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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00159
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 12, 1937
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00159

Full Text




Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's Fast-
:est Growing Little City. In
the Heart of the Pine Belt.. T


If you have any news-no matter
U how trivial it may seem to you-
bring or send it to The Star, it will
S TR be of interest to our readers.


VOLUME I PORT ST. JOE., FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12, 1937 NUMBER 3


City
City COSSomissiners



Ban 'Pa0 8e Boa rds


GROUND BROKEN

IN CITY FOR NEW

CONSTRUCTION

FIRST UNIT OF 40 HOMES IS
_..-QEGUN; CONTRACT FOR
Wr-HEATER IS.LET /

-Building permits were issued
this week to the Harlow-Miller
Construction Company of Hosford
for construction of three resi-
dences. According to information
. received, these three houses will
constitute the: first unit of 40 such
homes, and work of clearing land
for their construction is under
way. These homes will be of the
bungalow type and have all the
latest conveniences.
Bill Turner, manager of the' St.
Joe theater, announced Wednes-
day that permit for construction
of the new Martin-Davis theater
on Third Avenue had been se-
cured and the contract let to H.
H. Taylor, local contractor, for
construction, of the .building...Mr.
Taylor .states that work. will be-
Sgin immediately.
SCost of the theater will be; ap-
proximately $15,000 and it will
have a seatifg capacity--f 1,t24l.
/Size of the building is 45 by 120l
feet and it will incorporate all the
latest conveniences, lighting ef-
fects and sound equipment to be
found in theaters in cities of much
greater size than Port St. Joe.
Construction of the Martin-Da-
vis theater and these residences
is an indication that our little
town is fast becoming the city
that it is destined to become.

.HONOR ROLL STUDENTS t
TO GET SHOW PASSES
The St. Joe theater, under the
management of Bill Turner, now
makes it possible for every .child '
in school to win free passes to i
the show. All that is required is I
for the student to get his or.1ier s


Ordinance Provides That Sach
Machi-tes Are Illegal; Eight
Tables Belonging to George
Deeb Now In Operation

BOARD TO WORK OUT
SEWER SERVICE RATE

Agree to Make Special Re-
finds to American Legion
Post and Lions Club On
Carnival Circus Licenses

Adolf LeHardy appeared before
the city commissioners at their
meeting Tuesday night to inquire
about the licensing of so-called
"marble boards," eight of which
are in operation in the city, be-
longing to George Deeb of Panama
City, and which Mr. LeHardy has
charge of.
The commissioners believed that
such boards came under the city's
anti-slot machine ordinance and
asked the opinion of City Attor-
ney Clay Lewis, who informed
them that they were right, and
proceeded to read that section of
the ordinance pertaining to the
matter in question.
Mayor Sharit informed Mr. Le-
Hardy that the : only way- the
boards. could :be allowed to opera,
ate would be-to .aiend the pres-
ent ordinance, striking out that
portion applying to the boards,
and this they refused to do.
The city's ordinance is similar
to the state law covering slot ma-
chines and gambling devices of
all kinds;
Clubs Ask for Refund
A delegation from the Lions
club appeared before the commis-
sioners seeking some means t
whereby the city could refund
them a portion of the license they s
must pay for the Barnett Bros.
circus which was to appear here t
under their auspices. Proctor f
VanHorn was present on a similar
mission for the American Legion r
)ost, which has a proposition to
sponsor a carnival here during the


name on the honor roll at school, week of November 22-28.
and for this the theater will issue Mayor Joe Sharit pointed out
a free pass good for two weeks. that if such licenses were waived
Teachers whose students' names for these two organizations the
appear on the honor roll will also word would get about and all fu-
receive passes. ture carnivals and such would
be coming into the city under the
CHARTER GRANTED auspices of various organizations
FOR ST. JOE BAR to evade the city tax, and thus do
A charter was granted this week the city out of a large amount of
at Tallahassee by the office of the potential revenue.
secretary of state for the St. Joe'! However, after lengthy discus-
Bar, Inc., Port St. Joe. The firm sion, the commissioners agreed to
is incorporated with 50 shares of deputize members of the two or-
stock with a par value oE $100 per ganizations and pay them a stipu-
share. Directors are E. George, lated amount, approximately one-
Less Gilbert and Mrs. L. M. Gil- third of the license fee, as a re-
beft. fund, the money to be paid to the
A charter .-as ai o granted Less members acting as special police-
Gilberts, Inc., of Panama City, men and then turned back to the
beverages; 50 shares with a par treasuries of the civic organiza-
value of $100. Directors are Less tions. This method was used to
'Gilbert, Mrs. L. M. Gilbert and J. get around certain sections of the
A. Gilbert. city charter.
This was agreeable to both dele-
:DETAILS OF TRAP SHOOT gations. However, the Lions club
IN NEXT ISSUE OF STAR has since received word that due
Due to the fact that The Star to slack proceeds the circus they
-was printed Thursday morning of were to sponsor will not shot
*this week, details of the trap here, as they are going .into.win-
shoot held yesterday by members ter quarters. /'
of the St. Joe Rod and Gun Club To Fix Sewer CWlarge
will appear in next week's issue. The matter of property owners
The Star was printed a day ahead connecting to the city's n,,ew sewer
of time in order to give the editor Imains v-as brought, up by City
.and employes a half holiday. (Continued on 'page 8)


LAST FREE COPY

OF T H E PAPER

ENTER YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
NOW AND TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF WRITING ANALYSIS

This is the last issue of The
Star that will be circulated 'free
of charge, and all those who de-
sire to continue receiving the
paper must have their names, on
our mailing list.
As a special Inducement to
potential subscribers, we are of-
fering a free analysis of your
handwriting by Prof. Watling of
'Panama City. Turn to page
three of this issue and learn the
details of this offer. A reading
of this character ordinarily will
cost you $1', but it is yours free
with a subscription to The Star.


WORKER DIES OF

HEART FAILURE

LITTLE KNOWN OF YOUTH
EMPLOYED ON SEWER
CONSTRUCTION

A young man, about 25 years
of age, employed by the Langston
& Murphy company on construc-
tion of the local sewer disposal
system, died here Monday of what
was said to be heart trouble.
The only information that could
be .gleaned from a search of his
clothing was the face that. his
name was Wafter Earushowa and
a street address in Little Rock,
Ark., which was secured from his
social security ticket.
Mayor Joe Sharit immediately
sent a telegram to the chief of po-
lice at Little Rock to get in touch
with persons at that address as
:o disposal of the body. The
nayor received an answer from the
police chief informing him that
the only person knowing Earn-
shaw was a John Perry, who
stated that the young man had no
relatives as far as he knew, but
hat he believed Earnshaw hailed
rom Pine Bluff, Ark. The mayor
vired Pine Bluff, but received no (
eply to his telegram.
At the meeting of the commis- i
ioners Tuesday night, Mayor
Sharit offered the suggestion that
Collection be taken up to bury
recently the youth, and his sug- t
'estion met with the hearty ap- t
oroval of the board. However, he
tated, further efforts would be
iade to locate possible relatives
f Earnshaw.
The contracting firm of Langs- s
on & Murphy informed the com- s
lissioners that if the city could '
ot raise funds for burial that :
ley would foot the bill and place a
cement slab over th'e grave with 1,
is name on it. However. Mayor
harit believed that sufficient v
onld be raised publicly to pay all J
costs. a
We urge all who are asked to
contribute a small sum for this b
purpose do so, as we believe that t:
one of us would want any of our a
lived ones to pass away in some a
istant place and not be decently
iterred.
County Judge R. Alton Dendy
ondncted tire inquest.

FIRE EQUIPMENT ARRIVES c
The LaFrance fire truck, 1000 d
set of hose and siren purchased C
y the city have arrived and are ti
ow ready for use. The siren has c:
een mounted and tried out and
several practice runs made by the
volunteer fire corps. ei


SCHOOLS HERI

ARE OBSERVING

EDUCATION WEE

PRINCIPAL McPHERSON ASKED
PARENTS OF STUDENTS
TO VISIT SCHOOLS

Principal McPherson of the lo
cal schools announces that "Amer
ican Education Week" is being
observed in the schools here, an
urges parents to visit the schools
"American Education Week i
more widely observed each year,'
said Mr. McPherson, "and the in
creasing effectiveness 'of this an
nual event has been due to the
co-operation of all friends of edu
cation. This is the 17th annua
observance of the week and each
year includes Armistice Day. Ii
is the purpose of this event to
acquaint the public with the
aims, achievements and needs of
our schools."
The program of the week, from
November 8 to 14, emphasizes
that broader ideal of education as
set fort. in the seven -cardinal
objectives of education as- defined
by th'e National Education associ-
atin.f.'- Health and, safety. "w worthy
home membership, :mastery of the
tools, technique and spirit of
learning, faithful citizenship, vo-
cational and economic effective-
ness. wise use of leisure, and
ethical character.

THOSE ENTITLED TO TAX
EXEMPTION MUST NOTIFY
TAX ASSESSOR BY DEC. 1
An advertisement appears in
this issue of The Star asking that
all heads of families, widows and
cripples, who are entitled to cer-
tain exemptions from advalorum
taxes, notify the city tax assessor
on or before December 1 as to the
property on which exemption is to
be claimed.
City Auditor M. P. Tomlinson
points out that this is absolutely,
necessary if those persons entitled
.o such exemption are to secure
he deduction due then.

STATE FISH AND GAME
ASSOCIATION IS FORMED
The Florida Fish and Game as-
ociation, a new organization d'e-
igned to conserve the state's
ri!dlife, adopted a charter and by-
aws in Lakeland this week. The
associationn is to be composed of
local groups.
Election o[ permanent officers
will be held at a meeting during
anuary, the time and place to be
announcedd later.
This organization should be a
benefit to the state, and it is an-
icipated that the Port St. Joe Rod
nd Gun Club will become affili-
ted with it.

DREDGING WORK IS
PROCEEDING APACE
Dredging work in St. Joseph
lay and the turning basin is pro-
c'eding rapidly with two large
edges of the R. C. Huffman
constructionn Company in opera-
ion. R. C. Huffman. Jr., is in
charge of operations here.

Miss Vera Melvin was a week-
nd visitor in Marianna.


SSkate Auritor Dis:overs That
M May State ard County Of-
C fcaz e-.nI State Institutions
IT Co Checked For Six Years

MANY HANDLE MILLIONS
OF DOLLARS EACH YEAR

Records Show That No Audit
Has Been Made of Ac-
counts of the University of
Florida Since the Year 1932
g-

g (By Florida News Service)
TALLAHASSEE, Nov. 12 (Ex-
s clusive to The Star)-The start-
, ling lack of the application of or-
dinary business principles prevail-
ing at the time Governor Cone
e took office in the matter of audit-
. ing of the accounts of county and
State officials and state institu-
Stions, many of whom handle sev-
t eral millions of dollars each year,
D was revealed by State Auditor W.
SM. Wainwright.
"When we started, checking up
on the last audits made of state
Sand county offices and institu-
tions," Wainwright said, "we dis-
covered that the accounts of many
Sof them :.ad not been audited in
the past five or six years. This
w. as :dui to no fault of the offi-
iaiS4gi -is no reflection upon
Their honesty or efficiency, but re-
sulted from the failure of the state
auditing department to follow the
law, which requires an annual
audit of these offices. As a mat-
ter of fact," he said, "the failure
of the state auditing department
to audit the accounts of officials
as required by law often causes
embarrassment, and many of them
send in written requests that
audits be made. Many times
changes in laws affecting their
duties are unknown or are not
clearly understood by them, and
regular annual audits give them
the assurance that their accounts
are in order,or enables them to
correct errors made No private
business enterprise would think of
permitting any department hand-
ling the large sums these officials
handle to go without an audit for
five or six years."
No Audit At University
Among the examples cited by
Wainwright was the office of the
tax collector or Hillsborough
county, which collects several mil-
lion dollars each year. No audit of
this office has been made since
December. 1931. The records show
that no audit has been made of
the accounts of the University of
Florida since 1932, and no audit
of the numerous departments of
the state comptroller's office has
been made by the state auditor
since 1933; during that time the
comptroller's office has disbursed
in the neighborhood of $200,000,-
000.
The anxiety of many officials to
have regular audits is shown by
the action taken by the board of
county commissioners of Pinellas
county on November 1. when a
resolution was passed providing
for the payment of the salary from
county funds of an assistant state
auditor to be assigned to spend
his full time auditing the accounts
of the officials of that county.
Operating under the limitations
of a reduced appropriation, State
(Continued on page 8)


Audit- Reveals Many-



Offices NotB Cheked







PAGE TWO THE STAR November 12, 1937


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Application for entry as second-class matter
is pending.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65e

I -.f{ Telephone 51 }>.--
-
The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The The spoken word barely asserts; the
prin td word thoroughly convinces. Tihe
spoken word is lost; th!e rl!nted word re-
mains.


PORT ST. JOE MUST DEVELOP
Many changes, both economic and physi-
cal are in store for the residents of Port St.
Joe, and we should be prepared to meet them
as they arise.
With the opening of the Apalachicola
bridge and completion of the coastal highway
from Panama City to Pensacola, we are go-
ing to see an ever-increasing stream of tour-
ists passing through our city and, if we are
to reap benefit from these visitors we should
be prepared for them. The money they will
spend if we have accommodations for them
will add considerably to the monetary life-
blood of the community.
Port St. Joe has many natural advantages
that could be developed. We have the subtle
lure of'the Florida coast, surf bathing which
could be easily made avaialble, sea foods in
endless variety, duck shooting and fishing to
attract the sportsmen. If these assets are de-
veloped to the fullest, we will soon find that
greater hotel accommodations will become
necessary, and with the expansion of the hotel
facilities, other businesses will locate here,
and .homes 'will be built along the: Gulf frbm
this' city to Beacon Hill.
One thing is lacking. Florida possesses an
especial appeal to' people to the north of us,
and to them Florida is typified by the palm
tree. True, we have palms along the high-
way on either side of the city, but there are
none on our streets-in fact there are few
trees of any type bordering our streets. Why
-not set out palms along our boulevards and
the new streets that are being opened up?
It would add an hundred-fold to the attrac-
tiveness of the city and the cost would be
insignificant. Perhaps one of our civic or-
ganizations could take this as one of their
major objectives.
If our city is to grow, and grow the way
it should, we must have more homes for the
business men and workers to live in. Right
now we are sadly lacking in housing facili-
ties, and as a consequence a large portion of
the payrolls being disbursed here are going
to nearby towns, where the workmen and
their families are compelled to live because
they cannot secure accommodations here.
And where a family lives, there they will
spend their money. A number of homes are
under construction at the present time, some
for their owners to live in and some for ren-
tal purposes, but these are but a drop in the
bucket. What is needed is construction of
residences on a wholesale scale-in blocks of
fifty or a hundred-to care for the rapidly
increasing population. Perhaps some of our
enterprising local contractors or well-to-do
citizens can see their way clear to handling
such construction, but if not, perhaps we
can interest outside capital, for there would
be no question of renting the houses.
We of Port St. Joe must consider all these
possibilities, and many more, and develop
them to the fullest possible extent if we are
to take our rightful place in the scheme of
,. things.

' Some women wouldn't mind wearing sack
cloth if it displayed their curves.---Florida
Times-Union. Yeah, but they wouldn't pour
the ashes on their permanents.


WHY ADVERTISE? TH E
"Why should I advertise in The Star?" a .
local merchant asked us yesterday.
"Because it will be.valuable to you," we -
answered. "In offering you the columns of
The Star as an advertising medium, we offer
you infinitely more than a mere combination
of newsprint and ink. We offer you the
only home-like medium available in which to -
meet the people of Port St. Joe and Gulf
county on a mutual interest proposition.
"Through these columns the merchants and
the publisher together are striving to build
up community spirit and sell the residents of
the town on the advantages of all pulling to-
gcther for the things that will help us all.
''hev will accept your advertisement as it ap-
pears in the columns of The Star as earn-
cstly as they do our messages regarding the
happenings of their neighbors and friends,
and they will respond to your offerings with
the same interest as they tdo the other things ip~ s,9-
which they support with a common interest.
"Our institution, like yours, is built entirely '"
upon a basis of service to this community
and we know. from actual experience that
our patrons await each issue with keen in-
terest, and they will be your friends and pa- _
trons through an intelligent usage of these ',
columns.
"Your advertisement constitutes news of 11^i7
vital importance to every individual, because
it tells of life's immediate essentials-food,
clothing, shelter, amusements, health, etc.
"We have seen some copy that isas life- Stardust and
less as an Egyptian mummy. You can't ex-
pect to drive a spike with a tack hammer. M oonshine
Feature prices, change your copy weekly and y Th her Fellow
run ads that say something. An advertising
service with cuts for all occasions is at the
disposal of anybody who wishes to use it. A lady who is described as "col-
We are willing to write your ad, present a orist for a manufacturing con-
proof of it before it is printed and extend cern," in a small leaflet we picked
up yesterday, undertakes to ex-
our services to the highest form of accommo- plain about blondes and brunettes.
nation." -' "The canary blonde," she says,
S "stands out in a crowd like a sun-
The Florida legislature of 1937 changed: beam. As an entertainer, no mat-'
the dates for holding- the primary elections ter how dumb she is, she has it
all over her brunette sister. If all
from June to May, a full month earlier than that men wantedswas to be enter-
heretofore, says the Times-Union. The first tained continuously, the brunettes
primary will be held the first Tuesday after could resign themselves to spin-
the first Monday in May and the second pri- sterhood. But a man tires, after
mary the fourth Tuesday after the first Mon- a little, of too much vivid color,
and turns to black-which is more
day in May. The change was made so that restful. So mbla h is mored
restful. So most men end by
delegates to the national convention will not marrying brunettes."
be rushed off their feet. preparing for the All of which sounds plausible-
trip. In making this change the legislature and most of which, in my opinion,
neglected to change the date for closing the is bunk.
Let me make my little contri-
registration books. This may cause some con- but tthi scientific discus-
fusion,. but it probably can be worked out sion. Some like 'em light
satisfactorily. Anyway, the change means and some like 'em dark
an earlier political campaign. In fact there and tastes change and you
is already considerable activity in political never can tell and I, per-
iv c id a g i sonally, prefer red-heads over
circles and tentative candidates are grooming either light or dark. I was
themselves for the fray. off blondes for several years, but
now I am beginning to change my
Says L. E. Sellers, publisher of the Wash- mind and sort think they
ington County News at Chipley: "We have are the same as brunettes.
My old friend and counselor,
received on our exchange desk number one Bi Shakespare, said it when he
of volume one of 'The Star,' published at wrote: "Hanging and wiving go
Port St. Joe. W. S. Smith is editor and pub- by destiny." .Which means
lisher and is making a 'bang-up' good job of that you never can tell.
setting out a neat, well-planned newspaper And Longfellow, in "The Saga
I of King Olaf," said:
for the up and coming town of Port St. Joe. of King ," said:
.I "Not ten yoke of oxen
The first issue of 'The Star' contained eight "Not ten yoke of oxen
Have the power to draw us
Ages, full of live news and advertising." Like a woman's hair."
'Thanks, Earl, old boy-perhaps we can say And that applies to the
the same for you, for your paper is a credit blondes, brunettes and red-heads.
.o the thriving town of Chipley. But Goethe, in "Faust,"
sez:
xpert iuiry proves that there are in "Beware of her fair hair, for she
Expert inquiry proves that there are in excels
-xistence at least eight hats actually worn All women in the magic of her
'y Napoleon during his lifetime. This leaves looks;
them still running a bad second to the num- And when she winds them 'round
ber of beds actually slept in by George Wash- a young man's neck,
igton.-s L She will not ever set him free
ington.-Columbus Ledger. agai
Againn"
Of course, that was writ-
The average man puts a greater value ten before bobbed hair came in
upon a favor he bestows than upon one he and before divorces were so com-
receives.---Coumbia State. mnim, and now lots of blondes are
out merely to mace a record of
marriages and hang divorce scalps-
Is there anything more lonesome looking on their belts.
than .an empty beer keg?---Times-Union. But, as a matter of fact
Sure---two empty beer kegs. most men do marry brunettes--


because, according to statistics,
there are more brunettes than
blondes in the world.

"It is only after an unknown
number of unrecordef labors, after
a host of noble hearts have suc-
cumbed in discouragement, that
their cause is lost, it is only then
that the cause triumphs."-Guizot.
There is a beautiful Jhribuee
the successful failures who
tombstones dot the graveyard.
dedicated to all forms of human
activity.
Full-blown s u c c es s, achieved
without a succession of failures,
is rare. The man who
wins success may have suffered
no failures at all, but he has
climbed to his goal on trails beat-
en down by those who went before
him.
So it was that Peary discovered
the North Pole that the
Wright brothers lifted themselves
off the old earth in a flying ma'
chine that Darwin form
lated 'his theory of evolution .
that Magellan found' his way
around the world that Edk
son perfected thire incandescent.
lamp.


'GREEN LIGHT' AT

ST. JOE THEATER

"Green Light," that stirring
story of heroism, sacrifice and
love, which had many hundreds of
thousands of readers in its book
form a couple of years ago, comes
as a photoplay to the St. Joe The-
ater Sunday and Monday, a faith-
fully made, splendidly cast pro-
duction.
Errol Flynn is the masculine
star of the gripping tale, playin-.
the part of Dr. Paige, the scieg
tist who almost gives his life ii,
researches destined to alleviate
human suffering.
The girl he wins, after muc)
misunderstanding and hunhappl"
ness, is the lo'ily I:ttl blonde,
Anita Louise, w.o s-ares stellar'
honors with Flynn.
The saintly philosopher. Dean
Harcourt, is played by tbh distin-
guished British character star, Sir
Cedric Hard'.-ic',e. ?:arga et Lind-
say portrays r, .e-ev,;d hospital
nurse who loves F::n:', iut has to
surrender hir.. O. e s tthe cast
are Henry O'N'il ca.d Walter
\bel.

:Motorist (to man he had run
over): "Hey, look out back there!'
The Victim: "Say, you ain''
:omin' back, are you?"


PAGE TWO


November 12, 1937


THE STAR








November 12, 1937 THE STAR PA(~ THN~


REDUCE FIRE HAZARDS
AT STATE HOSPITAL

Purchase of two modern fire
trucks and a standby pdmp for
the state hospital at Chattahoo-
chea has been announced by Su-
perintendent J. H. Therrell. The
equipment, costing $16,000, is held
sufficient for any fire emergency
in the ward buildings which house
nearly 4,500 patients in addition to
employee personnel.
The 1937 legislature appropri-
ated $35,000 fo: a fire department
at the hospital after fire destroyed
the nurses' home last February.

Great Britain's most extensive
farm crop is hay, of which 6,606,-
000 acres were harvested in 1935;
its weightiest crop, turnips, 10,-
301,000 tons, the same year.


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Port St. Joe, Fla.



Print Dresses;


2:-


At Reasonable Prices
Ladies' S O
and Men's SHOES
At Reasonable Prices

GEIGER
BARGAIN STORE


Star Readers Now Have


Opportunity to Learn


The Secret of Success


Through the co-operation of
Prof. H. L. Watling of Panama
City, noted graphologist, readers
of The Star now have an oppor-
tunity to learn the secrets of
true happiness and success. To
take advantage of this opportunity
merely fill in the coupon to be
found on this page, accompanied
by a subscription to The Star for
one year, six months or three
months, and bring or mail to this
office, with a sample of your
handwriting. This offer is open
to those persons who already have
subscribed to The Star, and such
a reading ordinarily would cost
one dollar.


The tragedy of "a square peg
trying to fit in a round hole" is
exemplified daily im ,he lives of
all of us. Opportunity knocks at
our door .'o many times, but we
fail to recognize her Ibecals, we
are then engaged upon some dis-
tasteful task that occupies our en-
tire attention.
Happy is the man who finds his
TRUE vocation! Watch a natural
mechanic 'wvrk at his choeon line
and you see complete absorption
and accurate work. Watch a pro-
fessional man at work and if he
is in the correct field .f eni'eavor
-time oi effort mean notn:ng.
All work, whether it be manual
labor, skilled artizanship or brain
work, presents problems that only
the natural effort of "happy work-
manship" can solve. You must like
your work to be successful, and
if you are dissatisfied with your
present occupation, fill in the
coupon and Prof. Watling can
+tll unii iji t what line of endeavor


indication of poor education or
ability. On the contrary, many of
our best educated people write al-
most illegibly; but your TRUE
character is expressed in the for-
mation of the letters, the form,
style, shading and other charac-
teristics.
You can learn these truths by
simply filling out the coupon, on
this page and mailing it to The
Star with three or four lines of
your handwriting.
Here is an opportunity for high
school students, who will soon be
out in the world "on their own,"
to learn just what niche they will
fit in after their school days are
over.
Mail the coupon with your sub-
scription today-don't wait. All
information will be strictly confi-
dential and will reach no eyes but
those of the person for whom it


is intended.
Prof. Watling appeared at the
St. Joe Theater Monday night and
last night, but owing to the brief
time he could devote to each per-
son, he merely gave the highlights
on what the samples of handwrit-
ing really indicated. The readings
he will give through The Star
will be complete and of consider-
able length.


LUMBER CO.

OPENS YARD
On Panama City Highway; Will
Handle Complete Line of
Builders' Supplies


you should be following. Dwight Marshall of Apalachicola
and A. Soderberg of Orlando are
God has given to all of us po- announcing, in this issue of The
culiar talents and compensating Star, the opening of their new
abilities in some particular field lumber yard located on the Pan-
of endeavor. The world has :eed ama City highway at Highland
of that peculiar and particular View. Mr. Soderberg will be in
ability, and for that reason all of charge of the local yard.
us are given positive identilica- Their building is 60 by 110 feet,
tion whereby we may enter the which will house their choice ma-
field of work for which nature trials, and they will operate a
has fitted us! yard in conjunction, handling only
Character is YOU! As you to high grade material.
through life, certain traits de- This firm wil handle Johns-Man-
velop in your personality that are ville roofing and Lucas paints and
a clear indication of your talents. are equipped to furnish materials
These are the "sign posts" that for complete home building.
point the way to success for you. We urge our readers to drop in
These identifying personality and look over this new addition
traits are clearly indicated in your to our fast-growing city.
handwriting-your hand being the
instrument of your brain. As you "Sweet" is the English name for
write-so are you! This dore not dessert, and "joint" stands for
iean that poor handwriting is an meat on the Englsh menu.


Bring or Mail This Coupon to THE STAR for a

Free Analysis of Your Handwriting

When Accompanied With a Subscription to The Star

Name ................................ Birthday ............

Address ........................................ ....

Sample o7 Handwriting: ................................








I enclose $...,.... for 1 year ; 6 months ; 3 months
Subscription to The Star
(One year, $2; 6 months, $1.25; 3 months, 65c)
THIS ANALYSIS ORDINARILY WOULD COST YOU
$1.00-YOU GET -IT FREE!


Giants die young, judging from A yellow-billed cuckoo feeds
records on a number of men over habitually on harmful, hairy cat-
seven feet tall who attained an erpillars so that its own stomach
average age of only 34 years. becomes fuzzy.



ST. JOE ICE CO.

Manufacturers of

CRYSTAL ICE
FROM TREATED WATER

MAX KILBOURN, Prop.

--.-- -s-. T.--.---- -------------I

We Haul Anything-- -
We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

Horton and Dendy


PHONE 10


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


-- - -


4


EAT AT THE


BLACK CA'


CAFE



EXCELLENT
FOOD


r






"PROMPT AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE


PETE'S Cash Carry


Port St. Joe, Fla.

W--here Your

D 0 LL A

BUYS MORE


FRIDAY SATURDAY MONDAY
NOVEMBER 12-13-15
No. 2 Early June Peas, 2 ..15c IPOTTED MEAT, 3 for .... 10c
No. 2 TOMATOES, 3 cans 23c!i VIENNA SAUSAGE, 2 for 15c
No. 1 TOMATOES, per can 5c SARDINES,, 4 for ......... 15c


A- -1


~kr88~1~1~6lgl~ar%


Pounds n n 1c
L:~RIPEs


--F L 0 U R -- EL DELITO COFFEE., lb. ..27c
SELF- 24 lbs ........ 89c MAXWELL HOUSE, lb. ...29c
RISING 12 lbs ........ 45c APPLE JELLY, 2 lb. jar ... 23c


i





z
E


_ eL I I L


!


0


4


I.


~a;bas~a~9~


ko~vember 12~, 1937


THE STAR


PAGE THREE


rl
0
1
t
s
a
0


Spaghetti &- ryacarcni, 3 for 10c SANDWICH SPREAD, qt. 25c
Canned SPAGHETTI, 2 for 15c MUSTARD, qt ............. 15c
DOG FOCD, pe-, a ..... 6cc KETCHUP, 14 o7.., 2 for ..25c


VINEGAR, qt ............. 10c PEANUT BUTTER, qt. ....25c
CRACKERS, I pound ..... 10c MILK, 2 large or 4 small ..15c
GRITS, 3 boxes ........... 25c SNOWJDR IFT, 3 .1b, can ... 59o


Sho~p at P E TE 'S and Save!


10 lbs. S9G1AR 55cJ


oAlWEToudsPtatoes 23cl









I~ACE T


Club Plans To

Beautify City

The Women's Club of Port St.
Joe is enthusiastically sponsoring
a beautification program for our
progressive city. It welcomes this
opportunity to assist in every way
possible in making it a garden
spot in this section of the state-
one which visitors and passing
motorists will remember and of
which we, as residents, may be
justly proud.
The month of November is the
ideal time for planting or trans-
planting shrubs. Our natural re-
sources are great and are adapt-
able to cultivation, and there are
nearby nurseries which can pro-
vide a wide variety -of blooming
shrubs as well as evergreens for
grouping about the home, or which
may be used for hedges or
screens.
The Women's Club hop-s that
everyone will become vitally in-
terested in adding to the natural
beauty of Port St. Joe. Much
could be accomplished within the
next few months. Suggestions for
beautification are asked.

PRESBYTERIANS
ELECT TRUSTEES
At a congregational meeting
held Sunday, the members, of the
Presbyterian church elected as
trustees of the church, M. B.
Smith and Carmichael Smith. They
were also elected as a building
committee. Mr. Davies, Mr. Best
and Mr McGowii were chosen as
an advisory 'committee, assisting
the building committee. When
plans are be'ng formulated for
construction of the new chun':h, a
number of rd i'c wil be ad:'ei to
this committee.

Mis 7 T"': "a finger spent
Suncr,- i:: Ba'nb:'ie, Ga., visit-
ing her pa:'"t". TIr and Mrs. T.
C. Enfinger. -:c: Aster, Miss Vel-
ma Enfinger, returned with her to
sp-nd several days.



Amazing Success

Greets Adrienne


Smart Women Thrilled

With New Harmonized

Cosmetic Ensembles
"Harmony from head to toel" That is
the beauty .ideal of Adrienne Livingstop
of New York in presenting her Adrises
Scientifically Harmonized Cosmetics.
But even Adrienne herself is astounded
at the way they have caught popular
favor. She underestimated the real need
for this new, revolutionizing type ef cos-
metics creams, powders, lotions and
make-up aids scientifically harmonized
with each other, with the complexion,
with the costume, in'a complete beauty
ensemble.
The response has been overwhelming.
Hundreds every day turn from antiquated
make-up to assure themselves of smart
new beauty by using Adrt~.ne Cosmetic
Ensembles.
Ask your Rexall Druggist to help you
choose your Adrienne Ensemble. You cax
get the complete ensemble at a prica
often paid for a single jar of creams





ADIkINN .
SCIENTIFICALLY
HARMONIZED tl
COSMETICS

MILLER'S

DRUG STORE



Port St. Joe, Fla.


HOPE TO HAVE REV. BEATY
HERE TWICE MONTHLY
The Florida Presbytery meets in
DeFuniak Springs on Tuesday,
November 16, at which time it is
expected that Rev. H. F. Beaty's
work will be arranged so that he
can preach in Port St. Joe two
Sunday or more each month.



At the Churches

METHODIST
Caleb Bates, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m., first and third Sundays.
Sunday school 10 a. m., every
Sunday.
W. M. S. meets Mondays, 3 p.
m.
Next week is week of prayer
and on Tuesday the W. M. S. will
meet with Mrs. George Patton and
further plans for the program will
be made then.
-~
BAPTIST
Rev. Sizemore, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m. and
7:45.p. m., second Sunday.
Sunday school 10 a. m.
B. Y. P. U. 6:45 p. m.
W. M. U. 3 p. m., Mondays.
Prayer meeting 7:45 p. m., Wed-
nesdays.
G. A. 4 p. m. Friday (will meet
with Carolyn Baggett next).

PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Pastor
Church services 11 a. m., fourth
Sunday.
Sunday school 10 a. m. (at the
club house).

CATHOLIC
Father Massey, Priest
Mass first and third Sundays at
10:15 a. m.


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
10 a. m.-Surday school.
11 a. m.-Devotional.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic


Eerv-


ices.
Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeet:ng Wednesday eve-
ning.

CLEVER MINSTREL SHOW
PRESENTED AT THEATER
An entertaining and laughable
minstrel show was presented last
evening at the St. Joe theater by
a, group of boys and girls from
the local schools. It featured sing-
ing, dancing, wise-cracks and the
usual run of minstrel jokes which
brought howls of glee from the
Large and appreciative audience.
Carlyle Matthews acted as mas-
ter of cereraonies, and was ably
assisted 'by Billie Hammond, Roy
Boyett, Claude Seay, Wilmer Bow-
man, Lenell Rowan and Darwin
Pippins.
Chorus girls, who presented
several dance numbers, were Dor-
othy Trawick, Wji;ie Ola Martin,
Alice Gibson, Elizabeth Baggett,
Berniece Schneider, Lunette Ham-
mond and Marigene Smith.
This. was the second of a series
of Thursday night features to be
staged at the theater. Next week
there will be a "spook" show.

CHURCH CONGREGATION
ENJOYS SOCIAL HOUR
Lart Friday evening quite a
number of the Presbyterian con-
gregation enjoyed a social hour.
It is hoped to make this a frequent
affair. Those who could not be
present Friday evening missed a
very enjoyable time.
The younger group of the church
probably will hold a separate so-
cial at an early date.
A ''
-Miss Evelyn Brock spent the
wc-k-end in Marianna.


Kiddie Revue

Is Enjoyable


The characterization of Holly-
wood stars at the St. Joe Theater
last Thursday night by the chil-
dren of Port St. Joe was enthusi-
astically received by a large audi-
ence. Remarkable talent for mim-
ickery was displayed by all taking
part.
After showing of the feature
picture, the "Old Maestro," Ben
Bernie (Carlyl2 Matthews), came
on the stage in parson. Yowsah,
yowsah, he was right there to an-
nounce all of thie forthcoming
stars. Next came Joe Penner
(Lanell Rowan), just as much at
home on the St. Joe stage as the
duck was in h-s arms. Then came
the very latest thing in .Holly-
wood, Franchot Tone (Edward
Eells), top hat and everything
that goes with it.
Slim Summerville (Cornelius
Kirkland), just as awkward as
ever, ambled out on the stage, on
the lookout for Zasu Pitts (Mar-
gie Kirkland), who came out look-
ing for Slim, and "Oh, dear," was
she wondering where he could be.
Then came Eleanor Powell (Dor-
othy Trawick) with those dancing
feet, and how they did dance! Out
came Jane Withers (Gwendolyn
Howell), and she simply howled
for Mr. Turner to give her an air-
plane, which he promised gladly
if she would shut her mouth.
Then came Bob Burns (Hubert
Lennox), telling the latest about
his pa and Grandpa Snazzy. Shir-
ley Temple (Doris Walker) came
on the stage and reminded the au-
dience o' how well she played in
her latest picture "Wee Winnie
Winkle," and her next to be shown
here will be "Heidi."
Next to visit us was Clark
Gable (Roy Boyette), the ladies'
idol, and as usual had very little
to say about himself. G'nger Rog-
ers (Willie Ola Martin) gave us
her latest song and then tested
those flying feet of hers. The
Three Stooges (Billy Hamilton,
Darwin Pippins and Claude Stout-
meyer) walked onto the stage but
of course, had to be dragged off.
Next to pay us a visit was Patsy
Kelly and Ned Sparks (Alma
Grantham and Robert Hughes)
and Patsy, as usual, kept up he-
steady flow of conversation, and
Ned just had to take it.
Out came Mae West, (Alice Gib-
son) all dressed up in her furs,
diamonds, 'n everything. She sanr-
her old song, "Frankie and John-
nie," and gave everyone an invi-
tation to "come up and. see me
come time."
Good old, goad-natured. big
mouthed Martha Raye (Elizabeth
Baggett) came on the stage and
brought with her that rip-roaring
cowboy, Hoot Gibson (Wilmer
Bormnan). Out tripped Greta Gar-
bo (Julia Hewing), and her trip
was almost fatal before she got
those feet off the stage.
Joan Davis (Bernice Schneider),
as usual, started to say something
and before- she could think she
had stumbled over something. An-
other of those "rarin' cowboys,"
Tom Tyler (Edward Bartee) cam':
out and sang his song of the west
and invited us to see his next pic-
ture. Irene Dunn (Marigene Smith)
sang in her usual lovely manner,
"Never In a Million Years."
"Our Gang" was there in force.
-Spanky (Benton' Kelly) was, of
course, trying to get Farina (Ger-
aldine Parker) to- shoot crap, and
her "ma done told her not to shoot
any more crap"; "Angal Child"
(Marylin Rowan) felt that she had
'the responsibility o' the gang and
had to see that they all did tiher
part; To.t oy o(Mary Lee Davis)


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


went through her routine of acro-
batics, and Alfalfa (Sonny Prid-
geon) couldn't see why he couldn't
do the' same things; Molly Kelly
as Agnes, the new gang member,
just stood around In amazement
at the clever things the gang done
and only realized then what an
interesting bunch they were. Our
Gang won the $5 prize for the
b e s t presentation of favorite
movie stars.
And last, but not least, to come
on the stage, was lovely Joan
Crawford (Lunette Hammock).
Every week there will be an
added attraction at the theater
with the boys and girls of Port
St. Joe displaying their talent, and
maybe some day we may see some
of them on the stage or screen.

BAPTIST CHURCH CALLS
COLORADO MINISTER
The board of trustees of the
Baptist church has called Rev. J.
D. Sizemore of Colorado Springs,
Colo., as their new minister.
Rev. Sizemore expects to he on
the field by December 1 for full
time.


S-i ford, Marigene Smith, Bobby Bel-
R. P. Nedley of Apalachicola lows, Joe Sharit, Jr., Willie Lee
was a business visitor in the city Beard, David Maddox, Roy Gib-
Monday. son, William Trawick and Molly
S Kelly.
Tonight, 8 o'clock Annual They presented as a special
meeting of Red Cross, at city hall. number, "Living for Jesus."





ST. JOE THEATRE


A Martin-Davis Theatre


SUN. MON.-NOV. 14-15

Lloyd C. Douglas'
haunting story.
5 S broughttoflam-
ing life by the
S screen's newest
rorm ntic idols!
ERROL FLYNN
ANITA ,LOUISE

"GREEN LIGh-
MARGARET LINDSAY
SirCEDRIC HARDWICKE
Walter Abel Henry O'Neill
A Frank Borzage Production
A COSMOPOLITAN PRODUCTION

A Firt Nticmal Picture. Presented by
Wcro.r -ro,. Muio by Max Steiaer


TUESDAY-NOV. 16



JoeE.



Brown

n -



"PAOLO



JOE"


WEDNESDAY- THURSDAY
November 17-18


Bill Turner, Mgr.


FRIDAY-NOV. 19


SATURDAY-NOV. 20

-WILLIAM BERKE Y



C HRRM


,,d.- ..AnTrail


S- G fERTRUDE MESSINGiR R
EARL DWYER
ROGER WILLIAMS
CHUCK MORRISON
I' CilEf THUNPERCLOUD
^Dide1sd'by
WENDY IARRIE ,-t RL rMILLANlD ,I.1ay rar *
KENT TAYLOR .WlUAMl GARGAN .-'LY OWLE mIJjw-,r.s...wVrr Ai
SELECTED SHORT SUBJECTS EACH SHOW -
.^ a illifHIIlilit H Illlin @Alt~ iHfflHIf il&41lfinlHid Ai nf)1H$ Hii^flll ~ l'fg I


METHODIST YOUNG PEOPLE
ELECT CLASS OFFICERS
The Young Peoples class of the
Methodist church held a business
meeting Monday night at the
home of Mrs. J. M. Smith for the
purpose of electing new class of-
ficers. Arthur Lupton, president,
presided.
A motion was put in order for
election of the following officers:
Secretary, Miss Estelle Dickin;
finance chairman, Mrs. Bernard
Pridgeon; social welfare chair-
man, Mrs. T. S. Gibson, Jr.; hos-
pitality chairman, Mrs. Ed Ram-
say; membership chairman, Mrs.
J. M. Smith; social chairman, Mrs.
Mark Tomlinson.
Following the business meeting
Mrs. Smith served as refresh-
ments delicious cookies and hot
chocolate.

BAND PLAYS FOR
S. S. SERVICES
The following members of the
St. Joe band played for the Sunk
day school services at the Metho-
dist church last Sunday: Adelaide
Hardy, Alice Gibson, Jimmie Guil-


Nove+F~~mber 12, 1937-


THE STAR


PAGE FOUR







~J,_mb_ 2TF


TooLateto Classify
By RUSSELL KAY

From all. this argument going
on over the "Hobo Express," one
might be led to believe that the
fair state of Florida this season is
attracting no one but tramps and
bums.
The situation is serious, and
peace officers are more than jus-
tified in viewing it with alarm and
taking steps to.meet the problem,
but if we continue to howl about
it in the public print with front
page stories in black-face head-
lines we will frighten off a lot of

. !illill| Ill llllrllllIIII IIIl i lll llltWllll IIlllll [ll11
IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR


Phone 51-The Star
iM- llt lilil"!i. .' / illlliiillllf i !i III| i iii ii


timid souls who had planned to
visit us as first-class paid cus-
tomers.
During the last few years Flor-
ida has .been making .a remark-
able comeback. It is the bright
spot of the nation and the whole
blamed United States is beginning
to realize it.
Advertising has its penalties as
well as its advantages, and oppor-
tunity attracts the unfortunates as
well as the prosperous. With
every indication pointing to the
greatest tourist season in Florida's
history, it is only natural that
thousands seeking employment or
easy money are coming down
early to avoid the rush.
Travel by boat, train, bus and
plane this winter is expected to
tax the facilities of transportation
companies in spite of the fact that
considerable improvement has
been made in schedules and equip-
ment. Unsettled conditions in
Europe and the Orient will tend
to curtail foreign travel and will
serve to drive additional thou-
sands southward this winter.
The normal population of Flor-
ida should be more than doubled
during the next 60 days, and while
many who come here will be des-
titute and seeking employment,
their number will be infinitesimal
compared to the vast horde of
sun-seekers with ample funds who
come to enjoy our kindly climate
--who seek rest and recreation
and are able, and willing to pay
for it.

Never have your telephone num-
ber put on a visiting card unless
it is of the fold-over type. Your
address, however, may appear in
the lower right corner.


TINTY17 T'yM'r g fIr'"mo

NOVEMBER 20 IS THE DAY


REMINGTON

WESTERN

and PETERS


SHELLS

10 12 16 20 410 GAUGE RIFLE
CARTRIDGES FOR POPULAR PISTOLS
AND RIFLES

HUNTING COATS SHOE LACES
HUNTING CAPS SHOE GREASE


12 and 16 Gauge


PUMP GUNS


12 and 16 Gauge
Single and Double Barrel.

SHOTGUNS
.22 R0-IFLES
.22 RIFLES


12 and 16 Gauge


Automatics

EVERYTHING
FOR THE

HUNTER
Including Your
License


St. Joe Hardware Co.
FOR YOUR HUNTING EQUIPMENT
Part St. Jpe, Fla.


Pepper to Give

Radio Talk

WILL DISCUSS MATTERS OF
GRAVE INTEREST TO
PEOPLE OF STATE

Senator Claude Pepper announc-
ed yesterday that he had com-
pleted arrangements for a state-
wide broadcast to be made this
evening from 10:45 to 11:15, east-
ern standard time, over the state
CBS hook-up, in which he will dis-
cuss matters of grave interest to
people of this state.
In his broadcast the senator
will give particular attention to
matters dealing with the national
legislative program, especially the
wage and hour bill, and legislation
affecting agriculture. Floridians
who tune in on this program will
be given a clear, understandable
expression of Pepper's views on
these important matters of public
interest.
Senator and Mrs. Pepper expect
to leave Florida by car tomorrow
morning for Monday's opening of
the special session of congress.



PERSONALS

Mrs. I. C. Nedley and daughter,
Melba, were visiting Sunday in
Apalachicola.

Mrs. R. B. Porter and Mrs. Fred
Sawyer of Apalachicola were vis-
iting friends here Friday.

Josh Sharit, U. S. N., was visit-
ing Sunday with his brother,
Mayor J. L. Sharit.

Mrs. Lizzie Cooper of Apalachi-
cola was a busi-ess visitor in the
ity Saturday.

Miss Onita Joines and Claudius
Lanier of Wewahitchka were at-
tencing the theater here Sunday
night.

Miss Elizabeth Hance and O. M.
Mo'1ton of Carrabelle vire guests
Sunday oi Mrs. J. P. Lovett.

Mrs. C. B. White of Charleston,
S. C., joined her husband here
Sunday. Mr. White has been em-
ployed by the paper company for
several months.
,-'f -T *
Harold Smith of Dothan, Ala.,
is visiting his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. M. B. Smith.

Rev. H. F. Beaty will leave for
Pensacola to spend several days.
While away he will fill appoint-
n-ants at Fort Walton, Pensacola
and St. Andrews.

Tim Stone of Orlando was a
business visitor in the city Tues-
day.

Mrs. W. C. Roche is visiting her
father in Mobile, Ala., this week.

Miss Viola Barber spout the
week-end in Panama City visiting
her parent.

Miss Edna Earl Dormany of
Plant City is the guest of her
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. G. K. Dormany.

Mrs. J'e Gloekler and Mrs. I. C.
Nedley spent Monday in Apalachi-
co!a visiting friends.

The Misses Elsie and Phillipa
Nedley of Apalachico'a were dhe
guests of Miss Iva Mae Nedlay
Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Nedley and
daughter, Melba, spent Sunday in
Chipley visiting Mrs. Neixey's
mother,v Mrs. Thames.


The


* -_ ~ -vi.--,- ~t P. -. scribe


Star is $2 per year-sub-
now!


RED CROSS TO ELECT
OFFICERS FOR YEAR
The annual meeting of the Red
Cross will be held at 8 o'clock this
evening at the city hall. Robert
Bellows urges everyone to be pres-
ent, as the purpose of the meet-
ing is to elect new officers'for the
coming year.

THAT WAY NOW
Politician: "Do you believe we
will be under the rule of women
ten years from now?"
Henpecked Husband: "I do if
our wives live that long."


SPECIALS


EGGS, dozen ............ 30c REGAL MATCHES, 3 for 10c
TURNIP GREENS, 3 cans 25c Branson's MUSTARD, qt. ..20c
MACARONI, 3 for ........10c ONIONS, Red., 5 Ibs.....25c



SPotatoes 10 lbs 25c
Western T-BONE, Ib ......35c .,IXED SAUSAGE, Ib ....15c
Short Rib STEAK, Ib. .....17c SMOKED SAUSAGE, Ib. ..20c
STEW MEAT, 2 lbs. .....25c CHUCK ROAST, lb. ...... 15c
ROUND STEAK., Ib.......25c SMOKED BACON, Ib. ....25c



FLOUR 24 lbs. 99c

PET MILK. small, 4 for ...15c TOMATOES, large, 3 for ..25c
COOKING OIL, gallon ....95c Field CORN, large, 3 for ..25c
Water Maid RICE., 3 Ibs. ..23c CORN MEAL, 5 Ibs ......15c



White Badon Ib. 20c I




BAY SHORE GROCERY
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage




Announcing


OPENING OF THE










i Lumber
II










All Kinds of Lumber

and Builders'

i Supplies |


WE CAN ARRANGE TO FINANCE PART
OF BUILDING COSTS
'V
A Full Line of---

Johns-Manville Roofing and

Lucas Paints


Highland View, on Panama City Highway


Alligator Guards Golf Ballts
John Williams, operator of a
golf course at Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
was receiving many complaints
about caddies recovering golf balls
from the fourth hole water hazard
and selling them back to owners
-many times before they com-
pleted the round. He placed an al-
ligator in the pond and ended the
trouble permanently.

The first Nobel peace prize win
ners were Henri Dunant, Swiss.
%nd Frederic Passy, French, in
)01.


........... ............


THE STAR


PAGE FIVE


November 12 1937


r









r I T A1


(Editor's Note: We are indebted
to J. R. Hunter, clerk of the Gulf
county circuit coart, f,'r the fol-
1,'ing article, copied from The
Saint Joe Times from 1839 to 1841
as the same appears on file in the
Congressional Library in Wash-
ington, D. C. While practically all
of the c'der residents of Port St.
Joe and Gulf county are probably
familiar with these articles, we
feel sure that the new residents
will read them with interest, as
did the 'editor.)

(Continued from Last Week)
(From the issue of Jan. 12, 1839)
The union banks of Florida have
resumed special payment on their
bills under $5 and charge two per
cent on sight checks at the North
or elsewhere. The Life and Trust
has heretofore resumed. Where
is the Bank of Pensacola? Can't
Mr. Nick Biddle furnish her small
sums for special change?

(From issue of Feb. 2, 1839)
RAILROAD IRON
The barques Cygnette, Purse
and Master arrived here on Sun-
day last, 67 days from Liverpool,
having 342 tons of iron for the
St. Joseph and Iola Railroad. Ad-
vices per Cygnette say that the,
balance of iron required for the
completion of the road would be
forwarded in the ship Mirabeau.
The Eddystone, which sailed on
the 5th of November, with part
of the iron, put back through
stress of the weather and was un-
dergoing some repairs. She would,
however, commence her voyage in
a. few weeks -
'The iron received by the Cg-
R.ette will probably be- laid down
before the arrival of the other ves-
sels. The Cygn'tte spoke and was
desired to report off the Grand
Caymans, the ship Julian. 60 Gays
from Bremen, bound for New Or-
leans.

DANCE .' T MARIANNA
The races c:-::- off at Marianna
on the 6th inst. On Wednesday
evening of next week there will
be a ball at the Florida Hotel in
that interesting little village, at
which, through grandeur, we are
a manager, and to which we in-
vite all our blue-eyed female
friends. If the races go off well
and the ladies' feet fall "fast and
mute like snowdrops-we shall re-
port thereof to our cousin in New
York "The Spirit of the Times."
If there is slow time or bolting or


Summer Shoes
READY FOR

WINTER


We Specialize in Sewing
and Cementing


Half Soles and Rubber
Heels
Leather Half Soles

EXPERT DYING



^Leader

.Shoe Shop
.aa Port St. Joe.


any falls in cutting the "pidgeon-
wing," we shall look wise, say
nothing and come home.

INDIANS
About 200 refugee Indians are
said to be concealed in the ham-
mocks on the eastern arm of St.
Andrews Bay, between 30 and 40
miles north of this place. A de-
tachment of U. S. troops are in
pursuit of them. As yet they have
committed no depredations and
excite but little alarm in the
neighborhood.

MAIL. ARRANGEMENT
The North Mail-Due every
Wednesday and Sunday at six
o'clock p. m.


The
every
seven


Northern Mail Closes
Tuesday and Saturday at
o'clock a. m.
James Black, P. M.


$200.00 REWARD
Ran away from the subscriber
in the fall of 1837, two Negro
men named Will and Paul. Will
is about 20 years of age, five feet
six or eight inches high, of a dark
color and weighs about 160 Ibs,
and stammers in his speech.
Paul is about 24 years of age,
five feet eight or ten inches high,
very dark completion, has a scar
commencing on the lower part of
his eye on one of his cheeks and
a scar on his left breast, and a
downcast look when spoken to.
Said Negroes are supposed to
be on St. Vincent Island .or har-
bored in the vicinity of St. Joseph
or Apalachicola. i.
The above reward, will be paid
'for the -two; negroes upon the de-
livery to- me in Tallahassee, or
confined in some jail so I can get
them in possession, or $100 for
either of them.
J. O. Charles.

LAST NOTICE! TAXES! TAXES!
Notice is hereby given that all
of those persons who failed to pay
their taxes for the year of 1838
and shall not do so, shall have
their property taken and sold at
auction to pay said taxes.
St. Joseph, Feb. 16th, 1839.
Wm. E. Davis, Tax Collector,
Calhoun County.

"PUBLIC ROAD NO. 64"
An act authorizing a road to
be cut from the northern bound-
ary of the Territory of Florida, by
Marianna, to the Town of Apal-
achicola within the said Territory.
Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the
United States of America, in con-
gress assembled, that the Presi-
dent of the United States be and
he is hereby authorized to cause
to be surveyed, marked and lo-
cated, a route for a road from a
line which divides the State of
Alabama from the Territory of
Florida, by Marianna, in the
County of Jackson, to the Town
of Apalachicola, in said Territory,
and when the said survey and the
final location of said road shall be
made, if he approves the same, he
is hereby authorized to cause it
to be cut out, and for that pur-
rose the sum of $12,000 be and
the' same is hereby appropriated
out of any money in the Treasury
not otherwise appropriated; pro-
vided that said road shall be cut
out by contract and that no money
shall be paid at any time on ac-
count thereof. but on the certifi-
cate of an engineer of the Army
of the United States that the said
road has been faithfully con-
structed according to the terms of
said contract.


Approved June 30th, 1834.
(The above road is the old Gov-
ernment Road running from the
northern boundary of the state of
,Florida via. Marianna and cross-


MEMOIRS OF A DOOMED

AND FORGOTTEN CITY


one at this price ....
LUNCH KITS-
Comple with bottle

Pho


EEU-
ft-. Fh


Uo
$129


one


LeHARDY'S

PHARMACY
"Where Friends Meet"


New Protection

F o r Motorists

Is Aim of State

MORE RIGID REGULATION OF
GAS SALES TO START
ABOUT JAN. 1

According to Phil S. Taylor, of
Tallahassee, supervising inspector,
new regulations intended to pro-
tect the public in gasoline pur-
chases will be started by the de-
partment of agriculture about Jan-
uary 1. Expensive new scientific
equipment is being installed in the
oil laboratories at Tallahassee to
make octane rating tests of gaso-
line-this is known as the "knock
test."
When the new service is start-
ed, all pumps must be labeled to
show whether the gasoline is what
the public generally knows as
third grade, regular or premium
quality. Some form of coloring
may be required to distinguish
the various grades. Samples taken
from filling station pumps will be
analyzed, as well as samples from
gasoline shipments into the state
by boat, tank car or truck.
Taylor explains that present in-
spection regulations require that
all gasoline measure up to what
is known as "third grade." Beyond
that, the state does not have regu-
ations, and Taylor stated it is pos-
sible for third grade gasoline to
be sold either as regular or pre-
mium quality.
"The majority of dealers," he
said, "certainly do not mislead the
public in such a manner."
The oil inspecting division of
the department of agriculture
checks up about twice a year on
every filling station in the state.
This service at present, however,
is confined to ferreting out gaso-
line adulterated with kerosene or
other chemicals, and to checking
pumps for correct measurements.
Adulterated gasoline is confis-
cated. State law provides fine or
imprisonment for persons convict-
ed of selling adulterated gasoline.

THE TRUTH
Mother: "Do you know what
prompts little boys to tell lies?"
Junior: "Sure. Traveling on the
train and hearing theia parents
,ay they are seven when they
know they are twelve."
ing the eastern arm of St. An-
drews Bay, thence on by way of
Port St. Joe to Apalachicola. The
survey was actually made in July,
1836. This road is known as the
Old Stage Road.)
Next Week: The formation and
signing of Florida's constitution.


DRUG

NEEDS

for less..
Let us fill your prescrip-
tions. You can be as-
sured of pure ingredients
and accuracy.
TOOTHBRUSH and 49c
CREAM ........
CLOCKS- You need QQc


LIARS AND LIARS
" Arctic Explorer: "It was so cold
where we were that the candle
froze and we couldn't .blow it out.'
Second Explorer: .."That's, noth-
ing. Where we were the words
came out of our. mouths .in, pieces
of ice, and we had, to fry them to
see what we were talking about."
-Montreal Star.

Mail is delivered regularly to
London homes up to 9:30 o'clock
at night.


E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Cotini Building
Port St. Joe, Florida


TV A 11 JL
-at the -

ST. JOE BAR
-<


It's Time To Check Your Car
WE SPECIALIZE IN

WASHING

POLISHING

GREASING
We Sell the Gas With 7 noco
More Mile- and Less Carbon W OCOlep
SERVICE
DRIVE-IN STATION
On Highway No. 10 J. W. Duncan, Mgr.



Eat .

THOMPSON'S BREAD-

and Cake

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR GROCERS



THOMPSON'S BAKERIES
Port St. Joe -:- Apalachicola


J. L. K1


PORT ST. JOE,

-0---


-WATCHES
-CLOCKS


Repairing
A Specialty


-J E


SWRR

FLA.






WELRY
-DIAMONDS


Free


(-N


25 Gallons Given


Away Each Week!

- BEGINNING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 -
This Offer Applies Only on CASH PURCHASES

ASK US FOR DETAILS
Prompt and Courteous Service-Expert Lubrication

MALONE'S STANDARD SERVICE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Grant's tomb on the Hudson
river in New York City cost $600,-
000, all raised by popular sub-
scription.


You Can Always
Find Your Favorite
:Brand of-

BEER

WHISKEY

WINF


r abbRIPaaiWb] Ir~-~c~R~a~


. a


I


PAGESi 61X


THE 8TAR


Namov~vberl_12,:,1937







The Mammoth Cave of Ken- Chemists have tried to make
The Last Ten Years COURT UPHOLDSL tucky has 47 domes, 23 pits, eight diamonds in the laboratory ever
and one sea. only in producing tiny crystals.
IY_ A cataracts, three rivers, two lakes since 1880, but have succeeded

Of Pulp and Paper Mill MURPHY ACT and one sealin roduciny crytal
EEnables Thori Who Have Been MEET YOUR--FRIENDS--- --AT-- -- -- --
Development In State abe To Pay Taxes To Get MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT
Them Back On Tax Rolls :
By WILLIAM L. WILSON nandina and at his suggestion the A law passed by the last PLA C
Vice-President-at-Large, Florida committee called a meeting there lature, known as the Murphy Act, -.{ PALM POINT INN g..-
State Chamber Commerce on September 12, 1933, at which has been upheld by the supreme
(Reprinted from Times-Union) plans were formed for securing a court. It provides that the owner FOR AN ENJOYABLE EVENING
pulp mill for that city. Both Mr. ,
of lands, or a person desiring to
Allen and the industrial commit- p t c
(Concluded from last week) tee stayed on the job and at one cetcaes o l
time secured favorable action to.of another. call notify the clerk of REFRESHMENTS -:- DANCING
In promoting the St. Jo'e ossi-me sece avorale action to h circuit court to advertise the
ability many manufacturers of pulp ward the construction of a mill by tax certificates on the lands se --- No Profanity Allowed
and paper were interviewed. One the Union Bag and Paper Corn- forth in the application. The costs. I
of them made a significant re- pany. Savannah, however, was in including advertising, is to be paid
mark which was prophetic. Being position to offer more financial as- in advance. C. D. WILLIAMS, Prop.
a manufacturer of white paper, he sistane and landed that mil Te o-owing advertising, the certif- ........
said: "I admit white paper can be pubicty connected with the ac icates are offered for sale to the
made in the South from southern tivity started by the Fernandina highest bidder at the court house
pine at a cost lower than we are meeting resulted in the investiga- door on the date and at the time
now making it in the North, but," tion of this as a site by a number advertised.
he added, "at present our compe-of other mills. Two of these, the If advertisement is desired on l
tuition is not as severe as the kraft Container Corporation of America nds not owned by the applicant
people are facing. We do not want of Chicago and the Rainier Corn- and he is the highest bidder, then
.to be the first concern to move pany of San Francisco, are now he must hold the certificate for
South, but we will certainly be building pulp mills at Fernandina. two years before he can apply for T ke Advantage of the Off-Season
the second, for once the start is The first-named will manufacture a tax deed. At any time the or-
made there will be a virtual stam- kraft board, and it is interesting iginal owner can tender the Savings
pede to the South by paper manu- that the latter wi manufacture amount of the bid, with three per
facturing concerns." pure cellulose for use in making cent interest, and take up the cer-
This is exactly ihat has hap- such products as rayon, cellophane tificate at the bid made by the
opened. The man who made that and duco. other party.
remark was George Mead who was During the past 10 years, especi- This law was passed to enable Let Me Figure Any Building
almost the first white paper man- ally since the construction of the owners of property who were un- Tht Y r
ufacturer to move South in spite Panama City mill, Florida loca- able to pay their taxes to clear hat ou Deire
of his remark. His company actu tions have been investigated by them up and get them on the tax
ally took an option on the St. Joe many manufacturers. The pulp rolls, and to present a method by
property, sent engineers and for- and paper business has increased which people could purchase the 2F You Can Be Proud of a Home Built By Us
esters to make an. examination of in size and in profit and it now back taxes on lands owned by an-
conditions and when favorable re- has come to the point Mr. Mead other and ultimately get a tax
ports were received from both prophesied they are actually deed to them,
groups, decided upon a mill at "stampeding" into tire South. Flor- A number of property owners
Port St. Joe. Unfortunately, the ida has one mill actively in opera- are investigating this law and In- H. H TA YLO R
depression came along and it tion, four more are under con- dications are that a considerable
.seemed to be unwise to proceed struction, and if a prophesy is per- number will take advantage of its GENERAL CONTRACTOR Port St. Joe
with further expansion at that mitted, it may be said that at least provisions to clear up back taxes
time, so the option was allowed three additional ones will be es- on their property.
to lapse. Now that the depres- tablished at other locations within Anyone interested should see J.
sion is over, even though the St. the state of Florida before many R. Hunter at Wewahitchka, clerk
Joe property had changed hands months have passed. Now we have f the circuit court, who will be
in the meantime, the Mead Cor- the desired market-for pulp wood glad to give full information as to
portion is building a Mill at Port which can be fed first by. ex- what is required to get the bene-
St. Joe. They are also building a hausted trees, then by thinnings fits of this law. W AE
mill at Brunswick, Ga. and again by newly exhausted
The industrial committee of the trees. Turpentine will continue on WAITING
state chamber of commerce con- a more profitable basis, logging Waiter: "Here's your coffee, sir. i-
tinued its activity regarding the will continue and we can develop It's fine-fresh from South Amer-
acquisition of pulp and paper mills a rounded forest policy which will ica."
for this state. Fernandina ap- make reforestation in Florida Diner: "So that's where you've
feared to b-e a good location, profitable. been!" WE CAN SUPPLY YOU
The committee chairman persuad- It has been an active and inter-
ed James H. Alien to visit Fer- testing andi profitable 10 years for Accordin to "Chemical and Me-
nandina. Mr. Allen was formerly the state of Florida in the work Acordingi to "Chemi and Me-
tallurgical Engineering," an auto-
with the Southern Kraft Corpora- of establishing pulp and paper mobile tire costing $50 in 1910 N m matter h ll h
tion and while in their employ mills produced 5,000 miles, while in 1936
was largely responsible for induc- a tire costing $15 is good for 2 large your order, come to US.
ing them to accept Panama City The first blood of the American a costing $15 is good for 20,- g y C
as a location. War of Independence was shed. 0 YO sin will b
Publicity Brought New Mills most historians agree, in the ine
Mr. Allen was impressed with Westminster, Vt., massacre, Mar.pre ia .
the advantages available at Fer- 13, 1775. Look U s U p!

PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS When you need any

ELIMINATION OF DOGFLY If you want it done
RIG HT!
Now that cold weather has

dog flils have retired to ELECTRICCOMPANY
whence they came, a number
of suggestions for theirelim- H. B. Whitaker BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE
nation have been put forth
by various residents. Two of
t he best suggestions offered
follow:
Uncle Tom Gibson, who
holds down a chair .in one of
the Forest Service fire
towers, says that as the dog
flies are particularly fond of
horses, why not build a num.
EXPERT BARBER S ber of tin horses and when
they are thickly covered
Our customers say that with the flies, build a fire in-
we have a knack of giv- side the tin steeds and roast l
ing them what they ask the flier.
for. That's because our Fred Maddox has a much
barbers are experienced, simpler and less expensive
skilled operators! suggestion, w h ich would GOOD furniture makes a GOOD Christmas gift! Let furniture solve YOUR shopping
cause the flies to kill them. problems, simply, happily and economically. Make the entire family happy this
Try Us Today! selves. Says Fred: Christmas!
"Just catch one of the

COOPER'S tasl red, iand the rest of themes BARGAIN FUNITURE COMPANY
deBARBER SHOP woul laugh themselves to." Oldest Furniture Store in Gulf County PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
death--."--- I


~ -----~ i-~-- ~I Lc~-PILli- ~-- ~1 -~_I Isls~-s~~_~lll~C~~ -


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR


November 12, 1937






PAGE EIH K TRNoebr1,1


AUDIT REVEALS MANY
OFFICES NOT CHECKED

(Continued from page 1)
Auditor Wainwright has revised
the system used by his depart-
ment with the result that speedier,
more economical and efficient
audits can, be made, and he ex-
pects to have completed tbh au-
diting of all the accounts of all
state and county officials and
state institutions within the next
year.

WSEEK-END GUESTS AT INN

The following guests registered
at Ihe Port Inn during th'e week-
end: II. R. McLachlan and wife,
Pittsburgh, Pa.; G. T. Kaser and
Jacob Kaser, Coldwater, Mich.;
Al F. Rettig and Samuel Seddon,
Atlanta, Ga.; Margaret Beiden, At-
lanta, Ga.; Charles H. Manor and
wife, Jacksonville; J. L. Graham.
Tallahassee, Frank O'Neil and D.
L. Thompson, Greenville, Ala.;
Iarry Salmons, Charleston. S. C.;
A. J. Livingston, "'allahassee, Mr.
and Mrs. M. C. Rumley, Tusca-
loosa. Ala.; Thomas L. Waters
and E. W. Speed, Pensacola, K.
A. Sweenning, Knippord, Tenn.;
J. W. Smith, Pensacola; William
Sahr, New York, N. Y.; Mrs. D.
G. Moon, Savannah, Ga.; H. A.
Tierman, Toledo, Ohio.


/ dled

WHERE Y OU WANT I1y


SUPERFEX


oYZZ HEATERS

NEW, MODERN DESIGN

SUPERFEX heaters, a product of
Perfection Stove Company, are
made in several types and sizes
-radiating heaters and Heat-
Directors. Flue connection like
ordinary stove. Shown here is a
Heat-Director, with patented ad-
justable shutters making it possible
to direct heat where it is most
needed. Floors quickly warmed.
Sizes to suit small, medium, or large
homes, offices, shops, schools and
churches. Heating capacities 2,850
to 9,770 cu. ft., depending on size
and climate (equal to several or-
dinary rooms). Easy terms if desired.


ROCHE'S

COMMUNITY

STORE
Port St, Joe, Fla.


SPECTACULARAIR

SHOW AT ST JOE

'WINGS OVER HONOLULU' IS
FEATURE WEDNESDAY
AND THURSDAY

Combining the color of Uncle
Sam's naval air forces with the
romance of the tropics in a highly
dramatic story, "Wings O ver
Honolulu" plays at the St. Joe
Theater Wednesday and Thursday
of next week, with Wendy Barrie
and Ray Milland in there leading
roles. The picture was filmed on
location with the co-operation of
the United States navy and con-
tains spectacular aviation scenes.
The U. S. S. Ranger, giant naval
aircraft carrier, is the locale of
the picture's outstanding se-
quences. Several of her officers
and enlisted personnel appear in
th'e production, notable among
them being Capt. P. N. L. Bellin-
ger, commander of the ship.
Other Hollywood members of
the cast are Kent Taylor, William
Gargan, Polly Rowles, Samuel
Hinds, Joyce Compton and Mary
Phillips.
All the male actors except Tay-
lor portray naval officers. Miss
Barrie is seen as the wife of a
young lieutenant, played by Mil-
land.

TRAFFIC FATALITIES FOR
OCTOBER SHOW INCREASE
TAMPA, Nov. 1Z (FNS)-Flor-
ida traffic fatalities showed an in-
crease of 70 per cent as compared
with October, 1936, it was an-
nounced by Asher Frank, secre-
tary of the state safety council,
this week. The total for October
-this year was 52 deaths from high-
way accidents, against 30 for the
same month last year.
Pointing to the increasing death
toll as an indication of careless-
ness on the part or individual mo-
torists, Burton H. Schoepf, safety
council chairman, made a plea for
more caution in driving, especially
during the heavy traffic of win-
ter months.

BANKERS TO MEET IN
TALLAHASSEE NOV. 16
Bankers of Florida will talk
shop and hear several addresses
on various subjects when they
meet in annual convention in
Tallahassee November 16.
Speakers will include President
S. W. Anderson of Quincy, Dr.
Harold Stonier of New York, rep-
resenting the American Bankers'
association; Frank W. Norris,
of Jacksonville; Attorney General
Cary D. Landis, State Comptroller
J. M. Lee and Governor Fred P.
Cone.
James H. Kelley of the Wewa-
hitchka State Bank expects to at-
tend the session.

'TWAS A TIE
The skipper and the engineer
were arguing. Th'e latter said that
steering a ship N-as much easier
than looking aftor the engines,
and the captain said looking after
the engines was child's play com-
pared with steering. They decided
to settle the ar-gument by chang-
ing places.
After 10 minutes the captain had
to admit he was beaten.
"Mac," he shou'ed, "I can't get
the engines to start!"
"That's all right," replied the
engine!wr'. "ye nedna bother-we
are aground."--Montreal Star.

SPEAKING OF 'LOUIES'
A contributor to the New York
Sun t'lls of a woman "newly rich
iand not a specialist," who bought
a Louis XV bed. Finding it too
short she wrote to the dealer to
exch'-nge it for a Louis XVI. -
Mncon Telegraph.

Tr National J'ewish Welfare
Board was organized in 1917 and
ias its headquarters iff New York.


CITY COMMISSIONERS
BAN 'MARBLE BOARDS'

(Continued from page 1)
Manager W. R. Gait, who stated
that the disposal plants would be
sufficiently completed by Decem-
ber 1 to care for a limited number
of connections, and suggested that
the commissioners prepare an or-
dinance providing for monthly
charges as, according to specifi-
cations set forth in the bonds is-
sued for the work, such rental
must be provided for in order to
pay on' the indelbedn'ess.
Mr. Galt believed that the fair-
est system would Le on the basis
of amount of water used, with ex-
coiptions, anld pres-ented a poten-
tial schedule based on a rate of
ten cents per thousand gallons of
water, the charge decreasing as
the amount of water used in-
creascd. Under this plan the user
of 2,509 gallons of water would
pay twenty-five cents, or ten cents
per thousand gallons, while! th'e
user of 7,500 gallons would pay
sixty centg, and so on. This plan
seemed the best possible, and the
commissioners instructed City At-
torney Clay Lewil to draw up an
ordinance incorporating such de-
tails.
The matter of fixing the tax
rate for the ensuing year was to
have come up at Tuesday night's
meeting, but due to these other
matters taking up so much time,
the commissioners agreed to at-
tend to this important matter at
a future session.

YOUNG DEMOCRATS TO
HOLD 'VICTORY DINNERS'

Officials of the nation's Young
Democratic clubs announced in
Washington, D. C., this week that
December 9 has been selected as
the date for the annual nationwide
"Victory Dinners."
Arrangements have been made
for Democratic National Chairman
James A. Farley to address Young
Democrats from coast to coast in
a special radio hook-up on, that
date, the broadcast being sched-
uled for 10:30 to 11 p. m., eastern
standard time.

DR. J. M. MANN DIES
LAKE BUTLER, Nov. 12 (FNS)
-Dr. J. M. Mann, former state
senator from tae 15th district,
comprising Union and Bradford
counties, died here this week. For
17 years Dr. Mann has served on
the state board of medical ex-
aminers and held the office of
chairman at the time of his pass-
ing. He was 61 years of age.


Edison's first phonograph, with The first word of the preamble
cylindrical records, was' invented to the United States Constitutiona
in 1877. is "we."

aes~re~a~sl~~as-la~llslsoil Ic


Don't Be'a



Wooden






ALL YOUR LIFE! .. Take an ac-
tive part in affairs of your city.

join the Woman's Club, the Lions Club,
the American Legion, or any other civic
body, no matter what-, for they are all
working for the general welfare of the
residents of Port St. Joe. 7-n<. Ai
incidentally, in order to keep up with
affairs of the city and these various or-
ganizations, you should enter your sub-
scription right now for The. Star, youT"
-- home town newspaper.


NOTICE TO



TAXPAYERS




The heads of all families, widows and cripples
are entitled to certain exemptions fromii tial-
orum taxes. However, before such exemption
can be made or allowed by the City Tax As-
sessor it will be necessary that the Tax Assessor
be advised of the description of the property
on which you wish to claim exemption.

Please notify me on or before December 1st,
1937, of the property and amount of exemption
claimed so that such deduction can be made.


M. P. Tomlinson,
2t City Auditor and Clerk.


N You Can Afford the BEST in
S 0 BUILDING MATERIALS...

w E furnish materials
that give you a pride
in showing to your friends,
and the knowledge of own-
ership creates a satisfied
-~ feeling in the completed
-home.



LET US HELP YOU IN

,'_, .* PLANNING YOUR HOME

We Have a Cornplete

Advi-oa- -v service!


A Home You Can Be OProud of s

Mae of HODGES QUALITY LLU' R

We Stock All Grades and Sizes .. . media ..ivery .

V1 PortSt.ide

R. R. Ho xdges Lumber Co.ForidaSte


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PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR


November 12, 19374