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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00170
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 28, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00170

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
ert growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest -grow-
ing little newspaper-Odedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1938 NUMBER 14


Centennial Celebration



Date Set for December


CHAMBER OF

COMMERCE IS

UNDER WA Y

BALLOTS MAILED OUT FOR
SELECTION OF BOARD
OF DIRECTORS

At two organization meetings
held Friday and Monday nights at
the city hall, plans were formu-
lated for establishment of a cham-
ber of commerce for Port St. Joe.
Five men, J." L. Kerr, G. F.
Kaser, E. Clay Lewis, B. W. Ells,
and W. O. Anderson, were ap-
pointed as a committee to select
14 names from those registering
Monday night to be voted upon as
a board- of directors, seven to be
chosen. In addition to the com-
mittee of five. the following names
appear on the ballots, which were
Y nailed out Wednesday: J. R. Dor-
sey, Dwight Marshal, R. L. Miller,
T. M. Schneider, B. D. Smith, Hor-
ace Soule, W. S. Smith, C. A.
Tovey and G. P. Wood. The bal-
lots will be counted next Monday.
Following selection of the direc-
tors they will meet, choose their
leader and appoint committees.


RegistrationBooks

Open At City Hall

PERIOD FOR REGISTERING OF
QUALIFIED VOTERS ENDS
FRIDAY OF NEXT WEEK

"Now is the time for all good
ren and true to come to the aid
of the party"-well, anyway, the
city.
Registration books opened Wed-
nesday .at city hall for the pur-
pose of registering all qualified
electors who intend to vote Feb-
ruary 15 to choose one city com-
missioner for a six-year term. The
books are open between the hours
of 9 a. m. and 12 m., and 2 p. m.
and 5 p. m., and will remain open
until next Friday, February 4.
All residents of the city who
have resided in the state for one
year or longer ana n the city for
a period of six months or longer
are eligible for registration.
It is the duty of everyone so
qualified to register and take part
in the election, so if you haven't
already done so, drop around to
the city hall when you have a few
moments to spare and let Clerk
Mark Tomlinson sign you up on
the dotted line.
T. H. Stone, present member of
the commission, whose term ex-
pires this year, makes his formal
announcement for re-election in
this issue of The Star. To date he
has no opposition, but there are
rumors of several who will seek
the post.

GIRLS' CAGE TEAM TO
MEET FRINK TODAY

The girls' basketball team of the
Port St. Joe high school will meet
the Frink girls' team in Blounts-
town today. Everyone who can is
urged to accompany the team and
lend their moral support.


Earle Brown, Florida Na-
tional Exhibits Promoter,
Confers With Local Busi-
ness Men Aboute Fete.

Memories of old St. Joseph as
it was 100 years ago will be re-
vived in new Port St. Joe next De-
cember when the Florida Consti-
tution Centennial Celebration will
be staged here on the 100th anni-
versary of the signing of the
state's constitution, which was
drafted here'the latter part of De-
cember, 1S3S, and signed by the
delegates on January 11, 1839.
Robert Raymond Reid was pres-
ident of the constitutional conven-
tion and Joshua Knowles was sec-
retary. Signers of the document
were Walker Anderson, John L.
McKinnon, 'Daniel G. McLean, E.
Robbins, Stephen J. Roche, Cosam
Emir Bartlett, Thomas Baltzell,
Sands C. Bellamy, Alfred L. Wood-
ward, Richard L. Long Rich, C.
Allen, Banks Meacham, John W.
Malone, George Ward, W. Wyatt,
James D. Wescott, Jr., Leigh Reid,
A. Bellamy, John N. Partridge, E.
Carrington Cabell, William Bunce,
J. MicCants, John C. McGehee, W.
B. Hooker, Joseph B. Watts, John
F. Webb, Wilson Brooks, George
E. McClellan, I. Garrison, E. K.
White, A. W. Crichton, Oliver
Wood, Wi. Haddock, Edwin T.
J'enckes. Jose S. Sanchez, David
Levy, W. H. Williams, William
Marvin, J. B. Brown and Emund
Byrd.
Date of the Centennial Celebra-
tion was set for December 7 to 10
at a meeting held Tuesday night
at Port Inn.which was attended
by Earle Brown, vice-president
and manager of Florida National
Exhibits, who will submit a tenta-
tive outline for the affair to the
committee in charge, which is
made up of J. L. Sharit, general
chairman, B. W. Ells, W. R. Galt,
J. W. Kelley, G. P. Woods, Robert
Bellows, and E. Clay Lewis.
The 1937 legislature appropri-
ated $5000 to be used in staging
the celebration.

FIRST BABY IN 100 YEARS IS
BORN AT SITE OF OLD ST. JOE

Mr. and Mrs. W. T, Pl'rker
of the Bay Ridge subdivision,
announce the arrival of a son,
born at 3:10 p. m., January 26,
1938.
This is an event of epochal
proportions, as BayRTITdgeTis lo-
cated on the site of the famed,
but now almost forgotten city
of St. Joseph where the state's
constitution was framed and
signed 100 years ago and whose
population was wiped out by a
scourge of yellow fever.
As far as is known, this is the
first baby to be born in that
section since the old city was
doomed.
The youngster has been given
the name of James William.
--'--*-----
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Woman's Club will weet on
Thursday of next week at 3:30 p.
m. at the clulb house instead of
Wednesday, on account of a spe-
cial P.-T. A. meeting in Apalachi-
cola Wednesday.,

Save by reading the ads!


President Roosevelt, who has
subscribed to the National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis
as founder number one.


PLANS COMPLETE

FOR PRESIDENT'S

BIRTHDAY DANCE

FUNDS FROM LOCAL AFFAIR
WILL AID FIGHT ON
POLIOMYELITIS

Horace Soule, vice-chairman of
the Gulf county committee for the
celebration of the President's
birthday tomorrow night, states
that plans are complete for par-
ticipation by Gulf countians in
the nation-wide campaign to raise
funds for combatting infantile
paralysis.
The big event will be a dance
at Port Inn, this city; and on the
basis of reservations made and
interest shown, this will be one of
the most successful .affairs ever
sponsored in Gulf county. The
Chattahoochee orchestra will fur-
nish music for the dance, which
will continue from 9 to 4.
Committeewomen appointed by
Mr. Soule to have charge of the
affair, and who are -usliy engaged
in selling tickets, are Leta Huff-
man, Mildred Mira, Mary Gore,
Doris Dorsey, Ruth Soule and
Sally Mahon. These ladies are
also selling Founders' certificates
for $1 each. This money will go
to the new foundation for the con-
duct of a unified fight for the
elimination of the disease in every
'part of the country.
Paul de Kruif, a national figure
in the infantile paralysis fund
drive, has this to say in regard to
the drive:
"The failure to fight infantile
paralysis as we know how to, is
a major national scandal and is
an affront to the conscience of the
American people.
"Science is now known that
makes possible the treatment of
this sickness with such skill that
(Continued on Pagf 3)

ST. JOE LUMBER CO IS NOW
TAKING FHA APPLICATIONS

C. A. Saderberg of the St. Joe
Lumber Company announces that
his concern is now taking'applica-
tions for FHA loans, and that they
will be glad to accommodate any-
one who is contemplating building
at the present time. The lumber
company is located on the Pan-
ama City highway, about a mile
and a half west of Port St. Joe.


CONTRACT IS LET

FOR BUILDING OF

GULF CO. CANAL

HILL DREDGING CORPORATION
OF VENTNOE, N. J., IS
LOW BIDDER

The Gulf county commissioners,
meeting in Wewahitchka Monday,
awarded the contract for con-
struction of a canal connecting St.
Joseph's Bay and the intra-coastal
waterway in this county, bonds
for which were recently voted' to
the amount of $200,000. The Hill
Dredging corporation of Ventnoe,
N. J., received the contract over
eight other bidders for $145,787.50.
The canal, which will be six
miles in length with a minimum
depth of eight feet at mean low
tide, will carry the present water-
way directly to Port St. Joe and
will connect St. Joseph's Bay and
Apalachicola Bay by an inland
water route.
Eventually we may hope to see
pleasure yachts of all types using
this canal, 'as it is propo ed--to.
construct such a waterway along
the entire west coast of Florida
so that pleasure craft may come
down the east coast to Stuart,
take the canal across-state to the
Caloosahatchee river to Fort My-
ers and thence up the west coast
to Pensacola, Mobile andi New Or-
leans. It will be a big help in
the shipping of logs to the St. Joe
Paper Company mill, which gave
the right-of-way through their
lands for the canal.
A slight delay has been caused
due to inaccuracies of descriptions
in the right-of-way deeds, which
will have to be redrawn, but it is
anticipated 'that work on the canal
will commence within the next 15
or 20 days.

NEW TRIAL FOR DEEB
IS OPPOSED BY STATE,

The state attorney general's of-
fice has asked the supreme court
to reconsider a recent opinion
granting George Deeb, Panama
City contractor, a new trial on
manslaughter charges.
A petition filed: by Assistant At-
torney General T. A. Norwood said
the court apparently overlooked-
previous decisions in ordering a
new trial because of certain de-
fense testimony to which the
prosecution, objected.
Deeb was convicted, twice of
manslaughter and sentenced to 20
years for the shooting of Creel
Godwin in Pensacola during April,
1933.
----& -*- .
TEACHERS TO ATTEND
MEET IN PANAMA CITY

Attending the teachers' meeting
in Panama City today from the
Port St. Joe schools will be D. G.
McPherson, T. McConnell, W. H.
Linton, T. Owens, Mesdames T.
McPhaul, B. Pridgeon, J. Ferrell,
P. Howell, L. Gainous, J. Perritt
and H. Allen, and the Misses Er-
line McClellan, Avaryee Coilier,
Louise Soloman, Juanita Gunn
and Bernice Beaty.


Hydro Gas Concern To Submit
Prcpos:tion To City Dads
At Next Meeting of Com-
missioners, February 8th.


Apparently being unable or not
desiring to furnish a financial
statement to the Port St. Joe city
comnr-issioners. the Consumers Gas
company of Tampa and Atlanta
has withdrawn its application
for a franchise to furnish this city
with gas after several weeks' dis-
cussion of the matter and the
submission of several proposed
franchises through their attorney,
John H. Carter, Sr., of Marianna.
The matter was closed when
the following letter from Mr. Car-
ter was presented to the commis-
sioners Wednesday night at their
meeting:
"Gentlemen-In re. application
of the Consumers Gas Co., Inc.,
for a public utility franchise. We
beg to advise that our client, the
Consumers Gas Co., has today in-
structed us to withdraw its appli-
cation for the franchise, giving as
a reason that they have submitted
the very best offer they can afford
to make, and it has not been ac-
cepted. The .company has, tyb-
other places to enter right away
and will forego further considera-
tion of Port St. Joe at this time.
'Yours very truly,
"John H. Carter.
And, as Mayor J. L. Sharit re-
marked, "that is that."
Messrs. Clark and Robinson, of
the Hydro Gas company of Pen-
sacola, were on hand at the Wed-
nesday night meeting and stated
that they would like to secure a
franchise for the immediate in-
stallation of a gas plant here and
would like to submit their bid for
a franchise.
"This is a responsible company,
adequately financed," stated Mr.
Robinson, "and while it is a young
concern, being but 3 years old,
this gas has been on the market
22 years and is In use all over
the country today."
"We want a gas plant here,"
said Commissioner T. H. Stone.
"We are always in favor of any-
thing that will improve our city."
"Will your company build a bulk
plant here?" asked Mayor Sharit.
"If business warrants it, we
will," replied Mr. Robinson.
"All right," said the mayor.
"Now, do you want to put in a
gas plant and system here, or do
you intend to sell the franchise to
someone else?"
"We want to put in a plant here,
to become property owners and
citizens of Port St. Joe," returned
Robinson.
"Very well," said Sharit,. "sub-
mit your plans to City Engineer
Galt and your franchise to City
Attorney Lewis and when you have
gotten past those two you can
(Continued on Page 5)
.-----A-------
BRUSH FIRE
The volunteer fire department
had what mTght be termed a prac-
tice run last Friday when they an-
swered a call to extinguish a grass
fire which threatened to burn the
row of cottages on Blossom Row.
Only damage reported was ruina-
tion of a pair of shoes by Mark
Tomlinson. who became bogged in
a mud hole.


-TH


Pensacola Firm Enters







T Srta IHry2


DAGE TWO


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida, I
under Act of March 3, 1879.
Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.-S{ Telephone 51 1*.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Tire spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

JAPAN SEEKING WORLD POWER
Avery Powell, editor of The Florida Times-
Union, apparently one of those sad-eyed sen-
timentalists who know nothing of the Jap-
anese as a race except what they have learned
through various propaganda bureaus estab-
lished by the Japanese government, compar-
ing the lot of the American citizen with that
of the Japanese, has this to say:
Forty-two million Americans who spend
$100 apiece each year motoring about the
country on vacations, are twice blessed.
They have the wherewithal to spend on
this type of pleasure, and they have the
room in which to move about. Compare
their fortunes with the unhappy lot of the
Japanese, who are the scorn of the world
for their treatment of China, while they
are pursuing an absolute necessity to make
more space for the increasing millions on
the little strip of volcanic land.
While the Sino-Japanese conflict is being
waged because one of the peoples is
cramped for room on this earth, about
7,700,000 Americans are spending their va-
cations riding about the country on excur-
. sion trips by rail, boat, plane or bu). .
This is the type of civilization that
Americans take for granted; while the Jap-
anese are hammering at the door of their
neighbor in an effort to expand, not for
pleasure-bent citizens, but that they may
have more space in which to wring a liv-
ing from mother earth.
The lot of the United States is some-
thing for which her citizens may rejoice.
With natural resources that abound, and
treasures stored up in the earth and grow-
ing from the soil that have never been
touched, nearly one-third of the nation's
population enjoy a prosperity that enables
them to take annual vacations costing $100.
The Japanese are an educated people, ac-
cording to authorities who state that the
citizens of that land have one of the high-
est rates .of literacy in the world. They are
said -to be a nation of readers, constantly
acquiring ideas.
It .is as unnatural for a people of this
character to be any more willing to con-
fine themselves to the narrow borders of
,a small land as it is for Americans to re-
strain themselves from the expenditure of
$100 a year riding about the North Ameri-
can continent in automobiles-and enjoying
.trips by rail.
What do Americans see when they take
their trips? They see the waving fields of
mid-western grain sections. Their trips
carry them through the gigantic centers of
industrialism, the far-flung lands of the
South with billions of dollars worth of un-
developed resources, and endless other
sights that offer them the assurance that
there will be more jaunts for another sum-
mer. Far across the Pacific, the Japanese
seek expansion from a land that is said to,
have only one acre out of five under cul-
tivation.
The editor of The Star, who was born and
raised in a section of California that was be-
ing "peacefully penetrated" by thousands of
Japanese farmers, all of whom retained their
Japanese citizenship and had had their share
of military training, which is compulsory in
'the Land'of the Rising Sun, differs with Mr.
'Powell on the fact that the Japs are seeking
"'expansion from a land that is said to have
only one acre out of five under cultivation."
They are not seeking new land to "make more
space for the increasing millions." They are
seeking absolute domination of the eastern
shore of the Pacific.


The editor is not casting aspersions on the
Japanese as a people. In fact, we admire the
ease with which the Japanese people lifted
themselves from a mediaeval feudal state and
took their place as members of a complex
modern machine-made; civilization. But in
spite of all their outward show of modern-
ism, all Japanese are raised to.the belief that
Japan is composed of a race of gods, that the
rest of the world are barbarians, and that it
is Japan's divine right to rule the world.
In 1933 a book, "The Menace of Japana,"
by Prof. T. O'Conroy, was issued in London,
and in it Prof. O'Conroy stated: "Japan is
aiming to subjugate the nations of the East
and will attempt to conquer the world at the
point of the bayonet. I accuse Japan of
working at top speed toward war."' He added
that Hawaii and the Philippines are objects
of the conquest plans that are intended to
give Japan control of the eastern shore of
the Pacific. He maintained that the former
German Pacific islands given Japan under
League of Nations mandate after the World
War are destined to be bases for naval de-
fense against Britain and attack on the United
States. Since that time Japan has signified
her determination to hang on to these man-
dated Pacific islands, which come danger-
ously close to Hawaii.
As far as room for expansion goes, Japan
has all the room necessary for the time be-
ing in Manchukuo, which she wrested from
China a short time back. It is not land, but
world power that the Japanese are seeking.
Prof. O'Conroy writes: "Japan's eyes are on
Siam, Shanghai, Singapore, Malaya, Burma,
India, Hongkong, Hawaii, the Philippines,
Australia, New Zealand, Indo-China, all Asia
and eastern Russia. She is deliberately fo-
menting trouble in China with the view of
conquest. Japan is arming the mandated is-
lands which could be a base for holding back
or attacking the British in Malaya and Hong-
kong, of United States territory of the Ha-
waiian Islands and the United States-con-
trolled Philippine groups. The islands are
being put on a footing of readiness for war.
They are already in such a state as to enable
Japan to put them into commission in the
shortest time." And apparently Prof. O'Con-
roy, who is a former professor at Kieo Uni-
versity at Tokyo and was at one time con-
nected with the Japanese foreign office,
knew whereof he spoke, as his predictions
are rapidly coming true.
It is particularly noticeable in California
that the Japanese farmers congregate in the
neighborhood of the large oil shipping har-
bors and huge oil storage "farms," on the
outskirts of rail centers and water shipping
points and in proximity to the oil fields, even
though much better farm land is available in
other sections. Why? Because if the United
States should become involved with Japan
the entire Pacific coast could be paralyzed
at one fell swoop, allowing Japanese soldiers
to land and secure a foothold on our soil.
No, we have no sympathy for the Japs
and do not concur with Mr. Powell that the
Japanese are in dire need of more land to
care for their increasing millions.

A CALL TO ARMS
The bugle call has sounded. Mobilization
orders have been issued. Every strong, large
hearted patriot is needed. The want is so
dire that, it takes precedence over any little
wishes of individuals or communities.
It is a national emergency, and no true
American has ever failed to respond to such
a call. The National Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis must have help to fulfill its broad
destiny as the finest, most efficient, unselfish
institution of its kind in the world.
This appeal comes to you as the voice of
thousands who cannot speak for themselves.
The thousands of' past, present and future
victims of the disease that strikes irn the
dark attacks a toddling child more
often than a towering athlete are
crying out to you for help.
Listen well. Will you do your bit by at-
tending the President's Birthday Celebration


Stardust and

Moonshine
By The Other Fellow


For the benefit of those rural-
ites who believe in trading with
the big mail order houses, 'under
the delusion that they are getting
high grade merchandise at half
the cost they could purchase the
same thing at home, we reprint
the following:
Mail Order Commandments
1-You shall sell your farm pro-
ducts for cash, where you can, but
not to us, for we buy nothing
from you.
2-You shall believe us, and buy
all you can from us, for we want
your best, because we do not know
you personally.
3-You shall send your money
to us in advance ou that we can
buy the goods from the factory
with your money; you may have
to wait a few weeks if we are out,
but that is our business method.
4-You shall get help from your
county commissioners to build
good roads, so thai you may easily
haul goods from the depot and
your produce to the markets, but
do not ask help from us-we- don't
help to build good roads.
5-You shall buy church bells
and altar utensils from us, and
scnd the money in advance-that
is our rule.
6-You shall get all the help
you can for your church from the
business men in your nearest vil-
lage or city for. although we have
more profits from you than they,
it is against our rules to give to
churches.
7-You shall convert your neigh-
bors also to your faith in us, so
that they will buy from us-we
'have room for more money.
8-Yof shall loe< at the 'pretty
pictures in our catalog as often
as you can, so as to strengthen
your desire for thmgs you do not
need, but which you may order
with other goods to -save freight.
Send us all your ready cash, so
that you may not have any of it
left to buy necessities from your
home dealer and to pay your taxes.
9-You shall believe us rather
than your home ousmess men, for
we want your trade. We get to be
millionaires on your support. Don't
be bluffed into believing that you
should spend your money at home
-your home-town newspaper may
urge you to do so, but don't be-
lieve all you read.
10-You shall call on the busi-
ness people of your own vicinity
for help and credit if you meet
with hard luck, trouble or sick-
ness. It's your money we want-
we don't know you unless-.your or-
ders are accompanied by cash.
Think this over, and then con-
sider. Every dollar you
spend at ,home you get another
whack at it but every dol-
lar sent to the mail order houses
is lost forever. And this
doesn't apply to the farming popu-
lace of Gulf county entirely-there
are a lot of town folks who do a
great portion of their buying'from
the mail order houses.

Ground Hog Day occurs next
week when, Old Man Ground Hog
pops out of his winter burrow and
casts an eye about to see whether
he can discover his shadow .
and if he does-well, we'll have
.six more weeks of winter weather.

Guy Fawkes was nanged during
the reign of James I as a conspira-
tor in the "Gunpowder '.?lot" to
blow up the Houses of Parliament.

at Port Inn tomorrow night .or by
becoming a founder in this great
national foundation. If you do,
you will become one of the front-
line fighters in this great war on
poliomyelitis. Buy your ticket to-
day!


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you vant it done
R I G H T

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker





Fishig ..
-




Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.
TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates Hotel ac-
commodations within l4he
means of everyone.
SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.



MEN'S 18-INCH

BOOTS
WERE $6.50
Now Going At


CASH
LADIES' and MEN'S

SHOES
Were $3.00--NW
$950


$2.50 SHOES
NOW
----o------
ALL DRY GOODS AT
GREATLY REDUCED
PRICES
We are clearing out our
present stock to provide
room for our Summer
Stock


C. C. WILLIAMS
Highland View
.;-i,'^^ *n----t?----















GASOLINE
FOR ECONOMY!
You Save because you get
more miles to the gallon and
less carbon.
FOR QUALITY !
You get a 'pure product, fa-
mous for dependability.
WASHING-GREASING
POLISHING


WOCO-PEP
SERVICE STATION
W. COLLINSWORTH, Mgr.
ON HIGHWAY NO. 10
V----------------,,,..


Firid~iy- January 23, 193


THE STAR








Friday,*-- J


F. S. Pope of the Mead corpor- GUESTS FROM ALABAM'
ation of Chillicothe, Ohio, was a Mrs. Helen Allen spent the
business visitor at the St. Joe Pa- week-end in Gordon, Ala., with
per company several days this her family. Mrs. Allen's daugh-
week. ter Peggy, and sister, Miss Mattie
Owens, returned with her. They
will make their home at Beacon
JA 29 19 Hill during the remainder of the
J A 29, school term.

TYou are invited to Read the ads-it pays!


the- Celebration of
thePresidentsBirth.
day- biggest part)
for a great cause.


PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gu;f County


LILIUS JEWELRY CO. BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla. Port St. Joe, Fla.


iS -H'T-SA

WITH AN 1,




-- ---- ,
Better. Light

for Better I

Living .j
I,.
Light uip and live! It i. a
scientific fact that good iali-
ing aids physical and ric.l-,l
-well-being.' That is why: tihe
q'bundant, glareless lighti-g: .:f.
E. S. Better Sight Lamtir-s
permits you to relax and enr :.
your book or card game. See
one of these new type L.nri'.:
Obsewc how htey -iffer ;i.-,i
ordinary lamps. There a[r:-
many models from whir'h to:
Choose. Table, floor and i:.i,-
it-up types give you a v. .,ae
range of selection for c--n-
pletely light conditioning : ,-,r
home. Low in price,..I. E S.
Lamps provide -he double a;1-
vantage of sight saving a.. .-.cil
as graceful beauty


4ll T. I1. S. La:mps carry tl. C.:r-
H t ic :tin 'Tag illustrated r. ,-
S hiclh shows tha they romp!, r.,il,
the rigid 'necificniions, of !', i
luminatin Emngineering Soci.: ..



Li








1, E. S. Lamps- Are
[-,7.rdware and Hous


FLORIDA

CORPOI
'I


E. S. LIGHT

. E. S. LAMP


-f

Sold At Electrical,
se Furnishing Stores


POWER

RATION


PERSONALS

Miss Erie Gulledge returned to
Panama City Sunday after spend-
ing the past week with Mr. and
Mirs. J. M. Smith.

Mrs. Charles Doyle of Apalachi-
cola spent several days here this
week with her daughter, Mrs. C.
Edwards.

Miss Teresa Zingarelli of Apa-
:chicola was visiting in the city
Ian day.


M'is3 Jean Cre'ad was visiting
3unvay ia Panama City.

Miss Carol: Boggs of Panama
City was the week-end guest of
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gibson.

Quinlan Adams of Jacksonville
Propcrtties, Jacksonville, .was a
business, visitor, for several days
this week in the city. .

Mayor J. L. Sharit and Robert
Bellows were business visitors
Monday in Wewahitchka.

Mr. and Mrs. H. Saunders and
daughter, Betty,: and' Mrs. D. C.
Mahon were visiting Sunday in
Panama City.

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Turner and
Mr. and Mrs. Morton Mahon were
visiting Sunday in Panama City.

Mrs. Dewitt Marks of Apalachi-
cola is the guest of her .sister,
Mrs. J. Gloekler. for several days.

The Misses Dorothy Williams
and Opal Carter of Wewahitchka
were visiting Saturday with Miss
Estelle Dickens.

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Cutchens of
Newville, Ala.. were the guests
Sunday and Monday of Mrs. Cut-
chens' grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
M. B, Smith.

Richard Hardy and Albert Wil-
liams of Headland, Ala., were in
Port St. Joe on business Sunday
and Monday.

Miss Viola Barber returned to
the city Sunday after spending a
week with her parents in Lynn
Haven.

Mrs. Robert Dorsey left Mon-
day for Tuscaloosa, to be gone for
several days.

Earle Brown or Lkleland was a
visitor of several days i -Port St.
Joe this week. He is in charge of
:he Florida exhibition., in Cleve-
land, Ohio.

Miss Ma!zie Waters was a week-
end visitor in Panama City.
---S-~------
THANK YOU, MR. HUNTER
County Clerk J. R. Hunter of
lWewahitchka was a visitor in Port
St. Joe Tuesday. He dropped into
The Star office for a chat with
ye ed and stated: "You've got a
real newspaper-it's chock full of
news of interest to everyone."

ATTEND QUARTERLY MEET
Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore,
Mrs. E. C. Cason, Mrs. Fred Mad-
dox, Mrs. J. O. Baggett and others
attended the quarterly W. M. l T.
association meeting in Imnmanual
Church, Panama City, last Thurs-
day.

GUESTS OF MRS. LOVETT
Mr. and Mrs. John Brown, Sr.,
Mr. and Mrs. John Ear;e Brown
and Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Brown
a.nd two children of Apalachicola
were the guests Sunday of Mrs.
Mary Lovett.

SHERIFF IS VISITOR
Sheriff B. E. Parker of Wewa-
hitchka was a visitor in the city
Monday.


PLANS COMPLETE FOR ridden-that is a disgrace to our
BIRTHDAY PARTY nation which calls itself civilized
and Christian.
(Continued from page 1) "Our county rejoices in a band
the horrible deformities following of scientists and healthmen, comn-
it can be prevented. Yet failure p.ct-nt to search to prevent this
to use that science is now de plague. They are unequalled in
forming thousands of our young any other nation. They have al-
people yearly, ready gained knowledge of the
"The art of correcting this sneaking habits of this damnable
tragic crippling has been highly disease that makes the actual pre-
dleveloped by a little group of or- vontion of this death and maiming
- i i..,-,.. surgeons. Yet the pres- a hope, a possibility. Yet private
oat lack of orthopedic hospitals pliilanthropy has im:serably failed
and the present impossibility of I to support these fighters for our
training enough surgeons has lives; and they are the neglected
pilod nup a horde o victims- stepchildren of our generally
hoi'lin r; on crutches, rising in shameful public financing of
vwhel chair, or permanently bed- death-fighting science."




NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Available Immediately

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING RE FRIGERATION

-i A full line of gas appliances in stock 'S0-


Inquire
Miller's Drug Store
PORT ST. JOE


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


~" ~, L -i E k m


A Bank

for

Business

Men


SAn institution with
fieh ethics of good business as a basis. Here
the busi-ess man knows he has an invisible
Fparter .one that he can depend upon
whi hie needs support most. This Bank is
th.e unqucstionale ch,;icc of s;.cce~sful busi-
.ies merien of G :& f Co'auty!


. ". .^1 .I -, ; i
i ... ,- .I:.-

S Bank L ^ -':'

for the 1 ,. .

Family
S! i


It's the friendly bank
where Junior's savings account is considered
just as izrportant as Dad's; It's the bank
which protects and handles faily affairs
he bank that carries on after you
are out of the picture. This bank has be-
come a Gulf County family institution!



Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


IICU---IK-~I -NIL--&-~LI(DE~-


~r~ll --- ~-~,_~------ -. 1~


Friday, January Z8, 1939F


THE STAR


PAGE THREE






Friday., January 28, 1939


PAGE FOUR
--d -===


P.-T. A. HEARS TALK course to those present.
ON 'CITIZENSHIP' Mrs. C. P. VanHorn also enter-
The Parent-Teacner Association trained Monday in 'honor of Mrs.
met yesterday afternoon at the Elderkin at her Beacon Hill home.
high school with 2r members pres- After an hour of bridge Mrs. EI-
ent. Following regular opening derkin was presented with a beau-
ceremonies, two numbers were tiful handkerchief by each one
rendered by members of the high i present. Mrs. VanHorn served de-
school glee club, after which City licious refreshments to her guests.
Maanager W. R. Gait gave an in- *
teresting talk on "Citizenship. Mrs. MRS. GLOEKLER HOSTESS TO
R. P. Young gave "A High Ex- WEDNESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
anrplc of Citizenship," concluding The Wednesday Night Bridge
the program. The meeting was club met this week with Mrs. J.
then turned over to the president Gloekler at her home on Sixth
and regular business taken up. street. After three progressions
The next meeting will be Febru- prizes were presented to Mrs. G.
ary 10. Gore for high and cut to Mrs. J.
r M. Smith.
GIRLS' AUXILIARY .MEETS The hostess served delicious pe-
WITH THE MISSES COSTIN can pie and hot coffee to Mes-
Marjorie and Dorothy Costin dames J. M. Smith, B. Pridgeon,
were hostesses to the Girls' Auxili- G. Gore, T. Owens, B. Owens, H.
ary of the Baptist church last Fri- Soule. E. Ramsey, M. Tomlinson,
day afternoon at t:neir home on C. Lewis, C. Edwards and R. Co-
Second Ave. Following the meet- burn.
ing the hostesses served delicious
refreshments and during this so- Lucius Allen of Chattahoochee
cial hour the members voted to was the Sunday guest of Miss
send a wedding present to Mrs. Alice Baggett.
Morton Mahon, a former member Paid Political Advertising
of the auxiliary.
The girls will meet this after- FOR CITY COMMISSIONER
noon at the church, at which time
Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore Will To the Voters of Port St. Joe:
I amn a candidate for re-election
be present to the office of City Commissioner,
subject to the will of the voters at
PARTIES COMPLIMENT the City Election, February 15.
MRS. ELDERKIN Having served 17 years as such
MRS. ELDERKIN officer and 13 years as mayor, I
Mrs. L. Huffman complimented feel that I am qualified to give a
Mrs. Elderkin, who is leaving for fair and impartial administration
I to the duties of the office, and if
California next week, with a bridge elected I promise to use my past
luncheon Tuesday, and after sev- experience in conducting the du-
eral progressions the prize, which ties of the office to the best in-
consisted of going-away giftsfromterests of the people.
eahsm r of t day Cus Your vote and influence wi;l be
each member of the Tuesday Club, greatly appreciated.
was presented to the honoree. The Respectfully,
hostess served a delicious salad T. H. STONE.



PiT' Ic Cash & Carry
S Pcrt St. Joe, Fla.

PEACOCK FLOUR
12 24 $15
Sb. 55~ ls bs.. ,"
i get a 10c rebate on 24 Ibs. and,
S| 5c rebate on 12 Ibs., which will
make a 12-lb. bag cost you 50c
21 ior a 24-lb bag co.t you 95c.-
-----------------4----------------

FRIDAY -- SATURDAY MONDAY -
J~IJARY28 2 29- 31
SALT ) 3 i COOKING OIL, gal.......89c
SODA for MOTHER'S OATS, 3 lb 27c
Matches GRITS, 2 pkgs. ..............15c

O POUNDS lW f P
S (Lim:ted)R 4

*ims Large Box 254 M1r*1 2 Large or 1
l'Iso0 lOc Box 11 iullK 4 Small 10
CORN FLAKES, 2 fcr 15c DOG FOOD, per cann...... 5c


10 lba P ttoes 19c

ENGLISH PEAS TURNIPS............ 3 FOR
4 No. 2 cans..........-.. COLARDS....
POTTED MEAT, 3 for 10c COLL
Vienna SAUSAGE 2 for 15c SNAP BEANS...
SPAGHETTI, 2 cans ...15c C R ........

CHARMER Vh

C OFF E 2 for 25 z

MACARONI.... LIGHTHOUSE for 1
SPAGHETTI.- 3 for 1o CLEANSER

CampbeTl'so for 190C VINEGAR, quart ..........lOc
Tomato Soup t ,.MUSTARD, quart ........ 5c


,P,. ".C I g, TIHT



A- g INFANTILE


PA R A LYs I S
~ HOUSANDS of disabled chil-
.b~ T dren will be given a new lease
.i] ". < on happiness and a great chance to
6 be benefited, provided merry-
..'' i' /' ',. '. ... makers in every communitywilldo
.*:. their part to fight infantile paral-
ysis by giving their dollars and at-
Stending the Birthday Celebration
S'for the President January 29th.
f ? Leaders throughout the country
heartily endorse this great move.
ment to fight infantile paralysis,
.. ___ and the outstanding business firm
Pres:.unt's Birthday that generously paid for this space
Celebration ii! invites you to this great Celebra-
d. at the tion. "Do your bit" by going to
.4 PORT INN this-Birthday Celebration for the
SATURDAY NIGHT President-on January 29th.Order
-s-: your tickets in advance!
Music By |
Chattahoochee Orchestra "DO YOUR BIT"
9:00 'till 2:00
This advertisement sponsored by

DR. D. BYRD McMULLEN


1 doz. 20c
ORANGES 2
Maxwell House 3
COFFEE, Ilb. ..........
1 do=. 20
BANANAS 20c
CRACKERS- L
1-Pound Box ........
3 pkgs. 1c O
MACARONI ------------
DOG FOOD- 5C
Can 5c
GRAPEFRUIT- 25c
6 for 25c


QUALITY
MEATS


CHUCK ROAST- 15C
Per pound ..........
Pork SAUSAGE- T
18c Ib.; 2 pounds .... 35
HAMBURGER- 15C
Per pound ............15
STORAGE EGGS- 26C
Per dozen ............
Fresh Fla. YARD
EGGS Doz ....30c & 35c


SARDINES- 15C
4 C an s ......................
28 oz. 25
SALAD DRESSING .. 2u
MUSTARD-- 3
2-pound Jar ..-...-..-2
GOOD SYRUP- 3 O
Half gallon ------............
CREAM- 1 5c
2 large or 4 small ....1
3 Cans25
TOMATOES 2
No. 2/2 Can 2
PEACHES 20c
COCA-COLA-- 25C
For health-6 for ...
COOKING OIL,- 95c
Gallon


SU GAR 10 pounds 55c


POTAT 0 ES IsO 10bs. 23c


GRI FFI andGROCERY

GRIFFIN and MARK ET


.... .L : --~. -/B;Yif(;


___


I -rWR 71"


THE STAR






Friday, January 28, 193/ THE STAR PAGE FIVE


COURT UPHOLDS
FLORIDA LAW
Auto Drivers Are Required To
Stcp After Accidents
The supreme court Saturday up-
held the 1929 law which requires
automobile drivers to stop, ren-
der assistance ane give their
names if they are involved in ac-
cidents.,
The court said operation of an
automobile was a privilege, sub-
ject to license, and that owners
were required to give full infoor-
mation when they obtained a li-
cense, therefore, it said, giving in-
formation at the scene of an acci-
dent does not constitute double
jeopardy in requiring a person to
give evidence against, himself.
STORK SHOWER FOR
MRS. BENSON LAST FRIDAY
Mrs. J. Mira and Mrs. T. Allen'
were co-hostesses in compliment-
ing Mrs. Benson with a stork
shower last Friday at the home of
Mrs. Mira on Eighth street.
Bridge was enjoyed during the
morning and after scores were to-
taled Mrs. Benson was presented
with a high chair wrapped in pink
and blue and filled with lovely
little gifts. The guests were then
invited to the dining room where
Mrs. Coe poured.coffee and Mrs.
Elderkin poured tea. A delicious
luncheon was also served.
CONSUMERS GAS RENIGS
(Continued from Page 1)
take the matter up with us."
The two gentlemen from Pensa-
cola thanked the commissioners,
and informed them that they
would present their proposition at
the next board meeting, Febru-
ary 8.
The company plans. on. install-
ing units to serve groups of resi-
dences at iirst, later connecting
these units with the main plant.
Mr. Robinson stated that the busi-
ness district could be served ovith-
in 30 days after granting of a
franchise.
Several minor matters were
attended to by the commissioners
before adjourning at the unprece-
dented early hour of 9:30 o'clock.
INSTALLS NEON SIGN
The B. and E. Grocery this week
had installed a handsome new
neon sign over their place of busi-
ness on Third avenue.
----IT
Earl Rollins ot Columbia, Ala.,
was visiting friends in the city
Sunday and Monday.
Mrs. A. M. Barnett was called
to Tuscaloosa Monday on account
of the illness of her daughter.


JAN. 29, 1938














Ctild-ien everywhere deserve protec-
tion against Infantile Paralysi. Attend
your local celebration of the Presi.
dent's Birthday-lcO0 of the proceeds
will go to establish and maintain the
National Foundation forlnfantile Pa.
ralysis-to provide proper protection
of meri, women and children against
Infantile Paralysis.
Attend the Birthday Party
Tomorrow Night at Port Inn.!
LeHARDY'S PHARMACY
We Are Giving Away a
WALTHAM WRIST WATCH


Ask For Details


FORD GARAGE COMPLETED I Subscribe to The Star-$2 year.
T'%3 A:britton-Willian s Contract- -.
ing company yesterday turned Notice Regular Municipal
over the keys of the new Ford
garage building on Second avenue Election
to W. O. Anderson, local Ford dis-
tributor. Mr. Anderson anticipates Notice is hereby given that the
opening for business in his new regular municipal election for the
home tomorrow. election of one City Commissioner
for the full term of six years, for


It pays to advertise-try it!
ANNOUNCEMENT
Dr. Byrd McMullen has now re-
sumed his practice in Port St. Joe
after being absent due to illness.
H.e may be found at his offices in
Miller's Drug Store.


the City .of Port St. Joe will be
held at the City Hall in the City
of Port St. Joe on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 15, 1938. The polls will be
open at 8 o'clock A. M. and close
at 7 o'clock P. M., Eastern Stan-
dard Time.
(Signed)
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk.
1-21 4-11


QUARTERMAN STUDIO


--o--

PORTRAITS
and
COMMERCIAL
--o--
ROLL FILMS
DEVELOPED
24-Hour Service
----


Next to
PHONE 74


Florida Power Corporation Office
PORT ST. JOE


Dave FURNITURE Store




Is Open for Business


WITH WONDERFUL VALUES IN






FURNITURE


SEE US FOR SPECIAL BARGAINS IN


New Matttesses

Located on the Highway just East of City Hall


PORT ST. JOE


GRAN D 0 PE NIN G




aus.er'-s Dept.


FLORIDA


SALE!!
SAL e In


WITH A COMPLETE LINE OF


Ladies', Men's and Children's Ready-to-Wear

A handsome Gift will be given with purchase of $1 or more to first 25 Cus tomers Friday and Saturday

LADIES' SILK MEN'S LADIES' COTTON MEN'S

DRESSES DressShirts DRESSES MADE OVER
Regular $3.98 to $6.95 Regular $1.25 Regular 98c to $1.98 H AT S
NOW NOW NOW


45 95` 85 50


MEN'S SUITS MEN'S MEN'S MEN'S
Dress Shoes OVERALLS HATS
PURE PaOOL Dresnts S DOUBLE-HEADER Regular $2.95
Two Pair Pants NO
High Back N 0 W

$17 9`5 1 .95 $ 1. 11 45

MEN'S and LADIES' SPECIAL LADIES' CHILDREN'S
FULL FASHION
SWEATERS Men's Hose L FASHE SHOES
N WO Regular $1.98
N 5 Regular 79c NOW

8045 950
Per Pair 954

LADIES' ASSORTMENT OF MEN'S MEN'S

B L 0 U S E S REMNANTS UNDERWEAR
SRegular 98c Overall Pants
Regular $1.98 NOW
From One Yard Up

85' Come in and look 60' 950
these over!


SLocated in the Old Gulf Hardware Building Across from LeHardy's Pharmacy


1-1-~-L~~~---12~~I-LIL--------ZIIL- 1 I~-~L-II---~~-~ILI IILh~l--L~------L


.







PAGE SIX


On March 21 and September 22
the days and nights are of equal
I'ength throughout the world.


FIRST TIME
AT THIS

LOW PRICE


BERKSHIRE


4 I




3 and 4 Thread
You'll want to st-ck up on
these sheer, ringless, full-
fashion hose. Doubly re-
inforced toe and heel.

OWENS & MURDOCK
Portk St. Joe, Fla.


THE STAR-


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(From the Philadelphia Daily Sun,
March 19, 1845)
THE INDIANS IN MEXICO
Inroads of the Camanches; Cap-
ture of Two Mexican Girls
An intelligent gentleman who
left Chihuahua some six weeks or
two months since, says the New
Orleans Picayune, gives us inter-
esting and startling intelligence
in relation to the inroads recently
made by the dreaded Camanches
into the States of Chihuahua and
Durango, and of the ravages they
have committed during those pred-
atory incursions. Thousands and
thousands of horses and cattle
have been driven off, women and
children have been led into cap-
tivity, and ranchos and haciendas
innumerable have been made deso-
late; nor is there force enough to
make headway against and rid the
country successfully of the in-
caders. When repulsed in one







I J a






Dad's Grill
SREASONABLE- PRICES


LITTLE SERVICE STATION
Pc-t St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
S Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes



ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
Manufacturers of

2i4 CRYSTAL ICE
A FROM TREATED WATER
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


S^.

VWE CAN SUPPLY YOU


No -matter how small or how

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S. Your business will be

appreciated.



Gulf Hardware &


Supply Co.

BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


place they appear in another, and
con-mence anew their depreda-
tions and atrocities.
It is suspected, and with good
show of reason, that a number of
half-breed Cheroz-e renegades are
among the Camanches, instigating
them to these deeds, and perhaps
leading them on to their commis-
sion. On one occasion, a party
numbering over one hundred at-
tacked five wagons on their way
from Chihuahua to some other
point, bent upon capturing and
plundering their contents. A num-
ber of Americans were along with
the wagons, and determined to re-
sist to the last, they disposed of
themselves in the most advan-
tageous position and commenced
a fire upon their assailants in
good earnest.
It was while they were choosing
their position that a voice from
the Indians was heard shouting in
excellent English: "That's right-
huddle together, will ye.". The
waggoners finally made out to beat
off their assailants, and they were
positive t h at Cherokees were
among th'e Indians. Many of the
Mexicans assert that the Caman-
ches, from the daring and syste-
matic mode of their attacks, are
led by Americans; but this is flat-
ly denied by all the natives of the
United States, who know that the
Cherokees or some of our Western
Indians are league with their
more savage brethren of the
prairies.
To show the daring of the In-
dians, and the extent to which
they go ih the maraudings, a party
of some 250re'ecently dashed bold-
ly into Cuencame, a town of sev-
eral thousand inhabitants near the
southern line of the State of Dur-
ango, and carried off a large num-
ber of valuable horses, besides
many prisoners-the panic-strick-
en inhabitants hardly making a
show of resistance.
Among the prisoners were two
young, pretty and well-informed
girls, the daughters of a wealthy
Spanish merchant of the place.
The girls were at a small country
seat of their father's near the
edge of the town, were among the
first taken, and were carried off
by their captors to the North.
Their half-frantic parent offered a
heavy amount for their ransom or
rccaptutre, but all his efforts have
been ineffectual up to last ac-
counts. We i-ecollect these girls
well, having spent the better part
of two days at their father's house
while on the march from Santa Fe
to Mexico. The hospitality of the
parent and the graceful deport-
ment of his kind-hearted daugh-
ters have not yet been forgotten,
and it is melancholy to reflect
that such a cruel fate has befallen
them.
Such are the scenes which for
the last year have been almost
daily enacted in some of the north,
ern departments ir Mexico, and
yet these people ta.R right valor
ously of invading and overwhelm-
ing Texas. It would seem as
though a population kept within
its own gates by savages would
set to work to strengthen and for.
tify itself at home rather than in-
dulge in idle gasconade about in-
vading neighboring territories.

(From Mariposa (Cal:f.) Gazette,
October 15, 1856)
THE ORIGIN OF YO SEMITE
VALLEY
How was this curious freak of
nature formed? is a question that
every visitor will ask. It is a
puzzle to the imagination, and
baffles even the scientific student.
Prof. Whitney of vie state survey
discusses the question in his ad-
mirable volume upon the Yo Sem-
ite, the big trees and the I4gh bSi-


THE STAH


Johns-Manville Roofing


erra, which, with its maps, should
be the companion of every one
who visits these regions.
He rejects, as impossible, the
idea of water having worn it out;
or that it was the work of a gla-
cier; or that it was split open by
a convulsion of nature; but con-
cludes as the only practicable
supposition that the bottom just
dropped out! There is no other
way of accounting for what is
gone but that it sunk below. It
was not carried down stream; it
does not remain in the valley,
there would be no valley if it did;
there are but comparatively small
deposits of rock t the valley un-
der the walls-no more than the
waste, by frost and ice and water,
of a few generations at the most;
and, indeed, there seems to be no
other supposition that meets the
mystery than that the missing
rocks are swallowed up below.
It would appear, too, as if the
chasm had not been long filled up
to its present point, and that or-
iginally and until within a com-
paratively recent pernod; the whole
valley. was a grand, deep lake.
This is a peculiar theory; it ap-
plies but rarely to- the strange
forms of nature.scattered over the
earth's surface;: but the. Yo Sem-
ite is a peculiar phenomenon; it
justifies, it indeed, demands a pe-
culiar explanation, and no other
eits .itt sb reasoni ble as this.
Next Week: The Battle of Zurich.


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Oil Paints In All Colors

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If you have, your Lot,


let- 'u figure lhe,.cost


of your Homse.




Sts i o


We can arrange to fi-

nance lumber and build-

ing materials from

the foundation to
lock and key


GOOD GRADE FRAMING AT A LOW PRICE
See Us Before 'Buying

PHONE 69 PORT ST. JOE, FLA


Friday., January 28, 1939

The expression "All is lost save
honor" was first used by Francis
the First of France after a mili-
tary defeat.


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
----0------
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


,; 11 11\ I \'
FOR BETTER HEALTH
Milk is .an energy food. It is
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alone or with other foods. En-
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ALWAYS CALL FOR

iSOLOMON '

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Products


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iol






Friday, January 28, 193



Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


As we approach another election
period we hear rumors of this or
that individual becoming a candi-
date for such and such an office.
The layman, concerned with the
business of living, reacts to these
rumblings in much the same man-
ner as he responds to the familiar
growl of distant thunder that fore-
tells the coming of the storm.
He knows that clear and peace-
ful skies soon will be darkened
,by heavy clouds; blinding rain will
dTin visibility; the rumble of
thunder will increase, the light-
ning will flash, raw winds will
howl, and there will be mud to
contend with.
The tendency on the part of
those of us who have no personal
axe to grind, who seek no office,
covet no special privilege, ask no
favors but prefer to go about our
business as ordinary citizens, is
to seek shelter end-as far as
possible-keep out of the political
storm.
No matter which way the wind
blows, we know it is pretty apt
to be a cold one as far as we are
concerned. We prefer the warmth
of sincere friendship and the light
of truth, and we have learned that
these are usually lost in the tur-
moil and torrent. The slimy mud
annoys us; the fog and sleet blind
us and make clear, sane thinking
a problem. The pledges and prom-
ises that drop like driving rain
from the lips of" -ager office
seekers we know will disappear as
the 'dew when calm returns and
the storm has blown itself out.
We are asked to choose leaders
authorized to th ik and talk and
act for us in affairs of momentous
import. On a bit of paper the
politicians -referito as "The. Sacred
Ballot" we are urged to make a
tiny cross-mark beside this or
that name. To all but a pitiful
few the names appearing on these
ballots will mean nothing. Listed
there are names of men you and
I never met-some we have never
even heard of. Others, mayhap,


THE STAR PAGE SEVEN


we have been permitted to gaze
upon from a distance as they
waved their arms and extolled
their virtues upon a stump.
We want to get it over with
as quickly as possible, so we make
our mark and go our way. Few of
us stop to ponder over what the
marks we leave behind us really
mean. If that ballot carried above
the names the following statement,
a lot of folks would take more
time and give more thought to
their marking:
"I, John Citizen, do hereby ap-
point those designated below to
act as my agents and clothe them
with full and complete authority
to regulate my life and that of my
family, determine what I shall or
shall not do under any and all
circumstances, restrict my activi-
ties, mold my morals, share my
earnings, throw me in jail, send
me to war, question me at length
on any subject, inspect my books,
require that I pay various licenses,
tax my income, determine my dole
to charity, provide for my old age,
educate my children, determine
my needs, specify my hours of la-
bor-in short, I place my welfare
and that of my children, present
and future, in their hands, with-
out reservation or equivocation,
and may God have mercy on my
soul."
Most of us-would hesitate to
grant such authority to one we
had known and respected and
trusted all our lives. Certainly
we would want to know a lot more
about such a person than we do
about the average office-seeker
for whom we make our mark.
Regardless of weat the candi-
dates say about themselves or
each other, ask yourself before
you vote: "Would 5 trust this man
to care for my wife and child;
would I share with him a joint
checking account at my bank;
will I follow blindly where he
leads?"

SEEK BUSINESS LOCATIONS

B. F. Kerr, E. T. King, L. L.
Zimmerman and L. E. Jenks of
Tallahassee, we.e in Port St. Joe
this- week seeking business loca-
tions.


January 29, 1938


BEGAY
WHERE GAIETY
DOES GOOD
BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW
for the Gulf County Celebra-
tion of the Birthday to the
President at Port Inn.

GULF HARDWARE AND

SUPPLY CO.


SOUTH GEORGIA LANDS
MAY BE TAPPED FOR OIL

Thousands of Acres In 0O Counties
Are Leased for Exploration

Seven hundred thousand acres
of land in ten Georgia counties
have been leased for oil explora-
tion, according to J. L. Adler of
the Independent Prospecting com-
pany. who states the south Geor-
gia area has structures similar to
the Texas-Louisiana Gulf coast oil
areas.
Pan-American and the Adams
Oil and Gas company of Houston,
Texas, hold huge tracts of acreage
in Georgia. Deep tests are sched-
uled to be made within a few
weeks. One test, a wildcat, is be-"
ing .drilled now just across the
Ceorgia state line in Florida.
Leases have been selling for
nominal sums, ranging from 25 to
50. cents an acre. Royalties are


completed and the postal depart-
ment will move into the building
tomorrow.
I --


selling for a much higher price,
some acreage bringing in as high
as $7 an acre.
Leasing.has been active in Cam-
den, Wayne, Brantley. Pierce, Ap-
pling, Bacon, Ware, Atkinson, La-
nier and Coffee counties.

NEW PANAMA CITY POST-
OFFICE AND PARK TO BE
DEDICATED FEBRUARY 22
Panama City's new postoffice
building and the new Bay Front
park, being completed through
federal expenditures, will be of-
ficially dedicated February 22,
George Washington's birthday.
The $120,000 postoffice has been

Paid Political Advertising

FOR STATE ATTORNEY
Felldw Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election
as State Attorney for the 14th Ju-
dicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Bay, Calhoun; Gulf,.
Holmes, Jackson and Washington,
subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office
promptly, fairly, courteously, and
to the best of my ability. If re-
elected, I will continue to do so.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr.,
Marianna, Fla.


Sewer GConnections

We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

I SEE

Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.

- - - - - -- -- -- .. .


J. L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

-------o------

-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


MID-WINTER



CLEARANCE SALE


of


.QUALITY LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR



Commencing Friday, Jan.28




Lillian Kilpatrick's Smart Shop


PANAMA CITY


,-FLORIDA


-JEWEL R Y
-DIAMONDS


MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT

WILLIAMS' PLACE
--{ PALM POINT INN }.- ; i-i.-
FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING
""'.- ..^'-^ m \


REFRESHMENTS


DANCING


SNo Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.







Take Advantage of the Off-Season

Savings
Let Me Figure Any Building
That You Desire



H. H. TAYLOR
GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe


FILING CABINETS
T Durable, All-Steel
Electrically Welded
We have them for the small
office as well as the large
office.
Come in and let us show you
our line.
We Specialize in
BLACK LINE PRINTS
AND BLUE PRINTS


C. A. Tovey
Rooms 7-9, Costin Building
Port St. Joe, Fla.


I


------ ------l ~llillllllWI111


l'"'l;~h~i~l~i~~~IQ! I!llllll~b~illll!lllIlllli~h~~!lllilllll


mr~mml n!ll!llsl~t~wil!Hilla!!lll~


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR






PAGEEIGH THESTA


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MISS WILLIE OLA MARTIN
AND MORTON MAHON WED
Simplicity was the keynote in
the wedding of Miss Willie Ola
Martin and Morton Mahon, which
occurred at 9 o'clock Saturday eve-
ning at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
E. C. Pridgeon. The living room
and dining room were decorated
in white and green and tall white
tapers lighted the scene. An im-
provised altar of lattice-work en-
twined with greenery was placed
between the rooms, before which
the ceremony was performed. At
each side of the altar was placed
a sacred lily. Only members of
th'e two families were present.
Following the ceremony, those
present were ushered into the din-
ing room where the bride was pre-
sented with a beautifully decor-
ated brides' cake upon which was
a miniature bride and groom. The
hostess .served 'refreshments of
.ake" and coffee.
Mrs. Mahon is the youngest
daughter of Mrs. Willie Ola Mar-
ti, and has lived in Port St. Joe
practically all her life. Mr. Mahon
came to Porf-St. Joe from West
Virginia wh'ef quite small and is
a graduate of St. Joe high school.
He is employed at the St. Joe Ia-
p.r company and is operator at
the St. Joe theater.
BAPTIST W. M. U. IN
ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM
The Baptist Woman's Mission-
ary Union met at the church Mon-
day afternoon for th'e Royai Serv-
ice program, with Mrs. Willie Ola
Martin leading. The Golden Jubi-
lee of the National W. M. U. is be-
ing celebrated during 1938, and
the first program meeting of the
new year had been fittingly given
the subject "Our Golden Jubilee."
The various phases of the W. M.
TJ. work, past, present and. future,
were ably presented by Mesdames.
J. O. -Baggett, Presneli. Maddox,
Holliday and Harrell.
Th'e count of the two circles
was taken. Members from Circle
No. 1: Mesdamea L. R. Holliday,
Harrell, B. F. Daughtry, Perritt,
Wages, D. F. Miller, McClellan,
Maddox, Van DerGriff, Martin
-and Owens. Circle No. 2: Mrs. J.
W. Sisemore, W. J. Daughtry,
)endy, Hughes, Hammock, Cason,
"White, Willerson, Baker, Lawson
and Oglesby. With two visitors
and the president the total was
25 present.
Next meeting will be the fifth
Monday at the church. The sub-
ject of the program will be "Stew-
ardship."
r" r r
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Jones, Jr.,
have moved to this city from Tal-
lahassee. Mr. Jones has accepted
a position with the Florida Hous-
ing corporation.
Judge Alton Dendy of Wewa-
hitchka was the guest of his par-
ents over the week-end.
*


For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANfA TUBES
$10 :REWARD for any Radio
St we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Roche's Community Store


BAND PLAYS FOR
CHURCH SERVICES
Adding much to the Sunday
school and church services at the
Presbyterian church last Sunday
were numbers rendered by the lo-
cal school band under the direc-
tion of Dan Farmer. Much prog-
ress has been made by the band,
both in their work and in the num-
her now playing.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Howell an-
nounce the arrival of a son, born
in Cottondale on January 21, 1938.

F. M. Rowan, Jr., was visiting
friends in Panama City Sunday.


MISSIONARY SOCIETY
STUDIES NEW BOOK ,
The Methodist Missionary So-
ciety met at the church Monday
for an interesting study of their
new book, "What Is This Moslem
World?" led by Mrs. Roy Gibson.
An invitation was extended to
meet with the Apalachicola society
next Monday but this was not ac-
cepted due to a previous invita-
tion. All members are asked to
meet at the club house Monday at
3 p. m. for a social meeting.

NORRIS-SAPP
James Norris and Miss Mary
Sapp were married Saturday night
at the home of the bride's par-
ents, Rev. and Mrs. Sapp ,


JACKSONVILLE WEDDING
IS OF INTEREST HERE
A wedding of interest to local
residents occurred in Jacksonville
Wednesday when Miss Susan
Elizabeth Edwards, only daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. William T. Ed-
wards, was married to Arthur
Chamberlin, Jr., of Rackenford
Manor, England. The father of the
bride is connected with the St.
Joe Paper company and the Apa-
lachicola Northern railway, spend-
ing the greater part of his time in
this city.
The ceremony was performed
by the Rev. Newton Middleton,
rector of St. John's Episcopal
church, Jacksonville, and; the Rt.
'Rev. Frank A. Juhan, bishop of
the Episcopal diocese of Florida,
pronounced the benediction.
Mrs. Chamberlain was gradu-
ated from St. Catherine's in Rich-
mond, Va., and Sarah Lawrence
college in Bronxvlile, N. Y.
Mr. Chamberlain is associated


He will
Appreciate
YOUR
VOTE
and
Support
For

State
Fourteenth


Attorney
Judicial Circuit


E X mRA SPECIAL!!


B & E Grocery Co.


6 LARGE BARS PET MIL 4 LARGE CANS 4 Large Size Cans 5 LBS. BEST CANE

P SOAPP LARGE CANS TOMATOES PEAS SUGAR


25 15ce 25e 25c. 28c


BANANAS 3 POUNDS 2 POUNDS 5c S E L X
CRISC 0 SHORTENING CANDY BARS WASHING POWDER

7e 59c 25c FR c 9c

DOZ EN or 1 POUND 23c 25FO

4 POUNDS 4 POUNDS 4 POUNDS 10 POUNDS 6 cans VAN CAMP'S

BLACK PEAS NAVY BEANS GRITS POTATOES Pork & Beans
EYE


24c 23c 15e 199c 25c


GOOD BREAKFAST FIRST CLASS 1 POUND OLEO Taylor's Concord SELECT

BAC 0 N Pork Chops MARGARINE Grape Juice ORANGES
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27c Ib. 20c 1 5c 39c qt. 30c

RIPE 6 CANS 1 POUND 4 POUNDS J U IC Y

OLIVES SARDINES PEANUTS R I C E ORANGES


Oc can 25c 8c 25c 15c
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TENDERIZED Western CHUCK Western CHUCK FRESH FLORIDA S W E E T


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NEW STORE --- FRESH-VEGETABLES --- BEST MEATS

BEST OUALIqT GROCERIES


PAGE EIGHT


--


---


THE STAR


Friday., January 28, 1939

with the. Reynolds Tube com-
pany of Birmingham, Eng., where
he and his bf'ide will reside.
---------*7--~---------
Additional society pages 4 and 5.

ELECT

JOHN C. WYNN