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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00169
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 21, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00169

Full Text





Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
.DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
ert growing .little city. In
the heart .of the pine belt.


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


1838-HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 100TH ANN IVERSARY-1938


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 1938 NUMBER 13


ASKS RE-ELECTION TO
R. R. COMMISSION


Jerry W. Carter of Talahassee,
chairman of the Florida Rail-
road Commission, who yesterday
made formal announcement of
his candidacy to succeed himself
as a member of that body. He
will run in Group 2 for nomina-
tion fof a fouryear term.


Dredge Completing

Work In Harbor

MAYOR EXPRESSES APPRECIA-
tiiON FOfi'R VRK; SKitPPER
RECIPROCATES

The government dredge Pasca-
goula, which has been at work for
some time .in St. Joseph Bay
deepening the channel' and cutting
away the outer bar, this week
completed its work.
The following letter of appre-
ciation was sent Monday to Capt.
Willianm J. Colle, in command of
the dredge, by Mayor J. L. Sharit:
"Dear Captain Colle-I under-
stand you are about through with
the dredging assigned to you in
St. Joseph's Bay. I desire to ex-
press to you and your entire crew
the appreciation of our city for
the splendid work .that. you have
done in our channel and turning
basin. We feel you have done an
excellent piece of work, and we
are indeed grateful.
"May I-say to you, and I trust
that you will pass it ,on to your
men, that the city of Port St. Joe
appreciates immensely the cour-
tesy shown by your group of men.
No town 'or city could wish for a
finer bunch of men to be in their
midst; we have not in any way or
manner had the least trouble,with
any of them. I consider the city,
as well as yourself, very fortunate
in having a crew of men' that
makes up a crew like, the Pasca-
goula's.
"With kindest personal regards,
( am, Sincerely,
"J. L. SHARIT,
"Mayor." '
In turn, Captain Colle, Chief J. a
H. Larsen and the crew of the i
Pascagoula expressed their ap-
preciation of courtesies extended
them as follows:.
"We take this method of thank-
ing the people of the city of Port
St. Joe, the mayor, city commis-
sion and St. Joe Paper company (
.for the' hospitality and many fa- ,
vors which made our stay while
dredging Port St. Joe ship chan- a
nel very pleasant.".

Mrs. Lizzie Cooper of Apalachi- s
cola was a business visitor in the i;
city Saturday. r


RECOMMENDS

F 0 U R MILLIONS

FOR WATERWAYS

WOULD PROVIDE $119,000 FOR
WORK IN MAINTAINING
ST. JOSEPH'S BAY

The war department has dis-
closed that Major General Edward
M. Markham, former chief of en-
'gineers, had recommended that $4,-
055,600 be provided for develop-
ment of Florida harbors, streams
"and flood control projects during
-the fiscal year 1939. The report,
dated Ooctober 4, was written by
General Markham before he re-
tired as head of the engineers'
corps. The fiscal year of 1939 be-
gins July 1 this year.
Among the amounts which Gen-
eral Markham said could -be
"profitably expended" in Florida
during the year were:
Entrance to St. Joseph's Bay,
$119,000 for maintenance and re-
imbursement of- funds advanced by
local interests for 1938 work.
Carrabelle bar and harbor, $234,-
500 for dredging in the sound,
river channels, turning basin and
outer bar channel.
Apalachicola Bay, $30,000 for
maintenance.
Apalachicola river, cut-off, Lee
slough and lower Chipola river,
$25.000 for .maintenance.
Upper Chipola river, Florida and
Alabama, $5000 for snagging op-
erations.
St. Marks river, $75,000 for re-
moving snags and dredging in
Apalachee Bay to St. Marks.
Intracoastal waterway from Apa-
lachicola Bay to St. Marks river,
$480,000 for dredging canal.
Channel from Apalachicola river
to St. Andrews Bay, $30,000 for
maintenance.
Intracoastal waterway from
Choctawhatchee Bay to Pensa-
cola Bay, $20,(TOT- for mainten-
ance.
St. Andrews say, $40,000 for
maintenance.
Pensacola harbor, $85,000 for
maintenance and dredging Bayou
Chico channel and .turning basin.
--~~------

Taylor Is Awarded

Contract For Jail

STRUCTURE AT COUNTY SEAT 1
TO COST IN NEIGHBOR- I
HOOD OF $15,000 r

H. H. Taylor, local contractor a
and builder, has been awarded the
contract for construction of an ad- t
ition to the county jail at Wewa- a
.itchka to cost in the neighbor- s
blood of $15,000. o
Mr. Taylor, who is moving his
equipment to the county seat this c
Teek, will commence work on the ii
addition immediately 'and expects e
o complete the job within 90 c
ays. F
------A-------
PHOTO STUDIO
OPENED HERE

A. M. Quarterman of Panama
ity this week opened a photo tl
studio in the Costin. building, next T
oor to the Florida Power Corpor- n
tion office on Second avenue, a'
Mr. Quarterman is an expert o0
photographer and specializes in
udio and commercial work. He
also offering 24-hour service on hi
11 film developing. vi


WYNN SEEKS OFFICE
OF STATE ATTORNEY
|- -


Plans Being Made



For Birthday Ball



"Night January 29
1',__


Senator John C. Wypn of Mari-
anna, who this week announced
that he would be a candidate for
the office of state attorney for
the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit.


PRIZES FOR THE

BEST GARDEN

WOMAN'S :CLUB PRESENTED
WITH $50 TO.BE AWARDED
FOR BEST EFFORTS

Mrs. J. R. Dorsey, member oF
the conservation and natural re
sources committee of the Port St
Joe Woman's Club, is in receipt
of the following letter from W. T
Edwards of the St. Joe PapeI
Company: '
"This will confirm my verbal of-
fer to you to contribute $50 for
the year 1938 to be used by the
Woman's Club for prizes for the
best lawns, flower gardens or
other forms of planted home beau-
tification. The Woman's Club may
fix the amounts of the prizes, but
I would suggest the sum be di-
vided in not more than three
prizes. : '
"In memory of the man who
made the rebuilding of Port St.
Joe possible, I am requesting that
the prize be called 'The Alfred I.
duPont Honme Beautification Me-
morial Prize.'
"It is my earnest wish that the
adies of Port St. Joe, through the
Woman's Club and other organi-
zations, as well as individually,
begin now an active campaign to
nake the city of Port St. Joe the
most beautiful town in Florida."
With the incentive of a cash
award for home beautification,
something that every resident of
he. city should be interested in
anyway we may soon expect to
ee Port St. Joe a veritable bower
If beauty.
Every home-owner is urged to
o-operate with the Woman's Club
a this worth while, project, and
eventually we should make this
ity one of the boveliest in West
'lorida.

'ERMIT ISSUED FOR
SERVICE STATION

A permit has been issued for
he immediate construction of a
exaco service station at the cor-
er. of .Second street and Third
venue. B. W. Eells will be the
wner of this station.
--_____ _A-,
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. VandeGriff
ave returned to the city after a
sit of several weeks in Ocala.


Meeting Tonight

For Organization

Commerce Body

BELIEVE CIVIC INTERESTS OF
CITY MAKE SUCH A BODY
A PRIME NECESSITY

A number of leading citizens of
Port St. Joe, believing that the
advantages of the city should be
exploited to the fullest possible
measure, have called a public
meeting for this evening at 7:30
o'clock at city hall for the pur-
pose of organizing.: a: chamber of
commerce.
There are very few cities of any
size in Florida .oday that do not
have such a body and it is be-
lieved that the small amount of
money necessary to start a cham-
ber of commerce will be more
than repaid in the number of new
business houses P.a~jg permanent
residents brought here through
the agency of the chamber.
Every resident -of .Port St. Joe
having the interests of the city at
heart is urged to be present at
this meeting tonight.


Modern Grocery

To Open Here

WILL STOCK COMPLETE LINE
OF GOODS AND HAVE
UP-TO-DATE MARKET

Another addition to Port St.
Joe's rapidly expanding business
district is the new grocery store
and market opening tomorrow in
the store room next the Gulf
Hardware & Supply Co. on Third
avenue under the competent man-
agement of W. A. Bramball of Il-
linois and Glenn Elledge of Talla-
hassee.
The new concern has an enor-
mous stock of groceries and a
modern and up-to-date meat mar-
ket which will handle only the
best in the line of meats.
The residents of the city join
with The Star in welcoming this
new concern and know that their
faith in the future of Port St. Joe
as a growing community will be
fully justified.

T. H. STONE FILES FOR
COMMISSIONER OFFICE

T. H. Stone, present member of
the board of city commissioners,
whose term expires in February,
yesterday filed intention of being
a candidate for re-election. As yet
he has no opposition for the post,
but it is rumored that a number
of residents of the city will seek
the office.
Mr. Stone has served on the
city commission for 17 years, dur-
ing 14 of which he held the
mayor's chair. He has established
an enviable reputation as always :
working for the best interest of
the city and its residents.


Port St. Joe Will Join With
Nation In Contributing To
Fund For Fighting Dread
Infantile Paralysis.

Millions of Americans, for the
first time in history, are being
asked to enlist in a united fight
against the "maiming death"-in-
fantile paralysis, and the residents
of Port St. Joe and Gulf county
will have an opportunity to do
their bit when they purchase
tickets for the President's Ball to
be held at Port Inn the night of
January 29-President Roosevelt's
birthday.
C. L. Morgan of Wewahitchla
has been named chairman of the ,
drive in Gulf county, and fie will
be assisted in this city by Horace
Soule, who has appointed a bevy
of beautiful commrtteewomen, Mil-
dred Mira, Leta Huffman, Mary
Gore, Doris Dorsey, Ruth Soule
and Sally Mahon. to aid in mak-
ing the' affair a success. It is ex-
pected to raise between .$300 and-
$400 in Gulf county for' the new
National Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis.
Dinner will be served at the Inn
from 7:30 to 8:30, and a dance
will be staged from 9 o'clock un-
til 2. Reserved tables will be'
available for those desiring tables
for refreshments during the dance,
which will be held in the main
lobby of the hotel.
This is the first time that an
affair of this character has been
held in Port St. Joe, and everyone
is being called upon to make it a
success.
The new foundation will be to
lead, direct and unify the fight on
every phasd of infantile paralysis.
It will provide finances to carry
on investigations into the cause of
the disease and the methods by
which it may be prevented, and
it will endeavor to eliminate much
of the needless after-effect of the
disease-wreckage causell by the
failure to make early and accur-
ate diagnosis of its presence.
This is indeed a worthy cause
and one that we feel sure will be
contributed to generously by our
eiWftlfs.

JOE HAUSER TO OPEN
DEPARTMENT STORE

Joe Hauser, formerly connected
with the Hauser store in Marl-
anna, states that he will open a
department store in this city, prob-
ably next week, in the building on
Third avenue formerly occupied
by the Gulf Hardware & Supply
company.
This newest addition to Port St.
Foe's business district will carry
Complete line oT men's, women's
and children's ready-to-wear.
-----*------
TEACHERS' SALARY
FUND GETS $1,250,000

The state paid the January
school teachers' fund $1,250,000
'uesday. Officials announced col-.
ections from automobile license
ales were sufficient to meet the
mount..







PAG TW H TRFiaJnay2,13


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

--.f Telephone 51 }z-'-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


A NEW CITY RISES FROM THE DUST
OF OLD ST. JOSEPH

One hundred years ago St. Joseph was
seriously considered as the capital of the
state of Florida, and it was here that the
state's constitution was drawn up and signed.
At that time the city was one of the most
important shipping points in the state and
huge vessels from all parts of the world put
in here to take on cargoes of cotton, naval
supplies, beef and timber. It boasted a popu-
lation of about 3000 souls.
Today nothing remains of the once-thriving
seaport that was a city when the names of
Tampa, St. Petersburg, Miami and other
present-day metropolitan areas were un-
dreamed of, save a few mounds in the bury-
ing grounds where practically the entire pop-
ulation was interred when a scourge of yel-
low fever swept over the city and wiped out
men, women and children, rich and poor, in-
discriminately, leaving but a handful of
whites and the negroes, who were immune
to the plague. '
Now, rising from the dust of the doomed
and forgotten city as the Phenix rises from
its ashes, is a model city with paved streets,
modern water and sewer systems, electric
lights, modernistic buildings, telephone ex-
change, a newspaper plant and all the hustle
and bustle as of yore-and again ships of the
Seven Seas will ride at anchor-in the 27-
square-mile harbor and discharge their car-
goes at the 4000-foot steel pier.
Truly a reincarnation, and brought about
by the erection of a $7,500,000 paper mill here
by the duPont-Mead interests to convert
slash pine into kraft paper and pulp.
Those residents who had an abiding faith
in the future of Port St. Joe, remaining here
in the face of actual privation, and those who
have settled in the city since the first sur-
vey was run for the mill, can look forward
to an era of unprecedented prosperity for
this once-forgotten little town that for years
lay in the backwash of a progressing world.


A SURVEY OF TAX BURDEN

"The several governments under which
Americans live and suffer each year and by
which they also benefit, collect in taxes an
afiount which averages $100 for each man,
woman and child in the entire country," says
the- Montgomery Advertiser. "This is more
than a fifth of the national income-going for
taxes. But a far more significant fact is
that the burden of taxation falls most heavily
on the families least able to bear it thus de-
fying all rules of intelligent taxation."
It is remarked that this conclusion has
been reached, after a survey which was made
in the past two years by the Twentieth Cen-
tury Fund, from- money provided by the late
Edward A. Filene. It is indicated as scien-
tifically accurate and honest. Two other sig-
nificant conclusions were reached by the
workers under the fund auspices; first, that
nearly everyone pays more taxes than he re-
alizes, and second, that there seems to be no
prospect of tax relief.
Two heavy volumes comprise the report
on the survey, but some excellent summaries


have been made of the work, and it is told
that Paul Anderson, writing for the St. Louis
Post-Dispatch, has given a most interesting
review of it. From the printed summary it
is learned that "a farm family with an income
of $500 and a wage earner's family with an
income of $1000 will pay between 11 and 19
per cent of their incomes in taxes. But each
of these families, after meeting the bare costs
of existence-and the taxes hidden therein-
is in debt at the end of the year," Mr. An-
derson writes. "On the other hand, the fam-
ily .with an income of $1,000,000 may be taxed
at the rate of 93 per cent (which is excep-
tionally high,, and allows for gift and death
taxes) and still have $70,000 a year for liv-
ing and other expenditures." Then adds:
"Hence it is apparent that the taxes of the
healthyy are paid out of surplus over a gen-
erous allowance for living costs. Obviously,
the payment of such taxes involves no per-
sonal hardship for the taxpayer's family,
whereas the taxes of the low income families
come out of the very necessaries of life. In
other words, the pinching of the tax shoe at
the opposite ends of the scale really comes
cown to this: The rich family has, less to in-
vest; the poor family has less to ,eat.
"A singular injustice noted by the authors,
one that amounts to a refinement of cruelty,
is the fact that the very lowest income group
bears a heavier burden of taxes than the
group next above it. Thus, the Illinois farm
family with an income of $500 a year pays
11 to 16 per cent of it in taxes while the Illi-
nois farmer with $2000 a year pays an esti-
mated 8 per cent in taxes. Approximately
the same is true as between the $1000 a year
wage earner and the wage earner with $2000
a year. The explanation is that the lower in-
come groups spend a larger percentage of
their income for consumption goods which
are subject to general and special sales taxes."
It is recommended that the tax on undis-
tributed profits be repealed and that the
capital stock tax and sales taxes be abolished
and that the corporation income tax be re-
vised and reductions made in the payroll
taxes. In their stead the authors of the're-
port would impose a capital gains tax, "un-
der which," Mr Anderson explains, "increases
in the value of property of all kinds would be
taxed yearly on an accrual basis, with a pro-
vision for carrying over losses from year to
year."
The report says further that there should
be a "genuine" excess profits tax with "high
progressive rates reaching a peak of perhaps
75 per cent even in peace times." There
should be heavier reliance on death and gift
taxes and a broadening of the base of per-
sonal income tax exemptions. And these
suggestions and 'recommendations should be
given thoughtful attention when the matter
of tax revision is undertaken.-Times-Union.

A state legislature is a body of men who
consider first the welfare of the whole, not a
bunch of fellows who think only of their re-
spective counties.-Okaloosa Messenger. A
legislative body of that sort would indicate
that the long-deferred millennium had arrived.

The women gave up tight lacing because
it was too tough on the equator-Florida
Times-Union. Which caused a subsidence in
the temperate zone.

Boomerang: "If women had any sense there
would be more bachelors."-Port St Joe Star.
Carrying that thing too far would extermin-
ate the race.-Clermont Press.

Kansas and Nebraska are making plans to
get the grasshopper before he is able to hop.
-Times-Union. Couldn't plans be made to
get the speeder before he speeds?

Keep your shirt on, but don't let the sleeves
get in the way of your work.

Our wants are easily satisfied-our desires
never.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


I don't know how the question
arose, but somehow the conversa-
tional topic turned to "Love," and
a young man of my acquaintance
remarked 'that "Love is an ab-
scess."
It may be, for all I know .. .
People who are in love act as
though something were eating on
them.
The Good Book rays that "Love
passeth all understanding."
Webster defines it as "An af-'
fection of the hear; excited by that
which delights or commands af-
fection; devoted attachment to
one of the opposite sex."
Walter Wincheil, quoting George
P. Mayh'ew of Pittman, N. J., de-
fines it as follows: "Love is an in-
ward indescribableness and an
outward all overmshness."
Which, after afl, s about right.
Deciding to look into this mat-
ter of love myself, I went out on
the street Saturday evening and
interviewed several people from
various walks of life.
I first approached a one-husband
wife (or'at least so I was told)
and such wives are getting scare
nowadays, and asked her what she
knew about Love. .. She
said she had been hog-tied to an
old skinflint for ;0 years and he
was a goodly man and Lussed and
cussed and slapped not, but as for
Love-well. she just couldn't put
her finger on it that it
was like the pot or gold at the
end of the rainbow .. just
beyond her reach but she
had hopes of her husband drag-
ging a little .of it in before the
golden wedding bells began to toll.
I next chinned with a man who
had been hanging on to the same
apron strings for 55 years, and is
still at it which shows
he's a hound for endurance .
and I asked him wnat he had to
say about Love. "When male and
female can hit it orf together for
more than half century," he
said, "without pulling hair, pluck-
ing eyeballs or barking shins, that
must be Love." .. And I
thought that was a fine expres-
sion but he couldn't say
for sure what Love really is.
Next I struck up with a woman
who had enticed three men to the
matrimonial slaughterhouse and
was out trying to .asso the fourth
and I thought for sure I'd get the
low-down on Love from her. ....
I said: "Oh, woman, thou who hast
tossed many males to the ash can,
canst tell me what is Love?"
And she said: "Well, all that I
ever knew about it was the bunk."
That was a stunner, and yet
whatever it is, bunk or no bunk,
it must be hot stuff, for she was
out looking for more.
On my way back to my type-
writer, and still up in the air
about this Love business. I saw a
couple cozily entwined in a road-
ster. Stepping up alongside, I
asked: "Oh, Youth, is this Love?"
The gal shot her hard-boiled
disposition at me and said: "Who
wants to know?"
And when I told her the world
was dying for a little bit of Love,
she said: "Send 'em around." .
Which was about the same as ad-
mitting she had IT.
So about all the advice I can
give is: Why worry about it, for
if we can't understand it, how can
we know when we've got it?
Love might be bolony, and if it
is. I know a lot of people who are
full of it. Love might be
a trick of Nature to perpetuate
tle human race and if it
is, I know a lot of married folk
who are laying dawn on the job.
We are, admonished to "Love
thy neighbor as thyself"
and that's good doctrine, but it


PROPOSE NEWSPRINT
MILL FOR GEORGIA

$5,000,000 State Bonds to Build
Plant Being Urged

Construction of the South's first
newsprint mill in middle Georgia
is contemplated in a bill prepared
for introduction in the Georgia
legislature. Tlrh bill would create
the Georgia Wood Pulp Develop-
ment and Conservation Authority
as a public corporation, consisting
of three members to be appointed
by the governor.
The Authority would be em-
powered to issue bonds to the ex-
tent of $5,000,000 for construction
of the proposed paper mill, at a
location yet to be determined. In-
dustrialists are said to favor a lo-
cation at about the point, where
the Oconee and the Ocmulgee
rivers converge to form the Alta-
maha river.. This would be neat
Lumber City, in Telfair county.
However, Waycross, Valdosta, and
other points are said to be put-
:ting in strong bids.
The Authority would lease the
mill to a company which would
pay about $10 per ton rental on
the mill, capable of producing 200
tons of newsprint daily.
It is estimated that newsprint
can be produced at $20 a ton,
while the estimate of Dr. Charles
Herty, Georgia scientist and pine
paper trail-blazer, is said to be
about $25 a ton, Canadian mills
have a selling price of $50 a ton.

A wife is a wonderful help to a
man. She'll stand ny him in all of
his troubles he wouldn't have had
if he hadn't got married.-Florida
Times-Union.

can be carried too far
especially if you love thy neigh-
bor's wife. There's nothing that
beats one wife (or one husband),
one faith, one baptism and a good
cigar, King Solo':;on to the con-
trary notwithstanding. How-
ever, there are some men who say
that one wife is just twice too
many and you have but
to take one look at what they got
to understand what Sherman
meant when he said: "War is hell."
I've heard it said quite often
that "Love is blind." ... That
perhaps accounts for so many men
and women getting into th'e wrong
car or apartment. Somebody ought
to invent a dingus, some kind of a
safety compass, for steering 'em
to the right harbor and keep so
many matrimonial canoes from go-
ing on the rocks. To my
way of thinking, Love is not only
blind, but is also deaf, dumb and
insane, for it squealeth like a
stuck pig and biftteth its brains
out for no reason at all.
But with so great a multitude
of witnesses frothing at the mouth
and testifying for Love, swearing
by it and at it, I suspect I'm go-
ing to have to admit there is such
a thing .. ut before I fall
for the stuff, I'd like to know what
it is, from whence It cometh and
whither it goeth .. f you
have to buy it, borrow it or steal
it if it is all wool and a
yard wide if it increases
taxes or slams you for alimony
and if there is a string
tied to it so somebody can piay
you for an April fool?
Love is life's end (an end but
never ending);
All joys, all sweets, all happiness,
awarding;
Love is life's wealth (ne'er spent,
but ever spending);
More rich by giving, taking by
discarding;
Love's life's reward, rewarded in
rewarding.
-Phineas Fletcher,
"Britain's Ida."

I'd appreciate it a lot if some
authority amfongst those who read
this ribald column would write in
and tell me just--
WHAT IS LOVE i


THE STAR


Friday, January 21, 1938


PAGE TWO







Friday,~r~ Jaur t13 H TRPG HE


WATER ACTUALLY BURNS 5,000,000 PINE TREES


Hot water-it actually burns-
has started a drilling campaign in
Bolivar county, Mississippi. Oil
companies sent scout' to the area
when they heard rumors that wa-
ter fibm wells contained so much
natural gas that a match applied
near an open faucet would start a
flame.



Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R I G H T !

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker




C. C. WILLIAMS
Highland View


See Us for Anything in
the Way of


Electrical


SSuyipplies

We carry a complete stock
of Wire, Switches, Insula-
tors, sockets, fixtures and
all other necessities for a
complete wiring job.
I 4

Also a Complete Line of
CROSLEY
STANDARD
HOWARD
RADIOS


PLANTED IN STATE
Two and a half million pine
seedlings have been shipped from
the state forest tree nursery at
Oluste' during the first ,30 days
of the planting season. C. H. Coul-
ter, assistant state forester, said
that this represents ha:f of the
current year's crop and stated that
orders on hand and unfilled exceed
the stock still in the nursery. No
further orders can be honored and
those whose orders have been
placed are urged to take advant-
age of the present favorable wea-
ther for their planting. By next
Tuesday all seedlings should be
shipped from the nursery.
Coulter states that the nursery
schedule approved by the Florida
board of forestry for next season
calls for 12,500,000 trees, more
than double the current year's
production.

NOT BOTHERED
Doctor: "Do you suffer with
acute thirst?"
Toper: "No, I never let it get
that far."








$R 1IT

PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County
-- :--

BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


----- ------------ ----------------- ---------
LITTLES SERVICE STATION
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR--
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products -- Firestone Tires and Tubes


FOR THRIFTY HOUSEWIVES OF PORT ST. JOE

MILK 4 Small 15C 1Oc TOMATOES-- 25
or 2 Large ........... for ....... .......



Potatoes 10lbs, 2 do

LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs ....15c FIELD CORN, 3 cans 25c
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 25c COOKING OIL, gal. ...95c
Cranberry Sauce, can....10c MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes 10c

WHOLE U

PICNIC
j v N, I 'c !
Fresh PORK HAM, lb. 23c CHUCK ROAST, per lb 15c
Stew Beef, 10c lb; 3 lb. 25c Smoked SAUSAGE, lb. 20c


BAY SHORE GROCERY
BAY SHORE GROCER Y -


Highland View


We Appreciate Your Patronage


CARTER ASKS

RE-ELECTION TO

COMMISSION

"JERRY" HAS LONG BEEN A
PROMINENT LEADER IN
STATE'S AFFAIRS

Jerry W. Carter of Tallahassee,
chairman of the Florida Railroad
Commission, yesterday made for-
mal announcement of his candi-
dacy to succeed himself as a
member of that body. He will run
in Group 2 for nomination for a
four-year term.
"Jerry," as he is known to
thousands of Flor!dians, has long
been a prominent leader in gov-
ernmnental affairs and has been
credited with inaugurating many
features of Florida progress. He
held the office of state hotel com-
missioner by appointment from.
Governors Catts, Hardee and Mxr-
tin. A lifelong Democrat, he has
held many positions of trust in
the political party. He is com-
pleting his first term as a member
of the railroad commission.
Elected to the commission in
1934 with the largest percentage
vote given for -any office in the
primaries of that year, Mr. Carter
yesterday pointed out that he had,
"in matters of law, followed the
law, and in matters' of judgment,
dealt fairly with all, with special
care that interests of the great
masses of the people be pro-
tected."
Mr. Carter, white hotel commis-
sioner, inaugurated and put into
operation the Florida State Travel
Bureau, with the result that tour-
ist travel into the state increased
in volume from year to year. He
a;so was the leading proponent of
extension of the Florida tourist
season from a period of three
months to one of six months.
Another of his accomplishments
thlt marked a milestone in Flor.
ida progress was his successful
attempt to have railroads op'rat
ing into Florida set up cent-and-
one-half-a-mile fares for tourists
Mr. Carter wro:e the state build-
ing code, the state plumbers' code
and the state's sanitary rules and
regulations.
He is one of three state rail-
road commn-ssioners selected to
represent nine southern states on
a committee which attacked pres-
ent high freight rates in the South
before the interstate commerce
commission.


GULF COUNTIAN-

BACKS HODGES

J. H. KELLEY WILL OPPOSE
REMOVAL OF -STATE
CHAIRMAN

James H, Kelley, Gulf county
member of the state democratic
executive committee, said he will
oppose removal of Chairman J. B.
H.odges of Lake City for state-
ments interpreted as inimical to
President Roosevelt.
"I fail to distinguish wherein
Mr. Hodges violated any demo-
cratic principle,' elley s a i d.
"Chairman Hodges has exercised
a true democratic spirit in having
the abdominal stamina to make
an emphatic, private statement
which would convey his candid,
official and personal opinion. In-
stead of being persecuted by his
fellow Democrats-both young and
old-he should be further elevated
in the realm of the party."
Kelley said he did not entirely
agree with the I-Hodges statement
but defended it on grounds of free
speech. The Gulf committeeman
expressed "highest regard' for the
president.
An attempt to oust Hodges, he
said, vould "disrupt an orderly


and sensible party in the state."
The Leon county democratic
executive committee, after a very
stormy session Saturday after-
noon, voted 27 to 1 to urge the
state committee to remove Chair-
man Hodges for criticism of the
New Deal.
A resolution was passed re-
questing the Leon state commit-
teemen to "secure the resignation"
of Hodges because an "individual
at such cross-purposes with the
national administration cannot
wholeheartedly a nd efficiently
serve" the party.-Daily Demo-
crat.
---------4-
KELLEY IS NAMED MEMBER.
OF CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE
James H. Kelley of Wewa-
hitchka has been named by Gov-
ernor Cone as a member of the
Florida constitution centennial
committee for a celebration to be
held in Port St. Joe this year.

A new field of operations for
pickpockets has just been opened
in Berkeley, Calif. Two choir sing-
ers at the North Congregational
church had their purses stolen
while services were in progress.


GOVT. BOND UNCLAIMED
Unwanted: One $50 U. S. bond.
The Interstate National Bank of
Helena, Ark., being liquidated,
turned up the bond and its sup-
posed owner was informed. The
woman with whom the bond was
identified disclaimed ownership,
saying she had sold it.
'------------~-----"
Stromboli, a volcano in the
Mediterranean, has been in con-
stant eruption since the time of
Homer.


Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Available Immediaely

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING RE FRIGERATION

-.{ A full line of gas appliances in stock }*o-


Inruire


z tiR Theater Buil g


Miller's Drug Store Phone 168
PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY


SOUTH ERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


How will your bank account

be A YEAR FROM NOW?

We can give you the answer if you
open a weekly savings account at this
bank. We can tell you what amount
will accumulate from a weekly one-
dollar deposit from a five-dollar
weekly sum or more.

The week of January 17-23 has been
designated as Thrift Week by Congress
in honor of Ben Franklin, the man who
made Thrift fashionable. It is a timely
reminder to look to your financial status
-not only now, but a year hence.

Why not open an account today?

2!'2% INTEREST ON SAVINGS


Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.


Member cf Federal Deposit


Insurance Cor poration


~l~i~S9i~i ~ MA


PAGE THREE


THE STAR


Friday, January 21, 1938







~~~~AGE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ U FORTH TA riaJaia 1,13


Hotel Commission

Is Watchdog Over

Health of Citizens

MUST INSPECT .25,210.PLACES
DURING YEAR; 'COST OF
OPERATION IS LOW

Protecting the lives and health
of Florida's more than 3,000,000
annual tourists as well as safe-
guarding the local transient popu-
lation, is not an easy job; but it
is a job which is being done so
economically and efficiently by
the present state notel commission
as to draw commendation from all
parts of the state.
Some idea of the task which the
commission performs may be
gained from the statement of Com-
issioner W. M. Taylor that the
commission has to make regular in-
spections of all hotels, apartments,
rooming houses, restaurants, tour-
ist camps and all places providing
lodging or meals for the public.
The commission now has a list of
25,210 such places-which is 2,315
more than were listed for the year
1936. In addition rhe commission
must see that the many thousands
of employes in all pl-.ces serving
food have the proper health cer-
tificates.
The records of the commission
show that in spite of the great
amount of additional work done,
its exenditures have been de-
creased $13,814.80 fo:- those frst 11
months of 1937 from the rcnandi-
tures for the same period in 1936,
the exact figures being: For the
first 11 months of 1936, $94.559.59;


for the same period of 1937, $80,-
774.73. It is explained that these
economies have been effected by a
strict accounting of all traveling
expenses and by restricting pur-
chases to the exact requirements
of the department.
Receipts of the hotel commmis-
sion for the first 11 months of 1937
amounted to $104,696.85, which,
when compared to the $96,591.04
collected in the same period of
1936, shows an increase of $8,105.
This increase can be attributed
largely to increased number of
places requiring inspection added
to the list in 1937.
Only e xperience- inspectors are
employed by the commission, as
efficient inspection of fire and
health hazards requires specialized
knowledge, and the enforcement of
the rules and regulations adopted
by the commission for the protec-
tion of the public demands the ex-
ercise of the highest type of judg-
ment and discretion.

GILLIS QUALIFIES AS
COURT CANDIDATE
D. Stuart Gillis of DeFuniak
Springs qualified Monday as a can-
didate for justice of the supreme
court in Group 1. He paid $180 to
Secretary of State Bob Gray, be-
ing the first to qualify. He will
run in Group 1, in which Justice
Rivers Buford announced for re-
election. Candidates must qualify
by February 1.

Mesdames B. Dorsey, Watson
and. Saunders were shopping in
Panama City yesterday.
o c


Meeting Tuesday

To Talk Plans

For Celebration


MANAGER OF FLORIDA
HIBITS WILL CONFER
WITH CITIZENS


EX-


Earl Brown, vice-president and
manager of Florida National Ex-
hibits, will be in Port St. Joe next
week to confer with a committee
of citizens representative of Gulf
county with reference to formu-
lating plans for the Florida Con-
stitution Centennial Celebration
to be held here this year.
The meeting will be held at the
Port Inn.

"NO ONE READS THE PAPER"

"No one reads the paper," has
been repeatedly told every news-
paper worker since Ben Franklin
set his first line of long primer,
and disproven every time the
name of a 6-year-old fairy in the
school play was printed Lucy
Jones instead of Lucy Ann. Every-
one from grandma to second cou-
sin Susan will tell the editor that
he should have known the little
star's name; that it was just
wicked to let such a glaring error
get into the paper-why, even
Lucy would never be the same
again without that "Ann."
'Squeer, isn't it, that nobody
reads the paper, except the issue
that happens to print a six-point
error.-Sutton (Neb.) Register.


PAPER MILL SUGGESTED
FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA

Lewis Staley of the state forest
and park service, told the Central
Flolrida Council of Chambers of
Commerce Tuesday at Mount Dora
that 23,000,000 acres of Florida
land are "destined to grow timber
for an indefinite period.
"The timber could be used to
supply pulp mills," he declared.
He said a paper mill would be
an asset to Central Florida be-
cause there are 3,000,000 cords of
pine suitable for pulp but not
lumber in the ten counties around
Lake county.

Charlie Chaplin, a native of
England, Made his motion picture
debut in the United States in 1914.


IF ANYBODY HAS-

Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS.
TELL -THE EDITOR


Phone 51-The Star


WATCH FOR THE


OPEN IN
OF


Hauser Department


3 S tore
WITH A COMPLETE LINE OF MEN'S LADIES'
AND CHILDREN'S READY-TO-WEAR


Considering it a detriment to -------
state banks, President Jackson in Greater New York has about 5,-
1828 launched an attack on the 500 miles of streets, approximately
Bank of the United States. two-thirds of the mileage paved.


- .~. -


I dCz. 2 .
ORANGES .,-......---.2
M'axwell House TOC
COFFEE- 1 lb. ---.-.--6


Q 'UALUTY
M EA TS


2-lb. Jar
MUSTARD .... 2c-.....
2G Gal.SY P
GOOD SYRUP ...---.-33c


1 doz. CHUCK ROAST- .o- CREAM- 1sc
BAANAS20 Per pound .. ...2.. 1. re r 4 .
BANANAS


OLIVES-

3 pkgs. I 'P
MACARONI---------------
DOG FOOD- 5c
Can 5
GRAPEFRUT, each -......5c


Pork .SAUSAGE- 35
18c lb.; 2 pounds.......3
HAMBURGER- ...15C
Per pound .......
STORAGE EGGS-
Per dozen ............ L
Fresh Fla. YARD
EGGS Doz. ....30c & 35c


TOMATns .-..
TOMATOES .........---....25C


No. 2V' Can
PEACHES


20c


COCA-COLA-
For health-6 for ... 2c
COOKING OIL- 95C
Gallon


I'E'S BETTER,


SIGHT LAMPS


1''* I. E. S. Beter Sight Lamps have
captured the homes of America, not
only because they protect eyesight,
but because they add a new, re-
freshing note of charm and beauty.
l- We suggest you look at I. E. S.
Lamps at your dealer's and com-
S pare their glareless light with the,
S light from ordinary lamps. You will
want one or more of these new,
modern sight-saving lamps for
every room in your house. Let this
be your light-conditioning program
for 1938.

I. E. S. Lamps Are Available in Table,
Floor and Pin-it-up Models. Look for the
Tag.


Showing translu-
cent bowl common
to all I.E.S.Better
Sight Lamps.


\ Know
\ the

difference

between I. E. S. Lamps
and Ordinary Lamps


S U G A R 10 pounds 58c
SWEET 4

P 0 T T 0 E SsH1 Ibs.23c


GROCERY

G Fand MARK ET


I. E. S. Lamps Are Sold At Electrical
Hardware and House Furnishing Stores.



FLORIDA POWER

CORPORATION

y a Loeii Pt'ammtSWhiwvf'r'ii h9 -41


.~_I-


Friday, January Zl, 1938


-PAGE FOUR


THE STAR






Friday, January 21., 1938 'THE STAR PAGE FIVE


At the Churches


FIRST BAPTIST
Rev, J. W. Sisemore, Pastor
Sunday Morning services at 11
o'clock. Sermon topic: "God Is
Love." Evening services at 7:45.
Topic: "Son Remember."
Sunday school 10 a. m.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesday with choir practice follow-
ing.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. m. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays.
Ladies' Aid Soc;ety, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.
EPISCOPAL
Services 'at clubhouse Sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock..
First, third and fourth Sunday
hight as 7:30 o'clock.
CATHOLIC
CATHWOLIC


Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
16:15 a. m.
METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m.,'first and third Sundays.
Sunday school 10 a. m., every
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
10 a. mn.--Suirday school.
11 a. m.-Devotional.
7:30 p. m.-Evangeiistic


serv-


ices.
-Ladies'. C:'~ou. .l I, m erin TiI.'--
day afternoon .
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning.
Rites Held In Apalachicola
PFor Charles A. Schoelles
Last rites were. held -Monday in
Apalachicola for Charles Amos
Schoelles, 23, who died at his home
there Sunday morning following
an illness of more than a year.
Deceased, a native of Apalachi-
cola, was the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Schoelles of that city. He
was well known in Port St. Joe
and a number from here attended
the services.
Carter Out to Succeed.
Self As State Attorney
John H. Carter, Jr. of Marianna,,
state attorney, in this issue of The
Star makes his announcement as
a candidate for re-election to the
office he now holds, subject to
the-May Democratic primaries.
He states that he has handled
the business of the office fairly,
promptly, courteously and to the
best of his ability, and that if re-
elected will' continue to do so.
A. T. Ambrose of Shreveport,
La., arrived in t.,e city Wednes-
day and will be here permanently.
He was employed by the railroad
company several years ago.
Miss Elsie Nedley of Apalachi-
cola is the guest of Miss Iva Mae
Nedley this week.
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Smith of De-
catur, Ga., were visiting in Port
St. Joe Wednesday.
G. F. Williams of Jacksonville
was in the city Wednesday on
business.
Mrs. Harold Dean and baby are
the guests of their uncle and aunt,
Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Coburn.
:Send Tre Star to a friend.


i~s~;~P~ss~R~~s~as~l-VAN=a


j










j










I









i






i


and VEGETABLES at Prices You Can Afford to Pay for
the BEST.


ISrt s~ A 6ME- hOCER

MOT 02v"""AIN TORE


day


Friday, January 21-, 1938


~.1. ~I ,,


.~YYP. ~iYFIZ- I -PP-IM il~


----ri--.II 1^1________ -~-~l-__---Ly~


_ 111 1"n "'"'--_ --


J


JANm.22


With a Complete Line


4 CANS 4 CANS ALL 5e i ALL POPULAR 1 Small Size Free 4 Bars
No. 2 No. 2 PALMOLIVE
To 2aoes PE A S 1CandvBars Cigarettes RINSO P 0 A P
iomaioes PEAS i 03^ ^ ^ SOAP
SFOR 2 FOR With Large forRag
With Wash Rag
C25 i u0 251c

MORRELL'S G 0 0D MAXWELL BL LIS ALL 10c FresLh EGGS
BEST SLICED COFFEE HOUSE COFFEE SNUEF
BACON CO FFEE O

POUND POUND DOZEN
Golden Ripe FLORIDA ALL 1 lb. Carton DRESSED I
BANANAS ORANGES CHEWING Shortening H E N S argarne
SGUM 2 FOR
B gS U ,3 o4, ^ Z|[ ----
SFOR
DOZEN DOZEN i 1 v POUND POUND

LOCATED IN ALBRITTON-WiLLIAMS BUILDING, ADJOINING GULF HARDWARE CO.


of FRESH MEATS, GROCERIES


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


I


.ev ]a I %with,
In
0
URN
E NS VA T-UA
rl


W8Sf ew of the Many
\iv I f~
C:v kq s or~


r d~ay









PAGE SIX TI-IE-~P~ru STA Friday.------------ Januar 2l-1-


Planarium worms cut into sec-
tions produce complete individuals
from each piece.


For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANIA TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
Set we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Roche's Community Store


FIRST TIME
AT THIS

LOW PRICE


BE


RKSHI RE


--.

3 and 4 Thread
You'll want to stock up on
these sheer, ringless,' full-
fashion hose. Doubly re-
inforced toe and heel.


WENPort St. Joe, Fla.OC
Part St. Joe, Fla.


SMany Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(New Orleans Delta, Oct. 27, 18-)
BLOODY BATTLE
The fight between Heenan and
Morrissey commenced twenty min-
utes to 4 o'clock yesterday after-
noon, at Long Point, Canada. Hee-
nan made objection to the ground,
saying that it was not according
to the agreement, but as so many
had come so far to see the fight
he would waive his objection and
fight.
The first round lasted seven
minutes. The fighting was ter-
rible; Heenan throwing Morrissy,
and drawing the first blood.
In the second round Morrissy
was thrown.
In the third round Heenan was
thrown.
In the fourth round both men
came up looking weak. Morrissy
was knocked square down by a
blow on the upper jaw from Hee-
nan's right.
In the fifth, seventh and eighth
rounds Heenan was thrown.
In the ninth round both men
fought wildly, and fell side by side.
In th'e tenth round Heenan was
knocked down,
In the eleventh round Morrissy,
very weak, was carried to the
scratch. Heenan Went alone. This
was a terrific round, and Heenan
fo:L fainting.
In the twelfth round Heenan
was carried to the scratch; Hee-
nan, too faint to come to time, the
battle was declared won by Mor-
rissy.
The eleven rounds were fought
in twenty-two minutes. Both Hee-
nan and Moriissy 'were badly cut,
and had to be brought away on
beds.
The fight was witnessed by be-
tween two and three thousand
persons.
It is understood here that Hee-
nan has offered to fight Morrissy
again for a heavy purse. There
was no disturbance.

(The following excerpts are taken
from The Saturday Evening Post
of February 12, 1825.)
SPANISH AGGRESSION
In the com-munication to con-
gress, the secretary of state re-
marks, that the capture of the brig
James Lawrence, by a Spanish


have, for the last three years, con-
stantly applied f or reparation
equally strenuous and unavailing;
that the capture in the first in-
stance was illegal and that the
proceedings of the court of appeals
condemning the property, were ir-
regular, cannot be doubted. A
last appeal to the justice of,his
Catholic majesty at Madrid is all
that remains practicable in the
case, short of measures by author-
izing reprisals would assume up-
on the United States themselves
the task 'of dispensing to their
citizens that justice which has
hitherto been sought from the
Spanish authorities in vain."

THE NORTH CAROLINA
On Sunday week, the President
of the United States, the Secre-
tary of the Navy, with several
members of Congress, visited the
North Carolina man-of-war. After
inspecting this noble ship, the
company repaired to the upper
deck, where Divine Service was
performed by Mr. Geer, the Chap-
lain. After having dined with
Commodore Chauncey, the party
returned to Washington.
The North Carolina is pro-
nounced, by the best judges, to be
a very superior ship of her class.
She mounts 90 guns and is pierced
for 102. On the upper deck she
measures 220 feet; from the gib
boom to the ring-tail boom, the
distance is 380 feet. From the up-
per extremity of the main mast to
the bottom of the keel, is 280 feet.
Taking her altogether, she is a
most magnificent and truly grand
object, and will, it is hoped, add
to the credit of her name and na-
tion.

We are happy to learn, from an
authentic source, that the British
Government has very recently
communicated to this Government,
through our Minister in London.
the interesting -information that
Government has come to the de-
termination to recognize the Inde-
pendence of Mexico and Buenos
Ayres, and also of Colombia, re-
servin-? a declaration, as to the
latter, until the effect of the con-
test in Peru be more certainly de-
veloped; and that this determina-
tion will be communicated succes-
sively to all the other foreign


(Porto Rico) privateer, was a powers.
"flagrant outrage upon the prop-_
crty of the citizens of the United WEEKLY COMPENDIUM
States, upon which the executive The elegant new ship Atlantic,
government of the United Statesof350onsburth, was launched
of 350 tons burthen, was launched


WE CAN SUPPLY YOU



No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

Your business will be

appreciated.




I IG lH hardware &



SUpply Co S.

BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE
II ~- ..... .


on Monday evening, from the yard
of Mr. Burton. in Southwark, near
the Navy Yard. She is owned by
Mr. John M'Crea.
General La Fayette, Son and
.Secretary, and the Secretary of
the Commonwealth of Pennsyl-
vania, Mr. Emlen of the Senate,
and Mr. Baker, of the House of
Representatives, arrived in Balti-
more from Harrisburgh on Thurs-
day night week. The General and
family were in fine health and.
spirits, and left that city on Fri-
day. at 3 o'clock, for Washington,
accompanied by tie above named
gentlemen. It is said to be the in-
tention of General La Fayette to
visit every State in the Union be-
fore he leaves the country.
The amount piad by the public
authorities in the State of New
York for the destruction of wolves,
since the year 1815, considerably
exceeds the sum of 200,000 dollars.
Active measures are being taken
in the towns upon the West branch
of the Susquehannan to test the
practicability of steam boat navi-
gation thereon.
The Legislative Council of Flor-
ida have undertaken to restore an
attorney, who had been suspended


for improper conduct as such,
from the United States Superior
Court.
The Postmaster General has re-
ported to congress that ten thou-
sand dollars would be sufficient
to prepare the roac for stages in
the Indian country, for the con-
veyance of the mail from Washing-
ton to Nachez and New Orleans
through the state of Mississippi.
It has been estimated that the
consumption of cotton by Ameri-
can Manufacturers will, this year,
amount to one hundred and fifty
thousand bales.
His Excellency William Eustis,
Governor of the Coimmonwealth of
Massachusetts, dite in Boston on
Sunday morning last. The duties
of the office will for the remainder
of the year devolve on the Hon.
Marcus Morton, the Lieut. Gover-
nor.
Next: The Indians In Mexico.

It pays to advertise-try it!


Notice Regular Municipal
Election
Notice is hereby given that the
regular municipal election for the
election of one City Commissioner
for the full term of six years, for
th'e City of Port St. Joe will be
held at the City Hall in the City
of Port St. Joe on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 15, 1938. The polls will be
open at 8 o'clock A. M. and close
at 7 o'clock P. M., Eastern Stan-
dard Time.
(Signed)
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk.
1-21 4-11

Notice of Registration
Notice is hereby given that the
Registration Books of the City of
Pert St. Joe, Florida, will be
opened for the purpose of regis-
tration of all qualified electors
who are qualified under Ordinance
35X and Chapter 18816, Laws of
Florida, Acts of 1937. Said books
will be opened on January 26,
1938. and will remain open for
registration purposes until Febru-
ary: 4, 1938, between the hours of 9
o'clock A. M. and 12 M., and 2
o'clock P. M. until 5 o'clock P. M.
each day except Sundays and holi-
days.
All persons desiring to register
shall call at the City Hall for such
purpose.
(Signed)
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk, as
Registration Officer of the
City of Port St. Joe.
1-14-21


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COARBER S
BARBER SHOP


A GOOD MULE
The following classified ad is
clipped from a Montana paper:
"Last Sunday some polecat ran
away with my wife and took my
mule and buggy. Twenty-five dol-
lars for the return of the mule
and buggy. He was a good mule."

Send The Star to a friend.



CITY PRESSING

LIB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
0-
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Moonlight

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For the convenience of
LADIES, GENTLEMEN
and CHILDREN
Others Not Wanted-

NEW FURNISHINGS

J. W. RAKESTRAW, Prop.
2 Miles West Port St. Joe

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Milk is an energy food. It is
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alone or with other foods. En-
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ALWAYS CALL FOR

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j 1Manufacturers of

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We Haul Anything- -

We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE i0


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


PAGE SIX


THE STAR


Friday, January 21, 1938


D


I







Friday, january ,


WONDERLAND DOLLS SHOWN
Alice would have thought she
was in Wonderland has she at-
tended the fourth annual doll show
held recently at ORlahoma City,
Okla. Tire dolls, ana there were
about 600, were made of nearly
everything that a doll could be
made of, including peanuts, wal-
nuts, pipe-stems, wax, fur, cloth,
automobile inner tubes, tin, soap
and rice.

Read the ads-it pays!




Fishing..

Spend the week-end, in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.
TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. .. Hotel ac-
commodations within (he
means of everyone.
SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.
4- 4


it I?, ))) i (


WITH


Wood

Winter is here will
your present supply of
firewood last until the
Spring?
IF NOT-

Let Us Supply You

$3.50 Cord



GEO. GASKIN, JR.
-- WE DELIVER -
Wewahitchka, Fla.















GASOLINE
FOR ECONOMY!
You .Save because you gpt
more miles to the gallon and,
less carbon.

SFOR QUALITY !
i.-You get a pure product., fa-
mous for dependability.
WASHING-GREASING
POLISHING
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SERVICE STATION
W. COLLINSWORTH, Mgr.
-ON HIGHWAY NO. 10
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TAMPAN WANTS

TO HOLD STATE

CON VENTIO N

FLORIDA DEMOCRATIC PARTY
HAS HELD NO SUCH CAU-
CUS FOR 37 YEARS

The following letter was re-
ceiv'd this week by the editor of
The Star from Perry G. Wall of
Tampa, and we reprint it for the
careful and thoughtful considera-
tion of our readers:
"My Dear Mr. Editor-Why can't
the Democrats of Florida have a
state convention? It will not cost
the taxpayers anything and will
not interfere with our present pri-
mary system. A convention to pass
a platform to adopt a program of
constructive work for our officials
to carry out, especially our legis-
lators. We now have two pri-
maries and the delegates can be
elected at the first primary and
the convention held a week later,
before the second and last pri-
mary.
"All the professions, lines of
business, farmers, laboring men,
and even the civic clubs, hold con-
ventions, thereby recognizing their
educational value and their effi-
ciency in smoothing out) differ-
ences and developing personal con-
tacts.
"The party has not had a state
convention for more than thirty-
seven years, has no program for
party work and, in tact, for prac-
tical purposes, is not a party.
"The conventions, national and
state, of all the different profes-
sions, industries and civic organi-
zations of the country have helped
to build up our national spirit and
unquestionably have helped to
promote the progress of every
line of endeavor.
"If these are Pacts, I repeat:
Why don't the Democrats of Flor-
ida hold a convention? Who op-
poses it? It is practical thing
to do, is business-like, costs noth-
ing, and the party machinery is
already provided. The purpose of
this letter is to find out WHY?"
The editor can't say for why the
state conventions were discon-
tinued, being but a babe in arms
37 years ago, but !t looks to us
like a good idea, and would allow
a lot of candidates to blow off
steam, besides giving the dele-
gates a chance to get away from
home and let their repressed de-
sires rise to the surface. We have
seen a number or state conven-
tions and attended two national
conventions, and everybody, it
seemed to us, was having a whale
of an outing.
Why not try it out and see what
the result would be?

TILLMAN WILL NOT
SEEK RE-ELECTION

Tampan Headed Finance and Tax-
ation Committee In 1937

State Senator Henry C. Tillman
of Tampa, chairman of the senate
finance and taxation committee in
the 1937 Florida state legislature,
announces he will not be a candi-
date to succeed himself in the
May primaries. He is now assist-
ant county attorney for Hills-
borough county and said he could
not afford the sacrifice required
for a campaign for the office.
Tillman was author and sponsor
of the bill that outlawed slot ma-
chines and in the last two sessions
of the legislature he sponsored the
defeated "Florida Recovery Act"
designed to abolish the chain store
system in Florida.

LIFE BEGINS AT 70
Life begins at 70 for Takematsu
Katsube of Osaka, Japan, who at
that advanced age has started to
learn watch repairing so that he
can "make a new start." Pre-
viously he had been a teacher.


Fifteen of India's large cities,
each with over 100,000 population,
have no public museums.


SENATOR W Y N N

ISCANDIDATEFOR

STATE ATTORNEY

WILL OPPOSE JOHN CARTER,
JR., FOR 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OFFICE

State Senator John C. Wynn of
Marianna. was a visitor in The
Star office Tuesday and informed
the editor that he would be a can-
didate for the office of state at-
torney for the Fourteenth Judicial
Circuit in the Democratic primary
to be held on May 3. The circuit
is composed of six counties, Jack-
son, Calhoun. Gulf, Bay, Washing-
ton and Ho:mes, and the office is
now held by John H. Carter, Jr.,
also of Marianna.
Senator Wynn is a native Flor-
idian, having been born and raised
in Jackson county, and is engaged
in the practice of law at Marianna.
He has taken a prominent part in
politics in this section for several
years past. In 1930 he was elected
mayor of Marianna and was re-
elected in 1931; in 1932 he was
elected representative in the state
legislature from Jackson county,
and in 1936 he was elected state
senator from the Fourth sena-
torial district, the office which he
now holds.
In the 1937 session of the state
legislature, Wynn supported and
aided in the passage of legislation
which now provides $11,500,000 of
earmarked state revenue for the
county public school fund; he
sponsored and obtained the pass-
age of the appropriation of state
money which made possible the
payment of old-age pensions in
Florida, besides other legislative
activities.
Senator Wynn, who is 36 and
happily married, stated that he
would make an active political
campaign, and would endeavor to
personally contact every voter in
the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit.
---*-----
DEEPEST SPRING IS SAID
TO BE WEEKIWACHEE

Dr. Herman Gunter, Florida
state geologist, has attributed to
Weekiwachee, near Brooksville,
the deepest visibility of any spring
known to the Flolrida state geo-
logical department, and Dr. Con-
rad Van Hyning, director of the
Florida state museum at Gaines-
ville, has pronounced Weekiwa-
chee the deepest spring in the
world.
Of the depth of Weekiwachee
Spring, Kim's Guide to Florida has
to say: "From a great cavern of
200 feet deep, water pours forth
so magnifying clear that 147 feet
of the distance can be seen at all
times, and the entire 200 feet
some of the time."
It was' there that Rex Beach
spent several months in 1926 get-
ting color and data for his famous
novel, "The Mating Call."

Charlie Hughes has a friend
whose wife is a constant patron of
every new fortune teller faker.
The husband calls here "the or-
iginal seer sucker."


Paid Political Advertising .......... ....


FOR STATE ATTORNEY
Fellow Democrats:
I am a candidate for re-election
as State Attorney for the 14th Ju-
dicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Bay, Calhounr Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson and Washington,
subject to the May primaries.
As your State Attorney, I have
handled the business of the office
promptly, fairly, courteously, and
to the best of my ability. If re-
elected, I will continue to do so.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JOHN H. CARTER, Jr.,
Marianna, Fla.


Take Advantage oF the OFF-Season

Savings
Let Me Figure Any Building
S'That You Desire


H. H. TAYLOR


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


Port St. Joe


EXTENSION OF

15 DAYS GIVEN

FOR CAR TAGS

CONE WIRES ORDER FROM
FERNANDINA TO HIS
SECRETARY

Governor Fred P. Cone wired
from Fernandina last Friday to!
his secretary, W. Branch Cone ati
Tallahassee, to extend the time for
buying automobile license tags for
15 days. Motorists thus will be
given until February 1 to purchase
tags.
The governor's wire stated that
the action was taken "on account
of truck farmers and fruit grow-
ers."
Thursday of last week informa-
tion from the governor's office
was that there would be no ex-
tension because the school fund,
to which the tag money goes, did
not contain enough money for the
January distribution of teachers'
salaries. :
The governor is the only one
having authority to make such an
extension. Last year he gave a
similar 15-day reprieve.

Save by reading the ads!


FILING CABINETS
Durable, All-Steel
Electrically Welded
We have them for the small
office as well as the large
office.
Come in and let us sliow you
our line. ,
We Specialize in
BLACK LINE PRINTS
AND BLUE PRINTS



C. A. Tovey
Rooms 7-9, Costin Building
Port St. Joe, Fla.


Sewer Connections

We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.
SEE

Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.


J. L KERR




PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

------o-------
0

-WATCHES
----CLOCKS
Repairing --JE WEL R Y
A Specialty -DIAMONDS



MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT

WILLIAMS' PLACE
-.4 PALM POINT INN )--

FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING


REFRESHMENTS -:- DANCING
No Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR


J 21. 1938







PAGE EIGHT THE STAR Friday. Januai'v 21 1~S~


CLAY LEWIS SPEAKER AT M. E.
MEETING OF WOMAN'S CLUB MEETS
The Port St. Joe Woman's club The
met Wednesday afternoon at the Woman
club house with 50 members pres- the Mi
ent. Subject of the session was Monday
"Florida." circle a
After regular business was dis- Pattbn.
pensed with, E. Clay Lewis, local Subje
attorney, gave an interesting talk "Gifts
on "The University of Florida The Sc
andIts Benefits." Following Mr. Lupton,
Lewis' talk, Miss Erline McClellan given
spoke on "The Women's College: "Buy
of Florida and Its Benefits." Both Mrs.
talks were hugely enjoyed by all Transfc
present. "Dollar
The club will have more pro- Mrs. I
grams on Florida in the near fu- Econor
ture that promise to be very in- cepting
teresting, and all members are Boyer;
urged to be present. The next Bulletin
meeting will be held the third The
Wednesday in February at the church
club house. up their
Sr A "What
Mesdames H. Kane, D. C. Smith Memi
and Manning Smith visited Sun- dames
day in Panama City with Miss E. Ram
Erie Gulledge. Miss Gulledge re- Hodges,
turned with them for a visit of Lupton,
several days. tin, B.
S* son, P.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. McClellan of Deglar,
Blountstown were the guests Sun- Sharit.


day of Miss Vera Melvin.

L. C. Choughey of the
corporation, New York, is
ness visitor in the city for
days.


MISSIONARY SOCIETY
S AT "THE OAKS"
program meeting of the
i's Missionary society of
ethodist church was held
r afternoon with the "Oaks"
it the home of Mrs. George

ect for the afternoon was
for World-Wide Missions."
riptures were read by Mrs.
,and interesting talks were
on the following subjects:
Salvation for Individuals,"
Sharit; "Our Gifts Help
>rm Society," Mrs. Gibson;
s Invested In Education,"
.ovett; "Building a New
ly," Mrs. Ramsey; "Ac-
t h e Challenge," Mrs.
"Highlights from January
i," Mrs. Lovett.
next meeting will be at the
when the society will take
r new mission study book,
Is This Moslem World?"
bers present were Mes-
W. E. Boyd, W. E. Boyer,
nsey, W. E. Murdock, R. R.
, Charles Barner, Charles
J. T. McNeill. R. A. Cos-
M. Overby, Neldig, R. Gib-
Lovett, George Humphries,
George Patton. and J. L.
Mrs. Ormig and Mrs. Mc-


Mullen were visitors.

Meads Mr. Smith and M. D. Pettling
a busi- of the Smith Construction Co. of
several Pensacola are in the city for sev-
eral days on business.


PETE'S Cash & Carry

Port St. Joe, Fla.
o-0-

The Store Where
YOUR DOLLAR
BUYS MORE!

p0
Service With Courtesy

- FRIDAY SATURDAY MONDAY -
JANUARY 21 22 24

SALT 13 QUALITY
SODA for FLOUR lbs.45
Matches ) Guaranteed 4 lbs. 8V


10 POUNDS GAR 49
(Limited) S


PEANUT BUTTER, qt. 23c CORN FLAKES ...-....-... 8c
Compound LARD, 4 lb. 47c CRACKERS, 1 lb. box....10c
KETCHUP, 14 oz. ......10c GRITS, 2 boxes ....-- ......15c



10 lbs Potatoes 19c


SNOWDRIFT, 3 lbs ....59c, TURNIPS.......... 3 FOR
SNOWDRIFT, 6 lbs...$115 COLLARDS.......
SNAP BEANS .. E
APPLE JELLY 2 lb jar 21c TOMATOES .......
SPAGHETTI, 2 cans ....15c CORN ......... -



SCooking Oil, gal. 93c


MACARONI...:.3 for 10 1 E. PEAS, No. 2 can, 2 15c
SPAGHETTI. ..3 Water Maid Rice, 3 Ibs. 19c


MARKET SPECIALS 'STEW MEAT, 2 lbs-....25c
Best West. STEAK, lb. 25c PURE BUTTER, lb ....38c
Western PORK, lb. .....22c OLEO, lb. 16c


BAPTIST GIRLS' AUXILIARY
MEETS AT CASON HOME
The Girls' Auxiliary of the Bap-
tist Missionary society met at the
home of Mrs. E. C. Cason last Fri-
day afternoon with Flora Mae and
Hazel Cason as hostesses.
Topic for the meeting was "Mis-
sionary Study." The session open-
ed with a song, followed by de-
votionals by Betty Jo Lane. In-
teresting talks were given by
members of, the auxiliary, "God's
Telephone Wires," by Janell Prid-
geon; "Will You Follow .God's
Way," by Dorothy Costin; "Why a
Missionary Couldn't Go," by Hazel
Cason, and "Is It No Use," by
Carolyn Baggett. A reading and
Bible questions were given by
Flora Mae Cason.
Mrs. J. O. Baggett dismissed the
gathering with prayer, after which
the members enjoyed a social
hour during which the hostesses
served lemonade and cookies.
Members present were Virgie
and Marguerite Arnett, Carolyn
Baggett, Isabelle Baggett, Dorothy
Costin, Janell and Virginia Prid-
geon, Geraldine Parker, Evelyn
Strange, Betty Jo Lane and Mrs.
J. O. Baggett.

BAPTIST CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. CASON
Circle No. 2 of the Baptist Wo-
man's Missionary Union met Mon-
day afternoon at the home of Mrs.
E. C. Cason on Sixth street.
This being the first meeting of
the circle since the W. M. U. was
divided, the following officers
were elected: Chairman, Mrs. J.
W. Sisemore; co-chairman, Mrs.
W. J. Daughtry; secretary, Mrs.
J. F. Miller; treasurer, Mrs. B.
Hughes; program committee, Mrs.
G Wimberly.
The regular business program
was carried out, after which the
members enjoyed a delightful so-
cial hour with the hostess during
which coffee and cookies were
served. Members present were
Meesdames G. Wimberly, J. F. Mil-
ler. Lupe, J. White, M. Smith, J.
M. Patterson, E. D. Dendy, White-
head, B. Hughes, Adams, S. Hus-
band, M. Deese, Oglesby. J. W.
Daughtry, J. W. Sisemore and
Hammock.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT
BRIDGE CLUB MEETS
Mr.s Chester Edwards was hos-
tess to the Wednesday Night
Bridge club this week at her home
on Seventh street. Bowls of nar-
cissi added to the attractiveness
of the living room. where three
tables 'were placed for bridge. Af-
ter three progressions, prizes were
awarded to Mrs. J. M. Smith, high,
a deck of cards, and cut to Mrs.
G. Wimberly, a beautiful handker-
chief.
The hostess served cake with
whipped cream ana tea to the fol-
:owing members: Mesdames B.
Priilgeon, J. M. Smith, E. Ramsey,
H. Soule, R. Coburn, T. Owens,
and visitors: Mesdames Robert
Bellows, D. C. Mahon, J. Hiles and
H. Deann.

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Lovett, Mr.
and Mrs. Patty Lovett, Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Maddox, Mrs. Mary
Lovett, John Maddox, Sr., John
Maddox, Jr., and Jack Fowler at-
tended the funeral of Charles
Schoelles, Jr., held Monday in
Apalachicola.

Jimmie Payne of Marianna was
in Port St. Joe on business Tues-
day.

Mrs. Helen- Allen spent the
week-end in Gordon, Ala., with her
family.

"Subscribe to The Star-$2 year.


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


PHONE 69


CIRCLE ONE OF W. M. U.
IN MEETING MONDAY
Mrs. C. G. Costin was hostess to
the ladies of W. M. U. Circle One
Monday afternoon at her home on
Second avenue. Bible study for
the afternoon was John 15, 1-14.
,As the W. M U. has divided into
two circles, officers for this circle
were elected as follows: Chair-
man,-,Mrs. L. R. Holliday; co-
chairman, Mrs. K. Harrell; secre-
tary, Mrs. C. Pridgeon; treasurer,
Mrs. C. G. Crotin. Mrs. D. Miller
acted as secretary at this meet,-
ing in the absence of the secre-
tary.
Immediately after the business
meeting the members enjoyed a
delightful social hour, during
which the hostess served coffee,
sandwiches and cake to the fol-
lowing members: Mesdames Fred
Maddox, D. Miller, S. C. Pridgeon,
J. 0; Baggett, L. W. Owens, Y. L.
Wages, W. 0. Martin, W. Wells,
K. Harrell, P. O'Day, T. Jones, W.
W. VandeGriff and L. R. Holliday.

Mrs. D. B. McMuHlen arrived in
the city this week and will make
here home here with her husband,
Dr. D. Byrd McMullen.


QUARTERMAN STUDIO


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PORTRAITS
and
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St. Joe





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Enamels Varnishes Flats
Oil Paints In All Colors


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PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


MRS. JOE MIRA ENTERTAINS
WITH BRIDGE LUNCHEON
Mrs. Joe Mira entertained s'ev-
eral of her friends last Friday at
her home on Eighth street with a
bridge luncheon. Following a de-
lectable lunch of creamed chicken
patty shells, potato chips, olives,
pickes, hot rolls, cake and coffee,
served at the noon hour, tables
were placed and an afternoon of
bridge enjoyed.
Those present with the hostess
were Mesdames Vera Alien, Ber-
riadine Benson, Lois. VanHorn,
Nornan Elderkin, Ruth Soule, Nell
Bevis and Doris Dorsey.

MRS. J. M. SMITH HOSTESS
MONDAY TO J. A. M. CLUB
Mrs. J. M. Smith was hostess to
the J. A. M. club Monday night
at her home on Second avenue. A
delightful social .hour was enjoyed
after which the hostess served a
delicious salad course and hot
coffee to the following members:
Mesdames J. A. Connell, P. Boyer,
B. Pridgeon, S. C. Pridgeon, L.
Perritt and Miss Myrtice Coody.
Guests were Mrs. D. C. Smith and
Miss Erie Gulledge.


GOOD GRADE FRAMING AT A LOW PRICE
See Us Before Buying


Friday, January 21, 19i6


PAGE EIGHT


THE -STAR


%\