<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00167
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 7, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00167

Full Text



Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
ert growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


THE


STAR


The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 1938 NUMBER 11


JACKSON DAY

DINNER HERE

SATURDAY EVE

PRESIDENT TO BE HEARD ON
RADIO AT 9:40; FARLEY
ALSO ON PROGRAM

Indications on the eve of the
Jackson Day observance by the
Democratic party tomorrow night
are that Florida will-match if not
exceed the 47 similar dinners to
be staged in the states of the na-
tion. This record for Florida in
the 1938 observance of the Demo-
cratic party'g annual big day of
celebration will be made possible
by the fact that only one dinner
is being held in each of the other
47 states and the District of
Columbia.
President Roosevelt will speak
at 9:40 eastern time from Wash-
ington, and his message will be
broadcast over a nation-wide hook-
up of the major systems. He will
speak from the Washington dinner
for 20 minutes arter a 10-minute
address by Chairmai James Far-
ley of the national Democratic
executive committee.
Port St. Joe, along with approxi-
.mately 50 other Florida, cities,
will hold dinners, from present in-
formation, and Chairman Lewis
states that Secretary of State SR.
A. "Bob" Gray will be the princi-
pal speaker at the local dinner,
which will be held at the Black
Cat Caf at 8 o'clock" :'
Senator Claude Pepper -will
speak at Miami -,and. Senator
Charles O. Andre s will speak at
his home city of Orlando. Con
gressman J. Mark- Wilcox will be
the principal speaker at the Talla
iassee dinner, honre city of Sena-
tor Pepper.
Congressman Millard Caldwell
-ad been scheduled to. speak ai
Marianna, but he wired, that he
would be unable to fill the engage-
ment.
Tomorrow night's affairs' in
Florida are jointly sponsored by
Governor Fred P. Cone and Sena-
tor Claude Pepper. Committee
memlyers of the Gulf county din-
ner, to be held in this city, are:
E. Clay Lewis, chairman; Richard
C. Rector, vice-chairman; Tommy
Owens, Mrs. R. V. Coburn and
Roy Gibson, arrangements; L. W.
Owens, Mrs. A. D. Lawson and M.
P. Tomlinson, finance; Lillian Fer-
rell and C. F. Hanlon, publicity;
Wewahitchka committee members
are J. H. Kelley, R. Alton Dendy
and Mrs. Belle Cumnle.
An honorary advisory committee
is composed of G. Pierce Wood,
chairman;. J. L. Sharit, R. E. Hart-
man, Harry Saunders, Buddy Mc-
Lin and Judge R. Alton Dendy.


OLD AGE FUND

IS APPROVED

SUM ALLOCATED TO STATE
FOR THIRD QUARTER OF
FISCAL YEAR

The national. social security
board in Washington has ap-
proved a grant of $664,933.36 for
old age assistance in Florida dur-
ing. the third quarter of the fis-
cal year, according to a telegram
received from Dr. B. F. -Ashe,- re-
gional director, by Clayton C.
Codrington, commissioner of the
state welfare board, Tallahassee.
Dr. Ashe advised Codrington
(Continued on Page 5)


ANNOUNCES FOR
R. R. COMMISSION


Bruce Davis of. Tallahassee, who
this week makes his formal
announcement as a candidate
for member of. the Florida Rail-
road Commisslin in Group One.



YE ED FINDS NEW

FISHING GROUNDS

BASS, TROUT, BREAM, PERCH
AND WARMOUTH AL-
MOST SINK BOAT

The, editor: .f The -.Star would
' fI- hfng g', s6 last Fil-lay after-
noon we knocked off work early.
piled the wife, the fishing para-
phernalia, our special fishing hat
and Mr and Mrs. B. H. Graves
into the car, turned the key in
the lock of the sanctum sanctor-
ium and set out merrily for Su-
matra, in Liberty county, where
we had been informed that one
had to get behind a tree to bait
a hook.
Turning off the main highway
about four miles from the east end
of the Apalachioola river bridge,
we followed an exceptionally good
dirt road to the haunt of the wily
bass and trout and were met by a
perfect host and. guide, J. O. (Jim
to you) Smith, who immediately
asked if we had partaken of the
evening repast. Upon being in-
formed that we had not, he threw
together a real meal and we ate
so many of his lighter-than-air bis-
cuits that we had to loosen our
b'alt four notches.
We were ensconced upon Beauty
Rest mattresses and rose the fol-
lowing morning refreshed and
eager to do battle with the deni-
zens of Owl Creek.
We were not disappointed, as
the creek (to us It seemed more
li'b. a small river) was literally
alive with bass, trout, bream, war-
mouth and perch. We cast our
.plug up near the trees that line
the shores and wham! a four-
pound bass struck and set our- reel
to humming. This was followed by
others, some larger and some
smaller.
Meanwhile the good wife was
busily impaling worms on her
hook and yanking in perch, war-
mouth and bream, until finally we
were compelled to return to the
landing and get rid of our catch
to keep the boat from sinking.
We did not fish Sunday, due to
rain, but we are going back to
Sumatra at the earliest oppor-
tunity and get that "big- one" that
we failed to land. -`
Incidentally, "Jim" has an ad-
vertisement in this issue inviting
you to spend the week-end at his


FIRST SHIP

DUE TO DOCK

SATURDAY

'TROPIC STAR' SCHEDULED TO
ARRIVE FROM CHILI WITH
CARGO OF SALT

The first ship of any conse-
quence to put in at Port St. Joe
for many years is scheduled to ar-
rive tomorrow, according to J. W.
Maddox, port pilot.
The vessel is the "Tropic Star"
Irom Chili, commanded by Captain
Lundstol and laden with 3000
idns of salt for the St. Joe Paper
Company. Mr. Maddox stated the
ship has already left 3000 tons of
her salt cargo at Tampa and will
discharge the balance of her cargo
here.
Last week the U. S. Magnolia,
180-foot lighthouse tender, tied up
at the new city dock, coming here
to place buoys and channel mark-
ers. in the harbor.


CONE FAVORS

CHANGE IN

CRIME CODE-

HARD TO IMAGINE "ASSAULT
WITH INTENT- TO -OMMIT
MANSLAUGHTER"

Governor Fred P. Cone has ex-
pressed his intention to ask the
1939 legislature for a statute elimi-
nating the charge of "assault with
intent 'to commit manslaughter."
as a result of the recent hectic
sessions of the state pardon board.
The governor said it is hard to
imagine such a crime, and. offenses
covered by the charge fall almost
without exception into the- cate-
gory of aggravated assault, for
which the maximum penalty is one
year in prison or a fine of $500.
Governor Cone said his-objection
to the charge resulted from peti-
tions for clemency for a- number
of prisoners convicted under the
charge and sentenced to serve five
or ten years.
"Assault to commit manslaugh-
ter," he said, "is so close to ag-
gravated assault you couldn't draw
a razor blade between them. But
for one you get ten years and for
the other one year."
The charge is derived from a
statute providing 20 years for as-
rault with intent to commit any
felony that is punishable by death
or life imprisonment, and 10 years
for assault with intent to commit
other felonies.'
The governor said he questioned
the propriety of charging a pris
oner with assault with intent to
kill a person because the very
fact that intent enters the situa-
tion makes it murder or attempted
murder.

SNOWDEN'S HAVE GUESTS
Maurice Tupp of Monticello,
Jack Crawarter of Micissukee and
Henry Gossip of Quincy were the
guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs.
George L. Snowden.

Dr. J. C. LeHardy of Atlanta is
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. C. A.
LeHardy for several weeks.


villa and try your luck-and we
can tell you here and now that
you won't regret it.


THE STAR GOES TO
MANY STATES

The Star may be Flolrida'r,
youngest newspaper, but indica-
tive of its growth and of the in-
terest being taken by the ha-
tion in Port St. Joe, site of one
of the largest paper mills in the
United States, is the fact that
The Star is mailed to 11 states,
the District of Columbia and
the Canal Zone, in addition to
more than 100 copies in the
state of Florida and an almost
complete coverage of the city of
Fort St. Joe and environs.
States included on. the mailing
list are Alabama., California,
Georgia, Illinois, .Iowa, Ken-
tucky, M ary Ia n d, Michigan,
Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah,
District of Columbia and Panama
Canal Zone.
At the present rate, the pub-
lisher hopes to be able s-on to
announce allI 48 states on the
mailing list.


GROCERY MOVING

TO NEW BUILDING

Pete's Cash and Carry To Have
One of Most Modern Stores
And Markets In City

Pete's Cash and Carry grocery
and market will be located in the
new store building next the Miles
5 and 10 after, next Monday, ac-
cording to R. O..-"' te" Roberts,
owner.
Mr. Roberts states that his busi-
ness has outgrown his present
quarters, and to better serve his
customers he is compelled to seek
a more commodious building. The.
new store will have all the latest
fixtures and will be conveniently
arranged for quick service. One of
the most modern and up-to-date
meat markets will be installed,
-quipped with a large refrigerator
display case and counter.
"Pete" is to be commended for
opening one of the most modern
groceries and markets in West
Florida, and in so doing he is ex-
pressing his faith in the future
of Port St. Joe.

WOOD IS OFFERED
AT BARGAIN PRICE

,In this issue of The Star, George
Gaskin, Jr., of Wewahitchka, is
offering stove wood at what we
consider bargain prices-$3.50 per
cord. When Mr. Gaskin placed his
ad in the paper, the editor immedi-
ately ordered three cords, for with
this cold spell we are having it
will take that much wood to carry
us through to spring-and anyway,
we never could resist a bargain
like that.
------*&------
FLORIDA HOUSING CORP.
STARTS FIVE DWELLINGS

The Florida Housing Corpora-
tion this week started construe- I
tion of five more houses on Garri-
son avenue. This is in addition
to the one already nearing com-
pletion.
-----A----. ;
Mrs. Joe Gloekler spent Wed-
nesday and Thursday in Apalachi-
cola visiting with relatives.

Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon was called i
to Birmingham Sunday due to the 1
illness of her sister. (

J. F. Fincher of Rock Hill, S. i
C., was visiting in the city Sunday.


FIRST BABY OF

NEW YEAR BORN

TO R OB ER TS

INFANT AND PARENTS ARE
RECIPIENTS OF MANY
GIFTS

The only claim entered for the
first baby to be born in Port St.
Joe in 1938 was entered by Mr.
and Mrs. R. O. "Pete" Roberts,
who announced the arrival of a
10-pound 2-ounce boy at 10:45 a.
m. Saturday, January 1, 1938, at
the clinic of Dr. W. C. Roberts in
Panama City. The young man has
been -named Charles Armour.
Various firms ol- the city had of-
fered gifts to the lucky youngster
and its parents, including Mr. Rob-
erts, owner of "Pete's" Cash and
Carry Grocery, who had put up $2
trade in groceries.
The St. Joe Theater will present
Mrs. Roberts with a one year's
pass to the theater. The Bayshore
Grocery wllfgive $2 in groceries.
Schneider's Department Store is
donating a baby set to young
-Charle~and the ,.~,lJewelry Co.
a birthday ring. Mr. Roberts will
receive a handsome pocket knife
from the Gulf Hardware and Sup-
ply Company, as well as a nifty
dress shirt from Owens & Mur-
dock. LeHardy's Pharmacy will
contribute a hot water bottle to
keep the youngster's feet warm,
while the Danley Furniture Com-
pany, as their gift, will present a
baby's rocking chair which, we
suppose, will be put away until
the baby is old enough to use it.
The Star is entering Mr. and
Mrs. Roberts on the books for a
two years' subscription and tomor-
row will present the lucky young
couple with a box of printed an-
nouncement cards so that they
may tell the world of the arrival
of Charles Armour.
Mrs. Roberts has informed her
husband that she will hold out for
$2 in cash instead of the groceries
offered by the store.
The merchants whose generosity
made this blessed event such a
red letter day in the lives of Mr.
and Mrs. Roberts, join The Star
in extending felicitations to the
young couple and wishing them
every success and much happiness
during 1938 and the years to come.


HIGH COURT

AGAIN SPLITS

ON GAS LAWS

DIVISION LEAVES FATE OF
SPECIAL ACTS IN HANDS
OF CIRCUIT JUDGE

For the second time in three
months the state supreme court
split evenly Wednesday over the
legislature's right to divert state
gasoline tax money directly to the
counties.
Two new opinions showed little
change in the positions of the six
justices, who divided three to
three last October 6 on validity of
gasoline tpx laws attacked by
Comptroller J. M. Lee.
This division apparently leaves
n the hands of Circuit Judge J.
B. Johnson of Tallahassee the fate
of 24 special laws seeking to give
gas money to individual counties
or various purposes. Judge John-
(Continued on Page 5)









PAG TW TRFiay aur ,13


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, Dscember 10,
S937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-{ Telephone 51 )3--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. Th'e spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


OFF-YEAR CAMPAIGNING TO BE HEAVY

With coming of the new year, all indica-
tions seem to point to an unusually active
off-year campaign in Florida. This issue of
The Star carries the first political opening
gun advertisement-that of Bruce Davis of
Tallahassee, who aspires to the railroad com-
mission.
Claude Pepper of T* ahassce, who is com-
pleting the unexpired term of the late U. S.
Senator Duncan U. Flet:.-.er, to which he
was elected, 'will be op(o) d by j. Mark Wil-
cox of West Palm .a.c'-, nov.-' a member
of the house o2 .,,; -..:. es. rom the
Fourth Florida di-. t. No ot her candidates
have formally annLc.itu :c:" t;-: seat, but
there are numero"- rnum.ors.
Three state s-::reme cou-t ju tices, Chief
Justice W. H. Ellis and Justices Rivers H.
Buford and Roy H. Chapman, will be forced
to man their guns if they desire to hold their
present positions. But Justice Ellis has an-
nounced that he would retire from active duty
after the primary.
Each of the five congressional districts of
the state will have races for seats in the na-
tional house of representatives, the present
congressmen from Florida being J. Hardin
Peterson of Lakeland, First District; Rex A.
Green of Sta:ke, Second District; Millard
CaL.vwcll of Mi:ton, Third District; J. Mark
Wilcox of West Palm Beach, Fourth Dis-
trict, and. Joe Hendricks of Deland, Fifth
District. t -
In the counties, all 95 seats in the Florida
house of representatives must be filled. Half
of the 38 state senatorial terms expire and
mrust be filled.
in addition to these, there will be scattered
county "contests to fill out unexpired, terms
where officials have died or resigned since
the last general election.
The Democratic and Republican primaries
this year will be a month earlier than here-
tofore, May 3 instead of the first week of
Tune. This change, made by the recent ses-
sion of the legislature, intensifies preliminary
activities in the various races
The first -primary on May 3 will be fol-
lowed by-a second or run-off primary May
24 in all cases where one candidate fails to
receive .a majority vote in each race. The
two top candidates go into the runoff. The
general election this year will be held No-
vember 8.
All in all, in spite of it being an off-year,
it looks like there will be a hot time in the
state's political circles. And, as usual, the
voters will be handed a lot of la-de-dah about
economy, sanctity of the home, the God-given
prerogative of the ballot, and such drivel,
which will all be swallowed" and believed by
the always-credulous citizen, and will as
quickly be forgotten by the successful candi-
dates as soon as they get their feet in the
political hog trough where they can lap up
the taxpayers' money in great gobs and build
political fences for the next campaign.

Here's a fellow with sound sense. He says
the best way to eat spinach is to fatten a
chicken with it and eat the chi:ken.-Tampa
'ribune.


NEED FOR NEW HOMES
A welcome move in the direction of authen-
tic, as opposed to synthetic recovery, is the
evident disposition on -the part of adminis-
tration leaders, business men and even a
lethargic congress to pull together in giving
the nation better and cheaper homes through
amendments to the present federal housing
act.
According to the president, we need 800,-
000 new homes a year for five years. With
liberalized financing arrangements, a family
wishing to build a $4000 home can do so with
around $500 cash and pay for the balance in
20 years at 51/4 per cent interest. Eight hun-
dred thousand times $4000 is a lot of dollars
and such a huge sum, spent for raw materials,
labor, machinery and incidental consumer
products, would do more to speed recovery
than all the governmental ''pump-priming"
since 1933. Such a program would require,
for instance, six billion board feet of lumber,
37 million barrels of cement, 27 million gal-
lons of paint and varnish, 800,000 bathroom,
kitchen and heating installations, and more
than a billion dollars in wages for labor.
If building material costs can be kept
within reason and labor stabilized to a point
where it is reliable over a long-term pro-
gram, indications point to a great re-housing
boom in the spring. Every American family
wants a home of its own, and should have
t.-Punta Gorda Herald.

SLIMY SLICKERS
A few weeks ago an automobile equipped
with a makeshift loud-speaker parked on
Main street here, a woman dismounted, de-
livered a sermon (?), offered a prayer and
passed a collection plate. First round brought
a total of about $3 in pennies, nickels and
dimes. She played more music, exhorted
hearers to increase their gifts. They obliged
her, making the total. collections run cover
$5. Immediately she departed for greener
fields, if indeed there are such
Last wee k another smn'ot.li operator
"worked" the local ministers. He first in-
formed himself about the past activities and
other fields.of endeavor in which our minis-
ters have worked, thereby introducing him-
self as a former acquaintance and regular
church attendant. He had gone to Pensa-
cola, according' to his story, from his home
somewhere east of Tallahassee, to accept a
job which had been tendered him. The job
(lid not materialize and he was making his
way back home. He needed a few dollars
to pay bus fare and buy eats, and would re-
turn the "loan" immediately after his arrival
back home. A clever hard luck story, and it
worked in some instances.
Our advice: Watch out for unidentified
.slickers passing through town from the snow
slides up North to sunshine down South-
Okaloosa Messenger.

A war office bulletin in England warns that
a man with a beard "more than a hand long".
may find it impossible to weai gas mask in
'he next war. The redeeming factor, of
course, is the fact that no man with a beard
that long would ever need a mask.-Colum-
bus Ledger.

It took nature a million years to push in a
man's jaws and bring out his forehead.-
Florida Times-Union. And a high-powered
automobile in two seconds can push them
back to the point where they were a million
years ago.

Fifty of the old-fashioned, blanket size
$10,000 bills are still in circulation, the United
States treasurer reports. If you happen to
find one in your change, he suggests that
you turn it in for redemption.-New Orleans
Times-Picayune.

Worthy the man who can stand all alone
and always get by by himself on his own.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By- The Other Fellow


Annually I have hied me to some
altitudinous point and .seen the
meetings and partings of years,
and last Friday night it was an
untseady and protesting 1937- I
dragged with me to the top of the
city water tank. Boosting the Old
Year ahead of me, we struggled
up the iron ladder that seemed to
'ead to the horizon.
"There, there," I said placat-
'ngly, "you're all right. You're do-
ing fine! And there are but a few
more rungs to go."
"But," said the Old Year, who
was weeping so that he had to
pause now and then to wring the
tears from his beard, "they have
been calling me vile names."
I gazed out at the dancing lights
of Port St. Joe and remembered
the day when I had welcomed the
happy young sprout who was now.
this disconsolate oldster.
"They have been calling me
names," repeated the Old Year.
"Lissen, ol' pal, do you think I'm
a bum?"
"The way has been long," I
said, "but it leaves to a- height
where a crescent moon is waiting
and ready to sail into the peace-
fu'nless of history and things for-
gotten-just like tne NRA. A fair
journey, Oldtimer, and I wish you
well."
As I spoke, the Old Year glowed
brightly. His agea form stiffened
with something ?iie pride; his
eyes caught the exaltation of the
moment. He was almost noble. I
stared.
"You are what you could have
been, aid -- ow-i-why don't.- you
stay?" I asked. Vut I found that
I was staring right through the
Old Year, whose outline was
merging with the night. Stars
alco looked through the old frame.
The Old Year was a whis-
n'r and a sigh and I was
alone.
Sitting on top or the tank, I dis-
covered a little fellow with an
outspread umbrella. He had with
him a portable heater, a radio and
a great pile of blueprints and
charts.
"I was looking for you," said I,
"for it is about tTmna someone
helped you jump off into the
Great Adventure."
The New Year did not answer.
For all his youth, his was
the serious air of an adult. Along
with the traditional plug hat and
flowing sash, he was garmented in
tare. .. Somewhat at a loss,
I stumbled for words, harked baek
to the traditions anc caught speech
from the postcards of convention:
. ."Er, er, Happy New Year!"
I blurted out.
And that seemed to give the
young visitor an idea. He kicked
the umbrella into space and
watched it bob in the wake of the
crescent moon. I saw the young
limbs glisten and the clear eyes
dance. The New Year began, to
turn cartwheels. He sang and
laughed, and then he grabbed the
pile of charts and leaflets and
juggled with them in the wind,
singing the while, and stopping
now and then to slap me on the
back and thank me.
"You've saved my life!" he
cried, "and oh, w,;at a load you
have taken off my mind! They
have been making me maps and
schedules, telling me just what to
do and what not to do. They
have planned my life in a million
ways, and no two ways alike.
Uponi my shoulders they have
loaded responsibility, and into my
ears they"have poured warnings.
I was told to stay away from
China and Spain if I did not want
to get hurt. I must aid President


Lazy men are just as useless as dead ones, Roosevelt in getting out of the
and take up more room. I muddle he and the country is in.


LIVING COSTS OF FARM
FAMILIES EXPECTED TO
BE SAME AS LAST YEAR

Extension Service Suggests Well
Planned Conservation Program

Unless consumers' .income de-
cline considerably more than is
expected, the total living costs of
Florida farm families will not
change greatly th:s year from 1937,
state agricultural extension serv-
ice workers predict in their 1938
outlook report.
Production expenses of 1938
may increase because of increased
cost of materials used in raising
crops, but expected lower retail
prices for some foods and cloth-
ing. may tend to offset these.
The gross .income of Florida
farmers in. the 1937-38 season
(July 1, 1937, to June 30, 1938)
probably will equal or slightly sur-
pass that for the previous season.
SInasmuch as bumng power per
unit of many farm products may
be, lower in 1938 tfan In 1937, farm
families will find it advantageous
to plan a well-balanced 1938 pro-
gram of food production and con-
servation for home use.' Farmers
who plan in this manner will re-
ceive twofold benefits-a better
food supply anad more available
cash for purposes other than food.
Prices of ready-to-wear clothiiig
are expected to resume the up-
ward trend they took in 1937, and
this may lead to more home sew-
ing by home-makers.
The demand for Florida farm
products, the report says, will de-
pend on business conditions in
many sections of tie nation where
these products arm sold. Favorable
factors for an early end of the
business recession are need for
residence construction, need for
replacement and Improvement in
public utilities, ana relatively low
stocks of raw materials.-If these
factors develop favorably this
year, the demand for Florida ag-
ricultural products will be steady.

TERRIBLE LOSS
Jones: "Our house caught fire
last night and we lost everything
we had in the kitchen before the
blaze was extinguished."
Smith: "And what was- your
loss?"
Jones: "A corkscrew and a can-
opener."

:More people speak Chinese than
any other tongue. It is the lan-
guage of 400,000,000. Looks like
they will have to learn to speak
Japanese.

I was to bring cheer and hope to
the downtrodden and afflicted,
and so on, for worlds without end.
You are the first to suggest I
might be happy. Whoopee!" said
the New Year and he
kicked the charts into the Milky
Way.
So the New Year turned on his
electric heater, and we warmed
our toes as my watch slowly
turned to midnight. An owl hooted
and apologized; the noise of cele-
brating came from the town below.
"I'll jump into this thing," said
the young fellow, "with all the joy
and vigor of tradition. It's my
year for what I make it. Do you
hear them cheer'" Hold me until
the right second! They want me
-do you hear? Me!"
SI glanced at my watch: "On the
mark, get set .
"Whoosh!" The New Year was
off. I watched it streak downward
and heard words come back thru
the noise: "Watch my smoke! The
Great Adventure!"
The newcomer met the multi-
tude and was'absorbed. I
stood on the platform and my coat
tails flapped in the wind.
I was looking down on a world
ringed with waving, shouting mes-
sages: "Happy New Year!"
"Tonight." I remarked quietly to
the owl, "I have met a couple of
Other Fellows."


PAGE TWO


THE' STAR


Friday, January 7, 1939


1


--







Friday, January 7, 1938


CREDIT

PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
EASIER!
---:- -
Oldest Furniture Store in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


RESTAURANTS, HOTELS
TO RECEIVE REFUNDS
Restaurants and hotels which
have paid the state's one-half per
cent gross receipts tax will get re-
funds as the result of a supreme
court decision that they cannot be
required to pay.
Comptroller J. M. Lee states au-
ditors ip his office will determine
the amount due such of those firms
which have paid tne tax.
Refunds will be made when the
court's decision becomes final.



Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
RIG H T!

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker


Listen


to


This!


I'm the



SUPERSALESMAN!

PEOPLE INVITE ME INTO THEIR HOMES
a standing invitation in every Port St. Joe
home the old man chats with me, the
children pore over my many interesting, odd and
historical items the Missus shops with me.

THEY LISTEN TO WHAT I HAVE TO SAY
I don't have to beg. and go 'round in circles
looking for an audience Port St. Joe
listens to me they're anxious to hear
what I've got to say!

THEY BELIEVE WHAT I TELL THEM
because they know that i will never de-
ceive or steer 'em wrong. They believe me 'cause
they know I'm a straight guy!

THEY BUY WHAT I HAVE TO SELL
S. from dog food to automobiles after
they see me they're interested consumers .
I answer "what, where and how much?" about
everything that's new in Port St. Joe !


I'LL Work for YOU---and I'll

Guarantee RESULTS!



THE STAR
"YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER"

The Money You Spend With The Star Remains In Port
St. Joe Where You Can Get Another Crack At It!


THE STAR


State Business

For Fiscal Year

Is Fifty Million

COMPTROLLER'S ANNUAL RE-
PORT PRESENTED TO
GOVERNOR CONE


The annual report of State
Comptroller J. M. Lee, as pre-
sented to Governor Fred P. Cone,
shows that the Florida state gov-
ernament did a business of nearly
$50,000,000 in the past fiscal year.
Receipts for the fiscal year,
which ended last June 30, were
$49,850,579.80, and disbursements
were $49,857,867.80. Ail payments
for old age assistance were not in-
cluded in the totals because the
pensions did not start until after
July 1.
In the prior fiscal year, which
ended June 30, 1936, receipts were
$44,755,409.64 and disbursements
$43,281,680.50. The highest pre-
dious total of receipts was $37,-
676,909.36 in 1926, and the highest
previous disbursement was $44,-
313,180.75 in 1927.
Immediately upon collecting it,
the state turned back to the 67
counties $22,079,288.87 of the total
receipts. This went for public
schools, retiring highway bonds,
and for other county purposes not
including public health, courts and
other state funcTions carried on in
the counties.
Schools Get Lion's Share
Disbursements for education, in-
cluding public schools which re-
ceived $11,126,165.52, totaled $14,-
100,596.83 and represented the big-
best payment of funds. Next came
the $10.953,123.34 in gasoline tax
collections returned to the coun-
ties for road bonds and the race
track tax receipts divided equally
among the counties.
Highway maintenance and con-
struction cost $9,724,470, and gen-
eral government: expenses came
to $5,340,170, an increase of nearly
$2,000.000 caused ny the $1,600,000
state building program and the
$328,000 cost of a legislative ses-
sion.
Principal revenue sources were
excise taxes, including gasoline
and beverages levies, $26,281,946;
license taxes, $11,237,861; United
States government grants and sub-
ventions, $2,751,494; transfers of
money from one fund to another,
$1,075,588. which included $400,000
from the estate tax escrow ex-
pense fund to the general reve-
nue fund.
Excise Tax Total
In the 1936 fiscal year, receipts
from excise taxes totaled $22,-
699,612.36, nearly $4,000.000 under
the 1937 total. That year license
taxes brought in $8,516,402, or
$2,271.000 under the 1937 figure.
General property taxes produced
$2,202,855 in the 1937 fiscal year,
against $2,740,951 during the fiscal
year which ended June 30, 1936.
In transmitting his report to
Governor Cone. Comptroller Lee
said operating disbursements ex-
ceeded the revenue receipts by
$142,230. On June 30 the general
revenue fund had a balance of
$336,903.44.
Now, six months later, the
state's general revenue fund is
about $1,250,000 behind in paying
operating bills.
Lee said he would publish soon,
as a supplement to his annual re-
port, a list of all state employes
and their salaries Tor the month
of March, 1937. He said that month
was selected as representative of
the fiscal year because It included
the salaries paid to instructors
and other employes of-the state's
institutions of higher learning.

Grateful to seagulls that kept
locusts from destroying their
crops, the Mormons erected the
only. monument to birds extant at
Salt Lake City.


REFRESHMENTS


DANCING


----- No Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.







Take Advantage of the Off-Season
Savings
Let Me Figure Any Building
That You Desire


H. H. TAYLOR


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


Port St. Joe


HARDWARE


NEEDS/



VE CAN SUPPLY YOU )


No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

S .Your business will be

appreciated.



Gulf Hardware &


Supply Co.

BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


DAVIS IS CANDIDATE
FOR R. R. COMMISSION

Bruce Davis of Tallahassee, in
this issue of The Star, makes
formal announcement of his can-
didacy for a four-year term on the
Florida Railroad Commission, in
Group 1, subject to the Demo-
cratic primaries to be held in
May. Davis states he will base
his campaign on a program of re-
turning the administration of the
commission to the people of the
state in an "open door" policy that
would assure full public knowl-
edge of all commission transac-
tions.
"It is time the people of Florida
knew something about this unit of


St. Joe Radio Service
WE GIVE A COMPLETE CHECK-UP ON
ALL MAKES OF RADIOS

When your Radio don't make a squeak
Don't go and. throw it in the creek-
BRING IT TO US

WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ARCTUS TUBES
WORK GUARANTEED -
Located in ROCHE'S COMMUNITY STORE

,, -- -- Z -. vy ww ww wy yw v- v v v s- I- -
MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT

WILLIAMS' PLACE
--. -PALM POINT INN .-.
FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING


a bC PL-SL ~----- 181~1
n


-

V


-- -I


PAGE THREE

their state government,"-said Da-
vis. "In past years, a general in-
difference to public ;entiment has
marked commission tiembers' ac-
tivities, with the exception of the
six months' campaign time each
four years. The commission spends
approximately $50,000 of the tax-
payers' money each year, but not
one in ten people can given an
inkling of how the money is spent."
Davis received state-wide news-
paper comment recently when. he
resigned his position with the
state, with the explanation that he
contemplated running for office
and did not care to remain on the
state payroll during his campaign.

SSubscribe to The Star-$2 year.







PAG FOU TH TRFia, aur ,13


BREAKDOWN OF

CITY BUDGET

FOR COMING YEAR

COSTS OF VARIOUS DEPART-
MENTS TABULATED
IN DETAIL

Due to lack of space in the last
issue we could not publish a dB-
tailed breakdown of the city's an-
ticipated budget for 1938, so we
present it herewith:
Police Department
Salaries .................. $2,700
Court cost ................. 600
Auto expense .............. 300
Meals for prisoners ........ 180
Other costs ................ 120

Total ....................$3,900
Scavenger Department
Salaries .................... $1;080
Auto expense .............. 300
Other expenses ............. 120

Total ....................$1,500
Executive Department
Salaries-
Commissions ............$ 540
Auditor and Clers ....... 600
Municipal judge ......... 600
Other expenses ............ 60

Total ................... $1,800
Fire Department
Volunteer department ......$ 60
Gas and oil ......... ....... 60

Total ....................$ 120
Street Lights
Florida Power Corp.. .......$ 900
Office Expense


Printing ......... ... .$
Telephone: and telegraph ...
Lights and water ..........
Postage ....................
Fuel, ice, etc, ..............
Other expenses ............


120
60
120
48
72
60


Total ....................$ 480
Legal Expense
Salaries .................... $ 300
Other expenses ............ 180

Total .................... $ 480
General Salaries
Building inspection, engi-
neer, stenographer .......$1,500
Street Maintenance
Salaries, laborers ........... $1,920
Materials and supplies ..... 240
Gas and oil ............... 180
Other expenses ............ 60

Total ................... $2,400
Tourist Camp
Water, etc. ................$ 24
Park Maintenance
Salaries, laborers ..........$ 96
Other expenses ............ 24

Total .................. .. $ 120
General Surveys.
Salaries ..................$1,800
Gas, oil, etc. ............... 240
Other expenses ............ 60

Total .................. $2,100
Miscellaneous
Expenses not applicable to
other accounts ..........$ 300
Contingencies
Budgeted amount for over-
expenditures of the vari-
ous classifications listed $1,176

Total .................. $19,300
The commissioners at their last
session fixed the tax rate for the
coming year at 5% mills.

RECOVER DEPOT SAFE
AND PICK-UP TRUCK
A 750-pound safe, stolen from
the railroad station at Carrabelle
on December 20, and a pick-up
truck stolen in Port St. Joe the
same day, were recovered last Fri-
day near Tallahassee.
The safe was found in the truck
at an old ranch between Talla-
hassee and Silver Lake. In the
'ruck was a complete welding out-
fit N -ich the thieves evidently had
used to cut open the safe and re-
Imove about $30 in cash.


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.-


(From The Ulster County Gazette
of January .4, 1800)
WASHINGTON ENTOMBED
George Town, Dec. 20.
On Wednesday laft, the mortal
part of Washington the Great-the
Father of his Country and the
Friend of man, was consigned tto
the tomb, with solemn honors and
funeral pomp.
A multitude of persons affembled
from many miles round at Mount
Vernon, the choice abode and laft
residence of the Illuftrious chief.
There were the groves-the spa-
cious avenues, the beautiful and
fublime fcenes, the noble man-
fion-but alas! the auguft inhabit-
ant was now no more. That great
soul was gone. His mortal part
was there indeed; but ah! how
affecting! how awful the spectacle
of such worth ana greatness, thus
to mortal eyes fallen!-Yes! fal-
len! fallen!
In the long and lofty Portico,
where oft the Hero walked in all
his glory, now lay the shrouded
corpse. The countenance ftill
composed and serene, seemed to
depress the magnity of the spirit
which had dwelt in that lifeless
form. There those who paid the
laft sad honours to the benefactor
of his country, took an impreffive
-a farewell view.
On the ornament, at the head
of the coffin, was infcribed Surge
ad Judicium-about the middle of
the coffin, Gloria Deo-and on the
silver plate,
GENERAL
GEORGE WASHINGTON
Departed this life, on the 14th
December, 1799. AEt. 68.
Between three and four o'clock,
the sound of artillery from a
veffcl in the river, firing minute
guns, awoke afreft our solemn sor-
row-the corpse was moved-a
band of mufic with mournful
melody melted the soul into all the
tenderness of woe.
The proceffion was formed &
moved on in the following order:
Cavalry,
Infantry, With arms revered.
uard,
Mufic,
Clergy.
The General's horfe with his
saddle, holfters, and piftols.


Cols. C I
Simms,
Ramsay, F M
Payne. (
Mourners,
Masonic Brethren,
Citizens.


Cols.
Gilpin,
Marfteller,
Little.


When the Proceffion had arrived
at the bottom of the elevated lawn,
on the bank of the Potomac, where
the family vault is placed, the cav-
airy halted, the infantry marched
towards the Mount and formed
their lines-the Clergy, the Ma-
sonic Brothers, and the Citizens,
descended to the Vault, and the
funeral service of the Church was
performed.-The firing was re-
peated from the veffel in the river
and the sounds echoed from the
woods and hills around.
Three general difcharges by the
infantry-the cavalry, and eleven
pieces of artillery, which lined the-
banks of the Potomac back.of the
Vaulf. paid the laft tribute to the
entombed Commander in Chief of
the Armies of the United States
and to the departed Hero.
The sun was now setting. Alas!


the Son of Glory was set forever.
No-the name of WASHINGTON
-the American President and Gen-
eral-wiill triumph over Death!
The unclouded brightness of his
Glory will illuminate the future
ages!

(From the Wilmington [Los An-
geles] Journal, Jan. 2, 1857)
THE GREATEST

Indian Battle of the Age-4,000
Indians Slain.
From Mr. White of the Pimo Vil-
lages, Lt. Straddon from the Rio
Grande and others from New Mex-
ico and Arizona, we are informed
of a great battle, between the
United States troops In New Mex-
ico and the Commanche and other
allied tribes of Indians, which took
place some time about the 1st of
December last on the Cimmaron
river.
Major McCleave, with about 300
men, was in pursuit of a body of
Indians, and nearing their sup-
poed rendezvous, expecting to come
up with and attack them on the
following day, was himself sud-
denly attacked the following morn-
ing while in camp, by a large body
of Indians.
The fight continued for some
hours, during which time he lost
60 men killed and a number
wounded. After some hours of ob-
stinate fighting, Col. Carson, at the
head of 800 or 900 men, having
heard the firing, hastened to the
scene of action, and coming sud-
denly upon the rear of the In-
dians, while they with their lances
were making furious charges, and
upon the point of overpowering
the troops under Major McCleave,
relieved McCleave's command from
the overwhelming number, and
heavy assaults of the Indians, who
turned upon him. The battle raged
with fury and without relaxation
for a number of hours, when Gen.
Blunt, with a force of about 5,000
men reached the tield.
The battle continued until night,
the Indians withdrew to a neigh-
boring eminence where they were
again reinforced py a large num-
ber. 4,000 Indians were reported
to have been left on the field be-
sides a large number of wounded.
Among the dead left upon the
field by the Indians were discover-
ed about 30 white men with their
faces painted to disguise them-
selves as Indians.
The number of Indians engaged
in the fight was about 5,000 at the
commencement of the battle, which
arrived during the day and night
:o 10,000 or 12,000. They consisted
of Commanches, Le Pans, Kio-
ways and some other tribes. It is
believed that this large number of
Indians had been concentrated at

points convenient to the battle
'ield, and a small portion of them
thrown out to the neighborhood of
Major McCleave's detachment to
ure him into the vicinity of their
rendezvous, where tney could over-
power and destroy his command.
This they would undoubtedly have
accomplished had It not been for
:he timely arrival of Col. Carson
and Gen. Blunt on the battle field.
No official report of this battle
has been received at Franklin or
at the posts in Arizona, but it was
received from su many sources
:hat .it was not doubted.
Next Week: Death of Abraham
Lincoln.


CELERY MEN VS. DEER HERD tom lands of the Kalamazoo river.
Celery growers near Holland, Now, the celery men say, the herd
Mich., while sympathetic with the has increased to 230 and is caus-
aims of conservationists, wish ing severe damage to their crops.
someone could do something about ---
keeping deer within bounds. Coral reefs often protect a near-
Ten years ago a -group of by shore from being worn down
sportsmen released 10 deer in b9t- by waves.


Moonlight

Hotel
For the convenience of
LADIES,T GENTLEMEN
and CHILDREN
-Others Not Wanted-

NEW FURNISHINGS

J. W. RAKESTRAW, Prop.
2 Miles West Port St. Joe


HOME OWNERS

MUSTFILE F0OR

TAX EXEMPTION

APPLICATIONS MUST BE FILED
NOT LATER THAN APRIL
1 OF THIS YEAR

Homestead owners must apply
for tax exemption privileges be-
tween January 1 and April 1 under
provisions of the Florida constitu-
tion, according to M. P. Tomlin-
son, city tax assessor.
The law provides that applica-
tions must be made annually for
the exemption, which is figured
on. the first $5000 of homestead
assessed valuations.
The law specifically sets up the
January-April period, and exemp-
tions for county and state tax pur-
poses must be recorded beginning


ST. JOE ICE

CALL COMPANY
SI ; Manufacturers of

WI -^. CRYSTAL ICE
qj FROM TREATED WATER

MAX KILBOURN, Prop.




We Haul Anything- -

We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Sewer Connections


We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.

SEE

Bob Haley or Art Reinertson
Or Phone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.

- -


J. L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

--------

-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


-JEWELRY
-DIAMONDS


A -- -- -I l -


January 3 in the office of County
Tax Assessor Sam Patrick at We-
wahitchka. Applications for city
exemptions must be filed with
Tomlinson in his city hall office.

The moon gives off no light of
its own, but it reflects light from
the sun, which travels to the earth
in a little over a minute.













Whenever that tired feel-
ing gets you, count on
milk to restore your pep
and give you the energy
you need to keep going
at top speed and ef-
ficiency.!.
PURE MILK
For Your Protection

Our milk meets the most
rigid standards for pur-
ity and wholesomeness.

ALWAYS CALL FOR


SOLOMON'S

Dairy

Products -


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR


Friday, January 7, 1938









Friday, January 7, 1933 THE STAR PAGE FIVE


Billy Tapper returned to Wash-
ington, D. C., last Saturday after
spending the holidays here with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Tapper.


"I )' li c1


111 =Mrs N

WITH


Wood

Winter is here will
your present supply of
firewood last until the
Spring?
IF NOT-

Let Us Supply You

$3.50 Cord



GEO. GASKIN, JR.

- WE DELIVER
Wewahitchka, Fla.





Radios


We have the best line of
Radios to be found in
Gulf County. .

CROSLEY

STANDARD

HOWARD

-0---

Let Us Demonstrate
Before You Buy!

---o--


C. C. WILLIAMS

Highland View

Gasoline Oil Groceries


EXPERT BARBERS
Our customers say that
we have a knack of giv-
ing them what they ask
for. That's because our
barbers are experienced,
skilled operators!

Try Us Today!


COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP


PERSONALS


Mrs. Aubrey Marks of Apalachi-
cola was the guest Wednesday of
Mrs. D. C. Mahon.

Mrs. Buster Owens returned
Wednesday from the hospital in
Panama City.

A. P. Wimberly of Tallahassee
was a business visitor in Port St.
Joe last Friday.

P. VW. Thompson and J. L. Cox
of Birmingham were visiting in the
city Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Brooks
of Fort Walton were visiting rela-
tives and friends here Sunday.

Mayor J. P. Coombs of Apalachi-
colla was visiting friends in town
Sunday.

W. D. Partin of Pensacola was
in Port St. Joe on business Sun-
day.


William Gibbs Smith of Talla-
hassee was a business visitor Sun-
day in Port St. Joe.

P. J. Sache of Greensboro, N.
C., was in the city Sunday on
business.

SH. A. Lurton and Thomas L.
Waters of Pensacola were busi-
ness visitors in the city Tuesday.


H. R. Mandy of Charlotte, N. C.,
was in Port St. Joe Tuesday on
business.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Leroux of
Chicago. Ill., were visitors Sunday
in Port St. Joe. -
*
W. C. Henry of Atlanta was a
Business visitor in the city Wed-
nesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Georg. E. Brad-
ford of Montgomery, Ala., were
visiting in the city Wednesday.

G. K. Kavanaugh of Knoxville,
Tenn., was a business visitor in
the city Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Haglin and
children of Cairo, Ga., were visit-
ing in the city last Friday.

Miss Avaryee Collier returned
Sunday from her home in Crescent
City, where she spent the holidays.

Earl Ro'lins of Gordon. Ala.,:
was visiting in this city Sunday.

Ewell Farmer of Headland, Ala.,
arrived Sunday to spend several
days with his brother, Dan Farm-
er and wife.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam R. Johnson
and Mrs. N. E. Rankin of Sarasota
were visiting Saturday in Port t.
Joe.




:Fishing...
4 4
Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
4
ing grounds.

TROUT
BAS S
BREAM
BOATS-with or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within i he
means of everyone.
SEE-
J. 0. "JIM" SMITH
SUMATRA, FLA.


Too Late to Classify

By RUSSELL KAY

It's funny where a guy will get
an idea sometimes. Here I was
sitting at my typewriter trying to
figure what to write this week and
my so-called mind blank as the
page before me. I began spinning
a coin, on the edge of my desk as
I courted the elusive muse.
Then I forgot the column and
became absorb'.d in the coin. It
was an old one, a half dollar, worn
nearly smooth. I could make out
the familiarr eagle with outstretch-
ed wings. I knew the banner he
held in his beak was inscribed
"E Pluribus Unum," but that
legend had totally disappeared.
Then I tuned it over to deter-


COURT SPLITS ON GAS LAWS

(Continued from page 1)
son already has declared 15 such
laws unconstitutional. Proceedings
involving the remaining nine are
pending in nis court.
The contr.veisy arose last July
when Comptroller Lee declined to
pay ironey claimed under special
acts, altl'ouzh otrer members on
the state board of administration,
Governor Cone anc Treasurer W.
V. Knott, voted to do so.
The matter reached the supreme
court on attempts by Washington,
Jackson, Calhoun and Liberty
counties to compel Lee to make
the payments. The split decision
has the effect of denying motion
for peremptory mancamuses and
also denying motions to dismiss the
alternative mandamuses against
Lee.
Meanwhile, Judge Johnson has


head I could barely make out the
remnants of a letter here and
there I knew once read "In God
re Trust."
And I wanted to laugh. What a
motto for a nation that didn't
trust anybody, much less an Un-
known Deity. Then suddenly it
didn't seem funny at all; it be-
came a tragedy. riere was a na-
tion favored beyond any other;
wealthy, prosperous, and peaceful,
where living standards, advant-
ages and opportunities surpass
those found anywhere else; young.
.powerful, free. A leader in educa-
tion, science, industry and prog-
ress-and yet it seemed to lack
something, and tieen I asked my-
self the same question millions of
others are asking: "What's wrong
with the country?"
You know all tre answers as
weil as I do if you read your
newspaper, listen to the radio, or
talk to your neighbor. But these
answers are all different and 'not
',e of them is corr-ct.
"'he president ane nis followers
te'l us bi. business s to blame.
Big business retaliates by bring-
'ng the same charge against Mr.
oos'eve!t and the administration.
Labor points an accusing finger
at capital; capital denounces la-
bor. So-called 100 ptr cent Amer.
cans thump their' manly chests
-nd curse the foreign-born. Demo-
-rats blame the Repulaicans and
Republicans the Democrats-and
-o it goes. We elect men to gov-
ern and then belittle their effortss
%nd question their motives. No
one whose views differ from ours
's entitled to either respect or
consideration. From an upright,
(Ood-fearing nation of industrious
men and women we seem to be
developing into a nation of cliques
and groups, each selfish in it.s
own interest, intolerant, distrust-
"ul, greedy-all eager to teer down
and no one capable of building.
And the pititful part of it is
there isn't anything wrong with
the country. The only thing wrong
is the people who live in it. High
and low, rich and poor, native or
foreign-born, we are all in the
same degree to blamee.
America does not owe her
growth and glory to any particular
group or class or. creed. America'
is a composite picture of every
man, woman and child that makes
ul its citizenship and the solution
of its problems as 'well as its fu-
turo lies in the hearts and minds
and thoughts and actions -of ALL.
The little negro that sucks at
its mammy's breast in the scrub
is just as much Amerienn as you
or I; the Jew is just as much
American as the Gent'le. The
mingled blood of black and white, i
Tcw and Gentile, makes up the
lust in Flanders Fie'ds, only a lot
of us have forgotten.
When we as inividuals restore
our faith in each other; when we
work with and for each other:
Shc'n wve each ituon our attEnt'o-'
first to what's wrong with our.
".'es: when we become tcl.frant
coug:' to respect Ame:i.ars, re


the 1931 general law.
-----^------
OLD AGE FUND APPROVED

(Continued from page 1)
that certification vo the secretary
of the treasury in the amount of
$200,833.36 as the January pay-
ment was aut orized.
Matching fund, by the state
makes slightly more than $400,000
available for the payment of old
age assistance during January,
with an increased payroll antici-
pated for the gainingng two
r2onths of the quarter.
Old age assistance expenditures
are nearing th~ monthly maximum
provided by the legislative appro-

gardless of race, creed or color,
and engrave in our own heart "In
God We Trust"-then we will have
solved the nation's REAL prob-
lem. The answer to what's wrong
with the country will be found in
the mirror-yours and mine.
Let's hope that "United States
of Am'erica" and "In God We
Trust" will not disappear from
'he face of the earth as they did
from that time-worn coin.


CITY PRESSING

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
ALL WORK
GUARANTEED
WE CALL FOR and DELIVER
0-
In Rear of Parker's Barber
Shop
PORT ST. JOE., FLA.


priation of $3,400,000, suplemented
by an equal amount from the fed-
eral government.

Eamon de Va-ra-. Irish Free
State president, was born in New
York in 1882.

Pa'd Fol;t cal Advertising.

ELECT


Bruce Davis


TO GROUP ONE
FLORIDA RAILROAD
COMMISSION
Subjcct to Democratic Primaries
in May


YOUNG


CAPABLE
ENERGETIC


LOOSE LEAF

LEDGERS











We Carry a Stock to, Fill;
Any Demand!


OFFICE SUPPLIES
Complete Stock for the
Modern Office


We Specialize in
BLACK LINE PRINTS
AND BLUE PRINTS



C. A. Tovey
Rooms 7-9, Costin Building
S Port St. Joe, Fla.


ANNOUNCING


Our Removal to New

Location-.


NEXT MILES 5 & 10

0
WE INVITE ALL OUR CUSTOMERS, BOTH
OLD AND NEW, TO SEE OUR NEW STORE
AND MEAT MARKET.


OPEN for Business MONDAY!


LOOK FOR
OUR DAILY SPECIALS

SEE OUR NICE LINE OF: PREMIUMS

PETE'S Cash & rry


PETE'S Cash & Carry


Friday, January 7, 1933


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


mine the date. I couldn't make it restrained Lee from making any
out for sure. Above Liberty's faint payments except under terms of







PAGESI-X. ITHE TARFridy, Jnuay 7,193


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The Methodist Missionary So-
ciety met at the church Monday
afternoon for their first business
session of the year. -Mrs. Boyd
presided:
The meeting opened with a
song, "We Are Marching to Zion."
The '23rd Psalm was repeated in
unison, followed by a prayer. Re-
ports were heard from all officers
on the past year's work a'nd pledge
was made for the ensuing year,
after which Mrs. Boyd gave a
reading. "When You Know a Fella
Well," by Edgar A. Guest. Mrs.
Ralph Swatts was enrolled as a
new member.
The following members were
present: Mesdames L. H. .Bartee,
G.:Patton,'W E. Boyer, R. Gibson,
E. Raniey. PP. Lovett, C. A. Lup-
ton, P. Howe!l. R. R. Hodges, J.
T. McNeill,: B. M. Overby, and J.
.L. Sharit. Mrs. Orwig was a visi-
tor.

ALABAMA VISITORS
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves of
Headland, Ala., Mr. and Mrs. D. L.
Helms of Enterpr:se, Ala., and
Mrs. T. B. Smith of Montgomery,
Ala., were the guests Sunday of
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Smith.

Harold -Smith of Dothan. Ala.,
spent Sunday in Port St. Joe, the
guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
M. B. Smith.

"Mrs. D.. Mahon returned Mon-
day from NeW Albany, Ind., where
she was called by the death of
her brother.

Miss Louise Soloman .returned
Sunday from her home in Perry,
where ih.-e p.-nt the holidays with
her parents.

Miss Juanita Gunn returned Sat-
tirday from Foley, where she spent
the holidays with her parents.


FIRST TIME
AT THIS

LOW PRICE























BERKSHIRE
.79









3 and 4 Thread
You'll want to stock up on
these sheer, ringless, full-
fashion hose. Doubly re-
inforced toe and heel.


OWENS & MURDOCK
Port St. Joe, FlI.
gumi


At the Churches


EPISCOPAL
Services at clubhouse
afterncoon at 3 o'clock.
First, third and fourth
night as 7:30 o'c'lck.

PRESBYTERIAN


Sunday

Sunday


Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Church services 11 a. mi., fourth
Sunday.
Sunday school 10 a. m. (at the
club house).
Ladies' Aid Society, 3:30 p. m.
every third Thursday.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.

METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m., first and third Sundays.
Sunday school 10 a. m., every
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
10 a. m.-Sunday school.
11 a. in.-Devotional.
7:30 p, m.-Evangelistic


serve.


Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning.
-*&-
BAPTIST
Rev. Sizemore, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:45' p. m., every Sunday.
Sunday school 10 a. m.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m=
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesdays.
G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
----- -----
MISSIONARY UNION TO
MAKE QUARTERLY REPORT
The Woman's Missionary Union
met Monday afternoon at the Bap-
tist church, and following reports
of various committees a discussion
and plans were made for quarterly
report. Plans were also made at
this meeting to attend the district
issociational W. M. U. meeting at
Emanuel church in Parama City.
Members presen- were Mes-
damies J. 0. Baggett, L. R. Holli-
day, W. J. Daughtry, J. White, B.
Hughes, J. F. Miller, D. C. Miller,
Charles McClellan, C. G. Costin,
T. F. Johnson, b]red Maddox, L.
W. Owens, E. Wages and E. B.
Dendy.

PASTOR ATTENDS MEETING


Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Sizemore
attended the meeting of pastors of
the West Florida district at Crest-
view Monday.

Mrs. Helen Allen returned Sun-
day from Gordon, Ala., where she
spent the holidays with her fam-
ily. !, i

Mrs. Phillip Lovett, Mrs. Asa
Montgomery and daughter, Miss
Betty Montgomery, spent Monday
in Panama City.

R. P. Nedley of Apalachicola was
in the city Wednesday on busi-
ness.

Miss Eva Doyle of Apalachicola
was the guest yesterday of her
sister, Mrs. C. Edwards.

Judge Alton Dendy of Wewa-
'iitchka was a visitor in this city
yesterday.

Mayor J. L. Sharit was transact-
I ing business in Wewahitchka yes-
I terday.


,GIRLS' AUXILIARY MEETS
WITH CAROLYN BAGGETT
The Girls' Auxiliary of the Bap-
tist church met rast Friday with
Carolyn Bagg'ett at the home of
her parents, Mr. ana Mrs. J. 0.
Baggett, on Seventh street. Margie
Costin, president, presided.
The minutes or the previous.
meeting were reach and roll called,
each member answering with a
Bible verse. As tuls was the first
business meeting of the new year,
plans were made for personal serv-
ice work for the year, outlined by
Mrs: E. C. Cason, counselor.
Following the business meeting
the hostess served refreshments
of hot chocolate and cookies to
Flora and Hazel Cason, Margie
and Dorothy Costin, Virge. Mae
and Marguerite Arnett, Virginia
Pridgeon, Mrs. E. C. Cason and
Mrs. J. O. Baggett.
A *& *&
JOE SHARIT, JR., FETED ON
ELEVENTH BIRTHDAY
Mrs. J. L. Sharlt entertained
with a supper-theater party last
Friday night, in honor of Joe
Sharit' Jr., on his eleventh birth-
day.
Immediately upon arrival of the
.guests they were ushered into the
dining room where a delicious sup-
per was awaiting them. The cen-
terpiece for the table was a beau-
tifully decorated birthday cake
with lighted candles. Soon after
supper all departed for the St. Joe
Theater to see Gene Autry in
"When Its Springtime In the
Rockies."
Present with the honor guest
were Barbara Edwards, Carolyn
Baggett, Onie Lou LeHardy, Ed-
ward Eells, Amelia Gibson, Molly
Kelly and Bobby Bellows.

MAHON'S HAVE VISITORS
Mrs. H. D. Marks, Mr. and Mrs.
H. D. Marks, Jr.. Mrs. W. H. Marks
of Apalachicola, Mr. and Mrs. J.
E. Graves of Jacksonville, Mr. and
Mrs. Tyler Price of Birmingham,
and Miss Miriam Marks of Wash-
ington, D. :C., were visiting Satur-
day with ;1Mr. .and Mrs. D. C. Ma-
hon of this city.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Covington of Niles
announce the arrival of a 7-pound
boy, born January 5, 1938.

I. D. Reals, J. E. Majors, Alton
Whidden and Arthur Graves of
Pensacola were in the city Satur-
day on business.



Magazines
2 FOR 5c, 5c AND 10c
Love Story Short Stories
True Confessions Vogue
American Magazine Liberty


American Home


Harper's


Good Housekeeping G-Men
Popular Aviation Collier's
Saturday Evening Post
Railroad Magazine All-Story
Aero Digent Sports Afield
Weird Tales McCall's
Yachting Foto
WESTERNS of All Kinds
MOVIE Magazines, All Kinds
Detective Magazines
AND MANY OTHERS
-0

- WE EXCHANGE -
Bring in one magazine, pur-
chase one, and we will give
you one FREE.
-o-

RUTH GRAVES
Star Bldg. Port St. Joe


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Ed;tos


Inquire
Miller's Drug Store
PORT ST. JOE


WOMAN'S CLUB IN FIRST
SESSION OF NEW YEAR
The 'Woman's Club met at the
clubhouse Wednesday afternoon
for the first business meeting of
the new year. Mrs. George Pat-
ton, -president, presided.
After the regular business was
disposed of, Mrs. Tom Owens read
the "History of Old St. Jo'3."
New members admitted to the
club at this meeting were Mes-
dames Watson, Barrier and J. A.
Whitfield.
The next meeting will be held
January 19 at the clubhouse with
Mrs. Robert Tapper, Mrs. Joe
Hiles and Mrs. R. F. Miller as
hostesses.


Ritz Theater Building
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS COMPANY

YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


8 n i w y v v. I i v r y,-,. -

LE TITLES SERVICE STATION
.1 J;PQrt St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR--- -
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf: Products Firestone Tires and Tubes
-------- ----------. -------- -I




If you have your Lot,



let us figure the cost



of your Home.






St. Joe



Lumber Co.





We can arrange to fi-

nance lumber and build-

ing materials from

the foundation to

lock and key


Lucas Paints
We Carry a
COMPLETE ST*CK
Exterior and Interior,Paints
Enamels Varnishes Flats
Oil Paints In All Colors


Johns-Manville Roofing


PHONE 69


Seasoned Lumber


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


MRS.. SOULE HOSTESS TO
WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB
The Wednesday Night Bridge
Club met this week with Mrs. H.
Soule as hostess -.t her home on
Sixth street. Two tables were
placed for bridge and after sev-
eral progressions prizes w er e
awarded,* high going to Mrs. B.
Pridgeon and low to Mrs. George
Gore.
The hostess then served a de-
licious plate lunch and hot coffee
to Mesdames T. Owens, E. Ram-
sey, B. Pridgeon, R. Coburn and
J. M.' Smith. Guests were Mes-
dames G. Gore and G. Wimberly.

N. P. lives of Lake City was
visiting 'in the city Tuesday.


NATURAL GAS SERVICE


Available Immediately

for

WATER HEATING-HOUSE HEATING
COOKING R E F R I G E RA T i ON

A*{ A full line of .gas appliances in stock -


PAGE.SIXX


''


THE STAR


Friday, January 7, 1938