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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00168
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 14, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00168

Full Text



Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
ert growing little city. In
t o 1 :-:` -'f T : n : belt.


TH'E


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


VOLUME 1 PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1938 NUMBER 12


EXTENSION OF 31

DAYS IS GRANTED

FLORIDA POWEI

FOR THE PURPOSE OF FIXING
A SALE PRICE ON ELECTRIC
SYSTEM IN PORT ST. JOE

At the request of P. C. Coombs
district manager for the Florid;
Power Corporation, and Don Me
Cloud of Apalachicola, who wa:
also representing the power corn
pany, the board of city commis
sioners at their meeting Tuesda:
night granted a 30-day extension
of time to the corporation for the
purpose of arriving at a sale price
on the existing electric distribu
tion system in the city of Port St
Joe, which the city is contemplate
ing taking over for operation by
the municipality.
"We do not know what price t(
put upon our system here," said
Mr. McCloud, "as the thought ol
selling had never entered ou
minds, and in view of changing
conditions in Port St. Joe, we do
not know exactly where 4e stand.
The company :came in at a time
when there was practically noth-
ing in Port St. Joe with the in-
tention of growing with the town,
the company having faith in its
future. Now, with a chance to
realize some profit on the invest-
mnent here, the company does not
1'ke to be coerced to sell its hold-
ings. The company feels that it
is entitled 'to some of the fruits
oF its investment here, since it has
stuck with Port St. Joe through
1he days of famine' antI depres-
sion. We don't know whether the
city wants to buy the system or
whether it is someone else, and we
feel that the city should be frank
5n divulging exactly what is in-
tended. We need 30 more days
to make a price and would like to
know just what the figures will be
used for. The company can not
go on with its plans for expansion
of the present system until this
matter is settled."
City Wants System for Revenue
To which Mayor Sharit replied:
"The city desires to take over the
system itself in order to bring in
revenue for operation of the city.
We appreciate and can see your
point and, with the consent of Mr.
Stone, the board, hereby grants
you the 30-day extension of time."
The city commission on No,
vember 24 informed the Florida
Power Corporation of its intention
to take over the electric system,
electricity for which will be sup-
nlied from the generators 'at the
mi'I of the St. Joe Paper Company
.t a nominal cosf.
Church Seeks Building Permit
Cecil Costin appeared before
(Continued on Page 4)
---------
NEW STORE OPENED
IN THIS CITY MONDAY

'Griffin GC.e 'ey and Market Open.s
In Old Location of Cash-Carry

Another grocery store and mar-
ket was added to the bu3ti ii -
tablishmen's o: Port St. Jce i:s i
Monday wi-m: the opening of the
Griffin Grocery and Market in the
store building formerly occupied
by Pete's Cash an::d Carry grocery.
The new store carries a com-
plete line of groceries, fresh
fruits and vegetables and choice
meats.
The grocery side is in charge of
Hiram Sansbury of Marianna, and
G. C. Curenton and James Curen-
ton of Panama City operate the
meat market.


First Ship



Ties Up At



City Dock


BRINGS 3000-TON CARGO SALT
CAKE FROM CHILI FOR
PAPER MILL

A crowd estimated at 400 per-
sons stood on the city's new dock
last Friday and welcomed with
cheers the arrival of the "Tropic
Star," 9,200-ton freighter, which
sailed majestically into historic
St. Joseph's Bay shortly after the
break of dawn and drew up to the
dock under its own power, with-
out the aid of a tug, marking the
rebirth of this city as a deep wa-
ter terminal.
The vessel was met at the har-
bor entrance by Pilots J. W. and
Fred Maddox and steered safely
through the 30-foot deep channel
which has been dredged from the
bar to the new 4000-foot pier,
which has 30 feet of water along-
side and is conceded by shipping
interests to provide the finest deep
water shipping facilities in the
country. --
I Arrival of the Tropic Star' re-
vived memories of the time when
Port St. Joe was one of the most
active ports in the country, when
the second railroad to bo built in
the United States, operated by the
.Lake Wimico and St. Joseph Canal
and Railroad Company, the rails
for which were brought from Liv-
erpool, England, in 1839 on the
barques Cygnette and Eddystone,
connected the waterway of the
Apalachicola river and Lake Wim-
ico to St. Joseph-s Bay, carrying
cotton, lumber and naval stores
for export through the port here.
The arrival of other vessels in
the future will not create such a
stir in this city, but they will al-
ways be of interest, particularly
in view of the fact that they are
aiding in the growth .and expan-
sion of our city.


SCHOOL CHILDREN
VISIT TROPIC


STAR


Is First Vessel of Any Size Seen
By the Majority

The children of the Port St. Joe
schools were treated to a rare
sight last Friday. when Prof. B. G.
McPherson obtained permits for
all of them to visit the large
freighter, Tropic Star, that had
tied up at the city dock the day
previous. School buses were used
to transport the children to the St.
Joe Paper company mill, where
they were met by George Tapper
and from there went out on the
dock to view the vessel.
This was a rare privilege, as the
majority of the children had never
seen a boat of this size, and none
had ever before seen a freighter
unloading cargo. The teachers and
pupils greatly appreciated .Mr.
Tapper's kindness and also are
grateful to those granting the per-
mit for them to visit the Tropic
Star.
------~-W- -~
WINDSORS 'EXPECTING'
It is announced that the Duke
and Duchess (Wallie) of Windsor
are expecting the arrival of an
heir in the near future.

Mayor J. L. Sharit was a busi-
ness visitor' Tuesday In Marianna.


JACKSON DAY DINNER
IS ATTENDED BY 40

Committee Remits $41.85 To Na-
tional Headquarters

Joining with groups throughout
the nation, Port St. Joe and Gulf
county Democrats turned out 40
strong to attend the Jackson Day
dinner held at the Black Cat cafe
last Saturday night.
Following the banquet, the radio
speech of President Roosevelt was
enjoyed by the gathering, and at
the conclusion Secretary of State
Bob Gray was introduced as the
speaker of the evening. Mr. Gray
held the interest of the group for
almost an hour, touching briefly
on the history of the Democratic
party, from its early organization
through the present day.
E. Clay Lewis, Jr., was chairman
of the dinner and his final report
indicates a total of 64 tickets sold
to the dinner at $1.25 each and
$41.85 remitted to national head-
quarters. ..


CITY WILLCHOOSE

COMMISSIONER

ON FEBRUARY 15

REGISTRATION BOOKS TO BE
OPENED TO QUALIFIED
VOTERS JANUARY 26

According to an announcement
appearing in this issue of The
Star, the registration books of the
city of Port St. Joe will be opened
for the purpose of registration of
all qualified electors for the city
election to be held February 15
for the purpose of choosing one
city commissioner for a six-year
term.
The registration books will be
opened January 26 and will remain
open until February 4, between
the hours of 9 a. m. and 12 noon,
and 2 p. m. and 5 p. m. each day
except Sundays and holidays. All
registrations must be made at the
city hall.
. To be qualified to vote a citizen
must have been a resident of Port
St. Joe for a period of six months
nrior to the day of election, and
a resident of the state of Florida
for one year.
The outgoing commissioner is
T. H. Stone, and as yet no one
has stepped forward as a candi-
late for his seat on the board. Mr.
Stone could not be reached yes-
terday for a statement as to
whether or not he will be up for
re-election, but from a reliable
source it is learned that he will
seek the post for another term.
-_-a--- -

PAPERMEN W I N

IN CAGE GAME

WITH MERCHANTS

N PRELIMINARY TILT PRE-
PARATORY TO FORMING
CITY LEAGUE

As a preliminary to formation
of a city league the Paper Mill
wagers met the Merchants basket-
ball team in a practice. tilt Tues-
lay .night on the h1gh school i
:ourt.
Both teams evidently had it in s
nind to show up the other and at t
he end of the first half the Mer-
chants led with a score of 11-2. t
lfter the second half had really
(Continued on Page 4) 1


Stops Work



On Theater;



PayTooHigh

MARTIN OBJECTS TO PAYING
LABORERS 25 CENTS HOUR;
SAYS 15 CENTS ENOUGH

"Off again, on again, gone again
Finnegan," seems to be the fate of
the new theater which is to be
erected here (we hope) by R. E.
Martin, part-owner of the Martin-
Davis chain of theaters.
A year ago the Martin-Davis in-
terests, in competition with two
other large theater corporations,
secured a 90-day permit for erec-
tion of a temporary theater to be
used while construction proceeded
on a permanent building. Today
that same open-air theater is being
used and work on the new edifice
has been halted.
The reason: Mr. Martin objects
to paying laborers 25 cents an
hour, maintaining that he has
never paid more than 15 cents per
hour for day-labor, and would not
pay over 20 cents, and so he in-
structed his foreman in charge of
construction to "stop all work,
pIace all material in the storage
shed. nail up the door and pay all
bills" if labor could not be secured
at 20 cents an hour. And this was
done the latter part of last week.
Due to previous delays in start-
ing work on the igw theater,
many complaints had been entered
with the city commissioners by
residents of the town, stating that
their children and many adults
had contracted serious colds,
whicli in some instances had de-
veloped into pneumonia, while at-
tending the open-air theater in the
cold weather that has prevailed in
the past few months.
The city Icommission, through
Mayor Joe Sharit, notified the the-
iter owners of conditions here and
informed them that 'if work was
not started immediately on the
new theater. action would be
taken to close down the tempor-
ary movie house until the weather
warmed up. This brought immedi-
ate results, and work of pouring
the foundation on the new build-
ing was started.
Now, with work on the theater
at a standstill, the commissioners,
at their meeting Tuesday night,
again discussed the matter and de-
cided that the best thing to do
was to declare the open-air show-
house a public nuisance and a men-
ace to the health of the commun-
ity.
However, before taking any
drastic action, the matter will be
taken up with citizens of the city,
and if it is found that a consen-
sus of opinion favors closing the
theater, such action will be im-
mediately taken..
---------
W. T. 'PAT MURPHY
DIES IN ORLANDO

Of Blood Clot In Heart; Was a
Member of Construction Firm t

W. T. "Pat" Murphy, member of
the Langston & Murphy Con- I
struction Company which had the 1
contract for laying of the city's r
sewer system and construction of f
the disposal plant, died Sunday t
night at his home in Orlando at k
;he age of 69.
Cause of death was said to have
been a blood clot In the heart. i


DELAY 2 WEEKS

IN AWARDING OF

GAS CO.CONTRACT

QITY COMMISSION FAILS TO
AWARD FRANCHISE DUE TO
LACK FINANCIAL REPORT

Due to the fact that the finan-
cial statement ol the Consumers
Gas company was not presented to
them as requested at a previous
meeting, the city commissioners
did not grant a franchise to the
gas company for permission to lay
mains and install a bulk plant in
Port St. Joe at their session Tues-
day night:
A revised franchise was sub-
mitted to the commissioners by
John H. Carter, Sr., Marianna at-
torney, representing the gas com-
pany, and some minor changes
were written in, following which,
on the motion of Commissioner T.
H. Stone, the franchise was ap-
proved. 41
Mayor J. L. Sharit then asked
Mr. Head of the gas company if
he had brought the financial state-
ment as requested, "for," said the
mayor, "we do not know whether
you have sufficient funds to pro-
ceed with installation of a plant
or whether you are merely seeking
this franchise to take it out and
peddle it to the highest bidder."
Mr. Head then submitted a tabu-
lation which he had drawn up
while sitting at the table, and
handed it to the mayor.
"But this is not a financial
statement." protested Mayor Shar-
it. "This is onl. a,- abulation of
the amount you intend .spending
here in Port St. Joe. What we are
asking is how much your present
holdings are worth, the income you
derive and how much, if any, you
have in reserve."
Mr. Head did not seem to know
what a financial statement was,
and the mayor told him that iL
the company hal an auditor he
could compile the information and
it could be submitted at the com-
mission meeting on January 24.:
No rate was written into the
franchise, as it was thought best
to leave the fixing of rates to the
test of experiment. It is believed
that a more equitable price can
be arrived at in this manner. Mr.
Head stated that his company has
always made the lowest' possible
charge and that ii the city of Al-
bany, Ga., the rate is $1.60 per
month minimum, wnlch is the rate
contemplated for Port St. Joe.

CASH AND CARRY
IN NEW LOCATION

Has One of Most Modern and Up-
to-Date Stores In City

Pete's Cash and Carry Grocery
moved over the week-end to the
Miles Hurlbut store building just
across the street from the old lo-
cation, opening the doors Monday
morning on one of the most mod-
ern and up-to-date groceries and
markets to be seen in West Flor-
da.
R. C. "Pete" Roberts is proprie-
tor of the establishment, being
assisted by Claude Steele of At-
nore, Ala., brother-in-law of Mr.
Roberts. H. L. Hatton of this city
ias charge of the modern meat
market with its glass-enclosed re-
rigerator-counter which displays
he meat for inspection as well as
keepingg it in prime condition.

Gene Austin of Apalachicola was
n the city Tuesday on business.


--~-~







~PAGE TWO THE STAR Friday, January 14, 1938


STHE STAR
SW. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.*( Telephone 51 }f-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thou htfuily weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Tlio spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


WHY WE ENTERED THE WORLD WAR

Inasmuch as Europe is on the verge of ex-
ploding into another war and efforts appar-
ently are being made to draw this country
into the Sino-Jap dispute, it may be well
to inquire into the reason America; joined
the last debauchery.
The real reason was exposed on December
14, 1934,. by the Nye committee investigating
the munitions industry when the senator gave
to the world the text of Ambassador- Page's
cable to President Wilson. IHere are the im-
portant paragraphs, which we cull from
"Freedom of the Press," a book by George
Seldes. This cable was dated March 5, 1917,
and exactly one month and one day later the
United States declared war on Germany and,
says Seldes, "the Morgan millions were
saved." Read:
The pressure of this approaching crisis,
I am certain, has gone beyond the abil-
ity of the Morgan financial agency for
the British and French governments.
It is not improbable that the only
way of maintaining our present pre-
eminent trade position and averting a
panic is by declaring war on Geryany.
Pressing danger that the Ft anco-
American and Anglo-American exchange
will be greatly disturbed; the inevitable
consequences will be that orders by all
Allied governments will be reduced to the
lowest possible amount, and that trans-
atlanitic trade will practically come to
an end.
The result of such a stoppage will be
a panic in the United States. We
shall soon reach this condition unless we
take quick action to prevent it. Great
Britain and France must have a credit.
in the United States which will be large
enough to prevent the collapse of world
trade and the whole financial structure
of Europe.
If the United States declares war
against Germany the greatest help we
could give Great Britain and the Allies
would be such a credit. If we should
adopt this policy, an excellent plan would
be for our government to make a large
investment in a Franco-British loan. An-
other plan would be to guarantee such a
loan. A great advantage would be that
all the money would be kept in the
United States.
We could keep on with our trade and
increase it, till the war ends, and after
the war Europe would purchase food
and an enormous supply of materials with
which to re-equip her peace industries..
We should thus reap the. profit of an un-
interrupted and perhaps an enlarging,
trade over a number of years, and we
should hold their securities in payment
Selldes says the Associated Press, Inter-
national News Service and the Universal
Service did not put the text of the foregoing
on the wires, and when queried, the AP gave
an evasive answer, and "finally a statement
that the committee had not given out the
text at all." However, the United Press put
the text of the cable into its munitions story
that day.
The New Republic, which made an inves-


tigation, says that only two New York pa-
pers printed the text, The Post and The
World-Telegram. Seldes adds that The Post
not only printed the text but published an
editorial suggesting that 50,000 doughboys
died to make the world safe for profits. "The
same newspapers which ignored or buried the
Page revelations," said The Post, "will spread
propaganda for our entrance, into the next
war because our entrance into the war will
safeguard those investments a nd those
profits."
The Star does not know why the press
services failed to put the text of this im-
portant and illuminating document on the
wires for their member papers. If their
failure was due to deference to the Morgan
Millions or the politicians of the state and
war departments, then we join George Seldes
in inquiring: "Freedom of the press?
WHOSE freedom?"

And while we are on this subject, here is
an editorial by N. A. Broking, editor of The
Highlands County News, Sebring, anent the
same topic:
We doubt if any news film ever
traveled half-way around the world in so
short a time after the incident occurred
as did the pictures of the sinking of. the
Panay which were shown here this week.
And we also think it would ne a safe
bet that it has been shown in more thea-
ters throughout the country than anpy
picture in so short a time.
While the news reel companies have
always been alive to news value and'in
some instances get' the pictures to the
public in a surprisingly short time, we
believe this instance was a record.
If the picture had been absolute proof
that the ship was sunk by japan, there
could have been just plain business en-
terprise back of the rush; but since the
picture showed so little background that
it could have been taken on the Missis-
sippi river, the haste and "hullabaloo"
had all the earmarks of showmanship or
propaganda.
The income from such a short release
shown in the smaller theaters through-
out the country could not have been
large enough to justify the large num-
ber of reprints that must have been
necessary to be shown in so many dif-
ferent places in the same week.
We do not say and we are not even
intimating that the thing could be a hoax,
but it is quite evident that money is be-
ing spent to be sure every theater-goer
in the country will see the picture while
the happening is still an international in-
cident.
We suggest that our readers keep an
ice pack handy if they have a tendency
to be "hot-blooded," and remember that
the people who cry for revenge and urge
war would have a pleasant feeling as
they shove the war profits in their
pockets.. But a bayonet in the abdomen
does not feel pleasant to the man who
actually does the fighting.
And another thing' we would like to
suggest is that you be sure you are ready
to grab a' gun and do your part before
you say what we ought to do to those
"dirty Japs." And when we 'ay grib a
gun, we mean grab it and do your part
on the battlefielld, not in". nhii iitions
factory:
A point well taken Editor Broking, and
undoubtedly if an investigation Were made
it would be discovered that the news reel
company was distributing the film at the
expense of Big Business. We know and you
know what it is to grip a rifle in battle, and
we would suggest that the best way to quiet
down all this bluster about going to war
with Japan would be to draft the first con-
tingent from the ranks of Big Business and
put 'em in the front line trenches.

You can generally tell whether a man is
guilty or not by the kind of a lawyer he
picks. :


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


The other day an insurance
salesman suggested that I take
out an endowment policy
which was a good suggestion, ex-
cept for the fact that I already am
weighted down witil two of them.
But it reminded me of a salesman
who called on me at one tiinme to
sell me some disability insurance.
He was one of those high-powered
ducks, and. after listening to him
for five minutes or so, I told him
I could think of no way of spend-
ing my time quite so pleasantly
as in work.
"Why, nobody would work un-
less he had to!" t;ie young man
exclaimed. He couldn't
see how utterly dull life would be
without work.
People talk about leisure ..
Leisure for what? Who-
ever was happy in idleness? Per-
haps leisure to writer books, to
compose songs, to create? .
The labor involv' .e ;n writing is
slight. Neither time nor physical
exertion is a factor in creative
production. The out!it of a real
poet need not diminish because he
drives a locomotive eight hours a
day. Loul at ye scribe.
I do my daily stint and
then" edit this pernicious column
with pleasure.
I can understand people who
want to change jobs or their en-
vironment. But the desire to in-
crease the loafing hours until each
day becomes a holiday is not un-
derstandable. I can think
of no thought so tortuous as
"What shall I do today?"
-
Isn't it an astonishing fact that
no man is so homely but that
some woman things he is just
LOVELY... And no woman
is so unattractive but.that some
man thinks she is an ANGEL.
This fact was impressed upon
me Saturday evening while stroll-
ing on Third avenue, and a walk
along any city street should be
enough to convince an unemo-
tional observer that most of us
are positively ugly-I've often won-
dered why a good looking woman
like my ball and chain chose an
ugly monstrosity like myself. .
And yet there isn't a man who
doesn't regard his wife as the
equal of Cleopatra or Helen of
Troy in looks and every
woman thinks her husband is a
Greek god.
Hundreds of men this evening
will show the preceding paragraph
to their wives and tell them that
the first part is true, anyway.

Ad fly poems:
A lonesome fly got in our house
One day not long ago.
The family armed itself at once
And started for the foe.
Potato mashers, frying pans
And baseball bats we got,
And broomsticks-and we started
in
With might and main to swat.
We smashed three good-sized mir-
rors
And tore down one chandelier;
We broke an antique heirloom
vase
And wrecked the jardiniere.
It seems a shame to stop and
think
What father's got to buy;
We swatted everything we could-
But didn't swat the fly!
-"Lake Breezes," Leesburg.

I understand there was a rum-
pus down at the postoffice the
other day. A woman wished all of
$10 worth of three-cent stamps
and was incensed because no dis-
count was allowed with the large
purchase.
"I never heard of such a thing!"


FAVORABLE PRICES FOR
FLORIDA CATTLE SEEN;
HOGS TO SELL EARLY

Esntmated Number Hogs on State's
Farms January ] Was 499,000

Compared with prices of grain-
fed stock, .prices of Florida cattle
in 1938 should be favorable, ac-
cording to the agricultural outlook
prepared and issues by the state
agricultural extension service at
Gainesville.
Early grass-fed cattle are ex-
pected to bring better prices than
those marketed later in the year.
Lower grades are expected to
show a seasonal advance during
the first half of 1S.38 and may even
go higher than in 1937, the report
states.
Fewer cows, heczers and calves
will be slaughtered alis year than
last; but the number of steers to
be slaughtered will be about the
same as 1937. An abundance of
feed grains will result in the fin-
ishing out of many more steers
and the total supply o2 beef prob-
ably will be almost as large as
that of 1937;.
With the increased number' of
stockyards and pac-:ing plants in
the state, Florida hog production
should be more profitable to
farmers in the northwestern part
of the state this year than last,
the report indicates.
Estimated number of hogs on
Florida farms on January 1 was
499,000, or about 14 per cent more
than the number on hand a year
earlier. The 1937 .pring pig crop
was about 12 "per cent larger than
that of 1936, while the 1937 fall
pig crop was only slightly larger
than, the 1936 fall crop.
Florida's 1937 corn crop was
somewhat larger than that of 1936,
but abnormally low yields of pea-
nuts probably resulted in a lower
total supply of hog feed than for
the previous year. Because of the
smaller feed supply, most of the
hogs will be .marketed earlier this
season and consequently lighter,
which will probably result in rela-
tively lower prices for the unfin-
ished animals.
------W------
GAME LANDS VALUED
Pennsylvania's 552,453 acres of
game lands were valued at $2,-
576,268, the game commission re-
ports. indicating an average value
of $4.66 an acre. Acquired over a
17-year period, actual purchase
prices averaged about $3.60 per
acre, or $1,996,070.

she exclaimed, and when others in
the long line before the window
began to giggle and snicker, she
accepted the same as encourage-
ment of further challenge. .
And now Uncle Sam and Postmas-
ter H. A. Drake know just what
one woman thinks of them.
It did not help. matters any
when, as she left, a man piped up:
"If you come here on Tuesdays
and Thursdays, there might be
some specials on sale."

Ad turtle poems:.
Hy and Sy are turtles;
They live in our back yard.
Their necks are rough and wrinkly,
Their skins are tough and hard.
They certainly are lazy;
They neither work nor play-
They're very fond of sun baths
And scarcely move all day.
They sometimes swim a little,
And sometimes eat a bite;
If they're ever really active
It must be late at night.
It seems to me a turtle's
Might be a fine career-
But who would kiss a turtle,
Or call a turtle "dear"?
-Elvira.

Well, I see politics already are
getting under way and I
have always foune that the
chronic handshaker usually has
something up his sleeve.


;PAGE TWO


Friday, January 14, 1938


THE STAR








Fridy, Jnuay ~ 938 HE TAR AGE HRE


4~L~=-~=~~


Listen





This!


I'mthe



SUPE SALESMAN


PEOPLE INVITE ME INTO THEIR HOMES
S. a standing invitation in every Port St. Joe
home .. the old man chats with me., the
children pore over my many interesting, odd and
historical items the Missus shops with me.

THEY LISTEN TO WHAT I HAVE TO SAY
S. don't have to beg and go 'round in circles
looking for an audience Port St. Joe
listens to me .. they're anxious to hear
what I've got to say!

THEY BELIEVE WHAT I TELL THEM
because they know that I will never de-
ceive or steer 'em wrong. They believe me 'cauce
they know I'm a straight guy!

THEY BUY WHAT I HAVE TO SELL
from dog food to automobiles after
they see me they're interested consumers
I answer "what, where and how much?" about
everything that's new in Port St. Joe !


-'LL Work for YOU---and I'll

Guranrtee RESULTS!



STHE STAR
"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"

T Vioney You Spend With The Star Remains In Port
Joe Where You Can Get Another Cra:k At It!


LONDON INSURANCE RUSH 01
IFears that Great Britain will be
come involved in another war ar
responsible for a wild scramble t
insure property against damage
From invading aircraft or born
Sbardment from the sea. Cover t(
tho extent of tens of millions o
pounds is being provided weekly
according to the Property Owners
Protection association.
------I-A- -
Registration of births was no
compulsory in England until 1876



Look Us Up!
When you need 'any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
RIG H TI

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker


WELFARE BOARD

WILL SOON GIVE

AID TO BLIND

APPROVE 38 OLD-AGE GRANTS
IN GULF COUNTY FOR
SIX MONTHS


N
e-
-e



f




t
p.


PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!

Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


GOVERNOR CONE MAKES
NEW YEAR RESOLUTION
OF NO NEW TAXES IN '38

Promise. No Spec'al Session of
The Lrgislatura Will B! Held

Governor Fred P. Cone ended
his first year in office with a
promise the state will be oper-
ated during 1938 without new


taxes or a special
legislature.


session of the


Even though the present short-
age of ready cash with which to
finance normal state activities ex-
tends into the new year, he said,
he will continue the policy of pay-
ing the most important appropria-
tions and letting others wait.
"I am proud," he said, "that we
have operated the state during the
first year of my administration
without new taxes or a special ses-
sion. This has been done even
though we took on new expenses
never before paid by the state,
such as old age pensions and other
social security activities.
"It has been possible because we
ran the state on an economical
basis, and because by more effici-
ent organization we received more
money from present sources of
taxation.
"In tire coming year it will be
my policy to run tIe Etate on what
we have. If we run short of money
'he least necessary appro'riat'o-s
will have to wait until the money


BOOKS OF MAYO

ARE APPROVED

AUDITOR SAYS AGRICULTURE
COMMISSION KEPT
WITHIN LIMITS

Expenses and other disburse-
ments of the state department of
agriculture for the three-year pe-
riod ending June 30, 1937, "kept
within the limits" of appropria-
tions and laws, according to a
statement to Governor Cone by
State Auditor W. M. Wainwright.
Nathan Mayo is commissioner of
agriculture.
"It was found that the commis-
sioner had properly accounted for
all licenses and other fees col-
lected, and for all license blanks
printed for his use, As well as all
inspection tags and stamps," the
auditor said. "The financial and
other records of the commissioner
were found to be accurate and
adequate. The commissioner has
set up and keeps a very thorough
check on all receipts and dis-
bursements."
Receipts by the department in
the three years from June 30,
1934, to June 30, 1937, totaled $2,-
844,114.55, not including some fed-
eral funds expended in inspection
services. Disbursements totaled
$2,883,526.28, of which $1,433-
270.54 went for salaries and in the


111


ginning July 1 and ending Decem-
ber 31, according to statistics
made public yesterday by the
state welfare board. The other
approximately 25 per cent were re-
jected or their applications were
closed by death, withdrawal,
change of residence or for other
cause.
For the state at large, 17,366
applications w e r e investigated
during the, half-year period, with
12.886 being approved, 2,874 being
rejected and 1,606 closed for other
reasons. The number approved,
plus those who were on the pay-
rolls on July 1 by transfer from
the old county-federal roster,
brought the total obtaining grants
'o 22,894 as of January 1.
Statistics for Gulf county for the
"ame period were: Approved ,38;
rejected, 8.
The state welfare board, in-
'ducted into office on July 1, en-
tered the second half-year of its
existencee with its program en-
larged to include aid to the blind.
At it3 January meeting it an-
nounced the appointment of Dr.
VW. S. Nichols of Lake City as
state ophthalmologist and desig-
"a'ed half a hundred other eye
specialists in all sections of the
state to examine those who apply
for this form of assistance.
As rapidly as the examinations
are made they will be forwarded
to Dr. Nichols for review and
those that receive his approval
will go To the district boards for
action. The district boards will
determine need and other cate-
gories of eligibility.


AREA CLOSED

TO FISHING

FISHING PROHIBITED IN PART
OF GULF AND CALHOUN
COUNTIES FOR 5 YEARS

Beginning January 20 of this
--car, a portion of Gulf and Cal-
houn counties will be closed to the
taking of fish for a period of five
years, according to an announce-
"--nt by Dr. I. N. Kennedy, execu-
tive secretary of the state conm-
--*- ion of game and fresh water
fish.
The area is on lamonia Lake,
Southeast of the D. F. Stanfill
'arm, and affects rushing territory
on both the Apalachicola and
Chipola rivers.
------__--_A
REHEARING MUST BE SOUGHT
BY JANUARY 22 IN DEEB CASE
Assistant Attorney General T. A.
Norwood has unt' January 2' to
file a motion for a rehearing of
the supreme court's decision
granting George IDeeb, Panama
City contractor, a thira trial on
manslaughter charges.
Indicted for first degree murder
in Escambia county, Deeb twice
was convicted of manslaughter
and sentenced to 20 years. The
court reversed his second convic-
tion on the ground that proper
evidence was ruled out 'by 'the
trial judge.
----
DIPLOMA SWITCH PROPHETIC
When Georg? E. Hunt and ATice
E. Palmer, classmates, were gradu-
ated from Tufts College Medical
Sch.ol at _Medford, Mass., in 1894,
he was awarded her diploma and
she his. The error proved pr*o-
"hct'c. "".ie r:.r-ld later, and
71 andi 70. r!nectivily,
"-?7 .:. -ss Ar.?t l:6, Ca:i'.


No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

S. Your business will be

appreciated.




Gulf Hardware





EUILDN G SUPPLIES PCRT ST. JOE


comes in." various departments under the
H.Ire's hopin' you can stick to commissioner's supervision.
your New Year's resolutions, gov- ------
ernor. Automobile license plates are
-------- clearer to read if dark letters ara
Broccoli was brought to England used on light ground, than if light
prom Italy in the 16th century, letters are used on dark ground.




NATURAL GAS SERVICE


Available Immediately

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING--REFRIGERATION

-<4 A full line of gas appliances in stock 3c-


Nearly 75 per cent of those
plying were granted old-age
distance for the six months


Inquire
Miller's Drug Store
PORT ST. JOE


Friday, January 14, 1938


THE STAR


PAGE THREE


-i


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


S SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932







-- --
NEEDS


'WE CAN SUPPLY YOU
-^








THE( SFMTd


DAGE FOUR


WEWAHITCHKA BANK
HOLDS ANNUAL MEET

Statement of Condition Reflects
Tremendous Growth in Year

The stockholders of the Wewa-
hitchka State Bank held their an-
nual meeting at the bank Thurs-
da:- afternoon, with 93 per cent
of the outstanding stock repre-
sented. The following were chosen
as board of directors for the en-
suing year: C, L. Morgan, Dave
Gaskin, H. C. Lister, Dr. Thos.
Meriwether, J. A. Whitfield and
James H. Kelley.
The board of directors elected
!he following officers and em-
ployes: Dave Gaskin, president;
Dr. Meriwether, vice-president; J.
H. Kelley, cashier, and Miss Doris
Davis, bookkeeper.
The statement of condition of the
bank reflects a tremendous growth
during the past year, the resources
increasing from $154,867 to $213,-
831. Deposits increased from $127,-
731 to $183,990. The statement is
published in this issue of The Star.
President Gaskin announced the
bank had experienced a satisfac-
tory year and that prospects for
the present year are equally sat-


EXTENSION GRANTED TOWN OF BRISTOL IS
FLORIDA POWER CORP. HARD HIT BY FIRE

(Continued from page 1) Allirost Entire Business Block Is


the commissioners for a permit to
make an addition to the Baptist
church to bh used for housing the
Sunday school classes, as the
o-r.sent building is taxed to ca-
pacity.
It was pointed out by the com-
mission that the building was in
the fire zone and that if a permit
were granted for the erection of a
wooden addition, other owners of
wooden buildings in the zone
would seek like privileges.
Mayor Sharit stated that the
St. Joseph Land Company was
killing to give the church mem-
bers a lot outside the fire zone in
exchange/ for their present site,
and under those circumstances he
and Commissioner tone would be
willing to make donations for the
moving of the building, and then
the permit could be granted for
naaking the addition. Contribu-
tidns could also be secured from
other interested parties and then
'he congregation could use the
present structure and addition un-
'4 such time as they were able
. erect a n-ore substantial edi-


Destroyed By Flames


Fire of undetermined origin de-
stroyed almost an entire block of
brick and frame business buildings
on the main street of Bristol
Monday. Loss- was placed at ap-
proximately $30,000 by property
owners, and included the Ameri-
can Legion home.
Aid in fighting the blaze came
from Blountstown and Quincy and
trucks of the forestry department
were used in hauling water.
..-----~------
PAPERMEN WIN GAME

(Continued from page 1)
got under way good the Papermen
decided that it would be, a deliber-
ate insult to let a bunch of white-
collar workers nose them out, so
they began to turn on the heat,
and when the final whistle was
sounded they were the victors by
a score of 14 to 12.
Both teams showed real fight-
ing spirit and show promise of
exciting entertainment for the
basketball fans of Port St. Joe.


is'actory. He informed th" stock- flie. Lineups were: Paper Mill: For-
hold.rs that the ban'~ was en- Ordinances Passed !wards, Dendy and Tapper; center,
deavoring to meet r- 7 banking .4 no ,b- of amendments to ex- p. Boyer; guards, G. Little and
requirement in Gulf county -nd .... o-'-,ances passed final Coldewev: substitutes, D. Boyer
that its original adopted rpo!cies s;:.us Tu-La" night, among and M. Parrisb. Merchants: For-
of rendering a county-wi,~ service -T a ;- a special licensing wardp, J. Woods. Stokes; Center,
--re being continr Isl:,y rain- kl machines, an amend- Rile,: guards, J. Ferrell and Ken-
tained. i-' *-- the minimum water nington; F bs. Cou:nil and Guest.
S1 -0 l..0 per month, and an ----
O. R. Cogswelll o0 T-?-: -i'*"! .--dment to the sewer ordinance Judge Alton DPnd.- was the
ns in the city Fri- o- I ,! :o-'-- a charge of 15 per cent guest Tuesda- of bi, parents, Mr.
ness. i .mount of thb water bill and Mrs. E. D. Dendy.
A A a for sewer service, the minimum -' c -1
Subscribe to The Star-$2 year. to be 50 cents per month. Save by reading the ads!


S, .,,, .-, -- ...
/-'\ ( --? ^^-JI--' P^ "^''''X'X C F- S /^*<^5 y;'^ ^


I doz, '0c
ORANGES
Max weJ House r)
COFFEE, 1 lb. ...------
I doz. 2
BANANANAS
OLPVES-. 1
Jar
3 pkgs.
MACARONI .......--.......
DOG FOOD- 5
Cm 5c
GRAPEFRUT, each .....5c


TRY OUR

QUALITY

-E A T S


The Market where your
bus'ncss is appreciated


2-lb. Jar 2a
MUSTARD .....-.....
'! Gal
GOOD SYRUP .-...-.....
CREAM-
2 large or 4 small .-.1
3 Cans 25E
TOMATOES
No. 2V2 Can
PEACHES 2
COCA-COLA- 25
Fcr health-6 for ...2
COOKING OIL- 95c
Gallon 95c


KING IS CANDIDATE L. V. Merritt of Panama City
FOR R. R. COMMISSION was in the city Tuesday on busi-
ness.


Will Oppose Jerry Carter In Group
Two; Resident of Zolfo Springs

Wilbur C. King of Zolfo Springs
announced yesterday that he will
be a candidate for state railroad
commissioner in Group 2. The of-
fice is now held by Jerry W. Car-
ter of Tallahassee.
----*- a-----
ATTEND FUNERAL
B. W. Eells, Sr., Nick Comforter,
Capt. Robert Tapper and D. C. Ma-
hon attended the funeral of Mrs.
Milton Smith in Marianna yester-
day morning..

Notice of Registration
Notice is hereby given that the
Registration Books of the City of
Port St. Joe, Florida, will be
opened for the purpose of regis-
tration of all qualified electors
who are qualified under Ordinance
35X and Chapter 18816, Laws of
Florida, Acts of 1937. Said books
will be opened on January 26,
1938, and will remain open for
registration purposes until Febru-
ary 4, 1938, between the hours of 9
o'clock A. M. and 12 M,, and 2
o'clock P. M. until 5 o'clock P. M.
each day except Sundays and holi-
days.
All persons desiring to register
shall call at the City Hall for such
purpose.
(Signed)
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk, as
Registration Officer of the
City of Port St. Joe.


It pays to advertise-try it!


GASOLINE
FOR ECONOMY !
You Save because you get
more miles to the gallon and
less carbon.

FOR QUALITY!
You get a pure product, fa-
mous for dependability.
WASHING-GREASING
POLISHING
-o--

WOCO-PEP
SERVICE STATION
W. COLLINSWORTH, Mgr.
ON HIGHWAY NO. 10
. .' ---,----ij S


SlI GHT--SAV LIG- T

WITH AN 1. E. S. LAMP


Hitter Light

for Better

Living


Light up and live! It i- a
scientific fact that good 11ait-
ing aids physical and rv -:nt:l
well-being. That is wh:, tl!
abundant, glareless light:rig ol
SE. S. Better Sight Lrampr
permits you to relax and ci'L::
your book or card game see
one of these new type L-:,.-
Observe how htey ..iffer trom
ardinrry lamps. There are
many models from whir,. to
-hoose. Table, floor and pin-
it-up types -give you a ;Jd
range of selection for com-
pletely light conditioning :ur
home. Low in price, I. E S.
Lamps provide ;he doub!:- ad-
vantage of sight saving a; v. ii
Rs graceful beauty.


All I. E. S. Lamrps carry th-. C.:r-
tification Tag illustrated r..l.:
which shows that they compile. '.i.
the rigid specifications of l: I
luminating Engineering Soc.. i






1hd


P OTIAT


SWEET
or
IRISH


I, E. S. Lamps
A hardware and


Are Sold At Electrical,
House Furnishing Stores


GROCERY

anMd MARK ET


FLORIDA -POV 7 R

CORPORATION

*_ ..* mI JI~rl l_ _, .i-->.i. m m ^Tl .K ,^ 1I


~ i--. -.l-___----P---- I SD-PI1


-- --- --


Friday, January 14, 1938


THE STAR


10 ~r~~~s


wlc


118l 08C1


S1~WB






Fraiday~-, Januar 14.,------- 193 THE STAR PAGE FIVE-


- ~. ?,~-.~


low I'


u -toI



'00%~


Store


We are Offering You


These


RED-HOT SPECIALS
We take this opportunity to advise our customers that we have no con-
nection whatsoever with the store in the old building which we vacated.


k-etcbYa


PRICES GOOD ONLY FOR

Friday, Saturday and Monday
JANUARY 14-15--17

Celebrating the Opening of Our New


GOOD


Aft
'a,550n~


OF PREMIUMS!!


POTTED MEAT 3 for 10o 10c BOX RINSO FOR Ic MUSTARD Quari jar 15
VIENNA SAUSAGE 2 for I With the purchase of one PEANUT BUTTER Quart jar 23
CORN BEEF 2 for 35 25c Box SPAGHETTI and MACARONI-3 for ......10
BALL PEACHES No. 2V2 can ...............19 I KEROSENE OIL 5 gallons ..................55
CORN FLAKES -- 3 boxes 25 P
COOKING OIL Gallon can 950' With the purchase of two Blue Boxes of GoYARod Fe DOZ
SALT or MATCHES 3 for 10
SUPER-SUDS
MOTHER'S OATS With Plate cr CupFRESH FRUITS AND VEGTALESOF
and Saucer 3 ib ......-....- ........---- 27 You can get a beautiful Cake Piate for Ic ALL KINDS IN SEASON





SCORN .... PEACOCK FLOUR MIRACLE WHIP
N P24-POUND SACK ..---....- .5
COLLA RDS ring this entire coupon to this store and | |re|a ing
T O M A T O E S get a refund of 10c on a 24-pound bag of P int 5;p Pint 2p Qt. 39S
STRING BEA S Peacock Flour, or a refund of 5c on a 12-
pound bag, which will make the cost of the
flour 95c for 24 pounds and 50c for 11 pounds






WATER MADE RICE 3 pounds ....-------..--190
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE 1 Ib ......29(
PORK & BEANS, 23 ounce 3 for ......---25 L E pound .. Ic IWhite Salt Meat I1b. 1 8c
PURE CANE SYRUP Gallon .-............... 5^ irt T' .t B
TPMATO JUICE -- 20-Ance can .............a 0, STEW MEAT, 2 b. 25 ,c Cream CHEESEh 1b. 23c
HOMINY No. 2'/ can .... I-O POR R O T GOOD
SAR D N E cans for .......-.-E........ _K K OA, 1 C REAMERYBUTTER, ib. 38c


0E IRISH 10 19
______.. L.II_ ~ ~ --n. -IP-~_~i L


'Where You Get the Most for Your Dollar


g I IA
2.4XF1


iOl
lor.

or


1OC


ol, INNIN FAVsA RTAM~rra~are~L


Friday, January 14., 1938


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


SEE OUR LINE


.1


PORT ST. JOEB, FLA.


'Isr,


wqd


vil


C.ASH









PACE SIX



Many Long
Under this heading will l:e publ
from old newspapers and cl;ppin
torical interest and should ma

(From the New York World of
April 15, 1865.)
LINCOLN ASSASSINATED

The Plot Involved Mr. Stanton


THE STAR

away. It had been Mr. Stanton's
intention to accompany Mr. Lin-
Y ears A go coln to the theater and occupy the
same box, but the press of office
ished a series of articles taken business prevented him. It seems
gF. They will be mostly of his- to have been the evident aim of
ke an interesting scrap book.
the plotters to paralyze the people
by at once striking cown the heart
respective duties in the same man- and arm of the whoie country.
n'ar as before the deplorable event As soon as the dreadful events
that had changed the head of the were announced in the streets,
Government. Richards, the AAsistant Provost
Facts Elicited Marshal and his Assistants, were
It is suspected that the conspir- at work to discover the assassins
ann w+AIlp-


Washington, April 15-3 P. M.- acy was organized in varylana.
Official notice of the death of An examination of witnesses not
President Lincoln was given by under oath was had before an in-
Heads of Departments this morn- formal tribunal this morning which
ing to Andrew Johnson, Vice-Pres- elicited the following:
ident, on whom tme constitution The murderer of the President
devolves the office of President. was J. Wilkes Booth. His hat was
Mr. Johnson, upon receiving this found and identified by several
notice, appeared before the Hon. persons who had =een him in the
S. P. Chase, Chief Justice of the past two days. A spur which
United States, and took the oath dropped was also Identified as one
of office as President of these he obtained at the stable where
United States, and assumed its du- he got his horse last evening.
ties and functions. At 12 o'clock This man had played several
the President met the heads of the times at Ford's theater, and there-
departments, at a Cabinet meeting fore was.well acquainted with its
at the Treasury Department. exits and entrances. The person
Among other business the follow- who attacked Secretary Seward
ing was transacted: left behind him a slouched hat
1st. The arrangements for the fand an old rusty revolver, the
funeral of the late P-es'dent chambers of which were broken
were offered to several Sn-'retaries from the barrel, as if by striking.
as far.as they relate' 'o their re- Th'a loads were drawn from the
spective departments. bhamb1-rs. one being but a rough
2nd. Wm. Hunter was ap-ointed 'ncc' o& 1rad. and the other balls
acting Secretary of St' 'rin:~ c"'aller t'-a the chambers and
the disability of Mr C-vard andl "r-"-ap-d in paper to prevent them
his son, Frederick, A'.: i':'t ec-- fr:"" fnlir : out.
retary. Tv-o u:entlemen who went to
3rd. The President f-'-1v -' ----.-etary Stanton's house to ap-
r-unced that he des' -' h, -.i -ris h'm.of the attack on Presi-
the present Secretaries of Depart- 'er' ''ncoln, met, near his resi-
ments as his Cabinet, and they dence a man muffled in a cloak;
v-ould go on and discharge their when accosted by them he hurried


and in a few moments LU Ltee-
graph had aroused the whole po-
lice force of the city, and every
precaution was taken to preserve
order. All the streets were pa-
troled by troops. The police were
mounted by order of Gen. Burger,
and every road leading from Wash-


ington was strongly picketed. The
steamboats about to depart down-
the Potomac were detained, and
the mournful news' immediately
telegraphed to Baltimore. The cav-
alry there were immediately put
upon active duty and every road
picketed. Other measures were
taken for the arrest of the assas-
sins.
The Death Scene
The President breathed his last
at 7:30 this a. m., closing his eyes
as if going to sleep, and, his coun-
tenance assuming an expression of
perfect renose. Ther: were no in-
dicatio:s of pain. Rev. Dr. Gurley,
of the New York Avenue Presby-
terian Church, immediately on its
being known that life was ex-
tinct, knnlt beside his bed and of-
fered an impressive prayer, which
was responded to by all present.
The scene at the President's
bedside is described by one who
witnessed it as most affecting. It


STATEMENT OF CONDITION



Wewahitchka State Bank

At the Close of Business
December 31, 1937

COMPTROLLER'S CALL

RESOURCES:
T Plans aln Discounts ......$ 73,479.49
Banking House .... --------- 4,792.10
Furniture fndd Fixtures 1.00
Other Real Estate .-..-....------------------------ 49.77
Other Assets .- 612.52
Interest I. ccrued on Securities -. 602.50
RESERVES:
U. S, County and Municipal Bonds $35,500000
Other Stocks and Securities ..-....- 1.572.00
Cash ard Due from Banks -....--... 97,221.65
$134,293.65

TOTAL .--....$213,831.03

LIABILITIES

Capital Stock ....$ 15,000.00
Surplus Fund 11,000.00
Undivided Profits .....-------- 2,862.25
Dividends Unpaid _--...... 9000.
Reserved for Depreciation, etc. 78.56
DEPOSITS --.... 183,990.22

TOTAL $213,831.03

On the Basis of the Above Statement We Solicit the Accounts of Individuals
and Business Firms In Gulf County



Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"

VEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


Friday, January 14, 1938


was surrounded by Cabinet minis-
ters, all of whom were bathed in
tears, not even excepting Mr.
Stanton, who, when informed by
Surgeon General Barnes that the
President could not live until the
next morning, exclaimed, "Oh!
oh! General, no, no!"-and im-
mediately sat down on a chair
near the bedside and wept like a
child. Senator Sumner was seated
on the right of the President, and
Couch at the head, holding the
right hand of the President in his
own. He was sobbing like a wom-
an, with his head bowed down al-
most on the pillow of the bed on
which the President was lying.
The President's remains were
removed from the private resi-
dence opposite Fore's Theater, to
the Executive Mails:on at half-past
nine, in a hearse wrapped in the
American flag, escorted by a small
guard of cavalry. Gen. Augur and
other military officers on foot, and
a dense crowd accompanied the
remains to the White House,
where the military guard prevent-
ed all but the persons of the
household and the personal friends
of the deceased from entering.
The body was to be embalmed,
with the view of removal to Illi-
nois.
The last writing done by Presi-
dent Lincoln was addressed to the
latter for an interview. The mes-
sage was written on a card on the
President's knee in his carriage
about a quarter past eight, just
as he was starting for the theater.
The note was as follows: "Allow
Mr. Ashman to come to me at 9
A. M., tomorrow, April 15th, 1865."
It is expected, though nothing is
definitely determined upon, the
funeral of the late President will
take place on Thursday next.
Next Week: The Heenan-Morissey
Prizefight and Bits from The Sa-
urday Evening Post., Feb. 12, 1825.

GOV. CONE IS QUOTED AS
BACKING CLAUDE PEPPER

The Miami Daily News quotes
governorr Fred Cone in an inter-
-iew as endorsing Senator Claude
-',pecr in his campaign for re-
"I1ctonn against Representative J.
Mark WVilcox.
"I expect to support Claude Pep-
ner of the two who are running,"
the governor said.
Asked'what he thought of the
-orsibility of former Governor
Dave Sholtz entering the race, the
'.iami paper sata the governor
-irugced and made a L:ghting re-
mnark.
---------
CARTER TO SEEK RE-ELEC-
TION AS STATE ATTORNEY
John H. Carter, Jr., of Marianna,
-tate attorney for the Fourteenth
judicial circuit of Florida, in a
communication to The Star yester-
day, announced that he will be a
candidate to succeed himself to
that office in the coming primary
election.


ST. JOE ICE


j COMPANY

Manufacturers of

i CRYSTAL ICE
FROM TREATED WATER

MAX KILBOURN, Prop.

-- --- ------ - -

We Haul Anything-- -

We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
^ A^ AA AA A ^ ^ A ^ ----- -----


BLOUNTSTOWN TAX LEVY
IS CUT FROM 65 TO 55 MILLS
At a meeting of the Blounts-
town city council held last week,
the tax levy for that city was cut
from 65 to 55 mills.

Some new models of railway
sleeping cars have improved light-
ing fixtures for reading in bed,
and sponge rubber mattresses.


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
-GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
----
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.




Moonlight

Hotel
For the convenience of
LADIES, GENTLEMEN
and CHILDREN
-Others Not Wanted-

NEW FURNISHINGS

J. W. RAKESTRAW, Prop.
2 Miles West Port St. Joe







4






SWhenever that tired feel-
ing gets you, count on
milk to restore your pep
and give you the energy
you need to keep going
at top speed and ef-
ficiency!!
PURE MILK
For Your Protection

Our milk meets the most
rigid standards for pur-
ity and wholesomeness.

ALWAYS CALL FOR

SOLOMON'S

Dairy

Products


~- ----






Frdy Jaur 4 98TH TRPG EE


BRITAIN TO BUY AIRSHIPS
British-owned airships are to fly
again. Almost eight years after
the R-101 crashed and her sister
ship R-100 was turned into scrap
to show that th' a:r ministry was
finished with lighter-than-air craft
private British interests plan to
fly three helium-filled, Diesel-en-
gined "baby" airships. The ships
will be purchased in the United
States.

Subscribe to The Star-$2 year.




Fishing...

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.

TROUT
BASS
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within 1~he
4 4 '


means of' ev


eryone.


SEE-

J. O. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA,, FLAA.


d'~ )'~~ ~


WITH


W o d
t. .,- ,.- ."
Winter is here will
your present supply of
firewood last until the
Spring?
IF NOT-

Let Us Supply You

$3.50 Cord



GEO. GASKIN, JR.

-- WE DELIVER -
Wewahitchka, Fla.




C. C. WILLIAMS

Highland View



Dry Goods


Shoes


Hats

At Very Low Prices
SEE OUR LINE
BEFORE YOU BUY!
O-0-



Radios

CROSLEY
STANDARD
HOWARD
We have the best line of
Radios to be found in
Gulf County.,


The recent building of pulp and
paper mills in the southeast con-
stitutes one of the most important
developments in the South's eco-
nomic history.' Within the past
two years 11 large pulp and pa-
per mills have been located in the
six southeastern states from Vir-
ginia to lorida. When these mills
are in full operation they will have
an output in excess of 3000 tons
oF pulp a day, utilizing more than
5000 cords of pulpwood. Te put
it another way. these 11 mills will
consume 350 freight cars of pulp-
wood a day, or approximately 125,-
000 cars of pulpwood every year.
Many other new mills will un-
doubtedly be constructed in this
area as time passes, as it is evi-
dent that the pulp and paper in-
dustry in the Sout: is in its in-
fancy. Th'l natural advantages of
this area are too great-to be over-
looked by manufacturers in other
sections who must look:to a re-
duction of costs in order to com-
pete in the markers of the world.
The mills recently established
have provided employment for
many thousands of laborers in
plant operations, wood cutting,
transportation and.oth'er activities
incident to the manufacture of
pulp and paper. With the building
of paper mills, opportunities are
created for the establishment of
numerous smaller plants in th'e
territory for the conversion of pa-
Der and board into bags, packages.
cartons and other specialties used
by the consumer. The develop-
ment of the pulp and paper indus-
try will likewise result in the
building of chemical plants and al-
lied industries in the South.
Kraft Heretofore
Heretofore all mills built in this
area have been for the production
of kraft, or sulphate pulp. The re-
cent start of construction on a
large sulphite mill marks an im-
portant step in the diversification
of the South's pulp industry. The
use of. wood cellulose is expand-
ing at a remarkable rate. Its rami-
fications extend into literally
scores of commercial products
which form th'e basis of many of
our most important industries. The
sulphite mill will produce pulp
from southern pine for the manu-
facture of rayon. The same kind
of pu:p is used in making high-
grade bond, book and magazine.
paper, the manufacture of lac-
quers, plastics, etc. The latter
products alone comprise a field
which holds almost unending pos-
sibllities for expansion. Careful
study of recent trends in the cel-
lulose industries will reveal possi-
bilities for developments in the
South not heretofore apparent to
the casual observer.
In addition to the benefits de-
rived from increased employment
and new pay rolls, it is believed
that the coming of pulp and pa-
per to the South' wili' make
marked contribution to the estab-'
lishment of sound forestry prac-
tice. Even now the effect of pulp
and paper developments is being
demonstrated. Certainly the South
is more conservation-minded, than
at any times, in its history.


Since most of a nation's wealth
comes from the soil, it is of great
importance that due consideration
be given to the proper manage-
ment and use of :tre land. In this
day of crop curta:nment, reduced
acreage and retirement of sub-
marginal lands fronl ordinary agri-
cultural production, it is more
necessary than ever that careful
consideration be given to land
usage to the end that the greatest
returns may be r-'-a:zed.
The coming of puip and paper
is literally a boon to the agricul-
ture of the South Lands retired
from crop production can be
profitably utillized in the growing
of timber. Excess farm population
will b'e absorbed into industry and
home markets will be created for
the products of agriculture, there-
by stimulation further diversifica-
tion of farm crops.
Vast Cut-Over Area
Most of the.vast forests of vir-
gin timber, whicu originally cov-
ered the South, have been con-
verted into lumber, leaving more
than 100,000,000 acres of cut-over
lands. Great areas of these lands
now support stands of second-
growth timber which, under prop-
er management, can be made to
supply the requirements of all
wood-using industries in the South,
with attractive financial returns
to the land owners.
For years the national forest
service, state foresters and others
have advocated conservation of
timber, fire control and reforesta-
tion. Many land owners have
heeded this advice, with the result
that our timber resources are be-
ing conserved and protected to a
certain extent. In many cases,
however, lack of markets has
militated against the practice of
forestry., It is useless to advo-
cate conservation measures if fi-
nancial returns to the land owner
do not justify the effort and ex-
pense involved. If a sound forestry
policy is to prevail in the South, a
steady market for timber crops
must be available. Pulp and pa-
per mills will help materially to
provide such a market. A continu-
ous demand for trees to be used
for sawmill purposes, poles, pil-
ing, ties, naval stores and pulp-
wood will justify the effort and
expense required in integrated
timber operations.
In recent years wood cellulose
has made marked inroads into
fields previously dominated by cot-
ton. The South's position is very
fortunate in this respect. No mat-
ter how much wooc cellulose may
invade markets previously sup-
plied by our cottnri growers, the
South, with its favorable soil and
climatic conditions, will still be in
position, with proper management
of available timber stands, to sup-
ply the markets of the world with
wood cellulose.
Therefore it wl!i be seen that
the Iractice of forestry offers to
a great extent a solution of the
problem.of proper" land utilization.
The coming of pulp and paper to
the South will break the. value into
millions of. acres of hitherto idle
lands,..and'the effect of the indus-
try will contribute in large meas-


One'of our present major prob- ure to the Industrial and commer-
lems is the utilization of land. cial life of this entire section.


DOGS FIRST, BEER SECOND

Citizens of Hamilton, Ont., paid
the city $2,000 more in. 1936 for
the privilege of keeping dogs than
for the right to drink beer in li-
censed beverage rooms, a com-
parison of fees reveals. The dog
tax brought $14,390 to the treasury
of the city and beverage room li-
censes totaled only $12,390.


SCHOONER. CIRCLE GLOBE

Harold Nossiter and his two
sons have returned to Sydney,
Australia, after circling the globe
in their auxiliary staysail schooner
yacht Sirius in one year and two
months. In 30,000 miles 'of sailing
they used their auxiliary engine
for only 700 miles, and chiefly for
entering and leaving ports.


What the Coming of Pulp

And Paper Means to South


By WARREN T. WHITE
General Industrial Agent, Seaboard Air Line Railway


---A--- *
The only water bird of North
"merica whose nest has never
been found is Ross' snow goose.


EXPERT BARBERS

Our customers say that
we have a knack of giv-
ing them what they ask
for. That's because our
barbers are experienced,
.skilled operators!

Try Us Today!


COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


Distyle is a composition in clas-
sic architecture showing two col-
umns in front.


GREED TRAPS SNAKE
A four-foot rattlesnake that ate
chree canaries belonging to Mr.
and Mrs. Gail Kessler of Oilton,
Okla., paid for his diet. He found
himself trapped in the bird cage
by his bulging sides. Kessler killed
the snalke with a broomstick. The
reptile had gained entrance into
the house through a partly opened
screen door.

Egyptian laborers working on
-oyal tombs, staged a sit-down
strike in 1179 B. C., when their
wages were verdue.


Sewer Connections

We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

Si g SEE

Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.

> --- ___ __ ___ -


J L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

-------o------

-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


-JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


ING


DANCING


----- - - - -

MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT


WILLIAMS' PLACE
-..- PALM POINT INN '- 1


FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVEN


REFRESHMENTS
No Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.


Take Advantage of the Off-Season

Savings
Let Me Figure Any Building
That You Desire


H. H. TAYLOR


Port St. Joe


PAGE'-SEEN


Friday, Jan~uary 14, 1938


THE STAR


LOOSE LEAF

LEDGERS











We Carry a Stock to Fill
Any Demand


OFFICE SUPPLIES
Complete Stock for the
Modern Office


We Specialize in
BLACK LINE PRINTS
AND BLUE PRINTS



C. A. Tovey
Rooms 7-9, Costin Building
Port St. Joe, Fla.






A


BAPTIST W. M. S. DIVIDED
INTO TWO CIRCLES
The Woman's Missionary So-
ciety of the Baptist church met
Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock at
the home of Mrs. Ben Hughes on
Fifth street, with Mrs. Hughes
and Mrs. L. R. Holliday as joint
hostesses. The meeting was a
business and social meeting com-
bined.
During the business hour the
circle was divided and made Cir-
cles No. One and No. Two. Mrs.
Holiday was maoe chairman of
No. One Circle. anc Mrs. Sizemore
chairman of No. Two.
During the social hour ambrosia
and cake was served to the fol-
.owing members: Mesdames M.
Dees, K. Harrell, J. White, J. W.
Daughtry, B. F. Iaughtry, F. Mad-
dox, J. F. Miller, D. C. Miller, E.
C. Cason, C. G. Costin, J. W. Size-
more, E. D. Dendy and J. O.
Baggett.

MRS. COBURN HOSTESS TO
WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB
The Wednesday Night Bridge
club met this week with Mrs. R.
Coburn as hostess at her home on
Second avenue. Adding to the at-
tractiveness of the living room,
were potted plants and bowls of
narcissi. Two tables were placed
for bridge and after several pro-
gressions, prizes were presented
to Mrs. J. M. Smith, high, and
second high to Mrs. 3. Gloekler.
The hostess then served a salad
course and hot coffee, which was
enjoyed by Mesdames C. Edwards,
H. Soule, E. Ramsey, B. Pridgeon,
J. Smith, and J. Gloekler, mem-
bers, and Mrs. B. Wimberly a visi-
tor. -,

Claude Steele of Atmore, Ala.,
is rnaking his home here with his
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and
Mrs. R. C. Roberts, and will hold


the position of clerk in
Cash & Carry grocery.


Pete's


FIRST TIME
AT THIS

LOW PRICE























BERKSHIRE


Hosiery



79c
3 and 4 Thread
You'll want to stock up on
these sheer, ringless, full-
fashion hose. Doubly re-
inforced toe and heel.


OWENS & MURDOCK
Port St. Joe, Fla.


METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marretta, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m., first and third Sundays.
Sunday school 10 a. m., every
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
mr.
-ft-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
.0 a. m.-Sunday school.
11 a. m.-Devotional.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic serv-
ices.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning.
i -
BAPTIST
Rev. Sizemore, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:45 p. m., every Sunday.
Sunday school 10 a. m
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesdays.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.

NEWLY-MARRIED COUPLE
TO MAKE HOME HERE
Parks Young of Mooresville, N.
C., and Miss Mary Lizzie Head of
Stony Point, N. C., were married
Tuesday, January i, at the home
of the latter.
Mrs. Young is the attractive
daughter of -Mrs. _. P. Head of
Stony Point and is a graduate of
the Lowrance hospital of Moores-
ville, N. C. She has recently been
connected with cne St. Peter's
hospital at Charlotte, N. C.
Mr. Young is a nephew of Guy
M. Beaty, who nas the contract
for covering pipes and boilers at"
the St. Joe Paper Company mill.
The young couple are making
their home with Mr. Young's
uncle, Rev. H. F. Beaty.

RETURN FROM HONEYMOON
Mr. and Mrs. Opal Ogburn re-
turned Saturday of last week from
their wedding trip in South Flor-
ida, and are at home on Seventh
street.

J. R. Hunter of Wewahitchka
was visiting friends in this city
Tuesday.

Miss Malzie Waters of Panama
City has accepted a position as op-
erator in the Princess Beauty
Shoppe.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lambert of
Birmingham, Ala., are visiting Mr.
and Mrs. Alton McKeithen for
several days.

Mrs. Votie Gibson and Miss
Verao Melvin were visiting with
relatives Wednesday in Panama
City.


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Sunday school 10 a. im. every
Sunday at the clubhouse.
Preaching 11 a. m., third and
fourth Sundays. Sermon topic for
Sunday, January 17: "The Gospel
of Try Again." At the Woman's
Club building.
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.

EPISCOPAL
Services at clubhouse Sunday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.
First, third and fourth Sunday
night as 7:30 o'clock.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.


For Every Type and
Make
EXPERT ATTENTION
We Handle
SYLVANIA TUBES
$10 REWARD for any Radio
Set we can't make play!

ST. JOE RADIO SERVICE
Roche's Community Store


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Ed:tor-


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS HEAR
TALK BY REV. SIZEMORE
The Lottie Moon Girls' Auxili-
ary of the Baptist church met Fri-
day afternoon at the church. Af-
ter the devotional, led by the coun-
selor, Mrs. E. C. Cason, Rev. Size-
more spoke to the girls on the
aims and ideals of the auxiliary
as outlined in the manual, which
is now being studied by the organi-
zation: Rev. Sizemore proved that
he Was a .magician as well as a
minister by performing sleight-of-
hand tricks, to the delight of aE
present.
At the meeting were Rev. and
Mrs. Sizemore, MFs. E. C. Cason,
Miss Virginia Stoutemeyer, Mar-
jorie Costin, Dorothy Costin, Caro-
lyn Baggett, Flora Mae Cason,
Hazel Cason, Janell Pridgeon and
Betty Jo Lane. Next meeting will
be Friday at 4 p. m., with Flora
Mae and Hazel Cason.

P.-T. A..,PLANS TO BUY
SOUSAPHONE FOR BAND
The executive committee of the
Parent-Teacher association met at
the school auditorium yesterday
for the purpose of making plans
to buy a sousaphone for the school
Band, as the band is expecting to
take part in the music festival to
be held during April at DeFuniak
Springs.
Plangswere also made to have
pictures made and have the his-
tory of the Port St. Joe P.-T. A.
compiled and sent to the Panama
City P.-T. A., as they are gather-
ing histories of all such organi-
zations in this district.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Rev. and Mrs. Joe R. Bancroft
of Poll City, Ala., announce the
arrival of a daughter, born, Janmi-
ary 11, 1938. The baby has been
named Elizabeth Ann. Rev. Ban-
croft is the son of a former pas-
tor of the Port St. Joe Baptist
church.

Rev. and Mrs. D. F. Hickman of
Tomlinville, Ala., announce the ar-
rival f a son, born December 26,
1937. Rev. Hickman is a former
pastor of the Baptist church here.

Bob,.Nedley of Apalachicola was
a business visitor in Port St. Joe
Monday.

H. K, Johnston, publisher of the
Apalachicola Times, was a visitor
in this city Tuesday evening.

Don McCloud of Apalachicola
was visiting friends in the city
Wednesday.

Charles Mahon of Apalachicola
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
George Patton yesterday.

Miss Phillipa Nedley of Apa-
lachicola is the guest of Miss Iva
Mae Nedley of this city.

Send The Star to a friend.


CHANGE ANNOUNCED IN-
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev, H. F. Beaty, pastor of the
Presbyl'erian church, announces
that 'hereafter services will be
held on the third and fourth Sun-
days of each month, at the Wo
man's Club building. Heretofore
services have been held only on
the third Sunday of the month.
Rev. Beaty's sermon topic for
next Sunday will be "The Gospel
of Try Again."
-ft- f
Basil E. Kinney of Blountstown
was 'a business visitor in town
Monday.

D. H. Hawck of Panama City
was visiting in the city Sunday.


PHONE


Immediate
Delivery

LOWER PRICES


LeHARDY'S PHARMACY


If you have your Lot,7



let us figure the cost



of your Home.






St. Joe





Lumber Co.



We can arrange to fi-

nance lumber and build-

ing materials from

the foundation to

lock and key


Johns-Manville Roofing


PHONE 69


Lucas Paints
We Carry a
COMPLETE STOCK
Exterior and Interior Paints
amels Varnishes Flats
Oil Paints In All Colors

Seasoned Lumber

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Read the ads-it pays!











I'.I




Dad's Grill
REASONABLE PRICES


LITTLE SERVICE STATION
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes
. ^. ^. . f. . A. j. . j. - - -' ^ j


I


THE STAR


Friday, January 14, 1938


PAGE EIGHT


When precious health is involved
it becomes an important duty to
use the utmost care in preserving
it. LeHardy's Pharmacy prides
itself upon the modern accepted
methods of prescription prepara-
tion ussd here. Expert pharma-
cist and pure drugs for health
protection.
QUALITY DRUGS AT


I