother, Mrs. M. B. Smith. Elwyn Thomas of Fort Pierce, conclusive answer.-Atlanta Jour-
& r T. G. Futch of Leesburg and J. T. nal.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Haydn left Watson of Tampa. They seek to OR T RIFTY HOUSEWIVES OF PORT ST JOE
Tuesday for New York City. Mr. succeed Chief Justice W. H. Ellis, FOR THRIFTY HOUSEWIVES OF PORT ST. JOE
Haydn has been employed by the who states he will retire immedi- DATH ES .. .SM
St. Joe Paper Company. ately after the primaries. MILK 4 Small ]cp 10c TOMATOES- _p
Sr Q j Justice Roy H. Chapman, ap- (Continued from Page 1) or 2 Large ........... UU 3 for .................. UU
Miss Barbara Watson, student pointed to succeed Davis, qualified Joe about 25 years and was a man
at the Florida State College for for the remainder of the term and of such high character and kindly
Women at Tallahassee, is visiting will be opposed by J. M. Hearn of disposition that everyone loved
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Live Oak. and respected him.
Watson, for several days. She left --- --- Surviving are his widow and | _
Wednesday for a visit in Pensa- THE TVA DECISION the following children: Mrs. A. M.
cola. In what may well prove to be Hickey of Orlando, Fla., Tom LIMA BEANS, 2 Ibs ....15c FIELD CORN, 3 cans 25c
P z an epoch- marking decision, a Fleming Smith of Cornelia, Ga., POTTED MEAT, 6 for 25c COOKING OIL, gal. ...-95c
Ed. Marsh left Saturday for Mi- three-member federal court has up- Mrs. Sadie Werngren of St. Louis, Cranberry Sauce, can....10c MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c
ami, and- after spending several held all of the activities of the Mo., Harold Smith of Dothan,
weeks in that city he will go to government's Tennessee Valley Ala.. Jesse M., D. C. and M. B. WHO LE
New York. Authority in controlling floods, de- Smith, Jr., and Mrs. Sam Davts, CURED
Bs a veloping navigation and producing all of Port St Joe. pfl
Bob Dennin, who has been em- power. The first two of these ac- Those from out-of-town attend- PICNIC HM b
played by the St. Joe Paper Com- tivities is the TVA's primary func- ing th'e funeral services here were -M
pany, left Tuesday for Now York. tion. Its production of power Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves and Fresh PORK HAM, lb. 23c CHUCK ROAST, per Ib 15c
r r comes as a consequence of the daughter Alma, of Headland, Ala., Stew Beef, 10c lb; 3 lb. 25c Smoked SAUSAGE, lb. 20c
Miss Rita Jefferies of Quincy work done to prevent floods and Mr. and Mrs. T. VP ISmith of
was the week-end guest of Mr. and to facilitate navigation. Shall the Cornelia, Ga., Miss Emeline Miley
Mrs. Jim Bevis. power thus generated be an idle of Panama City., Mrs. E. R. Wern- G R O
by-product, or shall it be made gren and son Edwin, Jr., of St. B A Y SH O R E G R O C
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Bevis left available to farms and homes and Louis. Mo., and Mrs. E. L. Cutch-
Tuesday for Quincy to visit Mr. industries, thereby serving the eon and little daughter, Betty Sue. Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage
Bevis' parents for several days. 'general good? Attending the services in Cairo,

J 7 I
PETE'S Cash fC arry" e ilC-CCL^-.^^ T ^^

Port St. Joe, Fla. -

The Store Where










CH MER ....... DR KETCHUP- SAES
-COFFEE 25N SHORTENING, 2 lbs. ..25c 2 for 4 Cans ...

RIC E, 3 lbs SALAD DRESSING

(LiSeitcdce itR C ORANGES 2. QUALITY 2-pound J., .......
0Y n-5 u T F O O ma GOOD SYRUP-PE

Saxwe 3 HouseM EATS Half gallon .---....30C
HARER SNOWDRIFT, 3 bs. ..59 KETC U -- 2C SARDINES-- 15



No. 2/2 Argo Yellow 2 Large or CHUCK ROAST-
Clng PEACHES ..... 14 l 145 ....... doz. C- 2 large or 4 sma.l oz 215c
CORN FLAKES, 2 for 15c Carolene Milk, 3 for......19c BANANAS 3 Cans
CRACKERS- 8c lb.; 2 pounds, .... 35c TOMATOES
S-PounCRACKS- -l p rk SAUSAGE- IE 25c
O O p D-.1 U H-BURER- '15 BEACHES. 20c.

OSTORAGEES EGGS- .....

Guaranteed 1 S A L T 3 FOR GRAPEFRUIT- Fresh Fla. YARD COOKING OIL-c
FLOUR 24 lbs. 85 S 0 D A -- for 25 EGGS Doz. ...30c & 35c Gallon 9.5
Water Maid Rice, 3 lbs. 19c -D 0&CG oro
COFFEE, 1 Ob.











MUSTARD, quart ........15c





HAMBURGER, 2 lbs. 25c Creamery BUTTER, lb. 38
kii Fesh Fla. YARD Galn 5 'I A mm









H .MBURGER, 2 Ibs. 25e Creamery BUTIYIrR lb.3 38c?


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


Friday, February 4, 1938






F 1


SENATOR VEST PAYS proves ungrateful or treacherous, against his enemies, and when the
SE R A TRIBUTE TO A DO is his dog. last scene of all comes, and death
PERS N ALS "A man's dog stands by him in takes the master in its embrace,
prosperity and poverty, in health and his body is laid away in the
"The best friend a man has in and sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, no matter if all other
Lonard Belin of Auburn Col- the world may turn against him cold ground where the wintry friends pursue their way, there by
lege, Auburn, Ala., spent the mid- and become his enemy. His son winds blow and the snow drives the graveside will the noble dog
term vacation here with his par- or daughter that he has reared fiercely, if only he may be near be found, his head between his
ents,Mr and Mrs. W. J. Belin. He with loving care may prove un- his master's side. He will kiss the paws, hi. eyes sad, but open in
returned to his studies Sunday. grateful. Those who are nearest hand that has no food to offer. He alert watchfulness, faithful and
and dearest to us, those whom we will lick the wounds and sores true even in death." -Senator
Miss Smythe Meriweather of trust with our happiness and our that come in encounter with the Vest, oA Missouri.
Wewahitchka was the week-end good name may become traitors roughness of the world. He guards
guest of Misses Estelle Dickens to their faith. The money that a the sleep of his pauper master as Paid Political Advertising
and Roxie Nichols. man has he may lose. It flies away if he were a prince. When all FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
S* *from him, perhaps, when he needs other friends desert he remains
Mrs. Leta Huffman left Tues- it most. A man's reputation may steadfast. When riches take wings To the Voters of Port St. Joe:
day for Jacksonville, to be gone be sacrificed in a moment of ill- and reputation falls to pieces, he I hereby announce my candi-
for several days. considered action. The people who is 'as constant in his love as the dacy for City Commissioner. If I
Si are, prone to fall on their knees sun in its journey through the am elected I promise my best ef-
Mrs. E. C. Cason and son, Em- to do us honor when success is heavens, forts will be directed toward an ef-
ory, left Monday for Lake City, to with us may be t:ie first to throw "If fortune drives, the master ficient and economical program of
be gone for several days. the stone of malice when failure forth an outcast in the world, administration of the city's af-
r -. a settled its cloud upon our heads. friendless and homeless, the faith- fairs.
Mr. and Mrs. Elgin Bayliss and "The one absolutely unselfish ful dog asks no higher privilege I will appreciate your vote.
sons, Elgin, Jr., and Tommy, of friend that man can have in this than that of accompanying him, Respectfully,
Tallahassee, were the week-end selfish world, the one that never to guard against danger, to fight HORACE SOULE.
guests of Mrs. Bayliss' mother,-
Mrs. Nora Howard.
Mrs. Charles Doyle and daugh- I
ter, Miss Eva, were the week-end
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Chester
Edwards. I i I a g m f1


Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Lewis and
baby spent the week-end in Mari-
anna, the guests of Mr. Lewis'
parents.
Miss Maxine Delks of Tallahas-
gee was the week-end guest of her
uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. J.
L. Sharit.
Miss Viola Barber has returned
from Panama City, where she
spent several days with her par-
ents.
-Mr. and Mrs. J. Mira, Mr. and
Mrs. Jim Bevis and Miss. Rita
Jefferies spent Sunday in 'Panama
City.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gauthreaur and
son have.moved to this city from
New Orleans and at present are
making their home at Beacon Hill.
Mrs. E. R. Werngren and son,
Edwin, Jr., of St Louis, Mo., ar-
rived in Port St. Joe Saturday,
called' here by the. illness of her
father, Mr. M. B. Smith.
Bob and Saunders Smith of At-
lanta were the week-end guests of
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Saun-
ders Smith.
Mr. and Mrs. W.'C. Kirby of At-
lanta arrived Tuesday and will
spend several days in Port St. Joe.
It pays to advertise-try it!
----------------------:
GULF VIEW

TAVERN

We Carry the Best Lines of
WINES and BEERS -


i,


5;?



/


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met W7ith An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR


Phone 51-The Star
GliIII Illlinr~illl~lUIm lI^l~llllllil iiHiii.^


WeCary a mIet ie of FrC ats

We tarry a Complete Line- of Fresh Meats


OLEOMARGARINE

SWEET SIXTEEN

15c pound I


ITS READY TO
EAT AND JUST
SMELTS IN YOUR
MOUTH

35e
LB.


Come .Out and Enjoy an.
Evening of
DANCING
--.
Please Use No Profanity
W. E. LAWRENCE
7 Miles Out on Panama Road


STEAK

BEST WESTERN


2mci B.


U.S.CEETIFIED


i ; .. i.;. .
". :- --_ -

f. S -- .. ... .^/S



9- lb.


38c lb.


PAN

SAUSAGE
PURE PORK


11 Sb.


29c pounds


,FRESH EGGS
FLORIDA U U


I







i7c


LIF A AJ I I U Lf MLMUA W I

Specials
& E GR OCERY Limited


4-TIE 2 LBS. LARGE 2 ta l TOMATOES

BR 0 0 MS Spanish ONIONS o 4 r" CANS
r ...sm all2
C 15ON I EVE'sRY
......4AC PAK AGE 1511 2c

WATER GROUND .YLES SALT APPLES PEAS
MEAL
1/V2 POUNDS EASY POUR Large Select Cooking 2


3" "" 10C-- 4c Ib2 5m-

PURE CANE G U EST ORANGES BANANAS

SUGAR IVORY SOAP Nice and Juicy

5 LBS. 2cBARS 11 i 2H doz. 17 doz.


--~I --~-------_r- -----P-n
--~~Yslu


.


Friday, February 4, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


RDAY AND
v nuiv








PAGE SI TH STAR Frdy Ferur 4, 1938 "~. ~"


South Sea natives raise no kind
of grain.




... ki-






WITH




Winter is here will
your present supply of
firewood last until the
Spring?
IF NOT-

Let Us Supply You

$3.50 Cord



GEO. GASKIN, JR.

WE DELIVER -
Wewahitchka, Fla.


PHONE 70


ALL-IMPORTANT QUESTION
In the words of that great states-
man and patriot-that great phil-
osopher, philanthropist and. phil-
anderer-that friend of all the
people-that poet and spreader of
joy GC loomy Gus Hooligan:
"What," as he so quaintly put the
ancient question; a query that is
ever on the lips and in the hearts
of hundreds-yea, thousands-no,
millions- kings and knaves, rich
and poor, white and black, yellow
and freckled; queens and Madam
Queens, babes and boobs-"what
is there in it for me?" Florida
Times-Union.
Subscribe to The Star--2 year.
Subscribe to The Star-52 year.


Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


SE ,!ITT RvICE STA IOiN


S Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR- .
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes



iSTi JOE ICE

SI COMPANY

S' Manufacturers of

CRYSTAL ICE
FROM TREATED WATER

MAX KILBOURN, Prop.
1 aa riraida~affma!mauasaa)!BSEije aa
XTBHBB""B"i^Ea~BMS(Sf%_~l^^lmlrf~M


INTANGIBLES

ON TAX ROLL IN

BIG INCREASE

INCOME TAX RETURNS SHOW
NUMEROUS ITEMS UN-
REPORTED

TALLAHASSEE, Feb. 3 (FNS)
-One of the biggest jobs ever un-
dertaken by any department of, the
state government has just been
completed-the job of bringing to
light the hitherto untaxed stocks,
bonds, mortgages and other in-
tangible property in the state.
Press dispatches have stated
that nearly two billion dollars will
be added to the intangible tax
rolls of the state for the year 1938
and approximately $1,750,000
added to the state's general rev-
enue fund, as the result of the
completion of this work, but that
is only part of the story.
When the last legislature ad-
journed after boosting appropria-
tions for state expenditures and
then depriving the general reve-
nue fund of several profitable
sources of revenue, it became ap-
parent that something would have
to be done to meet the situation.
So Governor Cone secured the
permission of the federal govern-
ment to examine income tax re-
turns filed in Florida and set State
Auditor W. M. Wainwright to
work digging out the intangible
property which had so long dodged
the tax collector.
This was a big job and one re-
quiring untold patience and skill,
but a two billion dollar increase
in intangible tax valuations makes
it well worthwhile, for with this
example now set, future adminis-
trations are certain to see that
stocks, bonds and mortgages con-
tribute their proper proportion' to
the expenses of government along
with automobiles, real estate, mer-
chandise, cattle and other prop-
erty.
Some idea of the magnitude of
the task Wainwright faced may be
gleaned from a comparison of the
figures his report discloses. The
total income from the intangible
property of individuals, corpora-
tions and fiduciaries in Florida re-
ported to the federal government
in 1936 amounted to $87,065.56,
representing a valuation of $2,-
176,369,100. The assessed valua-
tion on all intangibles on the tax
rolls of the state for that year
amounted to only $176,677,427, or
nearly two billion dollars less than
the, actual amount owned in the
state. The revenue.which the gen-
eral fund should have received
from this source was $2,176,693,
while it actually received only
$417,368.

COUNTIES WILL GET
RACE TRACK MONEY

F:orida -counties will receive
$248,834.93 from race track collec-
tions in the first allocation of re-
ceipts from the 1937-38 racing sea-
son, according to State Treasurer
V,. V. Knott. This means about
$3,713 to each county. It is antici-
pated that other payments will be
made monthly until the end of the
season.
State law provides for the race
track taxes, after paying ex-
penses of the state racing com-
mission, to be distributed equally
among the counties on or before
April 15 of each year. Last year
the counties received $1,834,324.43,
or $27,377.97 each.
DOWN-------N
DOWN AND UP
Lawyer: "I notice that when a
doctor makes a mistake the mis-
take is buried under six feut of
earth."
Doctor: "And I notice that when
a lawyer makes a mistake the
mistake is hung six feet above the


DELEGATIONS

HEARD BY ROAD

BOARD AT MEET

ESTIMATED THAT NEW ROADS
ASKED WOULD COST
$20,000,000

At a budget meeting of the state
road department held in Tallahas-
see, Florida counties asked for
highway work during 1938 which
Chief Engineer J. H. Dowling es-


VOTE JAPAN BOYCOTT
The Lake Placid Woman's club
has passed a resolution condemn-
ing Japan for making war on
China and calling on their mem-
bers and others to refrain from
purchasing merchandise -manufac-
tured in Japan.
In their resolution they stated
that many patriotic stores in the
United States are refusing to sell
merchandise made in Japan; that
many women, by refusing to buy
Japanese-made goods have it in
their power to stop the sales of
the larger portion of such, and
that they as a club and individu-


timated would cost $20,000,000. ally pledge themselves to such
"We just don't have the money," a boycott.
said Chairman A. B. Hale, who -
previously had announced there Hearing is less acute after a
was little prospect for any state- heavy meal, a physician explains.
financed construction of new roads
during the year.
Members of the board listened EXPERT BARBERS
to delegations without making
any promises or commitments. Our customers say that
"Thank you. Your request will be e have a knack of
considered," was Chairman Hale's e hae a kak o
stock reply. ing them what thev ask
Dowling said the amount of work for. That's because our
requested was far less than at barbers are experienced,
previous budget sessions, He fig- skilled operators!
ured last year the 'work asked Try Us Today!
would have cost $38,000,000, and
the year before he said the coun-
ties had asked for about $60,000,- CO PE S
000.
Many counties submitted their BARBER SHOP
requested programs in writing.
The department will hold another
budget meeting within 60 days at
a place yet to be selected. CITY PRESSING
Principal new construction ad-
vocated at the meeting was the CL B
Gulf Coast highway along the
Florida west coast. It was pointed THE OLDEST PRESSING
out that a main through-traffice CLUB IN TOWN
road could be provided by build- ALL WORK
ing about" 30 miles of new road to GUAR
tie; in existing stretches.GUARA
Dowling estimated the proposed WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
route would cost several millions o
of dollars to complete. In Rear of Parker's Barber
------- Shop
BOY ANGLER HOOKS MOTHER PORT ST JOE FLA.
Home again after an unsuccess-
ful afternoon's fishing, 13-year-old
Donald Turkal of Washingtbn, D.
C.. gave a last flip to his line as
he got out of the family car. Arch-
ing gracefully through the air, the
hook caught Donald's mother, Mrs.
M. J. Turkal, in the lip.


For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANIA" TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
Set we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Roche's Community Store


PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER.!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County
---- --

BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Pla.


'q earth.


1----- -


W e Haul Anything- -

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GC33 CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


iE CAN SUPPLY YOU 0
-71


No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

Your business will be

appreciated.




Gulf Hardware &



Supply C .
BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


F


W


THE STAR


Friday, February 4, 1938


PAGE SIX








FrH Say, TA PA*ruIry S E, V


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
RIG H T !

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H". B. Whitaker






Fishing...

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.

TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.
SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.



,



-~\o\ -






FOR BETTER HEALTH,
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods. En-.-
joy the benefits of the v.lu-
able vitamin content of fresh
milk!

Refreshing
and Economical
You'll enjoy the delicious
flavor of Solomon/s Milk

ALWAYS CALI FOR

"SOLOMON' S"

Dairy

Prod cts


GASOLINE
FOR ECONOMY!
You Save because you get
more miles to the gallon and
less carbon.

FOR QUALITY !
You get a pure productc, fa-
mous for dependability.

WASHING-GREASING
POLISHING
-0- ---

WOCO.PEP
SERVICE STATION
W. COLLINAWORTH, Mgr.
ON HIGHWAY NO. 10
4 cu-


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a cries of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
tor:cal interest and should make an interesting scrap book.
c- --------- ------- ------------ --------- --- -


(From The London Gazette of
October 19, 1799)
THE BATTLE OF ZURICH
Dispatches, of which the follow-
ing are a copy and extracts, have
been received from Lieutenant-
Colonel Ramsay by the Right Hon.
Lord Greenville, His Majesty's
Principal Secretary of State for
the Foreign Department:
Headquarters Shaffhausen,
September 30, 1799.


My Lord-It is with extreme
concern I inform your Lordfhip
that an attack has been made on
the Allied army, the result of
which your Lordfhip is already in-
formed, were intended to have
taken place on the 26th and 27th;
and fix battalions of the army
commanded by General Korzakoff
were detached to Uznach on the
27th, for the purpose of increas-
the force defined to act in that
quarter. The enemy, who was no
doubt apprised of this circum-
ftance, attacked t he Ruffian
army on the 25th, at a very early
hour in the morning, a brisk at-
tack of mufketry was heard on
our left in the neighborhood of
Wallishosen, accompanied.' by a
cannonade on. our right, which ap-
peared to proceed from the neigh-
borhood of Baden.
The attack on our left was
merely intended for the purpose
of drawing the attention from the
true point; and the enemy paffed
the Limmar in great force in the
neighborhood of Weinangen, be-
tween Zurich and'Baden. By this
manoeuvre they broke the line in
that quarter, cut off from the
army the eight battalions of (dens.
Markoff and Durasoff. who were
pofted-between Weinengen and the
.Rhine; and after leaving a corps
for the purpofe of observing and
attacking them, they ascended the
Limmat toward Zurich.
A regiment of dragoons, being
in consequence of the detach-
ments that had been sent away,
and the troops that had been
drawn to the left, the only force
remaining in that part where the
paffage was effected,'the enemy
advanced and arrived in the neigh-
borhood of Zurich between the
Limmat and the heights, which
running parallel to the Limmat,
formed a continuation of the Aldra
to the N. Weft, being occupied at
the same time by a line of their
infantry and cavalry, who with a
very numerous train of artillery
attacked with great vigor the
troops in front of Zurich, and pre-
vented their detaching to the
right the point on which the great
efforts of the enemy were directed.
At a late hour 'in the forenoon
some ,reinforcements arrived on
this fide of the Limmat, but the
trians; but Gen.. Horze was un-
fortunately killed at the com-
mencement of the action and Gen.
Petrasch, who succeeded to the
command of the army, having re-
solved in consequence of the loss
he had sustained, to avoid the at-
tack which he expected, the next
morning, retreated 'In the- night
from Uznach. The situation of the
Ruffian army was thus rendered
ftill more critical, and it became
enemy were already masters of
some of the principal heights
which command the town; and
notwithstanding the bravery dis-
played by the Ruffians in their
repeated attacks, the superiority
in point of force and position on
the side of the French rendered
it impoffible for them to regain
that which has been: loft.
At sunset the French had made
themselves masters of part of Zur-
ich Berg and nearly surrounded
the town. The attack on the pofi-
-tion of General Horze had termi-
nated rather in favor of the Aft-


machine by means of which
stamps could quickly and easily
be tor- from the sheet.
A few weeks later Archer. with
his machine, presented himself at
Som'erset House and told the au-
thorities what he nad made. They
wfre interested znd appointed a
elect committee to go into the
matter and report back. In their
report the committee said "that
the perforating of postage stamps
would be of great convenience and
advantage to the public," and
recommended the government to
purchase the machine.
And so it came about that the
pin pricks of Charzes Fowler
brought 4000 pounds (about $20,-
000) to the man who had been
looking on.

TAX DEADLINE NEXT MONTH

Although March 15, the dead-
line. may seem far removed at
present, J. Edwin Larson, United
States collector of internal reve-
nue for Florida, has issued a
warning to individuals and busi-
ness houses to b'egm work at once
on their 1937 income tax returns.
The warning was prompted by
the fact that the commissioner of
internal revenue states that ex-
tension requests may be granted
this year only in exceptional and
meritorious cases.


The first of the month is near-
have you a sufficient number of
statements? The Star prints them.


absolutely necefrary to abandon
Zurich, and the position in that,
neighborhood without delay
On the 26th in the morning the
retrcat took place, and the whole
arrived in the course of that night
in the neighborhood of,. Eglisan
and Schaffhausen without experi-
encing any loft of consequence
during their march.'
We have to regret the loff of
between two and three thousand
killed, wounded'and miffing; and
ten pieces of cannon have, with
a part of the baggage, fallen into
the hands of the enemy. A nearly
equal number of French cannon
were taken by the Rifffans, but
the want of horses, which pre-
vented them from taking away
their own, was the cause of their
being also obliged to leave them.
.'The army under the command
of General Korsakof is at present
posted with its right to Egifan and
its left to the Laie of Conftance.
By a letter jirf arrived from
Field Marfhal Suwarrow, it ap-
pears that he has taken the Mount
Saint Gothard, and is at prefent
advancing towards Ailtdorf and
Schweitz.
I have the honor to be, &c.
(Signed) JOHN RAMSAY.

(From Mariposa (Calif.) Gazette,
October 15, 1856)
A squad of Dutch girls went
into one of our largest mercantile
houses, to buy goods. One of them
purchased a hoop skirt. and the
clerk was about papering it up,
when she stopped nim and said
she wanted to use it now. Step-
ping a little to one side, she pro-
ceeded to put it on, while the clerk
blushed, stammered, and at last
told her he preferred her to go
into the back roon. The obedient
girl started, but kept putting her
hoops on, and by the time she
reached the door of the room, was
hooking the band around her
waist-thus performing the opera-
tion before the eyes of the
trembling clerk.
--~---------
ORIGINATION OF
PERFORATIONS FOR
POSTAGE STAMPS

London Journalist Instrumental In
Producing Present Method

How many persons have heard
of Charles Fowler? Very few-
perhaps none of our readers. Yet
the fact remain that he was
largely instrumental in doing the
public a great service.
Charles Fowler was a journalist
who lived in London about 100
years ago. He was what is known
as a "penny-a-.iner" and spent
most of his.time reporting the ;out-
break of fires. Because of this he
was nicknamed "FireFowler."
One evening, ,in tne autumn of
1837, he was busy In h;s little of-
fice in Red Lion Square, getting
a number of letters ready for the
post and, no doubt, wishing he
were at home in bed. On his table
lay a sheet of postage stamps
which had to be cut, since, in those
days perforation had not come in.
If Charles Fowler's scissors had
not taken that particular moment
to hide themselves, or if he had
been a less resourceful person, we
might not have been writing about
him now. Taking a pin from the
lapel of his coat he made a line
of pricks between the stamps,
carefully tore them apart, fixed
them to the envelopes, and thought
no more about it.
But there chanced to be in the
office at the time a man by the
name of Henry Archer who had
an eye to business and who, hav-
ing watched Fowler's pin at work,
decided to invent a perforating


Sewer Connections

We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

SEE

Bob Haley orArt Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.

--- -- -


J. L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.




-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


--JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


kA* A A.A -A A +C A I- # -* *-. --*" ">.* +

MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT


WILLIAMS' PLACE
-.{ PALM POINT INN ..-

FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING


REFRESHMENTS


DANCING


- No Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.

;






Take Advantage of the Off-Season

Savings

Let Me Figure Any Building
That You Desire


H. H. TAYLOR


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


Port St. Joe


- ; -- ~


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR


di F b ar 4 1938


S FILING CABINETS
j Durable, All-Steel
Electrically Welded
' We have them for the small
office as well as the large
office.
Come in and let us show you
our line.

We Specialize in
BLACK LINE PRINTS
AND BLUE PRINTS



C. A. Tovey
Rooms 7-9, Costin Building
Port St. Joe, Fla.







PAGE EIGHT THE STAR Friday, February 4, i3S


P.-T. A. COUNCIL INSTALLS
OFFICERS AT APALACHICOLA
The meeting for installation of
officers for the Parent-Teacher
Association Council was held Wed-
nesday afternoon in Apalachicola,
with Mrs. Brown, district superin-
tendent, acting as installing offi-
cer.
Officers installed for the ensu-
ing terms were: President, Mrs.
Robert Tapper, Port St. Joe; vice-
president, Mrs. Dwight Marshall,
Apalachicola; secretary, Mrs. J.
M. Smith, Port St. Joe; treasurer,
Mrs. J. Whitfield, Wewahitchka;
librarian, Miss Emily Porter, Apa-
lachicola.
Following the installation serv-
ices Mrs. LeGallee of Panama City
gave an interesting talk on "Prob-
lems of the School."
Members present from the Port
St. Joe P.-T. A. were Mrs. Robert'
Tapper, D. G. MtPherson, Mrs. R.
Gibson, Mrs. Helen Allen, Miss
Soloman, Mrs. P. Howell, Mrs. J.
Ferrell, Miss Juanita Gunn, Mrs.
H. W. Davies, Mrs. C. Edwards,
Mrs. G. A. Patton, Mrs. T. Owens,
Mrs. J. M. Smith, Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett, Mrs. C. Pridgeon, Mrs. Rob-
ert Bellows and Mrs. J. L. Sharit.

MISSIONARY MEETING
IS POSTPONED
The meeting of the Methodist
Missionary Society was postponed
this week on account of funeral
services for Mr. M. B. Smith.
The meeting next week will be
a combined social and business
session at the club house.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born, Tuesday, January 22, 1938,
to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Stokes, a
son.

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Campbell
announce the birth of a daughter,
January 23, 1938,

Read the ads-it pays!


FIRST TIME
AT THIS

LOW PRICE












,


BERKSHIRE


Hosiery


79c
3 and 4 Thread
You'll want to stock up on
these sheer, ringless, full-
fashion hose. Doubly re-
inforced toe and heel.

OWENS & MURDOCK
Port St. Joe, Fla.


At the Churches

METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m., first and third Sundays.
Sunday school 10 a. m., every
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.
-
FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m.
Sunday Morning services at 11
o'clock.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
Evening services 7:45.
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Soctety, 3:30 p. m.
every:third Thursday.
EPISCOPAL
G. T. Benson, Minister
Services at clubhouse Sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.
CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
-SJ-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
,H. P. Mdney, Pastor
Full-time services.
Sunday school 10 a. m. W. L.
Gatlin, superintendent.
Preaching service 11 a. m.
Evangelistic services 7 o'clock
Saturday night.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve',
ning at 7:30 o'clock.


WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLU -
ENTERTAINED BY MRS. G '
A charming hostess waS Mr\s
George Gore to the Wednen;day
Night Bridge club this week at
her home on Second avenue. The
living room was attractively dec-
orated with bowls of narcissi,
where tables were placed for
play. Following several progres-
sions, prizes were presented tto
Mrs. Gloekler, high, a beautiful
creani and sugar set, and cut was
presented to Mrs. T. Owens, an at-
tractive vase.
The hostess served a delicious
salad course and hot coffee to the
following members: Mesdames B.
Pridgeon, J. Gloekler, T. Owens,
B. Owens, H. Soule, E. Ramsey,
M. Tomlinson, C. Lewis, C. Ed-
wards, R. Coburn and guests Mrs.
George Wimberly and Miss Juan-
ila Gunn.

GIRLS' AUXILIARY IN
MEETING AT CHURCH
The Girls' Auxiliary of the Bap-
tist church met Monday at the
church for their regular meeting.
Following. regular business, Rev.
Sisemore entertained the mem-
bers with an interesting talk on
John 3:16.
Present were Rev. Sisemore,
Mrs. E. C. Cason, Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett, Flora Mae and Hazel Cason,
Betty Jo Lane, isabelle Baggett,
and Carolyn Baggett.
The auxiliary meets today with
Janell Pridgeon.

Steve McPhaul left Saturday for
Tampa to spend about ten days
with his sister, Mrs. C. W. Poe.


Society Personal, Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Edi r


Let The Star
cial Printing.


do your Commer-


ATTEND PRESIDENT'S BALL
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kelley, Mr.
and Mrs. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs.
Alf Milligren, Miss Emily Milli-
gren and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Whit-
field of Wewahitchka attended the
president's birthday ball in this
city Saturday night.

C. M. Wallace of Apalachicola
was a business visitor in'the city.
Wednesday.


WOMAN'S CLUB TO SPONSOR
FLOWER SHOW SOON
Due to installation of officers in
1:.io Parent Teacher Association
oiuneil at Apalachicola Wednes-
daK the Woman's Club met yes-
terlvfy :-t the club house, with
Mri-. G. A. Patton presiding.
The meeting was opened with
the Lord's Prayer, followed by
roll call, to which all members re-
sponded with an Indian name and
its meaning. The regular business
was taken up and all members
were urged to attend the insti-
tute to be held February 22 in
Tallahassee.
It was decided that the club
would sponsor an exhibition of
flowers and antiques the latter
part of April or early May.
An interesting program was pre-
sented by members, using, the
theme "Florida Indians." A sketch
was given by Mrs. W. E. Boyd,
"Seminole Indians," and Mrs. Wil-
liam Bragg presented "Current
Events."
Hostesses for the afternoon were
Mesdames B. W. Eells, Thomas
McPhaul and R. R. Hodges.

ATTEND BIRTHDAY BALL
Those attending the President's
Birthday Ball from out-of-town
were. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Marks,
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Austin, Mr.
and Mrs. H. D. Marks, Miss Cro-
nin Marks, J. P. Coombs and Stan-
ley Sheipp, all of Apalachicola;
Mrs. Arthur Kimball of Mobile,
Ala., and K. J. Boyd of Tallahas-
see.

Mr. and Mrs. Jessie Dorsey and
family of Tuscaloosa have moved
to the city and will make their
home at Beacon Hill for the pres:
ent.

Mr. and Mrs. McDonald of Bea-
con Hilll left yesterday for Mo-
bile. Mr. McDonald has been em-
ployed at the St. Joe Paper Com-
pany for the past several months.

Miss Velma Enfinger has re-
turned to her home in Bainbridge,
Ga., after spending several days
with her sister, Miss Thelma En-
finger of this city, and friends in
Panama City.


PHONE 69


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


N W IN OUR NE


S W HO ME


At the Corner of Second Ave. and Fourth St.





St. Joe Motor Co.


WE HANDLE ONLY THE BEST


GOOD GULF GAS -- U. S. TIRES

FORD DISTRIBUTORS \
We Carry a Complete Stock of FORD PARTS


We Cordially Invite the Public to Come In and Inspect Our

New Building and Equipment


YOUR BUSINESS WILL BE APPRE IATEDI


W. M. U. MEETING POSTPONED
The Baptist Woman's Mission-
ary Union meeting this week was
postponed due to the funeral serv-
ices for Mr. M. B. Smith. The next
meeting will be at the church
Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. M. B. Smith and children
wish to thank their many friends
for their kindness, sympathy and
many beautiful floral offerings
during the illness and death of our
dear husband and father.


FHA




Financing



NOW AVAILABLE

o


St Joe







L\ umqer to.



Qualified to HandIl


Your Application





See Us Before Building


'Friday, February 4, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE EIGHT