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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00162
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: December 3, 1937
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00162

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000'
DuPont Paper Mill-F!orida's Fast-
eat Growing Little City. In
the Heart of the Pine Belt.


STAR


If you have any news--no matter
how trivial it may seem to you-
bring or send it to The Star, it will
be of interest to our readers.


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 3, 1937 NUMBER 6


No Bids Received For



Local School Bonds


PROBABLE CHANGE IN
WAGE AND HOUR BILL

It appears likely that substan-
tial change will be made in the
wage and hour bill before it is
finally approved by congress, ac-
.-cording to Millarc .Caldwell of
Washington, D. C., representative
,.-from the Third Florida district.
"The sentiment in opposition to


Issue For Second Time Fails
To Find Buyer; Effort Will
Be Made to Borrow Money
For Completion of Building

The $33,000 worth of school
bonds voted by the citizens of Port
St. Joe last month for construction
of a new building, for the second
time Wednesday failed to find a
buyer.


a five-man control board is grow- Due to a legal technicality the
3.ing," writes Caldwell. "Just azt first issue of bonds were not ac-
the moment the trend seems to be ceptable to the buyers, and as a
Toward the fixing of certain mini- consequence work on the struc-
mum standards in the act itself, ture, which was already about
giving the board the power to half completed by the Albritton-
grant exceptions in cases of prov- Williams Construction Company,
en hardship. The bill can, under was stopped.. with the expectation
the constitution, apply only to of commencing work again as soonR
workers engaged in interstate as the second issue was sold.
commerce. It seems quite defi- A number of individuals and
nite that agricultural workers will companies had expressed their in-
'be specifically exempt." tention of bidding on the bonds,
Sponsors of the proposal say it but due -to negligence all of them
is not the intention of the legis- failed to get their bids in before
nation to bring about sudden the deadline., This will cause'a de-
chabges in operating 'costs' and .ay of at least 30 days while the
methods, but to eventually cause bonds are re-advertised.
the working conditions to meet a However, according to W. E.
minimum standard. As the mat- .Murdock, chairman of the local
ter develops.'assurance is being board of school trustees, aiv effort
given that every effort wi'l be- i being made to borrow money on
,,made to avoid hardship and un4e'. the: bonds, and if. a';deal is mnad e
disruptionn bialdiis. '.i work wiill be started immediately
-' b i i.rusa the pew bullding't1o tom-
pletion. Tlie bank which is:'`con,
RJUSHu TJ '' i .": si'dering- maklhg the- loan is waif-
big- for word from 'Attorney-Gen-
RR-G A A ral- rLandis as to the legality of
such 'a procedure.


NEW BUILDING TO BE LO-
CATED ON CORNER SECOND
AVENUE ANb FOURTH ST.

The Albritton Williams Con-
struction Company has a large
crew of men at work on the new
garage and service station of the
W. O. Anderson Motor Company
on the corner of Second avenue
and Fourth street.
The new home of the Ford dis-
tributing concern will be of brick
with a concrete floor, 70 by 60
feet and will house a modern ma-
chine shop laid out under specifi-
cations provided by the Ford Mo-
tor Company, a large showroom,,
parts room, and one-stop service
station.
"We will be prepared to serve
the public in every-respect," said'
Mr. Anderson yesterday, "and will
carry a complete line' of Ford
parts, tires, gasoline and oil."

SALE OF NEW MOTOR
TAGS IS UNDERWAY

Florida's new automobile li-
censes-canary yellow numerals
on a blue-black background are
now being offered to motorists of
Gulf county through the office of
Tax Collector E. C. Pridgeon.
Governor Cone and Colin Eng-
lish, state superintendent of
schools, are appealing for early
tag purchases so that money can
be obtained to pay school teach-
ers' salaries by Christmas.
The state manufactured 520,000
tags for 1938 at its prison plant.

Mr. and Mrs. Thales Wathen
and children, Carlos, Winifred and
Thales, Jr., and Mrs. Annie Wa-
then, of Carrabelle, were guests
Thursday of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip
Lovett.

Subscribe to The Star-$2 year.


RULING BY JUDGE TO AID
IN SCHOOL OPERATIONS

Tallahassee attorneys say a re-
cent decision by Federal Judge A.
V. Long at Gainesville determined
for the first time that school op-
erations cannot be crippled to pay
off general county school bonds.
Judge Long's decision, they say,
reverses a federal court order for
Levy county to use half of its 10
mill general school tax to pay off
$35,000 worth of bonds held by in-
dividuals.
The court found that because
the county is limited by law to 10
mills for general school opera-
tions, the remaining five mills
would not be sufficient to keep
the schools going. The court de-
cided that the county should set
aside only about two and one-
quarter mills to apply against the
block of bonds.
Attorneys say the ruling will af-
fect more than $8,000,000 worth of
general county school bonds out-
standing in Florida.

POLICE CHIEF WARNS. OF
SHOOTING IN CITY LIMITS
Chief of Police Troy Jones
states that a number of boys of
the city have been discharging .22
rifles and shooting at birds within
the city limits, and says that this
is in violation of the city ordin-
ance prohibiting discharge of fire-
,arms within the city limits.
"These boys will be picked up
in future and brought before the
municipal judge," said Chief
Jones.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Marshall of
Panama City were visitors in Port
St. Joe over the week-end.

-Irs. E. B. Denry has returned
from an extended visit in Atlanta
with relatives.


GULF COUNTY

RED CROSS ROLL

CALL CONTINUES

CHAIRMAN POINTS OUT THAT
DUES ARE USED IN PUB-
LIC HEALTH SERVICE

The Gulf county Red Cross roll
call committee announced Wed-
nesday morning that the 1937
membership drive thus far has
been successful, but that there are
a lot of residents who have not
yet turned in their dues. From
present indications it is believed
that the roll this year will exceed
that of last year.
Twenty-five years ago the Red
Cross public health nursing serv-
ice was inaugurated, and observ-
ances of this occasion, are being
carried out this year by Red Cross
chapters throughout the United
States, according to J. H. Kelley,
chairman of the county Red Cross
chapter.
This nursing service, Mr. Kelley1
said, was established to create bet-
ter health conditions for the "for-
gotten family"-those who reside
in rural areas and are deprived of
nursing by the barrier of distance.
Froin a few 'scattered patients in
outlying districts during 1912 until
today the Red.Cross public health
nursing service has increased; the
number of its annual visits;, to
more than one million.
'Classes in, home' hygiene and
care of the sick he said, were con-
ducted by 930 chapters of the
Red Cross during the past year,
reaching 69,450 persons. During
that 'period, 1,615 nurses acted as
instructors-all qualified to teach
this important subject. The thou-
sands who left the classes carried
into their homes the knowledge to
safeguard their families and their
communities, and to brighten some
of the dark places that spring up
from negligence or ignorance.
"Through its 25 years of pio-
neering, Red Cross volunteers have
worked shoulder to shoulder with
public health nurses throughout
the country, in cities, small towns
and the most remote rural areas, 1
and have brought life, hope and a t
chance for better living to millions
of persons," Mr. Kelley said. n
Pointing out that a much greater
growth of public health nursing b
services must be planned for the t
near future, Mr. Kelley said that
the need for public health nursing
services ealls for one nurse to
every 1,500 to ',000 persons.
sI

CITY WATER IS GOOD o
SAYS HEALTH BOARD a
a
Three samples of water, taken i
rom different points in the city's 1
water system, were sent to the v
Florida State Board of Health last d
veek for bacterial and purity a
ests.
The analysis sheet, signed by c
hired A. Safay, director of the i]
board, was received yesterday by s
City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson and c
hows a negative test. e
"Results of the analysis shows n
hat the sanitary quality of the' F
water is good," writes Mr. Safay. c
n
TRADE AT HOME
When you begin your Christmas
hopping, remember to trade at
home. Merchants of Port St.-Joe
reed and appreciate your support,
nd their goods are as good as E
hose in neighboring towns, and P
betterr than those from the mail o
order houses. o


Power Company Has Big



Investment In This City


TELLS OF SYSTEM TO
SAVE ON TEXTBOOKS

State Superintendent of Schools
Colin English this week reported
his office had installed a new sys-
tem to prevent waste in distribu-
tion of free textbooks to Florida
pupils.
"We allow each county a maxi-
mum appropriation, based on a
certain amount for each pdpil," he
said. "The county superintendent
may order as many books as he
actually needs up to the maxi-
mum.
"One of the most important in-
novations is in permitting the
county to order as often as neces-
sary. Heretofore, only one order
a year was permitted. As a re-
sult, the county superintendent
worild- be sure to order extra
books for every contingency. He
usually had to .get books that
wouldn't be needed to be sure of
filling his requirements."
He added that "in Duval county
alone we found $30,000 worth of
unused books. We adopted an ex-
change system by which we give
them books they need in ex-
change for their Rurplus in other
texts. 'Altogether we-. have- gqtfen
back- $50,000-worth- o such hooks
and we haven't begun to cover, all
the counties."


NEWFORDS ON

DISPLAY HERE

Anderson Motor 'Company Gets
Two Sensational Cars For
Display, Demonstration

With a great tooting of horns
and led by a car carrying a ban-
ner stretched its length by sup-
porting standards, the sensational
new Fords for 1938 were intro-
duced to Port St. Joe last Wed-
nesday by the W. O. Anderson Mo-
or Company, local distributors.
The company has two of the
new models on display, and from
ll appearances the Ford car
,roadens its appeal for 1938 with
wo distinctive designs differing in
appearance, appointments, body
ize and price.
The standard Ford V-8 is freshly
styled with longer hood and flow-
ng curves. It offers again a choice
of V-8 engine sizes. The deluxe
t
nodel is entirely new in appear-
ince. The front end is refresh-
ngly new and modern with longer
hood. It looks big and is big,
,ith more room in the closed se-
lan. more comfort for passengers
nd larger luggage space.
Both the deluxe and. standard
ars are built on the same 112-
nch wheelbase chassis, to the b
ame standards of mechanical ac- y
uracy and excellence. With two I
engine sizes, two body sizes and c
nany body types to choose from, t
'ord buyers are sure of getting a '
ar that meets their personal I
eeds exactly.

POSSIBILITY OF
CURB MKT. HERE,

Paul Bredd of Crestview and J. C
E. Garrett of Laurel Hill were in t
'ort St. Joe yesterday looking p
ver the city with the possibility '
f locating a curb market here. 1


Figure They Have Contribut-
ed Something to Upbuilding
Of the Community; Brief
Resume of Activities Here

J. P. Coombs of Apalachicola,
district manager for the Florida
Power Corporation,;was in the city
yesterday and gave the editor a
brief history of the company's ac-
tivities here since taking over the
local electric system.
"The Florida Power Corporation
negotiated with the city of Port
St. Joe in the fall of 1930 to take
over the local lighting system,"
said Mr. Coombs. "An election
was held at that time and carried
without a dissenting vote to sell
to our company and grant a 30-
year franchise. That was on De-
cember 2, just .seven years ago.
We started work immediately on
construction of a high tension line
from Apalachicola, as the generat-
ing equipment here *as' obsolete,
and in March, i931, we were giv-
ing the city 24-hour service. Pre-
vious to that time, I believe, Port
St. Joe had but 12-hour electric
service.
"The company paid $12,500 for
the system. -which at that time
was serving between 30 and 40
customers%" continued Mr. Coomba.
"Since that time consumption of
electrieal energy in Poj .St,. Jop
has Increased considerably and, to
meet this increased demand and
care for the power necessary in
construction of the paper mill, we
installed a new 500 kilowatt gen-
erator at our Apalachicola plant.
"Our franchise rate here origin-
ally was 12 cents per kilowatt
hour, but since the increase in
consumption this rate has been
dropped to 11 cents for the first
25 kilowatts, 6 cents for the next
60 and all over that 3 cents per
kilowatt hour.
"Naturally, after building the
system up to the point where we
can show a profit after years of
operating at a loss, we would not
like to see it taken over by the
city. We figure that we have
contributed something to the up-
building of the community and we
will continue to make further re-
ductions when conditions justify."
Mayor J. L. Shar:n was out of
town yesterday, so The Star is un-
able to present further details this
week as to any action taken by
the city in proceeding with plans
to take over the local electric sys-
:em, but, as last week, we hope
to present the matter in greater
retail in our next issue.

McCLOUD RETURNED
ON TWO CHARGES

J. A. McCloud, former night-
vatchman in Port St. Joe, was
brought back to Wewahitchka
yesterdayy by Deputies Cumbie and
'atrick and Proctor VanHorn on
chargess of issuing bad checks and
making a car out of the state
without permission of the owner.
He was arrested in Lake Provi-
lence, La.

GULF HARDWARE TO MOVE
STORE TO rIEW LOCATION

The Gulf Hardware & Supply
Company yesterday announced
hat they will move into their new
place of business, adjoining the
Thompson Bakery, on December
0.






PAGE TWO




THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Ijditor and Publisher.

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
.from The Star Building

Application for entry as second-class matter
is pending.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.C0 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months-...... 65c

S -..{ Telephone 51 }jt'-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The The spoken word barely asserts; the
printed word thoroughly convinces. Th'e
spoken word is lost; the printed word re-
mains.


OPINION FAVORS CITY LIGHT PLANT

The consensus of opinion in regard to a
municipally-olwned light and power ,plant
appears to be favorable. While but a, small
portion of the city's population has been ap-
proached for an expression of opinion,: those
who have include business men, professional
men, day laborers, clerks and housewives.
All seem to agree that if the city of Port
St. Joe were to take over the transmission
lines of the Florida Power Corporation, the
present rate of eleven cents per 'kilowatt
hour would be practically cut in half, as the
St. Joe Paper Company has agreed to fur-
nish electric energy to the city at one cent
or less per kilowatt.
It is also brought out that the only way
for the city to control rates and service is
by running its own plant. No matter what
kind of a contract a city may have with a
company in regard to rates and service, re-
peated experience has been that courts of the
state do not hesitate to set it aside if a re-
duction can be made to appear confiscatory.
"If the city owns .its own plant," said one
prominent business man, "the earnings will
stay in Port St. Joe. The earnings of the
Florida Po.wer'.Corporatioin go out of town
to pay interest and dividends to ,security
holders."
That is true, and the interest and divi-
dends continue -the same, or increase, from
year to year, while with a municipally-owned
plant the bonded indebtedness would be re-
duced each year, with a consequent reduc-
tion in interest payments, and eventually
would be eliminated entirely, giving the city
a steady source of income for other purposes.
The move of the city commissioners to
call for an election on this matter appears
to be, in the eyes of many, one of the best
things ever to happen to the City of Port
St. Joe since the establishment of the paper
mill here.


FIGURES PLAY TRICKS

Figures in various combinations can play
some peculiar tricks-almost eerie in many
instances. Here is one of the combinations,
and if you can figure out how the results
come out correct in each instance, you are a
genius.
Multiply your age by 2 and add 5 to the
result. Then multiply that by 50. Now, if
you have any change in your pocket, if less
than a dollar, add that in. Subtract the num-
ber of days in the year-365-and add 115
for good measure. You will find, much to
your surprise, that the two left hand figures
will show your age, and the two right hand
figures the amount of change in your jeans.
Now that w'e have you started on this
lhing, here's another: Put down the number
of the month of your birth. Multiply this by
2. Add 5. Multiply the result oy 50. Add
your age. Subtract from the result 365. Add
115. To the left will be the number of the
*month you w"re born, and to the right will
he your age.


"* An old bachelor says that women laugh
when they can, and weep when they will.---
'.t,: Constitution.


THE STAR

MAKE THIS A HAPPY CHRISTMAS

Thanksgiving over, the thoughts of every-
one turn instinctively toward Christma's.
Yuletide: is always the happy holiday season.
It is frequently said that'a1 llthings are-: rela-
tive. One- Christmas season may be rela-
tively happier' than-another. It-is true that
in some instances economic stress has thrown
its shadows across the hearthstone of many
a worthy home. .It is true also that real
happiness cannot be manufactured. It is not
artificial. Nor can real happiness come out
of want and distress and the dread uncer-
tainty which falls upon the unemployed and
the needy. Here again the term "relative"
applies. ''he forthcoming Christmas will find
many families in Port St. Joe and Gulf
county in want. And yet many of them will
be made happy by the generous ministrations
of neighbors and friends.
Happiness, after all, is not denoted by the
dollar mark, nor is it weighed out or com-
puted interms of the mind. Life, with its
compensations, frequently finds the poor and
the afflicted truly happier than many who
flourish in opulence, without bodily afflic-
tion. Often it is true, as observant persons
know, that wealth is a burden to its possessor
and a source of discontent and grief. It all
resolves itself back to the maxim of the old
Greek philosopher who held that happiness is
in us, not in the objects or possessions about
us. How true this is. One who keeps eyes
and cars open sees and hears it every day.
So there is no reason for the needy per-
son to dread the coming of Christmas on the
ground that there will be no happiness for
him or her on that holiday. Nor is there
any reason for the rich person to exult and
to think that he or she will have a monopoly
on Christmastide happiness. There will be
happiness enough to go around to rich and
poor alike, as the good God gives to the
hearts of men the capacity to enjoy life and
to enter into its blessings .with- thankful
spirit. .

A fellow has to be a contortionist these
days. First of all he has to keep his back
to the wall and his ear to the ground. He is
expected to put his shoulder to the wheel,
his nose to the grindstone, keep a level head
and both feet on the ground-a-nd at the
saime time look for the silver lining with his
head in the clouds.

An editor asks the cause of the present
craze for dark glasses. Has he considered
the possibility that the wearers are merely
trying to avoid the attention of the commit-
tee investigating tax loopholes??-Hartford
Courant.


SWhen the flying automobile -appears, the
roadside cows will feel like thirty cents-
Florida Times-Union. And think just how
the present-day automobilists would feel if
cows could fly.


Most of us have our doctor examine us to
see if we are in good health, see our dentist
regularly, eat spinach when it is placed be-
fore us, and then get run over uy a careless
inotorist.


Isn't it silly when a dictator declares war
and sobs "they shall 'not die in vain," while
he himself is nowhere near the smell of
powder ?-Florida 'Times-Union.


"'We notice a number of men around Port
St. Joe who dress as well as their wives. And
we know they don't make that much money.

A cynic is a person who knows the price
of everything and the value of nothing.-
Columbia State.

-. Husbands .differ. Getting them in hot wa-
ter makes some of 'em tender; others hard-
boiled.-St. Louis Star-Times.


Friday, December 3, 1937
7,


Stardust and

Moonsh6ine

By The Other F-ellow


Well, I'3i -,1 i alive and kicking
after blowing off steam last week
about the female of the species be-
ing more deadly than the male.
Strange' as it may seem, I have'
lrhard- .more comment from the
male readers than from the.female
contingent and.from what
I manage to gather, they want to
bear more along the same line-
and most of 'em were benedicts,
too.
I could go on and on and on,
giving examples of this prac-
tically inexhaustible subject .
But I'll take up but one or two at
this time.
To continue with our story: It
wasn't long after Eve inveigled
Adam to eat the apple core until
Job ran into a flock of boils and
was in terrible shape. He was a
godly man and held on to his re-
ligion like a sick kitten to a hot
brick. .Old Man Devil came
soft-soaping around, if I remember
my Gospge corr.-ctly, and set in to
bunk Job to fall from grace .
but Job smelled mcdes and didn't
fall for the boloney.
Mrs. Job, who evidently got
tired of tending her husband's
eruptions, threw up her hands in
disgust and sputtered to Job:
"You're a blamed old fool for try-
ing to keep a stiff upper lip, so
why don't you curse God and die?"
There you are! .'.. An-
other wife trying to shove her hus-
band into hades and collect his
insurance.
The same tendency even crops
out among the birds, beasts and
insects. Take the lady mos-
quito, for instance. She squirts
malaria .and yellow fever into her
victims, while the male is forced.
to content himself with singing
and sucking a -little .blood, al-
though, if scientists are correct,
most male mosquitoes live on the
juice of plants. As you
know (or don't you), the female
mosquito can't sing, and she
sneaks up -silently on her unsus-
pecting victims, stabbing them in
the dark, as it were. .. And
scientists .further inform' us that
feminine flies stick tighter, bite
harder and speck more than their
masculine side-kickis.
You've seen the cold, mangled,
lifeless forms of male bees lying
about the hive doorstep?
This is the dirty work of thie fe-
male. Whenever the he bee fails
to produce and tote. groceries into
the home, tire she bee up and
bumps him off and begins chasing
another he bee with a bank roll.
Then there's the female tropical
spider that's al! honey and mo-
'asse's ... a perfect angel of
a wife until she.is about
to become a mother-and just be-
fore she gives birth to her bounc-
ing baby spiders, she knocks her
lord and master over thie head and
then, while he is ,Uifil unconscious,
she calmly and deighi,'ully sits
dCown and eats him for dinner--
probably :having tea on the side.
There you are, men the
females are getting so hard-boiled
and cannabalistic .that they're
murdering and eating their hus-
bands. There's only on'?
safe and sensible (not to mention
sane) thing for us poor men to do
when we see anything that looks
like a skirt promenading along our
path start running, yell-
ing and shooting for to
stand still is to pay and pay and
pay.

One of my neighbors has a hen
affectionately known as "Lulu."
Well, this here now Lulu
gal; had been sitting on 16 eggs
for several weeks and the other
day, much to the amazement of


Have you bought your Christmas Seals? her owners, for it is the off-season


-for .chicks, strutted off her -nest
leading seven bokincing baby bid-
dies'. .. .
I. complimented .her'.'iuon h$
handsome offspring;. ,
''Yes," she said, "they're of :the
very' best- White Rock stock-our
ancestors came o rer on the May-
flower, you know..'.
"Indeed!" I exclaimed. "Well,
you have a neighbor who makes
the same statemnent-that Black
Minorca over there."
"Hmph," sniffed' Lulu, "she has
.no family tree. Wny, do you know,
my dear sir. -. .of course,
this is absolutely confidential ..
but I understand her mother was
-never married."
"You don't say!"
"Indeed I do. Ani just-look at
at that Mabel Minorca-the hussy!
Her comb a1.l painted up and a
permanent wave iii ner tail feath-
ers. Why,'she even tried to vamp
our husband, Henry. But we wives
put a stop. to that, you bet.
Why,. there's Hein--y now, coming
out from behind the garage! And
that awful woman is with him.
Oh, dear, I feel I'm going to faint
-catch me quick!"
But I had important business
elsewhere, not wanting to become
embroiled in. a family fight .
so I did not wait to see if Lulu
fainted or not.

SHere's another contribution to
the column from our Apalachicola
booster:
THIS DAY IS YOURS
My Lord this lovely day is Yours,
But You lent it to me;
To live and love my fellow men,
And do kind deeds for Thee.
Please let me use each golden
hour,
As You would have me do;
And always let-me bear in min
Each day belongs to You.
--Mary Donate.

We would like to see contribu-
tion. 'from other readers. -'What
have you to offers?

Here's-'a pood one on th'e ad-
ministration's alph.~ib.-1 combina-
tions. It was' written by F. F.
Fuller of the Rhame (N. D.) Re-
view:
THE TALE'OF A SHIRT
A .young CCC lost his BVD,
So the P.TA sent an SOS
To the CWA who was CTQ,
SAs tire FRA had put the CAN
To the PWA with a near (KO
And the NRA was all FOB,
So the AAA sent -it COD. .
But the USA wired PD'Q .
To the RFC for its IOU,,
Now its all -OK at the MTC,
For the CCC got his BVD.


The Sign
By Abbie L. Ronne "'

When Mother brings the -orn.a-
ments
We've used year after year.
Down from tire attic, then we
know
The Day at last is here!
The tinseled angels seem to sing
As on that Eve afar,
And on the tiptop twig, we hang
Again the shining star.
The tiny lights of red and gold,
Of yellow, pink and green,
Replace the candles. And a chime
Is tinkling quite unseen.

'he gifts grow more elaborate
With every passing year.
But still the same old-fashioned
mirth,
The same distinctive cheer.
Oh, Christmas is the heart's own
time,
The day that wears the crown.
I know it's he: -.-v hIen Mother
brings
The star and angels down.

Veteran seamen often are
'chronic sufferers from sea sick-
ness.








- -7-----l4E STAR- -TKE STAR


Forestry Wil Sustain. :


Wood Using Iidustry

By A. E. WACKERMAN
Industrial Forester, Seaboard Air Line Railway


Early forest industries in the
southeast undertook only to cut
and process the available timber
'already standing, and when it was
used up to seek more elsewhere.
At that time there was but little
thought that southern forests had
anything more to offer than the
then existing timber. Wood-using
industries, therefore, were in most
..instances .hut .temporary, ..and ..as
they migrated in search of more
old-growth timber, only cut-over
lands were left behind.
The cut-over lands, however, far
f r o m remaining unproductive,
promptly re-seeded to timber, and
thus. new forests became estab-
lished that have now developed to
the point where they are of the
utmost economic importance, net
only to the southeastern states
themselves but to the entire coun-
try in that they supply raw ma-
terial to industries manufacturing
large quantities of lumber, paper,
poles, ties, naval stores and other
forest products needed by all sec-
tions of the United States. Second-
growth forests are the foundation
of most of the region's wood-using
industries, many of which former-
ly were expected to be temporary
but have now found that the rapid
growth of young timber makes
,permanence readily attainable.
Until recently our timber wealth
has been the gift of a benevolent
nature, first as virgin forests that
came with the country, and next
as volunteer second-grotlth that
grew up uncared for and in spite


wood utilization ef all kinds.
What has been accomplished to
date in forest conservation is im-
portant but, considering the tre-
mendous forest areas, is only a
small beginning. It does, how-
ever, indicate what can and un-
doubtedly will be done on an in-
creasingly larger scale each year
until the great majority of the for-
est land in this prime timber
growing section is being managed
intensively for the annual-yield of
large crops of wood of all kinds
and sizes, from pulpwood to saw-
logs.
The manufacture of trees and
the products of trees'into useful
and necessary articles of com-
merce is of utmost importance to
this entire region in that such en-
terprises employ ?n healthful and
gainful occupations many thou-
sands of people. Since much of
the timber is owned in small
tracts by farmers and other indi-
viduals, the open market pur-
chases of timber by manufacturing
plants provide a substantial cash
income each year, from the sale
of the timber itself and from em-
ployment in cutting and hauling,
to many individuals not directly
employed by the mills.
One of the most fundamental
requirements ofl timber growing,
of course, is fire protection, and
to eliminate woods fires the full
cooperation of forest owners, gov-
ernmental agencies and the public
generally is essential. Splendid
progress has been made in fire
protection, but even yet, far too


of thoughtless mistreatment and much actual and potential com-
almost' constant fires. Although mercial wood is burned each year
the combination of climate, soil in the forest. When this big leak
and rapidly growing native timber in the wood supply has been
species makes the' southeastern plugged, southeastern forests will
.states one of the'.:most favorable automatically multiply their pro-
areas for timber growing. it is not ductiveness many times over.
sufficient that we depend upon Conservative timber cutting also
volunteer growth "'to :supply ex- is of utmost importance in main-
panding forest industries with es- training continuous and large tim-
Ssential timber supplies., ber yields of commercial form
That serious attention has been and quality. The leaving of seed
and is being given to the' matter trees, thinning out of dense young
.f providing adequate amounts of stands and selective cutting, all
:timber continuously is evidenced will result in more prompt and
by thele numerous forest properties nore rapid regeneration and
o.vned by individuals and operat- ,rowth of commercial timber prod-
log companies that have been or- ucts.
-z d for timber growing. Such With many millions of acres of
ties are pi-otected against productive forest land in the
-dlense young stands thinned, southeast, the opportunity to cre-
t'A Limber i- cut selectively, and ate forest wealth is limited only
.other fores-try.measures are prac- by the degree to which land own-
ticed, oial:ing timber no longer a ers can and will' -cultivate and
re-our,:e but. a crop with cutting grow timber crops. As has been
.limited to'the amount of growth pointed out, present industrial
attained. thus' assuring permanent developments are based on volun-
:.and conitihuous yields of merchant- teer second-growth timber. Utiliza-
able wood., tion can be expanded and multi-
Forestry, or timber farming, is plied as rapidly as timber growing
possible. only because the forest is expanded and intensified, and
industries have created markets there are many opportunities for
for trees, even of. small sizes;. much more timber culture on the
Without such markets, forests' millions of acres of available tim-
would have no intrinsic value and ber land.
owners could not afford to bear To guarantee that present for-
-the expense of raising non-salable est industries will have permanent
Iree crops. Excellent transporta- wood supplies ane to provide ad-
tion facilities that permit the ditional permanent supplies for
movement of wood from distant still more wood-using mills; all
points to manufacturing plants suitable forest land should be in-
make practically all forest areas tensively managed for diversified
in the southeast accessible to mar- tree crops and made safe from
kets, and thereby give an incen- fire through the co-operation of
tive- for. timber -growing even in everyone. The coming of the pa-
the areas more remote from utili- per and pulp mills has done much
Nation centers, to stimulate forestry, and there is
As long as extensive timber sup- every reason to expect the rapid
plies were available but little or expansion of fire protection and
no timber culture was necessary practical forest management now
or possible but, because of the that markets are available to use
growing demand ror wood of all the wood grown. Sustained wood-
kinds, forest industries, timber- using industries are an actuality.
-land o'wfersTfarmers and the gen- not a visionary dream. and with
eral public (all bf whom are vi- present accomplishments in tim-
tally concerned) m co-operate her growing, and the co-t'nued
in the protection'. nd deboe tive progress that can be depended
use of..timber, not sirqply to main- 'upon, there is room for m:re utilil
t-in existing fore'st-industries, h4 zaiion with assurances of sus-
to justify' fu.therC' cxpai-ion-" o' tainted' timber supplies.


Tg Sales FoirNov.

Show Big Increase

First 16 Daya, Brinl !n ..21,457.87
To State Treasury From
3,455 Tags

TALLAHASSEE, Dec. 2 (FNS)
-One would naturally think that
November would be a slack time
in the motor vehicle department.
New licenses did not go on sale
until December 1, all the old cars
should have licenses, and that is
the time of year when Pop is still
wondering whether he had better
trade in the old tus for a shiny
new one with all the latest gad-
gets as Mom and the kids want
him to do.
But figures released by D. W.
Finley, motor vehicle commission-
er, show that even November is a
revenue producer in this depart-
ment. For the first 15 days of
November of this year, 3,445 tags
were sOld, bringing the sum of
$21,457.37 into the state treasury;
an increase of 1,216 in tag sales
and an increase of $6,286.73 in
revenue over the corresponding 15
days of last year.
Title registrations for the first
15 days of November also showed
an increase over the same period
of 1936, with 4,865 title registra-
tions for the first half of Novem-
ber this year compared with 3,845
in the same period of last year.
Commissioner Finley says that
there are several reasons for tag
sales this late in the year and
just before the new tags went on
sale. Some of them represent new
cars purchased, some are bought


PAGETHRl


JR -


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ST. JOE ICE

1i'T COMPANY
Manufacturers of

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MAX KILBOURN, Prop.

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We Haul Anything- -
We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Dendy

PHONE 10 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


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THIS BOOK

7.answ,


V Aj2 cIquest


SQU E STION "Who cha
THA ARE ASKED business?
ABOUT BANKING uine
SrS"What ha
S- AN SW RS when I
11 4. MPLE when 1
UNDERS1ANDABLE q \i B k?"
Is ~~ANGUAGe Ban?"
Sw",.-, "Why sh
'. ,, money in.


Lt


ers


1011


~-:*P4-4t444A ~


.ET


these


.rters a Bank to do


ppens to my money
deposit it in a


wouldd I keep my
n a Checking Ac-


I get aloan at the



lany others


n, this booklet answers
is about banking that
available to you with-


out cost or obligation. Simply write or call for your copy.


Please send me a copy of your booklet, "Questions that are asked about Banking, with
Answers in simple, understandable language."
Name

Address




W/EWAHITCHKA STATE BANK
"A County Landmark"

X WEWAHITCHKA -:- FLOH IDA

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION


m.m --- 4-.m1f-- 3-v


,Fr~d a9, Doemb~r E, 1S57':


O.U
uLAY

LAY-A.


by people coming Into the state
and getting jobs, a; few represent
the purchase 'of" ol cars which
had no licenses, and -some are the
result of officers'ch.ecking 'up on
.the use for hire of cars having li-
censes for private use and forcing
the owners to buy.proper tags..

SILLY
Anne: What fools some women
are!"
Nannie: '"Why?"
Anne: "Well, if you give your
husband too much rope, can you
blame him if he skips?"

Subscribe to The Star-S2 year.


Select Yeur

Xmas Gifts Now!

LILIUS

JEWELRY, CO.


count?"

"How can
Bank?"

-and Im


In concise forr
forty question
customers. It is


are frequently asked by our friends and


I
I
__





--d


PW-








*AGEFOUR- hE' T~IR- FI4~Dnbe -a, 1W?_
U U -


LANETA DAVIS, Editor

'


.WOMAN'S CLUB HAS
CITIZENSHIP PROGRAM
The regular meeting of the
Woman's Club was held Wednes-
day afternoon at the club house,
with Mrs. G. A. Patton, president,
presiding. During the regular bust
ness session, which was held pre-
ceding the program, the new year
books were distributed; of which
the members are very proud.
The program, "American Citizen-
ship," was directed by the chair
man, Mrs. Robert Bellows. The
program was as follows: "In God
We Trust," music; violin solo by
Mrs. Ed Ramsey, accompanied by
Mrs. Joe Hiles; address, "Ameri
can Citizenship," Attorney MP P
Spear; music, "America the Beau-
tiful," by the club; Current Events
by Mrs. Fred Curtis.
Plans were made for -delegates
to attend the sleotional meeting
which will be held in Chattahbo-
chee December 4. Mrs. I. H. Best
was voted a member of the club.
The next meeting will be held
the third Wednesday in Decem-
ber with Mrs. A. D. Lawson, Mrs.
B. A. Pridgeon and Mrs. C. E.
Boycr as. hostesses.

MRS. GLOEKLER ENTERTAINS
MONDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Joe Gloekler was hostess
this week to the Monday Bridge
Club at her home on Seventh
:.;treet. The members enjoyed sev-
eral progressions of bridge, after
which prizes were awarded. First
prize was $1, second prize 50 .ents
and 50 cents went to the treasury.
SThe following members. we're
present: Mesdames Curtis, Lilius,
T. Owens, B. Owens, Huffman,
Miller, Mira and Hiles.
Refreshments of coca-cola and
candy were served.

Mrs. Ola Bennett of Apalachi-
cola and Gene Stewart of Panama
City were visitors Sunday at the
home of Sr. and Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett.

Mr. Shirk of Alabama has ar-
rived in the city to make his home.
He is connected with the electri-
cal department of the St Joe Pa-
per Company.


At the Churches

METHODIST
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m., first and third Sundays.
Sunday school 10 a. m., every
Sunday.


W. M. S. meets Mondays,
m.


3 p.


-
BAPTIST
Rev. Sizemore, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:45 p. m., every Sunday.
SSunday school 10 a. m.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
S Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesdays.
3 G. A., 4 p. m. Friday.

PRESBYTERIAN
S Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Church services 11 a. r.., fourth
Sunday.
Sunday school 10 a. m. (at the
club house).
Ladies' Aid Soc:ety, 3:30 p. m.
very third Thursday.

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.
-f'r-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
10 a. m,-Sunday school.
11 a. in.-Devotional.
7:30 p. mi.-Evangelistic serv-
ices.
SLadies?', council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning.

BAPTIST WOMEN OBSERVE
WEEK OF PRAYER
The Baptist W. M. U. is observ-
ing the Lottie Moon week of
prayer for foreign missions at the
church every afternoon this week,
Monday through Friday, with the
girls' auxiliary presenting the pro-
gram at 4 o'clock this afternoon.


M. J.
Ga., was
nesday.


McWhor.ter of Atlanta,
visiting in the city Wed-


FI,.


OFFICE


SUPPLIES

We have a complete stock of
supplies for the modern of-
fice.. Check your needs onw.

GET YOUR SUPPLIES
HERE AND SAVE!


Ink
Glue


INGd!


MRS. SMART IS HOSTESS
TO MISSIONARY SOCIETY
Mrs. J. L. Sharit was hostess to
the Woman's Missionary Society
of the Methodist church Monday
afternoon at her home on Sixth
street. The hour was spent in
old-fashioned games and contests,
such as "Going to the Zoo," "Ice
Contest," "Cities," and ended with
an old-time spelling bee, after
which the hostess served delicious
sandwiches, cookies and. coffee.
During the serving of refresh-
ments the members discussed a
"pounding" for the new minister.
Those present were,.. Mesdames
Lupton; Lovett, R. Gibson, A. M.
Jones, P. Howell, R. R. Hedges,
Deglar, E. Ramsey, Boyer and P.
VanHorn.
Guests of "The Oaks" circle
were Mesdames G. Patton, Overby,
Humphrey, Boyd, Neidig and
Barner.
The next meeting will be a
business session to be held at the
church.....

WEDNESDAY NIGHT BRIDGE
CLUB IN MEETING
The Wednesday Night Bridge
Club met this week with Mrs. Ber-
nard Pridgein as hostess, at her
home on Sixth "street. Vari-col-
ored chrysanthemums decorated
the room where three tables were
arranged for bridge. Following a
number of progressions, high prize
was presented to Mrs. Joe Gloek-
ter and second prize to Mrs. T.
Gibson, Jr. Refreshments of am-
brosia and cake were served.
Present with the hostess were
Mesdames B. Owens. T. Owens. H.
Soule, E. Ramsey, T. Gibson, Jr.,
R. Coburn, C. Lewis, J. Smith. C.
Edwards, J. Gloekler, M. Tomlin-
son and one guest, Mrs. G. Gore.
1-;1 A


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS MEET
WITH GWENDOLYN HOWELL
The Lottie Moon Girls' Auxiliary
of the Baptist church met Wed-
nesday afternoon, with Gwendolyn
I-owell. The topic studied for the
afternoon was "The Channel of
Baptist Work In Florida." Inter-
esting facts were learned about
the churches, schools, orphanage,
evangelists, etc.
During th'e social period hot
":3co'ate with tasty wafers was
served to the following members:
SMarjoric Costin, Dorothy Costin,
Bcrnicc Schneider, Janell Prid-
,co. 7.Tillie Ola Martin, Elizabeth
naggett, Flora Mae 'Cason, Hazel
Casti, Ann Treadwell, Carolyn
Basgett, Mrs. E. C. Cason and
Mr:. J. o. taggett.

ENJOY BRIDGE LUNCHEON
AT BEACON HILL
M'irs. Mercer Treadwell enter-
:alned her club with a bridge lun-
hceon at h-er home in Beacon Hill
Monday. After several progres-
:-js of bridge, prizes were
warded to Mrs. Khrone, first;
Drs. B. Ow-'ns, second, and low
'o Mrs. Allen, aftei: which the
r:::ar:Iing Ihstess served a de-
"''ous salad course, cake and
whipped cream.
Enjoying this occasion were
Miesdames Allen, Binson, Elderkin.
Xhrone, Huffman, VanHorn. Ivey
and B. Owens.

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Marley and
littlee daughter, Patricia, of Ozark,
Ala., arrived in the city Friday
and will make their home here for
some time. Mr. Marley is con-
nected with the St. Joe Paper
Company.
b T


Mrs. Buck Norton and Miss IDor-
othy Williams of Wewahitchka
were visitors in town Monday.

L. V. Merritt of Panama City
was a business visitor in the city
Tuesday.


Rooms ,79,, Costin -BuIlding


Port St. JJoe,


S- ,- --- - ----- -- --- --- -- - -- --


LADIES ARE GUESTSAT
LIONS CLUB MZt-TING
Tuesday night was ladies' night
at the regular meeting .of the
Lions club at the Black Cat Cafe,
and 15 members and 10 Lionesses
gathered 'round the festive board
for an enjoyable hour.
As a remembrance of this, the
first ladies' night of the local or-
ganization, the ladies were pre-
sented with small gifts as souve-
nirs of the occasion.

Mrs. Thomas R. L. Carter and
Miss Brownie Carter visited Miss
Lilla Carter Sunday in a Thomas-
ville, Ga., hospital, where she is a
patient. The many friends of Miss
Carter wish her a speedy recovery.

Mrs. Thomas McPhaul returned
-Sunday from Jacksonville, where
she spent the week-end with rela-
tives.

Mr. and Mrs. "Doc" Hoy of
Minneapolis, Minn., arrived in the
city last Friday and are the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Lovett.

Miss Pauline Stansberry of Apa-
lachicola was visiting in the city
Monday.
*
Mrs. J. B. Dunevant of Apalachi-
cola was a visitor here Monday.




GULF

DRY CLEANERS
(Formerly Swatts)

ALL WORK
GUARANTEED,

We Call for ind d
Deliver

PHONE 63


A Martin-Davis Theatre


J. A. M. CLU., MEET-
WITH. MRS. PRIDGEON
The J.. A. M. Club met Monday
night at the home of Mrs. Bernard
Pridgeon. Upon arrival the guests
entered into games which were
enjoyed by all-. Following the
games the membersL discussed
their plans for the Chrlatmas tree
and Christmas work of the club.
The hostess then served refresh-
ments of chili, saltines and coffee.
Members present. were Mcs.
dames J. Smith, H. Drake, J. Con-
nell, C. Pridgeon, L. Perritt and
Miss Myrtice Coody. A guest of
the club was Miss Edna Davis.

Subscribe to The Star--$2'year,


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and give you the energy
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Bill Turner, Mgr.


-- FRIDAY-DECEMBER 3

PAT O'BRIEN
in



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-- SUNDAY-MONDAY-DECEMBER 5 AND 6



Captains Ourageous'

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TUESDAY-DEC. 7


WED.-THURS.-Dec. 8-9

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Coming Events


American Legion Meets firs
Monday in month at. club house.
Legion 'Auxiliary Meets firs
Monday in month at. club house
Womian'a Club meeting Firs
and third Wednesdays, 4 p. m.
Port Inn parlor.
Eastern Star meetings--Second
and fourth Tuesday nights; Ma
sonic hall.

Mrs. W. S. Smith and Mrs. B
H. Graves spent yesterday ii
Blountstown, where they visited
with Mrs. Smith's brother-in-law
and sister, Mr. and Mrs. G. M
Sheppard.,

R. H. Deaderick and Mr. and
Mrs. G. A, Berting of Gallon, Ohio
were visitors ,in Port St. Joe this
week.

Mr. and Mrs. J.. P. Henderson ol
New Orleans, La., were week-end
visitors in the city.

Mayor J. P. Coombs of Apalachi-
cola was a business visitor in the
city Friday and Saturday.

J. G. Lathem and R. L. Bollard
of Atlanta, Ga., were business
visitors in the city this week.
Mrs. Ben H. Graves returned
Sunday after spending the Thanks-
giving holidays with her mother
and brother in Tampa.
D. J. Rae and G. Simpson. of
Tarpon Springs were visitors in
town Tuesday.
SW. H. Ho6vell 'was a Chattahoo-
chee visitor .Sunday. '


CITY PRESSiNG

CLUB
THE OLDEST PRESSING
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Port St. Joe, Fla.


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[


PERSON A LS


George Sims of Miami, student
at the University of Florida, was
:the guest of Willis Rowan during
the Thanksgiving holidays.
tfr **
Roselle "Mickey" Stone, student
at the University of Florida, was
the week-end guest of his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Stone.
d -t


Leonard Bclin, student at Au-
burn College, Auburn, Ala., was
the week-end guest of his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Belin.

Misses Loretta Long and Idell
Murphy of Apalachicola were the
guests Thursday of Mr. and Mrs.
Nick Comforter.

Miss Iva Mae Nedley was a visi-
tor Saturday in Dothan, Ala.
O. M. Morton of Carrabelle was
the guest Sunday of his mother,
Mrs. P. J. Lovett.

Earl Rollins and Miss Helen Al-
len of Gordon, Ala., were visiting
friends in the city Monday. Miss
Allen has accepted a position as
teacher in the city school.
*ft f **
Mr and Mrs. Forrest Jackson
and Lloyd Jackson of Headland,
Ala., were visiting friends in the
city Monday.


Royce Armstrong of Headland,
Ala., arrived Monday and is the
guest of his uncle and aunt, Mr.
and Mrs. Sammie Davis.
*Q *
Misses Avaryee Collier and Lou-
ise So'oman.returned Sunday from
Perry, where they spent the holi-
days .wSth..-Miss Soloman's par-
ents.

Mrs. Veto Sangaree and Miss
Josie Marr of Apalachicola were
in the city Tuesday on business.
Mrs. R. H. Miller of Jacksonville
was a visitor in the city Tuesday.
Mrs. Boncile Norris of Panama
City was the week-end guest of
her father. G. C. Currington.
Miss Lanell Roberts of Atmore,
Ala., was the guest over the week-
end of her brother and sister-in-
law, Mr. and Mrs. Pete Roberts.

Billie Bryan of Elba, Ala., is the
guest of his brother-in-law and
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Farmer.
*r -;? *
A. M. Jones of Columbus. Ohio,
arrived yesterday and is the guest
of his daughter. Mrs. J. O. Baggett.
Willard lMyers of Panama C:ty
was visiting friends in the city
yesterday.

Mrs. Jack Little of Apalachicola
was the guest yesterday of her
mother, Mrs. Anna Balkcom.

Mrs. W. J. Norrid, Mrs. Donald
Totman and Mrs. Charles Ponder
of Apalachicola were visitors Wed-
niesday in Port St. Joe.
? *<
L. E. Fitzgerald of Kalamazoo,
Mich.. was a visitor in the city
Tuesday.
A. T. Brunell of Holyoke, Mass.,

was a business visitor Tuesday in
the city.

Miss Margaret LeHardy has re-
turned home after a visit of sev-
eral months with her sister, Miss
Blanche LeHardy of Albany, Ga.

Mrs. Charles Doyle of Apalachi-
cola was the guest Wednesday of
her daughter, Mrs. Chester Ed-
wards.

Mrs. Mamie Brash and Mrs. Fay
Sherrill of Apalaihicola' wcre vis-
iting.-friends in the city Wednes-
day.


CREDIT

PATRONIZE A
HOME-OWNED
STORE
Our Prices Are
LOWER!
Our Terms
E A SI E R !


Oldest


Furniture Store) in
Gulf County


BARGAIN
FURNITURE STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


---


.


Johns-Manville Roofing


SEASONED LUMBER


PHONE 69


Lucas Paints


PORT ST. JOE, FM.


evidence


I PORT ST. JOE -


Priced fro m$200 to s$500 S To


These Lots Are Selling Fast---

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY I

Po St. Joe Is growing Values Are Increasing



The Company
is offering a re-
VE Lfund of 25 per

cent if purchaser begins erection of a
dwelling within 30 days after purchase


Call on us, write or phone for appointment


SAINT JOSEPH LAND AND


DEVELOPMENT CO.


PHONE 25


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


CHRISTMAS AND THE BtIRDI
It is said that no peasant in
Sweden will sit down with his
children to Christmas dinner un-
til he has provided food for the
birds. The farmers erect poles in
their dooryards to which sheafs
of grain are boulid, to provide for
birds through the season when
vegetation is covered with snow
and ice.

FLATS AND FLASKS
Smaltz: "The other day I mo-
tored clear across a prohibition
state."
Schultz: "Did you have a pleas-
ant trip?"
Smaltz: "Hang, no. I had nine
blowouts from running over empty
whiskey bottles."-Exchange.




ONLY
22
DAYS TO
XMAS


A 8EAIONARLE REMINDER

One-half of the work done in the
world is done in the United
States, according to a college pro-
fessor. The seasonal reminder ex-
pectant youngsters hand to Santa
Claus! .

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Hodges
and :it.tle son, Hubert, Jr.; of
Marianna, were the guests Sunday
ef Mr. and Mrs. IH R. Hodges.


EASY!




St. Joe,




Lumber




Company



We can arrange to fi-
nance lumber and build-

ing materials from
the foundation to
lock and key,


ONE AT A TIME
A red-headed girl, fishing on a
red dock, caught a redfish. The
lady is wintering in Port. St. Joe
from Grater, N. Y. "No New
Yorker can ever catch more than
one sucker at oie time,' says Dell
Mahon.

Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Sizemore
were the Sunday dinner guests of
Mr. and Mrs. J. 0. Baggbtt.


~ *"


v is aA


7-1,


'~'PAC FPN(E


orhtar ~rtcrmL 8, *9~37.


ana








,-THE$..sTA


Art Project Plans

Xmas Exhibition

Object Is to Create Market In
Northwest Florida For the
Work of Local Artists

The Pensacola Federal Gallery,
district headquarters for the state
Federal Art Project, WPA, is
planning to sponsor a Christmas
exhibition, the object being to cre-
ate in Northwest Florida a market
for the work of local artists, and
to stimulate the sale of paintings
for the Christmas trade. All resi-
dent artists are invited to partici-
pate in this show, which is
planned for December 13 to 24 in
the salon of the Pensacola Gal-
lery. It is anticipated that Port
St. Joe will be represented in this
showing.
Artists may submit three sub-
jects in any medium. Oils must
be suitably framed; watercolors,
prints, and black and white ren-
derings may be matted without
frames. All expenses connected
with delivering the pictures to the
gallery and their return must be
carried by the artist. Arrangement
and hanging of the exhibition will
be directly under the supervision
of Robert W. Burke, gallery direc-
tor, and subjects must be in gal-
lory not later than December 6.
Complete entrance forms may be
obtained by communicating with
the director of the gallery- per-
sonally or by letter.
The Pensacola Federal Gallery
project is designed to serve the en-
tire northwest section of the
state and it has been the thought
of this Christmas exhibition to
contact all artists of the section,
and through this means increase
interest in local talent and create
a market for the work locally pro-
duced.

Shorthand systems were used
almost as soon as systems of
writing appeared.


Tags Indicate

Freshnes (Of

Hens and Turks

Labelr. Must Deargnate Whether
Fowl is Fresh Drssed Or
Cold Storage

Florida housewives are finding
that the poultry they now secure
from the market Is tagged to show
whether it is fresh from the yard
or fresh from cold storage.
It is considered cold storage
meat it it has been subjected to
temperatures of 32 degrees or
lower.
Poultry dealers have received
notice from the department of ag-
riculture that labeling require-
ments must be observed. There
are three types of fowl:
1. Fresh dressed, meaning fowl
slaughtered within the state and
not subjected to 32 degrees temp-
erature or lower.
2. Shipped dressed, meaning
fowl slaughtered outside Florida
and not subjected to 32 degrees
temperature or lower. This type
also must be labeled to show the
state of origin.
3. Cold storage, meaning all
fowl regardless ot where slaugh-
tered which has been refrigerated
to a temperature of 32 degrees or
lower.
The department of agriculture
said millions of pounds of poultry
slaughtered last year at a time of
overproduction were carried over
in cold storage for this year's
markets. Currently there is a
shortage of fresh fowl.
If separate containers are used
in markets, a label may be placed
on each container showing the
type of fowl. If one container is
used for a mixture of shipped,
fresh dressed anG cold storage
fowl, each bird must bear a label.
Violation of the poultry law is
punishable by fine of $50 to $200
or imprisonment up to 90 days. In


4,#

J.'L. KERR

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

* ---- 0o----- ,

--WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


-JEWELRY
--DIAMONDS


Given Away Weekly!!


ASK US FOR
This Offer Applies Only on


DETAILS
CASH PURCHASES


addition, te vdeoler's business li-
cense may bpa revoked.
PhiU s. Taylor,, 4pervising in-
.spector of the. department of ag-
riculture, said, the labeling re-
quirements were intended to pro-
tect the public in rts purchase of
meat and also to encourage pur-
chases of atate-produeed turkey
and chicken.


Says Gov. Hurley

To Gov. Fred Cone

"You Have Chain. Gangs In Your
State, and Anyway I Want
The Negro Vote"

TALLAHASSEE, Dec. 2 (FNS)
-For more than three months
Governor Charles E. Hurley of
Massachusetts has refused to con-
sent to the extradition of Forrest
Hills, an escaped negro convict
sentenced to a 10-year term for
armed robbery and assault and
battery in Duval county, who es-
caped from the road camp at
Starke and was picked up in
Massachusetts. Governor Hurley's
refusal to grant extradition is said
to be based- on claims made that
Florida's penal system 'is unduly
severe.
Last week Governor Hurley
held a hearing at which Irwin T.
Dorch, negro attorney who achiev-
ed notoriety in the Scottsboro
case, charged that chain gangs
were a part of the Florida prison
system and condemned penal con-
ditions here.
State officials deny that Florida
has chain gangs and point out that
if Governor Hurley really wants
to know the truth regarding Flor-
ida penal conditions he has a wit-
ness available who can give him
first-hand information. That 'wit-
ness is Al Ford, alias Albert For-
tin, who was ordered on Novem-
ber 19 by Governor Cone, to be
returned to Massachusetts to face
a forgery charge. Ford should be
a competent witness as he has
served time both, in Massachu-
setts and Florida.
When Governor Hurley asked
Governor Cone tor Ford's extra-
dition, Ford refuse to waive ex-
tradition because, he said, of fear
of the hard treatment of prisoners
in Massachusetts. He stated that
he would rather do three years in
the Florida prison than six months
there; in fact that he would
rather die than go to prison there.
However, it has not been Gover-
nor Cone's policy to assume the
right to pass judgment on prison
conditions in other states, and
Governor Hurley's request was
granted.
The nntorifyg given to Florida's
attempt to hae "Hills returned to
Florida to serve his sentence and
the long delay by Governor Hur-
ley. in making his decision (the
firstt hearing was neld August 3),
is considered by Florida officials
as merely another case of seeking
the political support of negro
voters in northern states by am-
)tious politicians, and the desire
for free advertising by a negro
attorney.

CONE URGES SUPPORT
FOR SAFETY COUNCIL

Governor Fred Cone this week
urged public support for the Flor-
ida Safety Council in its campaign
to reduce traffic accidents. He
described the program as a
"worthy undertaking."
The safety council has started
a state-wide tour with an automo-
bile trailer to exhibit safety mov-
ing pictures and spread informa-
tion about careful driving.

The female phalarope attained
equal rights ages ago. Its plum-
age, contrary to general rule, Is
brighter than the male's and it
runs at large while the male
tends the eggs.


JUDGE THOMAS ANPO SINCE'S
SFOR SUPREME COURT SEAT

Jii'dge Elwyn Thomas of Fort
Pieite, 'ienibr fudge if the ninth
judicial district, has announced as
a candidate for justice of the su-
preme court in eroun 2. where he


Bob Haley
Or Phone 12


HE, NFEPNrNT WORRY, '

The conceited young max had.
been in the. hospital- for some timid
and .ad : been extremely well
looked'after by a pretty nursee
"Nurse," said he one morning,
"I'm in love with you. I have no


will oppose Chief Justice Ellis and desire to get well."
former State Senator Futch. He "Don't worry," replied the nurse
has served continuously on the cheerfully, "you won't. The doc-
bench for 12 years and has mat tor's in love with me, too, and he
with the supreme court on several saw you kissing me this morn-
occasions. ing!"


THOMPSON'S BAKERIES
Port St. Joe Apalachicola

CHRISTMAS P
.Per
Fruit Cake Pound 16
S Both Light and Dark 0
Our Fruit Cakes are of the highest quality, made from
the finest fruits, nuts, eggs, etc. It will com-
pare with any higher-priced cake on the market.
You can purchase one of our Fruit Cakes at your
favorite grocer's or at the bakery



It's Time To Check Your Car
-- WE SPECIALIZE IN

WASHING

POLISHING


We Sell the Gas '
More Miles and Less Ca


GREASING

r.on Woco-Pep


or Art Reinertson
Port St. Joe, Fla.


DON'T SHIVER


higher price.
one away for


ON THESE LONG
COLD NIGHTS!


WOOL

BLANKETS

0. 72 by 84,in. $1.50
Reversible.' to
a Two-toned. $3.15

j If we had not purchased
These blankets months ago
they would be at a much
. Buy now for your own use or put
Christmas.


FINE QUALITY e New Suedes
SCombinations
SHOES Patent Leathers
High-Tongue, Strap, Criss-Cross styles, Suede and
Satin. We have just the style, size and price
to suit you. Come in and see our complete line.

Keep the Children WARM!
SWEATERS JACKETS All Wool Coats
FOR BOYS AND SUEDE FOR GIRLS
GIRLS Knit wrist and Lively solid colors,
Red, Blue, Gray bottom fully lined

69c up $2.69 $4.85 up



Costin's Dept. Store


PAGE SIX_.,


)11 In E IN SERVICE
DRIVE-IN STATT ION
ON HIGHWAY NO. 10 W. COLLINSWORTH, Mgr.


Sewer Connections

I We are prepared to give you an esti-
mate on the cost of making your
sewer connection to the city's new
sewer system.
SEE


Complete Line of BATTERIES and SERVICE
ATLAS TIRES AND TUBES


Prompt and Courteous Service-Expert Lubrication


MALONE'S STANDARD SERVICE
S PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
I--- ....- Inl


------ -I~---` -------~c_ 1- r--- ~__ ___


- .. ...






Friday, December 3, 1937


E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW

SC-6tin Building
Port St. Jo&, Florida




ILook Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
R I G H T

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. B. Whitaker




Moonlight

Hotel
For the convenience of
LADIES, GENTLEMEN
and CHILDREN
--Others Not Wanted-

NEW FURNISHINGS

J. W. RAKESTRAW, -Prop.
2 Miles West Port St. Joe
4 4<


You Can Always
Find Your Favorite
Brand of-

BEER


WHISKEY

SWINE

SST. JOEBAR
ST. JOE BAR


EXPERT BARBERS
Our customers say that
we have a knack of giv-
min them 'what they ask
for. That's because our
barbers are experienced,
skilled operators!
Try Us Today!


COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP i


- Checks for Old

People In State-

-To Total $350,00(

More Than 20,000 .Persons Re
ceived. Cash; Expect 24,000
On December Roll

JACKSONVILLE,. Dec. 2 (FNS)
-The .advent of the holiday sea
son adds interest to the old age
assistance payroll, one of the larg-
est to be released in the state.
The total grants for Novembel
came to approximately $300,000
and for December will be between
;$350,000 and $400,000, according tc
the statement here of Clayton C.
Codrington, state welfare commis-
sioner. More than 20,000 persons
received November checks. It is
expected that 24,000, at least, will
be on the December rolls, as all
districts are now fully staffed and
applications are being disposed of
rapidly.
"It is the desire of Governor
Cone and the state welfare board
that December old age assistance
checks reach their destinations,"
Codrington: said, "and. with this
end in view the payrolls will be
made up here with all possible
promptness. They will be for-
warded-to the office of the state
comptroller in relays as written.
so that checks may be issued
without delay."
A new payroll is made up each
month, due to the fact that many
addresses are changed and that
names are removed from it for
various .reasons, usually because
of death..
The payroll is prepared in the
business--office of the state wel-
fare board here, the task being
one of major proportions and in-
volving nitch clerical detail. Al-
though the number of payees has
practically doubled since July,
h.) aiodn-'a- l l.-r.-:nr hleTp has
been employed, in accordance with
the economy program adopted by
the board and strongly sanctioned
by Governor. Cone.

CHRISTMAS JOYS
By William Banks
The olden days, the golden days,
They a!l come hack to me,
As happily the children crowd
Around the Christmas tree.
I see once more the comrades true
March onward by my side,
I hear the echo of their songs
To g-eet.:the Christnmastid'e.
In olden d3,.S, in golden 'days
My thought's were high and bold,
But, oh, the glory of this hour
When in my arms I hold
The gifts that lovw nas brought to
me.
They fill my heart with pride
As I join in their happy songs
To greet the Christmastide.

SWELL cGUY!
The dashing captain of the foot-
ball squad was changing his
clothes in the dressing room.
"Gosh!" he exclaimed,. 'I can't
get my shoes on."
"Feet swollen too?" th'- coach
asked quietly.

Proportions' of a young baby are
more like those of an ape than a
man.


EAT AT THE


BLACK CAT


CAFE


EXCELLENT
FOOD


PROMPT AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE


.
.
. q .


Too Late toClassify
By RUSSELI KAY

While other states may brag of
their "soap box", derbies, if the
* Florida Waterways Congress has
its way, Florida may establish a
name for herself as the home of
the ''orange box" derby.
The novel idea is designed, to
Educate boys ana girls of Florida
as to the value and use of the
- state's 'enviable waterways sys-
tem.
A few years ago someone con-
Sceived the bright idea of staging
a so-called "soap box" derby, and
prizes were offered kids who de-
signed and built the most unique
and speediest home-made coasters
constructed as miniature motor
cars.
The idea caught on, and in no
time "soap box" derbies' ~'ere be-
ing staged all over the country
and the winning kids won trips
to the National Soap Box Derby,
an event of such importance that
sports editors of great press serv-
ices assigned their best men to
cover it, newsreel companies vied
with each other for favorable
shots, and both great broadcast-
ing chains cleared all channels to
put the event on coast-to-coast
hook-ups.
Last summer in Ohio it was my
privilege to witness the event and
I was truly amazed at the interest
and enthusiasm it created, not
only among the kids but with
thousands of spectators. Rivalry
was keen, states !nd cities sent
delegations to bcvst and encour-
age their entries. Dignitaries of
national reputation greeted and
feted the winners; manufacturers
*showered them .'.-tlf prizes and
awards; newshawks and camera-
men swarmed over them in droves.
Under the plan or the water-
.ways congress, desirable prizes
will be offered boys and girls of
Florida who b .l 1 d miniature
yachts, cruisers or other water-
craft at a certain minimum cost
and enter them in competition at
regattas to be staged at various
points in the state.
Counties, communities and sec-
tions will be urged to enter con-
testants and stage local elimina-
tion contests-winners to be sent
to a state contest at a later date.
Unrivaled waterways are one of
the state's greatest assets and it
is fitting indeed that Florida, with
her glorious coastline, her count-
less beautiful lakes and many
scenic riers, should employ this
practical means or making the
youth of the state conscious of
this great natural advantage and
encourage them to take an active
interest in the further develop-
ment of this God-given resource.
The plan has limitless possibili-
ties and would serve to advertise,
as nothing else could, the advant-
ages Florida offers the yachtsman
and waterway enthusiast. The suc-
cessful staging of such a contest
would undoubtedly lead other
states to sponsor similar events,
and in time perhaps a National
Orange Box Derby would result.
Florida has long overlooked a
real opportunity ;n not pushing
harder than she has the improve-
ment and development of her wa-
terways. Yachtsmen will seek
Florida waters when we bring to
their attention the opportunities
this state affords.
The proposed "orange b o x"
derby is a step in the right direc-
tion. Every Florida community
should co-operate in the plan and
encourage the youth of their com-
munity to enter these contests.
Chambers of commerce and civic
clubs can help by informing them-
s-elves on the plan and sponsoring
local entries.
Let's unite in a statewide effort
to cash in one one o; the great-
est assets our state possesses- |
u.ar waterways.


FOR THE CHRISTMAS CARVER
Efficiency beyond compare-
The only kind that matters-
Attains perfection in the man
Who carves and never spatters..
The test-of' rare ability
And skill that's most appealing
Is this: To cut .the turkey and
Get none on walls or ceiling.

Subscribe to The Star--S year.


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


ENGLAND HALTED XMAS
For 12 years, from 1644, Christ-
mas was not kept in England.. The
Puritan?, .deeming it a pagan fes-
tival, passed an hat of ,parliament
abolishing it, and directing- that
D~iember 25'should be a day of
fasting and repentance. Charles
fl restored Christmas.

Advertising pays-try it!


St. Joe Radio Service
WE GIVE A COMPLETE CHECK-UP ON
ALL MAKES OF RADIOS

When your Radio don't make a squeak
Don't go and throw it in the creek-
BR ING IT TO US

WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ARCTUS TUBES
WORK GUARANTEED
Located in ROCHE'S COMMUNITY STORE


MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT

WILLIAMS' PLACE
-,A{ PALM POINT INN .--
FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING


REFRESHMENTS


DANCING


No Profanity Allowed


C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.


Take Advantage of the Off-Season

Savings



Let Me Figure Any Building
That You Desire


YOU CAN BE PROUD
OF A HOME
BUILT BY US


:3\" r~ ~T


Port St. Joe


No matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

S. Your business will be

appreciated.




| uif Hardware &




BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


H. H. TAYLOR


- - - - - -


- I-LI-----L-^-II~--_I


THE STAR


PAGE SEVEN







PAGE IO~4 T11 STA Prday~Deceber 7 27


MILLENNIUM IS NEAR;-
OFFICEHOLDER QUITS
TO MAKE CAMPAIGN

TALLAHASSEE, Dec. 2 (FNS)
--It may not be "something new
under the sun" but it's certainly
something unusual this latest
resignation in Tallahassee.
Bruce C. Davis, auditor in the
state comptroller's office, thinks
that good democracy requires that
a man contemplating seeking an-
other political post should not
only "run" at his own expense but
also should do his "contemplat-
ing" at his own expense. So he
asks Comptroller Lee to accept
his resignation so that he can tour
the state before deciding whether
to make the race for railroad com-
missioner or not. In tendering his
resignation he stated:
"Before making the decision, I
want to make a survey of the situ-
ation-which will require about 60
days of traveling. It is my con-
cept of good democratic govern-
ment that a man reaching this
stage of a prospective political
campaign for another post should
separate himself from the public
payroll in order that government
itself should not be forced to
carry the added burden of those
seeking to serve it."
In other words, he believes in
campaigning at his own expense
-not the state's expense.

TEACHERS' CONFERENCE
TO BE HELD IN ORLANDO

The Southeastern Conferenc of
the National Council of Teachers
of English will be held in Orlando
on December 27, 28 and 29. Speak-
ers of national reputation in the
field of English will discuss prob-
lems on the elementary, the high
school and the college levels. Au-
thor's o note will appear on the
luncheonn and dinner programs.
A large attendance of' Florida
teachers and -prinipals is desired.
Further infbrmatidn is contained
in the December issue of the Jour-
nal of the Florida Education As-
sociation.

S BUILDING PERMITS
The following building permits
have been issued this week at the
city hall by Cleik M. P. Tomlin-
son:
W. L. Durante, dwelling, $1,500.
W. O. Anderson Motor Company,
business building, $6,000.
Harlow and Miller, dweling,
$2,800; dwelling, $3,000.
Robert Johnson, remodeling of
residence, $450.
Mrs. Kate Harrell visited Satur-
day and Sunday in Bristol with
her son, Edgar Hall, and family.

We Carry a
Complete Stock of

,-GROCERIES

and MEATS
Everything In Our
Store Is
PRICED TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE


Let Us Supply Your Holi-
day Grocery Needs


GASOLINE AND
OIL
-*-:-a __. -


HI LAND VIEW

GROCERY
C. C. WILLIAMS, Prop.


'EVERY DOG HAS ITS
DAY' AT BONIFAY


BONIFAY, Dec. 3 (FNS)-There
is an old saying that "every dog
has its days"-and the citizens of
Bonifay proved its truth by stag-
Sing a special dog day. the first of
what is announced to be an an-
nual affair. And just to make it
different, they tied blue ribbons
and price tags on the dogs instead
of tin cans.
The feature of Bonifay's dog
day was a dog parade more than
a block long in which marched
dogs of every kind and descrip-
tion-long dogs, snort dogs, fat
dogs, leai\ ogs, .ugnacious bull-
dogs, friendly setters and pointers,
house dogs, pet dogs, and just
plain ogs.
Among the dogs offered for sale
were hunting dogs of fine breed-
ing and training. Prices ranged
from a small sum for yard dogs
and children's pets to top prices
for good hunters. The promoters
and the public were so enthusias-
tic over the success of the first
dog day that they have made ar-
rangements to stage another dog
show and sale day in 1938 and ex-
pect to make it an annual affair..
PLANT FOR MANUFACTURE'
OF CONCRETE PRODUCTS
IS NEARING COMPLETION
Work on the business building
of H. B. Culpepper on Fourth
street, near the St. Joe Ice Com-
pany plant, is being rushed to
completion. The building, 20 by
30 feet, with a 30 by 40 storage
shed, will be used for the manu-
facture of concrete building block'
and other concrete products.

OFFICE: SUPPLY STORE OPENS
A long-felt need in Port St. Joe
has at last been filled with the
opening by' C. A. Tovey o i an of-
flee supply-store in the .Costin
building on Second avenue. The
new establishment carries a com-
plete line of office supplies,. ii-.
cllding typewriter supplies.' See
their ad on page four.
Ancient Greeks thought ducka
hatched from barnacles.


degree an win carrlly out el
spirit of the president's message
which made an earnest appeal for
the co-operation of the nation's
business men.
The expansion of the housing
act, he stated, will encourage pri-
vate home ownership and will also
stimulate business of all kinds.
Such losses as the government
might sustain will be slight and
more than counteracted by the
benefits of revived business.

It is interesting- to note that J.
B Hodges of: Lake City; erstwhile
chairman .of the Florida Demo-
cratic..executive committee, is on
the payroll of-two power corpora-
tions. Perhaps the president's de-
termination to regulate the power
monopoly in this nation had some-
thing to do with Chairman Hodges
recent outburst against the admin-
istration.-Lake Wales News;


I SANDWICHES
BEER CANDIES
COLD DRINKS


GASOLINE and OIL ,


MA D. JONES
12 Milea South Port St. Joe
SOn Apalachicola Highway


FOR THRIFTY HOUSEWIVES OF PORT ST. JOE

Cranberry Sauce, can....10c MILK, 4 small .--..... ...-15
Grapefruit, 3 for ........... 15s MATCHES, 3 Ig. boxes lc



IPotatoes 10 Ibs 23c

LIMA BEANS, 2 lbs ....1Sc FIELD CORN, 3 cans 25c
POTTED MEAT, 6 for 25c COOKING OIL, gal ....95c

WHOLE u .a-I
SCU RE AM

Friesh PORK' HAM, lb. 23c CHUCl ROAST, per Ib 15e
STEW BEEF 2 Ib.. ....25cS Si6k6d SAUSAGE, lh...0


BAY SHORE GROCERY


Highland View


We Appreciate You Patronae
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TWO


SEN


SAT


NEW


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FORD V-8 CARS


FOR


NOW


938


ON DISPLAY


FORD


AT


PLACE


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


PEPPER ASKS SEASOARD AIRLINE WOMAN'S CLUB GETS
EXPANSION OF OFFICIALS VISIT NEW 'YEAR :BOOKS
HOUSING ACT -
-- J. R, Bradley, Jr., division pas- Members of the Port St. Joe
WASHINGTON, D. C., Dec. 3- senger .agent, of Jacksonville, and Woman's Club this week received
(FNS)-Immediate modification of A. P. Wimberly, traveling freight their copies of the club's new year
the undisbted rofit tax an agent of Tallahassee, both of the book, which contains officers of
the undistributed profits' taxand Seaboard Air Line railway, were the local organization, officers of
capital gains tax, and the expan- in Port St. Joe Wednesday on of- the state federation, chairmen of
sion of the national :housing act ficial business. Both were greatly committees, program committee,
to guarantee the entire cost of surprised at the growth of this roll of members and program for
construction and lot purchase for city in the past few months. the year.
moderate-priced homes, were ad- city in the past few ont. the year.
vocated by Senator Claude Pepper The 12-page brochure with ar-
as the special session of congress THE EARLIEST CAROL' tistic title page is a product of
got down to work. The earliest Christmas carol we The Star job department.
The modification of the tax act, know was written in the fourth
Senator Pepper said, will stimu- century by Aurelius Prudentius. It Against a rainy day, the shrike
late business activity to a marked was called "The Virgin and Child" impales its game -on thorns or
late busin ess ac y to ma and is still sung. barbed wire.
,WS fl will,* n... .v .. U an d


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