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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00166
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: December 31, 1937
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00166

Full Text







THE


Port St. Joe-S:te of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's Fast-
S est Growing Little City. In
the Heart of the Pine Belt.


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 31, 1937


CITY TAX RATE FOR


COMING YEAR SET AT



51 MILLS BY BOARD


PROPOSAL TO

RENAME STREETS

IS VOTED DO WN

COMMISSIONER T. H. STONE
REFUSES TO BE CONVINCED
OF NECESSITY OF MOVE

An ordinance was submitted to
the. city commissioners at their
meeting Tuesday n:ght which pro-
vided for renaming the present
rj.nue.I so tlhat' they 'would' not
conflict with stri-,t names ':At
present both avenues and streets
are designated by numbers.
SUnder the proposal First avenue
would become Baltzell avenue;
Second avenue, Monument avenue;
Third avenue, R e e d avenue;
Fourth avenue. Williams avenue;
Fifth avenue,- Long avenue; Sixth
avenue, Woodward avenue;' Sev-
enth avenue, Park avenue; Eighth
avenue, Gadsden avenue; Ninth
avenue, Knowles avenue.
. Following reading of the ordin-
ance, Commissioner T. H. Stone
entered an objection on the
grounds that he could "see nothing
to be gained by renaming the ave-
nues'- as all property is legally
recorded under the present street
and avenue names, and such a
move would merely add more legal
verbiage to records."
'"Also, under the present' system
of street and avenue names, a
stranger can come into town and
(Continued on Page 6)

MOTHER OF J. S. DAVIS, JR.,
PASSES AWAY IN ALABAMA
Mrs. J. S. Davis of Headland,
Ala., mother of J. S. Davis, Jr., of
Port St. Joe, was laid to rest
Thursday of last week in Old Cen-
,ter cemetery at Headland. She
was a life-long resident of Ala-
bama and a member of the Meth-
odist church since childhood.
Mrs. Davis had been in ill-health
for several years and lived but
three days after contracting pneu-
n-onia. She was greatly loved in
her home town and will be missed
by all.
Surviving are her husband, J. S.
Davis. Headland, Ala.; five daugh-
ters, Mrs. Olin 'Armstrong and
Miss Corene Davis of Headland,
Mrs. J. W. Vining and Mrs. Cecil
Moore of Orlando, Fla.. and Mrs.
Leroy Blackshear of Richland, Ga.,
and one son, J. S., Jr.
-----*----- -
Miss Idell Murphy of Tallahas-
see was the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Nick Comforter over' the week-
end.


PORPOISES HERD
MULLET TO NETS

"Set a fish to catch a fish"
would appear to be the motto of
one of Port St. Joe's old-time
fishermen, whose name is with-
held due to the fact that the
veracity of his story may be
doubted by some.
According to this fisherman,
whose catches of mullet are far
above those of other fishermen,
even when the fish are scarce,
he hIs succeeded in training two
porpoiss to "act' asdifish-hounds.
When a school of mullet is
sighted, the faitnru; porpoises,
which always keep abreast .of
the boat, circle the fish and
drive them into the net. The
fisherman has nothing to do but
sit smoking comfortably until
the net is full.
Boy., page Mr. Ripleyl


BIDS ASKED ON

NEW QUARTERS

FOR POSTOFFICE

EFFORTS OF DRAKE BRING
RESULTS AFTER SEVERAL
MONTHS' WORK

For the past eight or nine
months Postmaster H. A. Drake
has been working ceaselessly for
new quarters for the local post-
office, due to limited space in the
present locationn to handle the mail
expeditiously, and yesterday his
efforts were rewarded by an an-
nouncement from the office of the
district inspector at Jacksonville
announcing that proposals will be
solicited to furnish quarters suit-
able for postoffice purposes in
Port St. Joe.
A floor space -of about 1500
square feet is desired, centrally
located, with accessibility to rear
or side entrance for delivery of
Trails. Bids must include heat,
light, water, toilet facilities, heat-
ing and lighting fixtures, a safe
ir vault, and all necessary furni-
ture and equipment. Lease will
run for a term of from five to 10
years from date of occupancy.
This is indeed a big step forward
for Port St. Joe and is a sure in-
dication of continued growth.
Those desiring further informa-
tion regarding this matter may se-
cure it from Postmaster Drake.

Phil Yarborough of Quincy was
the guest yesterday of Postmaster,
and Mrs. H. A. Drake .


CHANGES MADE

INSEVERAL CITY

ORDINANCES

MINIMUM CHARGE 50 CENTS
FIXED FOR SEWER
SERVICE

In addition to amending the
city ordinance pertaining to water
rates, the city commissioners on
Tuesday night made changes in
other ordinances passed at pre-
vious sessions. '" ,
An amendment '.as made to the
ordinance providing for sewer
connections, which in brief was as
follows:


Cost of Operating City For
1938 Set at $19,300; Value
Of Mill Placed At $2,350
On $2,350,000 Valuation.

Port St. Joe's tax rate for the
coming budget year will be 51/2
mills, it was decided at the last
session of the board of commis-
sioners for the year 1937 held
Tuesday night at city hall with
Commissioners Joe Sharit and T.
H. Stone present. Commissioner
B. A. Pridgeon was absent, but had
previously informed the other two
board members that he would con-


cur in any decision they. might
reach as to the millage.
Total: estimated cost of operat-
ing the city during the coming
year was placed at $19.300, and to
that was added $6000 in interest to


A charge of 15 per cent of the be paid July 1 next on the $300,-
amount of water used monthly 000 issue of dredging and munici-
will be made for each sewer con- pal dock bonds, interest on which
nection, with a minimum of 50 is payable semi-annually on Janu-
cents per -month. A deposit will' ary 1 and July 1 of each year.
be required from each user, who However, the $25,300 will not have
will receive four per cent interest to be raised entirely by taxation.
on such deposit, to be credited on as other income' will be received
January 1 of each year. All those by the city from license taxes,
desiring to connect to the sewer fines and forfeits, state race tracT
mains must make application in fund and other sources. No esti-
writing to the city engineer and mate was made as to the amount
all work must pass inspection by that may or may not be realized
the city inspector. from the new city docks, as that
The 15 per cent rate was be- is entirely problematical.
lieved the most equitable as, with Value of the mill was placed at
the cut in rates for the large con- $2,350, on a total assessed valua-
sun'er of water he would pay no tion of $2,350,000, the 51/2-mill levy
more in proportion for use of the to be divided 3 mills for debt
sewer system than those who will service and 21/2 mills for opera-
use the minimum amount of water. (Continued on Page 6)
An amendment was made in ,- -
the licensing ordinance which pro- WATER RAT
vides that dry cleaners and press- IW T R AT,
ing clubs shall pay a yearly license
of $25. The previous license was CHANG MADE
$50. CHA E MADE
Amendment was made to the
coin-operated vending.or skill ma- MINIMUM SET AT $1.50; LARGE
chines section of the licensing or- CONSUMERS WILL GET
finance which provides that "It LOWER RATE
shall be unlawful to set up coin-
operated skill machines without
first securing a license." License A change was made in the city
of $25 a year is provided for any- ordinance pertaining to water
one engaged' in operating or dis- rates at the meeting of the city
tributing skill machines, and li- commissioners Tuesday night.
cense of $5 for penny-operated which sets a new minimum of
machines, $10 for five-Cent ma- $1.50 per month, compared to the
chines and $25 for machines which present minimum of $1.
require more than five cents to The new schedule provides that
play, is provided. the first 3,750 gallons shall be
An ordinance to change the paid for at the rate of 40 cents
names of existing avenues was per thousand gallons (which is
submitted but was voted down. $1.50); next 6,250 gallons, 35 cents'
*- per thousand; next 10,000, 25 cents
Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis re- per thousand; next 10,000. 20
turned Monday from Headland, cents, and all over 30,000 gallons,
Ala., where they weie called by 15 cents per thousand gallons.
the death of Mr. Davis' mother. This rate is based on figures se-
S^ cured from cities iron" all sections
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Perrkt spent of the nation with water works
Friday in Panama City. similar to that here.


G A S COMPANY

APPLIES FOR,

CITY FRANCHISE

CONSUMERS GAS COMPANY OF
TAMPA SEEKS 25-YEAR
EXCLUSIVE RIGHT

John Carter, Marianna attorney.
representing the Consumers Gas
Company of Tampa, appeared hb-
fore the T'oard of city cc
sioners Tuesday night to negotia
a franchise with the city for the
privilege of installing gas mains
and establishing a bulk distribut-
ing plant in Port St, Joe.
Mr. Carter submitted a tentative
franchise which he stated had
been drawn up after a number of
consultations with City Attorney
E. Clay Lewis and careful scrutiny
of the city's new charter. He
said that the company desired an
exclusive 25-year franchise to dis-
tribute gas here, but that under


the charter such an agreement
could not be entered into.' But, he
suggested, the city might give
such a franchise with the under-
standing that no other franchise
of a similar nature be granted.
The agreement, as submitted by
Mr. Carter, would cover a 10-mile
zone and all regulations as to
connections and rates would be
subject to the approval of the city.
It also provides that 10 per
cent of the gross receipts would
go to the city, starting January 1,
1939, but that if -he city should
grant another concern the right to
lay mains. this 10 per cent would
automatically cease.
The franchise provides for es-
tablishment of bulk. tanks in the
city, with distribution service to
begin within 30 days after grant-
ing of the franchise and mains
laid to serve the city within 12
months. At the expiration of the
25-year period the city would have
an exclusive option to purchase
the plant and distributing system
at a price to be' agreed upon by
arbitration.
Mr. Carter pointed out that the
10 per cent the city would receive
should, after a short time, more
than pay for. fighting the streets
and other public lighting that
might be necessary.
It was found advisable by the
commissioners to make some mi-
nor changes in the franchise as
submitted and no decision was
made on the matter at this time
because, as Mayor Sharit pointed
out, "we would like to talk this
over with the residents of the city
to discover what their reaction
will be to such a .proposition."
A revised franchise to conform
with the suggested changes will be
submitted to the board at their
next meeting, January 11.

J. L. KERR IS ELECTED
DIRECTOR STATE C; OF C.
J. L. Kerr, local jeweler, last
week was elected as a director of
the state chamber of commerce.
This is the first time Port St. Joe
has been so honored.


WISHES ONE AN ALL A


Happy


VOL. I NUMBER 10


year


mew







PEy.3


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffiee, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ...... $2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c


-'4f Telephone 51 J,-


The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word' is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


A New Year Comes---the

World Goes Its Way

Men have never known toward what the
world vwas moving, despite their statements
that it was going in this, that or the other
direction. No one can foresee what will oc-
cur in the future. Surely no one living in
Port St. Joe ten years ago ever dreamed that
it would be the bustling little city it is today.
The past stands in the path of the present,
holding us back in our eager desire to reach
ahead into new experiences and new.develop-
ments. Civilization has not changed so
greatly as we may imagine. The refine-
ments of luxury do not belong alone to our
modern times. There is hardly any stage in
world history when the same state of things
was not flourishing in the same degree, and
even in approximately the same forms. Hu-
man nature does not change, and in the same
degree the manifestations of the human mind
follow primarily the same channels, though
their outward habiliments appear to be new.
'The past, present and future are 'irrevoc-
ably linked together, and this fact is never
more emphasized than on New Year's Day,
as one calendar year becomes history and a
new span of twelve months spreads vistas of
expectation ahead.
We speak of growth, of changes for the
better-yet with the same breath we deplore
the deterioration which we-profess to see
around us. We contradict ourselves in the
utmost absurdity and then blandly refuse to
recognize that we have been slightly ridicu-
lous. We point to the past as representative
of what was finest in intellectual and artis-
tic endeavor-and then swell with pride be-
cause of the "long way we have come" since
one specific date or another. We talk about
the "great new industrial age when machines
will do all the work"-and simultaneously
complain of the tragedies and dangers of un-
employment and a pattern society.
We do all these things-and yet, perhaps
we are not so foolish as we may seem. The
world goes its way in spite of us. Year in
and year out, the e-i th turns in the' heaven
and the sun's rays shine down to give us light
and warmth. Nature pays no heed to. our
futile protestations at the injustices of hu-
manity. The grass continues to grow, the
seasons follow one upon another and aninial
and man reproduce their kind to take the
places of those who had completed their part
in the great cycle of life and death. If we
flid not protest a little because things are
-not just as we want them, we would not be
human. Only when we cease the rebellion
that leads to new knowledge and new un-
derstanding will civilization die.
IWe make resolutions on New Year's Day,
nmost of which we fail to keep. But it is not
that we fail to keep them that is important,
so much as that we felt the urge to make
them. In those resolutions, from the most
trivial to the deeply serious, is exemplified
the spiritual craving inherent in man which
eternally reaches out toward an ideal, nebu-
lasv. it is true, but none the less powerful.
New Year's Day is not necessarily a time
Jor merely "washiing the slate clean" and


starting anew. It is a time for making ad-
justments to life as it exists and must be
lived. Rather than the dismissing :of the
past, it calls for an intelligent review of
events and thoughts, with a sane and clear-
eyed summing up of those pasr influences,
their relationship to the present and a hypo-
thetical promulgation for the future. Whether
anything works out as expected or not, is of
lesser import. In determining the possibili-
ties, in allocating things in their proper po-
sitions, a calmer, more intelligent, more hon-
est and more sincere attitude cannot fail to
appear. Consciously or unconsciously, we
will be starting the New Year right.

THOUGHTS OF JERUSALEM

As Christmas passes and the oud year gives
way to the new, thoughts of Jerusalem, the
Holy Land, appear in thousands of minds-
and the sentiments those thoughts express
are echoed in thousands of hearts. No place
in the world, not even those imagined places
beyond the atmosphere of the world we
know, has exerted so strong and unfailing an
influence on the imagination of mankind as
has the Cradle of Christianity.
In Jerusalem practically unchanged through
nineteen hundred years, are the scenes that
Christ knew. The age-old hills of Judea re-
main through time, as do the green pastures
and still waters of Biblical significance. The
Garden of Gethsemane is there, and the-
Cradle of Jesus. The River Jordan, by its
name the mightiest of all the rivers of the
world, flows on as ever, serenely to the sea.
And in Palestine are the streets and buildings
that were old before the Christian calendar
began. The Plain of Sharon is still fruitful,
and the rose of which Solomon sang in the
most majestice of all poetry, blooms pro-
fusely. And there is Cana of Galilee, scene
of the wedding feast, and Nazareth, where
the carpenter who was to change all the civil-
ized world, grew to manhood. Not an inch
of earth but is rich: in history, and in the
lore of ages. Not a scene but brings to mind
some stirring passage from the Testaments.
And yet on the day of His birth, above all
others, while Christian faithful knelt at the
birthplace of the Lord in prayer for peace,
blood was shed when British and Arab troops
clashed in warfare. While pealing bells sum-
moned worshippers to mass, the rattle of
muskets and the clash of swords resounded
throughout the city of Jerusalem. As nuns
watched over the manger-cradle of the Christ
Child as the procession of worshippers passed
through the grotto of the famed church,
British troops stood guard.
"Peace on earth, good will toward men"-
and strife goes on in all portions of the globe.


WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO ABOUT IT

On Christmas Day the United States Cham-
ber of Commerce predicted that total taxes to
be paid in 1938 would touch a new high!--
$13,500,000,000. A beautiful Christmas pres-
ent for everyone-$110 to be paid by every
mnan, wo.ian and child in the rna.ion during
the (oniinY year of 1938.
Which means that out of e' ery five dol-
lars of income the tax collectors will take
one dollar. You probably won't realize it,
because most of these taxes are "hidden."
They are not like your gasoline tax, which
you know you are paying every time you
buy a gallon of gasoline. They are placed
on the manufacturer, the middleman and the
retailer-all of whom pass them on to the
ultimate consumer.
Next year this prorata of $110 for each in-
dividual probably will be larger, and the year
after that will see another jump-and just
what are we going to do about it?

Ohio judge makes drunks try out the ex-
periment of mixing castor oil with whiskey.
-Times-Union. Probably after they have
been mixing gasoline and whiskey.

Hell hath no terrors for a man whose love
letters have been read in court.


Stardust and

Moonshine

By The Other Fellow


(Editor's Note: The Other Fel-
low has been complaining that he
is not getting the support from.his
readers which he expected, and
that he wou~d like it understood
that "The Other Fellow" is every-
body-and that all should make
some contribution to this column
from time to time to keep up in-
terest. He informs us further that
he has no trouble in finding
"moonshine"-knowing where to
seek-but that the nebulous "star-
dust" is akin to the morning dew
and when he reaches out for it
it dissipates, even as the dew be-
fore the rays of the rising sun.
See if all of you can make a New
Year's resolution to contribute
just one item to this column dur-
ing the coming year of 1938. And
by the way, here we are ready to
go to press and he hasn't sent in
his copy.)
"Boy, oh boy-have you seen
The Other Fellow?"
"Yes, sir. He was chasing a
wild turkey through the woods
down by the monument."
"Did he say why he was chas-
ing the turkey?"
"Yes, sir. To see whether it
was a turkey."
"Did he say anything about h!i
column copy?"
"Yes, sir. He said to look un-
der the ink well."
"Well,, that's something.
But all it says there is 'Happy
New Year'.
"Call in the assistant editors.
We must do something alout this
at once. Now, gentlemen,
here we are about to enter a new
year and. The Other Fellow has
failed to turn fin his copy. What
are we to do about it?"
"Boil him in oil!"
"No, Crisco."
"Lard is better!"
"Why not phone his residence?"
"A brilliant idea. It shall be
done."
Br-r-r-r-ing!
"Maybe that's him on the phone
now. Yes, it is .
He says to look in the clock."
But all it says here is
'Happy New Year'."
"This can't go on. The press is
chafing at the bit; the people are
clamoring about our doors for
their papers; the wheels of prog
ress are being clogged by this-
this this insignificant nincom-
poop; this wart on the body po-
litic. Phone his lowly, dwelling
once more and demand in no un-
certain language that we must
have the copy of his column."
"Yes, sir, right away.
He says to look in the wastebas-
ket."
"Ah, now we are getting some
place. See if his copy is in the
wastebasket."
"All it says here, sir, is 'Happy
New Year'."
"Why, of all the- say,
do you suppose-"
"I wonder-"
"It couldn't be-"
"Yes, that must be it. .
All he was going to do was wish
all our readers-and we join him
in wishing it-
"A HAPPY NEW YEAR!"

QUICK THINKER
Jim: "Who's that old fossil over
there by the punch bowl?"
Jennie: "That's my aunt."
Jim: "I don't mean that one-I
mean that dried up old dame with
a face like a mummy."
Jennie: "That's my sister."
Jim: "Boy, how that woman
can dance!"

FAIR ENOUGH
'Teacher: "Give an example of
an imaginary spheroid."
Jimmy: "A rooster egg."


DEATHS FROM

ACCIDENTS IN

FLORIDA GAIN

FIRST TEN MONTHS OF 1937
SHOWS 70 MORE THAN
PRECEDING YEAR

Deaths from accidents in Flor-
ida during the first 10 months of
1937 were 70 more than the num-
ber of such deaths during the
same period of 1936.
Dr. Edward M. L'Engle, director
of the bureau of vital statistics,
state board of health, announces
that the official death records
filed in his office in Jacksonville
from the 67 counties of the state
show that accidents took 1.404
lives during the period from Janu-
ary 1 through October 31 of this
year.
During the first 10 months of
last year the figure was 1,334, and
for all of last year accident
deaths numbered 1,650.
The comparison by months in
the toll from accidents, including
those in homes, m factories and
on the highways, was as follows:
1937 1936
January ..:.......... 183 173
February ............. 157 144
March ............... 147 146
April ............... 123 137
May ................. 151 112
June ................. 99 134
July ................. 132 150
August ............... 138 122
September ........... 125 106
October .............. 149 110
November ............... 148
December ............ ... 168
Because of checking and double
checking, death figures are from
two to three months late in being
made public. it was explained.
The accident toll included 542
men, women .and children killed
as the result of automobile acci-
dents, and 27 fatally injured in
collisions between steam and
street railways with automobiles
or by motorcycle accidents.

CHANGES IN ADMISSION
REQUIREMENT EFFECTED
AT WOMEN'S COLLEGE
Changes in admission require-
ments which afford a wider choice
of subjects by the high school stu-
dent preparing for college have
been effected at Florida 'State
College for Women at Tallahassee.
Principal change is the provision
that the entering student need
have only three prescribed units
of English instead of nine units
of English, modern language, al-
gebra, geometry, history and ci-
ence, as in former years. Gradua-
tion from an approved high school
with 16 units remains the basic
requirement for admission.
The high school student now
may select her 13 other units from
such fields is English. journalism,
and speech; foreign language,
history and social studies, mathe-
matics, science, or partly from vo-
cational subjects. In the latter she
may not take more than four units
among the following subjects: Ac-
counting, art-draw!ng, commercial
arithmetic, commercial law, .edu-
cation, home economics, music,
psychology, shorthand and type-
writing.

THE RIGHT PLACE
Book Agent: "I am loo1ln for
a woman with a complexion like
a ripe peach, ears like pink sea
shells, a form like a goddess
and-"
Maid: "I don't think she lives
here, but-"
Voice from upstairs: "Mabel,
tell the gentleman I'll be down in
a moment."

Visiting cards come in tw
types: formal and informal. The
latter is a card to which is at-
tached a flap especially useful in
writing notes.


THE STAR


Friday, -December 31, 1937


PAGE TWO






Fridy~ ecemer 1, 137 HE SAR AGE HRE


I
I
I













i,






"U*


For the first baby born in Port St.
Joe in the New Year of 1938 the
merchants below are offering trade


or its


parents


Who will be the lucky

young Mister or Miss?


TO'"THE MOTHER OF THE FIRST
BABY BORN IN PORT ST. JOE IN
1938 WE WILL GIVE A
One Year's Pass
TO THE THEATRE
---*-----

ST. JOE THEATRE
A Martin-Davis Theater Bill Turner, Mgr.


TO THE FATHER OF THE FIRST
BABY BORN IN PORT ST. JOE IN
1938 WE WILL GIVE A

Dress Shirt


OWENS& MURDOCK


TO THE PARENTS OF THE FIRST
BABY EOR N N 1938 WE WILL GIVE


$2.00
$f0 9.Oo
*d.UU


in Trade


in Groceries


Baysh-re Grocery
Bayshore Grocery


TO THE MOTHER OF THE FIRST
BABY BORN IN FORT ST. JOE IN
1938 WE WILL GIVE A
STERLING SILVER
Birthday Ring
--oKERR JEWELRY CO.--

KERR JEWELRY CO.


TO THE FIRST BABY BORN IN 1938
IN THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
WE WILL GIVE A

Baby Set


SCHNEIDER'S
Department Store


TO THE FIRST BABY BORN IN 1938
IN THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
WE WILL GIVE A

Hot Water Bottle
-- 0--

LeHardy's Pharmacy
'Where Friends Meet"


TO THE FATHER OF THE FIRST
BABY BORN IN THE YEAR 1938
WE WILL GIVE A

Pocket Knife
-----o-----

Gulf Hardware and
Supply Co.


THE STAR


TO THE FIRST BABY BORN IN 1938
IN THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
WE WILL GIVE A

Baby's Rocking Chair
-0
------oi------

Danley Furniture
Company


TO THE MOTHER OF THE FIRST
BABY BORN IN PORT ST. JOE IN
1938 WE WILL GIVE

$2.00 in Trade
----0-

Pete's Cash & Carry
Groceries Fruits Vegetables Meats


- -- -- -


WILL GIVE THE LUCKY PARENTS A TWO-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO THE PA-
FER AND A HANDSOME BOX OF PRINTED ANNOUNCEMENT CARDS.


WEL COME




STRANGER!


or merchandise for the baby


2912,11,ii !NOR 111IN 1000u" QW11111i Abg RON MMOHME-WHII


,_. ,, .. ,, ,, ,--------.- T~~-- T--- ~ ~ --- -----------


- - - -


r~imrnmcr~elln~ f llli~llllllllll Ic~imr ~ i i i~ilrIl~irli: I~jii~ilil illl li~mmnow


Friday,, December 31, 1937


THE STAR


PAGE THREE

















SThe merchants whose
This page wish you ali
SHappi~ e sc, hce th, and a entire
year nt !oE bountoun s blessings. and Happiness during
S. I e;:e things we wish for WELCOME TO A NEW YEAR!
oe -you a-id -ours throughout the
SNew Year -a 1938. Chords of happiness and hopes for THANKS
V greater achievement ring out in wel- I< lAK
come to the New Year dawning. It PORT ST. JOE
S -- T -.. is our sincere wish that it usher in a Wehoe th
ST. U.n ..tJiBER new happiness for you and yours, and uGr service
begins a long series of prosperous pleased you
,y .ears. enough so that
you will con-
..C. A. TOVEY ...... pa....a,,,u
T V Y tinue your
6. j-. A. .... patronage thru
Office Supplies 19 38
#fEW 4 ...Owens & Murdock

1938
GREETINGS
0
As we close 1937 and look HAPPY NEW YEAR
I forward hopefully to We welcome the opportunity of wish-
S/ I 938, we wish to thank ing everyone a Happy New Year and
you for your patronage the pleasure of thanking everyone for
in the past. their generous patronage during 1937.
Sthe past. e are appreciative-and hope you'll do
p Accept Our Sincere ... It is our sincere wish that the same during 1938.
Best Wishes for ..- you and yours will have
SYou-c Happiness full measure of health, peace and contentment ST. JOE
rg hI during, the New Year. '
During the
V 1 During the A .. .. .D ... .. .... .... ..........
J EaEtire New Year! M. ORR SO N, ,
0 A NEW YEAR
SReinerson SANDWICH SHOP A NEW YEAR
SC o1 e! a Cotracorsa BEACON HILL, FLA. DAWNS-

May this, the New -
Year, be a bright
day dawning for
al of3 all oT ouor friends andpatrons. We
: wanJt to thank all for their hearty co-
.. operation during the year just closed.
Pete's Cash & Carry
0 J. M. Griffin Market


V;' -.culd i ung'-ateful~ if we did not exp -ess our appreciation for all the favors you I
o ha.-e ':co ud us, ard extend our heartyGood lWishes for a Happy and Prosperous GREETINGS
New Ycar. |"
STo all our friends and
e wan:t oii our friends and customers to know low much v.-e appreciate your pa- pros ho haveproven
o t:-o-,e i-ar good will, rnd all our new p tr'ons to k--o th.t you can continue to so loyal, staunch and true,
ccu.t on us for the very best service we k now !,.w to render, we wish to express our
-- i- i 1 \ i 1 i i --1 appreciation and -0o o d
C-C V; e are !oc' i; forward to a New Year f '!d with ,ossibilities of expansion and we .apreciatio a New Yea
S. wishes for a New Year 1
are -tamti.c it off with a resolution to do ec-.rvt-ini; we can to improve our service of Iappiness.
N of Happiness. ,
Sr u- TSefrncs to everyone with whom w have business relations. *
COOPER'S

S GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY COMPANY Barber Shop

T B--E- T-----
HAPPY NEW YEAR 'BEST WISHES THE BEST-
o Your good. will and patronage are highly a We to extend to you an to those e are grateful for the goo arnd personal
appreciated, and we thank those customers near and ear to ou, our sincere good d during t hvego been per-
who have made our business quite satisfac wishes for the-year 1938, and may it be mitted to serve you. Our sincere
nttedd to serve tou. asyair sincere
tory during the past year. the Most Prosperous and Hlappy Year wish is that 1938 will mean good health, good
SV c you have ever known. ccer and abundant happiness for everyone.
SGul View avern I JOE ICE CO
o^ We Invite Yc. rto Welcome the New SCHNI DT'E"'T' '' DERPTE .
" Year With Us .a J.sA -a.% 0 STORE Max Kilbourm


~s i~gof0 ~~09~O4 p~l"",,14~~~~:::::::::::::::::::: o


THE STAR


Friday, December 31, 1937


PAGE FOUR














Y a E 3 R7 HA



greetingss appear on V.- \

btoy, Success, Health tat a ncw year of service
-1938. w lit our Siere expressions of 0
ithak-;.s for your support during
S.... ........ ........ 99.37. WWSe Yhope that everyone will
SALL THE BEST DURING 1938 have a Happy, Prosprous New
1937 WAS A GOOD YEAR
S. 938 WILL BE BETTER The Happiest of New Year's to Yea
everyone in Port St. Joe and
We enjoyed good business dur- Gulf County tc for O O o
23 a T Sul o tn t. a th ''ocer
ing '37, thanks to Port St. Joe our special offerings during ail of
residents and we hope Higlland View
you'll continue in '38 1938! g d Vi
we'll do our part better than
ever. Miller's Drug Store
Roch's Community The REXALL Store a

Store Ko

HAPPY DAYS ARE i
A YEAR OF SERVICE HERE AGAIN .
During the Newv Year our motto And in appreciation of the
wil be, as always, "Service"-and ri Good iil of our
we are going to bring you bigger
and better lines of quality merchan- patrons and friends and
dise than ever before. We'll see hose ith wom we do
you in '38! r1.ushi:ess, we extend the *
Ssea s reetings ad iish- May it brin-g Health and Happiness to o
S'S season's greetings and wish
LeARD al Another New Year-an-
a-- Sc~:cr opportunity, to live successfully
.in 1938.
PARAl.^M ACY HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL I *nn9l y. \We're rer.ds to servesfl

0
SVan's Recxeation Club F LO4,DA. POWER
CLEAN RECREATION ON THE GULF CO P O
Rates: Day, Week, Month AT BEACON HILL, FLA.
-- =B--^"^
A new opportunity to achieve great --------
things-that's what 1938 means .
Our hope is that all its finest pos- S i
sibilities may be realized and that a'r t W i s es
its succession of joyous days may T- .
be filled to the brim with good) T-r;t a few vords to thank our
luck for you.
luck' i yu many customers for their pa-
SCostin' s ept Store tronage during the past year,
o )ou all for the good
... for the wonderful things you thioygs in life
( K have done for us and our busi-
ness, we are proud to count e
HAPPY NEW YEAR
| v vyou as friends. C
SAt this season of the year our Happiness
Sthouhs natl t We are striving always to please you and are erecting api
thoughts naturally turn to Prosperity
those of you whose friendly a new theater to better serve you in 1938 and the years Prosp
Business has made possible to come. Let us wish for you all that you would Health
c .bigger andl better things .... 1
bigger an better things. wish for your-elf-and more! MIay the New Year hold dirring the coming
W e hope that this New Year 1
will be full of te best of many blessings, Ihappy events and joys for each of you. (OOD NEW YEAR!
everything for you and yours.

SThompson's S ', .
Bakery



GOOD CHEER! pPP 6NEW GREETINGS I HAPPY NEW YEAR
May the months to come Y I sincerely thank your for To or ht o l p n
be filled overto overflowing our ost o loyal patrons
with Health, HappiO y our patronage and good / we extend the best of the .
and Prosperity for those ( jill during 1937, and extend scasoio's good wishes for a
it has been our pleasure \heartiest best wishes for a brht and hay New Year
to serve during 1937. HAPPY NEW YEAR I

Lilius jewelry Co. H H. TAYLORc? Miles 5-10-25c Store

,,~ ~ v .'-v~ a ud 0 0ld a 0q~P O 00'


PAGE FIVE


Friday., December 31, 1937


THE STAR







PAESXTESA rdy eebr3,13


Many Past 100

A r e Receiving

Old Age Benefit

TOP RANKER CLAIMS TO BE
;; BELIEVE CLIMATE
DESERVES CREDIT

Maybe the Florida climate de-
s'arves the credit, but regardless
of where the glory goes, the fact
rcn:iains that 53 persons claiming


CITY TAX RATE IS SET Old Age Payroll
AT 5V2 MILLS BY BOARD

(Continued from Page 1) Is On Increase
tion of the city. Present levy is
Smill.
The final recapitulation of bud- In ulf County
get figures for 1938, as compiled
by City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson STARTED AT $3'07 IN JULY;
'nd approved by the commission- STATE IS NOW PAYING
ers, is as follows: $1,016 MONTHLY
Anticipated Budget for 1938
Police Department .........$ 3,900
Scavenger Department .... 1,500 Gulf county's old age assistance
Executive Department .... 1,800 payroll since the state welfare
Fire Department .......... 120 board began to function on July 1
.. ha. Is reached the substantial total


city and asks directions as to the
residence of sine individual, he
may be told 'at the corner of Sec-
ond street and Fifth avenue,' and
when he has repeated this to him-
self two or three times it may be
'the corner of Fifth street and
Second avenue,' and he would end


Furr


-. Street Lignhtng ............ u --
to be more than 100 years old office Expense........... 480 of $4,471, according to announce-
are already receiving old age as- Legal Expense ............ 480 mernt made yesterday.
distance in the state, according to Salarie General ........... 1,500 Old age assistance payments
statistics made public yesterday Street Maintenance ....... 2,400 have increased from month to
by the state welfare board. Tourist Camp ............. 24 month in practically every county
Only one of the 12 welfare dis- Park Maintenance ........ 120 of the state as additional names
tricts is unable to boast of a cen- general Surveys........... 2,100 were added to the rolls.
tenarian, this being District 8 Miscellaneous............. 300 Payments for Gulf county by Its T
with headquarters at Fort Myers. ontingencies .............1,176 months follow: July, $307; Au- I
The Tampa district has but one gust, $191; September, $634; Oc-
claimant to unusual antiquity, a Total...................$16800 tober, $931; November, $972- De-
white woman born 110 years age. Fire Apparatus...........$ 1,500 member, $1,016. W
District 12, with headquarters at Contingencies ............. 1,000 With the aid to the blind plan
Orlando, is the home of the old- formally approved by the national
est grantee, an American Indian Total Anticipated Costs..$19,300 social security board, the welfare
whose claim to 131 years is well General Fund Anticipated payroll in this county will soon be
substantiated and who is probably Property Taxes1932-36 ...$ 1500 swelled slightly by grants mad to
the oldest person in the United L Taxes 6000 the blind and neur-blind. Enroll- We Sell
States. License Taxes .............6,000
States. Fines and Forfeits ........ 3,000 meant is practically completed and More Mil
District No. 2, wiea thheadqute Race Track Fund ......... 1,650 will be followed by examinations
trs atQuincy,leads thestatewith Sources ............. 500 by specialists to determine the
13 persons varying in age from loss or impairment of sight where
an even 100 to 107.Total Anticipated Revenue $12,650 the need of the applicant has been ON HIGH
.Tacksonville, District 6, has en- established to the satisfaction of -A
rolled a white man who admits to the.district board.
be 122 years and who is the run-
rerup in the state-wide longevity Total...................$19,300
contest.
Perhaps the most remarkable ND. At the C arches
NO MOTHERS DIE OF CHILD-
instance of retained vitality comes COUNTY
BIRTH IN GULF COUNTY
from the Tampa district, where MONTHS BAPTIST
welfare district records contain URev. Sizemore, Pastor
the notation that a woman 114 According to Dr. Edward M. Rev. Sizemore, PastorI
the notation that a woman 114L' director of the bureau of Church services 11 a. m. and
years of age waA denied assist- vital statistics for Florida, no 7:45 p. ., every unday.
anco "because of earnings of ap- Sunday school 10 a. m
fm deaths of new mothers from child-
p.icant from private employment. h occurred in Gulf county B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
aThe statistics show that almost 10months of 1937. r. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
n ua number of men and wo-deaths Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
A decrease of 21 in the deaths oo>I
r.en are o tlhe old age honor nesdays.I
rmen are oo the old age honor of new mothers in the entire state nesdays. O
roll. 25 women matching years G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.
with 28 men. The average age of was recorded during the same pe- Or P
the 53 persons is 102.51 years, and o compared wth the cPRESBYTERIAN
hir combined ages 5,453 years spending period of 1936. The
heir combined ages 5,453 years records showed 155 such deaths Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
records showed 155 such deaths ,,
-- Church services 11 a. m., fourth
SubSscribe to The Star-$2 year. or the January-October period of Sundays.
1937, as compared with 176 dur-
ng the first 1Q months of 1936. Sunday school 10 a. m. (at the
-- the first 10 months of 1936.
Duval county headed the death club house).
Ladies' Aid Soc-ety, 3:30 p. m.
list with 17, while Dade and Hils- Ladies' Aid Soety 3:30 p. m.
S1 every third Thursday.
borough each reported 11 such every third Thursday.
deaths. Twenty-four counties of -C
CATHOLIC
the state reported no such deaths. F M
i Father Massey, Priest
S. ------ Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
METHODIST
Rev. D. E. MarLetta, Pastor Repai
Whenever that tired feel- Church services 11 a. m. and A S
ing gets you, count on 7 7:30 p. m., first and third Sundays.
milk to restore your pep / Sunday school 10 a. m., every ....
and give you the energy Sunday.
you need to keep going W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
at top speed and ef- PATRONIZE A
ficiency! HOME-OWNED ASSEMBLY OF GOD
PURE MILK STORE 10 a. m.-Sunday school.
For Your Protection Our Prices Are 11 a. m.-Devotional.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic eerv- '
Our milk meets the most L U WER ices.
rigid standards for pur- Or Tr Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
ity and wholesomeness. E EAS I ER day afternoon.
--i- :-- Prayermeeting WVednesday eve- O
ALWAYS CALL FOR Oldest Furniture Store in ning.
Gulf County ---
SOLOMONSS PROPOSAL TO RENAME Chassis
S Dairy B BARGAIN STREETS VOTED DOWN
Dairy BARGA I N __
r otFURNITURE STORE (Continued from page 1)il
Products Port St. Joe, Fla. find his way about with ease, but
with the change of avenue names
__from numbers to names, while


I S T. 1JOE IC





iiv CRYSTAL ICE
I T FROM TREATED WATER
SMAX KILBOURN, Prop.


-9
I


permanent residents of the city
would become accustomed to it,
the stranger in our midst would
be confused. I am opposed to it."
It was pointed out by Mayor Joe
Sharit that the suggested change
was to do honor to those men
whose names appear on the monu-
ment as signers of the state con-
stitution here in 1838.
"And besides, as It is now, the
stranger can eas.!y become con-
fused," said City Engineer W. R.
Galt, "for when he comes into the


This O


up way out in the swamp."
But Commissioner Stone was
adamant, and after some discus-
sion along the above lines, the
matter was dropped.

Half the menus in London seem
to be printed in French.


future for Christmas----
Increase the beauty and happiness
of your home by giving-
NEW FURNITURE
TELEPHONE 56

anley Furniture Co.
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


ime To Check Your Car
WE SPECIALIZE IN -

SHING

POL FISHING


the Gas W
es and Less Ca

OCO-P
IWAY NO. 10 -


GREASING

i t Woco.Pep
rbon
E P SERVICE
EP STATION
W. COLLINSWORTH., Mgr.


wet Connec0tions

S We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.
SEE

Haley or Art Reinertson
hone 12 Port St. Joe, Fla.


rL. KERR


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


STCHES
-CLOCKS


ring
ecialty


-JEWELRY
-DIAM


f las



change and


s Lubrication


m Away Weel
- ASK US FOR DETAILS -
ffer Applies Only on CASH PURCH


STANDARD CROWN ETHYL GASOI
STANDARD CROWN GASOLINE
--- ESSO, MOBILOIL AND ESSOLUB
(Finest of Motor Lubricants)


MALONE'S STANDARD SERVI


PHONE 73


PORT ST. JOE


ONDS


















kly!


CASESS

LINE

E -



ICE
E, FLA.


I


1J
~a~8an~Hlr~uPwrarxwas~i~


WN


~q~r~asqa


ibf-


mgnla(B~W~ij~ae~.'~x~i~. .-B~U`II~-~--~PII~D~~


PAGE SIX


TWHE STAR


Friday, December 31, 1937


I







Friday; December 31, 19~7 THE STAR PAGE SEVEN


DRIVING PERFECT SINCE 1914

A Salem, N. J., mechanic has
driven automobiles 250,000 miles
since 1914 without an accident.
Milton L. Hurff attributed his un-
smirched record to "good motor,
good brakes and moderate speed."



Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
.If you want it done
RIGHT!

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker



CITY PRESSING.

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
CLUB IN TOWN
----o---
All Work Guaranteed
We Call for and Deliver
----
In Rear of Parker's Barber
ShopL
Port St. Joe, Fla.

-- -----------------4. i

Moonlight

Hotel
For the convenience of
LADIES, GENTLEMEN
and CHILDREN
Others Not Wanted-
.-- 4
NEW FURNISHINGS

J. W. RAKESTRAW, Prop.
2 Miles West Port St. Joe




t
GULF

DRY CLEANERS o
(Formerly Swatts)
c
ALL WORK f
GUARANTEED Y
in
We Call for and i
Deliver h
s
PHONE 63
tf
fe


EXPERT BARBERS
Our customers say that
we have a knack of giv-
ing them what they ask
for. That's because our
barbers are experienced,
skilled operators!

Try Us Today!


COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP


Many Long Years Ago
Under this heading will be published a series of articles taken
from old newspapers and clippings. They will be mostly of his-
torical interest and should make an interesting scrap book.


(From The Ulster County Gazette
of January 4, 1800)
CONGRESS
House of Representatives
Thursday, December 19.
Mr. Marshall with deep sorrow
on his countenance, and in a low,
pathetic tone of voice, rose and
addreffed the House as follows:
The melancholy event which
was yesterday announced, without
doubt has been rendered but too
certain. Our Washington is no
more! The hero, the sage, and
the patriot of America-the man
on whom in times of danger, every
eye was turned and all hopes were
placed, lives now only in his own
great actions, and in the hearts of
an affectionate and afflicted peo-
ple.
More than any other individual
and as much as to one individual
was possible, has he contributed
to found this, our wide spreading
empire, and to give to the West-
ern world its independence and its
freedom. Having affected the great
object for which he was placed at
the head of our armies, we have
seen him convert the sword into
the plough share and voluntarily
fink the soldier in the citizen.
In obedience to the general
voice of his country, calling on
him to prefide over a great peo-
ple, 'we have seen him once more
quit the retirement he loved, and
in a season more ftormy and tem-
peftuous than war itself with calm
and wise determination purfuethe
true int'refts of the nation and
contribute, more than any other
could contribute to the eftablish-
ment of that system of policy
which will, I trust,, yet preserve
our peace, our honor, and our in-
dependence. Having been twice
unanimously chosen the Chief
Magiftrate, of a frel people, we see
iim at a time when his relation
with the universal suffrage could
lot have been doubted, affording
he world a rare instance of mod-
eration, by withdrawing from his
ligh ftation to the peaceful walks
If. private life.
However, public confidence may
change and the public affections
luctuate with respects to others,
yet with respect to him they have,
n war and in peace, in public and
n private life, been as fteady as
iis own firm mind, and as con-
tant as his own exalted virtues.
Let us then, Mr. Speaker, pay
he last tribute of respect and af-
ection to our departed friend. Let
he grand council of the nation
display those sentiments which
he nation feels.
A meffage was received from
he Senate informing the House


THIRD


that they had agreed to the ap-
pointment of a joint committee to
consider a suitable manner of pay-
ing honor to the memory of the
man first in war, first in peace,
and first in the hearts of his coun-
try, and that they had appointed
seven members to join a commit-
tee for that purpose.

To. the PRESIDENT of the
UNITED STATES
The Senate of the United States
respectfully takes leave, fir, to ex-
press to you their deep regret for
the loss their country has suf-
tained in the death of General
George Washington.-This event,
so distressing to all our fellow cit-
izens, must be peculiarly heavy to
you, who have been long affoci-
ated with him in deeds of patriot-
ism. Permit us. fir, to mingle our
tears with yours: on this occasion
it is manly to weep. To lose such
a man at such a crifis, is no com-
mon calamity to the world; our
country mourns her Father.. The
Almighty Disposer of human
-events has taken from us our
greatest Benefactor and ornament.
It becomes us to submit with rev-
erence to him, who "maketh dark-
ness his Pavilion."
With patriotic pride, we review
the life of our Washington, and
compare him with those of other
countries who have been pre-emi-
nent in fame. Ancient and modern
fames are diminished before him.
Greatness and guilt have too often
been allied, but his fame is whiter
than it is brilliant. The destroyer
of nations stood abashed at the
majesty of his virtue. It reproved
the ten-perance of their ambition
and darkened the splendor of vic-
tory. The scenes closed, and we
are no longer anxious left misfor-
tune should sully his glory; he
has traveled on to the end of his
journey, and carried with him an
increasing weight of honour; he
has depofited it safely, where mis-
fortune cannot tarnish it-where
malice cannot blazt It. Favored of
Heaven, he departed without ex-
hibiting the weakness of humanity
-magnanimous in death, the
darkness of the grave could not
obscure his brightness.
Such was the man whom we de-
plore-Thanks to God, his glory is
consummated. Wasnington yet
lives on earth in his spotless ex-
ample-his spirit is in Heaven.
Let his countrymen consecrate
the memory of the heroic General,
the patriotic Statesman, and the
virtuous Sage; let them teach
their children never to forget that
:he fruits of his labours, and his
example, are their Inheritance.
Next: Washington Entombed.


TR AL convicted of manslaughter and
I AL given 20 years in the state peni-
tentiary. The supreme court over-
GIVE1i N DEIR ruled the conviction. A second


STATE TRIBUNAL HOLDS THAT
CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE
ERRED

The state supreme court last
week ordered a third trial for
George Deeb, Panama City con-
tractor, well known in Port St.
Joe, on charges of killing Creel
Godwin in Escambia county four
and a half years ago.
The court said the circuit judge
erred in refusing Deeb permission
to testify about circumstances of
an argument with Godwin the day
before the shooting on April 19,
1933.
Deeb was indicted for first de.
gree murder. He lost a plea of in-
sanity and, in rAril, 1934, the case
was transferred t.kaloosa coun-
ty on a change of vein e was


trial also resulted in a manslaugh-
ter verdict and a 20-year sentence.


The defendant was guaranteed
by the constitution the "right to
be heard in support of the issue
of self-defense," said the court,
and could give testimony "more
fully than other witnesses."
The reversal was on his attempt
to testify that he approached
Godwin seeking reconciliation af-
ter their altercation, but was
afraid and fired in what he con-
sidered the defense of his life.
Some of this testimony was ex-
cluded by the trial judge.
Other pleas of Deeb's counsel
on appeal were overruled, al-
though the court said part of the
judge's charge was "inappropri-
ate" although not prejudicial.
Justice Rivers Buford and Jus-
tice Roy H. Chapman said they
found no reversible error in the


record. They dissented from the The word "El Dorado," meaning
court's opinion. "the gilded one," was first ap-
-- plied to a South American tribal
Ten per cent of the bill is the king or priest, said to cover him-
average tip given to a waiter in a self with gold dust at an annual
public dining place, religious festival.


----------------

We Haul Anything- -
We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


St. Joe Radio Service
WE GIVE A COMPLETE CHECK-UP ON
ALL MAKES OF RADIOS

When your Radio don't make a squeak
Don't go and throw it in the creek-
BRING IT TO US

WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ARCTUS TUBES
WORK GUARANTEED
Located in ROCHE'S COMMUNITY STORE


MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT

WILLIAMS' PLACE
--A PALM POINT INN 1.-
FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING


DANCING


- No Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.







Take Advantage of the OFF-Season

Savings
Let Me Figure Any Building
That You Desire


HH. TAYLOR


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


REFRESHMENTS


Port St. Joe


HARDWARE


!NEEDS



WE CAN SUPPLY YOU


No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

S. Your business will be

appreciated.




Gulf Hardware &



Supply Co.

BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


Friday., December 31, 1937


THE STAR


PAGE SEVEN






PAGE EIGHT


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MISSIONARY SOCIETY
IN BUSINESS MEETING MISS Ola Stone Wed
The Methodist Missionary So-
ciety held their regular business On Christmas Da y
meeting Monday afternoon at the
church. Purpose of the meeting
was to put all business in order The wedding of Miss Ola Stone
for the past year and to be in or- and Mr. Opal Grice Ogburn was
der for the new officers to take solemnized Christmas afternoon at
over their work for the ensuing :, o'clock at the home of the
year. Mrs. Hill was enrolled as bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T.
a new member at this time. H. Stone, with the Rev. D. E.
Members of the society present Marietta, pastor of the Methodist
were Mesdames Buyer, Ramsey, R. church, officiating. The living
Gibson, P. Lovett, Sharit, Ward, P. room and dining room of the Stone
Howell, and of the "Oaks Circle" home were opened en suite and
Mesdames Patton and Boyd. decorated with a beautiful Christ-


Installation of officers for 1938 mas tree and large baskets of
will be held at the Methodist white and deep red- chrysanthe-
church Sunday night with the Rev. mums with ferns.
Marietta acting as installing offi- Preceding the ceremony, Miss
cer. Adelaide Hardy impressively sang
S '" "The Sweetest Story Ever Told,"
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT accompanied at the piano by Mrs.
Max Kilbourn, after which Mrs.
1937, to Mr. and Mrs. E. Clay Kilbourn played Lohengrin's "Wed-
Lewis,. a daughter, at Marianna, cing March." An improvised altar
Congratulations! was placed between the library
and dining room. before which the
Born, Tuesday, December 28, ceremony was performed.
1937. at Lisenby hospital, Panama The matron of honor, Mrs. Ralph
City, to Mr. and Mrs. Buster watts, sister of the bride, pre
City, to Mr. and Mrs. Buster
wens, a son. The young man has ceded the bride, who entered with
Owens, a son. -The young man hasei
been named Frederick Jerome. hler father, T. H.. Stone, who gave
her in marriage. They were met
SMr. at the altar by the groom and Mr.
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Haygood HaroId Palmer, best man.
left Wednesday for Montgomery, At the reception which followed
Ala., to spend New Year's with the ceremony. the able was laid
Mr. Haygood's mother. Mr. and
wvith a lace cloth on which was a
Mrs. Haygood spent the Christmasding cake topped by a
huge wedding cake topped by a
holidays here with Mrs. Haygood's miniature bride and groom. As-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Belin. sisting the mother of the bride in
serving brick ice cream, lady-
J. J. Dorsey returned Sunday fingers and macaroons were Mrs.
from Tuscaloosa, Ala., where he Robert Tapper, i\:ss Lillian Fer-
spent the holidays with his family. rell, and the Misses Alice and
SAlma Baggett.
Johnny Joyner returned Sunday The bride was attractively at
from Quincy. lied in pearl grey traveling suit
SA c : -viith dubonnot accessories, and
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Yancey of her corsage was of white rose-
Marianna were the. guests yester- buds. The matron of honor was be-
day of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake. coniingly attired .n dubonnetdress
Mrs.' Drake returned to Marianna with matching accessories and cor-
with them for a short visit, sage of carnations. The mother
I b Q of the bride w,:'e" a becoming
"Buck" Montgomery, Mrs. Asa dress of black with corsage of pink
Montgomery and Mrs. Phillip Lov- rosebuds, while the mother of the
ett were in .Panama City Monday groom wore gray, with a corsage
where Mrs. Montgomery was of pink rose-buds.
taken for treatment. The happy young couple left im-
ST mediately following the ceremony
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dorsey re- for a brief honeymoon.
* iidLq Cln fJm T.it lonrat. l a


t. UCU OteLLIUaJ. I uLn ,ClmUOa,
Ala., where they spent the Christ-
mas, holidays.
Mrs. D. C. Mahon was called to
New Albany, Ind., Sunday by the
death of her brother, Clifford Mor-
toi.
Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Smith and
children of Coinelia, Ga., are the
guests of the former's parents for
several days.
0. M. Morton and Miss Eliza-
beth Hance of Carrabelle were the
guests of the former's mother
Christmas Day.

John, Jr., and Billy Maddox
spent Christmas in Apalachicola,
guests of their parents, Mr. and
Mrs. John Maddox.
M. P. Spear, local attorney,
spent Christmas in Apalachicola
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph B. Spear.

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sharit and
son. Joe, Jr., were in Tallahassee
Tuesday where Joe, Jr., was taken
for treatment.
W. H. Linton returned from his
home Monday, where he spent the
holidays,
SStanley S. Sheipp of Apalachi-
cola was a business visitor Tues-
day in Port St. Joe,


Madeline and Arthur Saderberg
of Orandro arrived in Port St Joe
last week to make their home
with their father, Carl A. Sader-
berg, and will enter school when
it opeos Monday. Arth.or will en-
ter the eighth grade arn Madeline
Ihe vcventh grade.

Aubrey Marks of Apalachicola
was the guest Tuesday of Mr. and
Mrs. George Patton.
Mrs. Mary Lovett, Mr. and Mrs.
Pat Lovett and Miss Ella Lovett
were visiting in Japalachicola Sun-
day with friends and relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith and
;daughter, Marigene, Mrs. J. W.
(West and Mr. and Mrs. Homer
Kane spent Saturday and Sunday
in Dawson, Ga., guests of W. W.
Kelly and family.
The Misses Loietta Long, Clyde
Brown and Erline Brown, and Mrs.
Jennie Brown were the guests
Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Nick Comn
forter.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown
and children of Apalachicola were
the guests of Mrs. Brown's par-
ents over the holidays.
Mrs. Fred Maddox and son, Da-
vid, spent Sunday in Frink with
Mrs. Maddox' parents, Mr. and
Mrs. J. McFarland.


WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB
MEETS-WITH MRS OWENS
The Wednesday Night Bridge
Club met this week with Mrs. Tom
Owens as hostess at her home on
Eighth street. The living room of
the home was decorated in holiday
colors, a Christmas tree and poin-
settias. Following threA progres-
sions of bridge prizes were award-
ed to Mrs. R. Coburn, high, and
Mrs. IL Soule, low, after which
the hostess served a delicious
plate lunch.
Present with the hostess were
Mesdames J. M. Smith, H. Soule,
C. Edwards, E. Ramsey, R. Co-
burn, and J. Gloekler. Miss Ger-
trude Boyer was invited as a guest.
Mrs. Charles Burns returned
Monday to her home in Auburn,
Ala.
Mr. Childers or Birmingham.
Ala., has been the guest of Dr.. L.
H. Bartee for several days.
Mr. and Mrs. Benson, Mrs.
Charles Mahon, and Mrs. Charles
Schoelles of Apalachicola were the
Tuesday guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Phillip Lovett.
;'* Q f r
Mr. and\Mrs. Ewell Wages spent
Christmas in Apalachicola with
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wages.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Maddox spent
Monday in Carrabelle on business.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many
friends for, their kind expressions
of sympathy in the loss of our
mother.
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Davis
and Family


HOUSE FOR RENT
Five-room dwelling house on
Beacon Hill highway, nearing com-
pletion. All conveniences, inchld-
ing lights, running water and hot
water heater. See M. P. Spear,
Costin Bldg., or phone 52.


LITTLE SERVICE STATION
Port St. Joe, Florida
LET US DO YOUR-----
WASHING POLISHING LUBRICATION
Gulf Products Firestone Tires and Tubes




If you have your Lot,


let Us figure the cost


of your Home.





St. loe
O I 0 C.






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nance lumber and build,
ing materials from
the foundation to
lock and key


Johns-Manville Roofing


PHONE 69


Residence


Lucas Paints
We Carry a
COMPLETE STOCK
Exterior and Interior Paints
amels Varnishes Flats.
Oil Paints In All Colors

Seasoned Lumber

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Lots


IN PORT ST. JOE


Priced from $200 to $500 T"SIT


These Lots Are Selling Fast---

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY !

Port St. Joe Is Growing .-- Values Are Increasing



AV The Company
is offering a re-

SA E 25 fund of 25 per
cent if purchaser begins erection of a
dwelling within 30 days after purchase


Call on us, write or phone for appointment


SAINT JOSEPH LAND AND


DEVELOPMENT CO.


PHONE 25


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


THE STAR


Fri-day, December 31, 1937