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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00157
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 29, 1937
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00157

Full Text



*iPort St. Joe--Site of the $7,500,000
tPont Paper Mill-Florida's Fast-
est Growing Little City In
ithe- heart of the Pine Belt.


THE


STAR


If you have any .news-no latter
how trivial it may seem to you-
bring or send it to The Star, it will
be of interest to our readers.


OLUME I PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 2f, 1937 NUMBER 1




C- ITYIS CO ING T 0RO T


IRAKE REPORTS

BIG INCREASE IN

POSTAL RECEIPTS

LOCAL OFFICE SHOULD SOON
RECEIVE HIGHER RATING,
SAYS, POSTMASTER

An indication of the substantial
i.rogress and development of Port
gr 'Joe Is shown in the increase
ut receipts at the local postoffice
.fr. the quarter ending September
30. according to Postmaster H.A.
Drake.
Mr. Dral-e's report showed an
nicrease of $1,201.28 over the
-ime period last year, and his
records indicate a steady increase
since 1935. If this increase con-
linues proportionately in the fu-
ture. it will be but a short while
before the office will be elevated
to a--bigber grade.
Posta .receipts for the first
three quarters were $4,164.41, as
against $1.464,63 for the same pe-
riod last year. Receipts for the
first quarter of 1937 were $873.42;
el:ond quarterr $1.331 93; third
.quarter., $1.959 01. and the current


MEMOIRS OF A DOOMED

AND FORGOTTEN CITY


(Editor's Note: We are indebted
to J. R. Hunter, clerk of the Gulf
county circuit court, fir the fol-
li'vinE articles copied from The
Saint Joe Times from 1839 to 1841
as the same appears on file in the
Congressional Library in Wash-
ington, D. C. While practically all
of the older residents of Port St.
Joe and Gulf county are probably
familiar with these articles, we
feel sure that the new residents
will- read then with interest, as
did the editor.)

(The following. is .supposed to
be in the year 1851, and describes
the awful plAgu'e of yellow fever
that wiped out the town and
which was followed later by a ter-
rific hurricane.)
Then uncontrollable fear seized
upon all. Business ceased. Ships
slippedL their anchors and stole
away in the night. The. air was
stagnant and filled with pestelen-
tial vapors. Many sought safety
through flight only to be stricken
and die by the wayside. Soon the


quarter, according to Mr. Drake, Ihorrid pestilence held undisputed


is expected to exceed $2,500,
.which is on the basis of second
'14a01lP erpaTSti9- Receipts for ..the
.'i~etdar .year of 1926 were $2,-
*43".72. On the basis of present,
i'teirts. it is hoped it will be but
a short while before the office is
advanced into the second class.
Under the postoffjce depart-
ment's system of deducting 15 per
Enit of the gross recelpcs since
in.:eption of the three-cent rate on
L.5t-class matter, receipts must
Stoal $9,425 per aniunm in order
that an office berated in the sec-
indi class.
",'th an elevation in grade,


sway throughout the city. Deaths
were no longer counted. All day.
long v.-as heard the rmnble Of-thek
death wagons 'upon the streets.
Trenches took the place of graves


NEW HOMES PROGRESSING
The new homes being :can
structed by Art;~r Lupton are
making rapid progress. These
residences, from present appeiar-
ances, -will soon be ready roJ (c.
cupancy. These houses will he at-
tractive six-room bungalows and
will add much in improving the
section of town in which they are-
being built.


and rude boxes for coffins. Halv-
crazed men would rush to the sur-
rounding woods for safety, with
heads bursting with :nexpress-
able pain and eyes forcing th'em-
selves from their sockets. Under
some lofty pine they would check
their mad flight, hesitate,, stag-
ger, then the dark blood, the
black vomit of death, would come
rushing through their parched
lips-they would fall forward into
.this pool of deadened blood and
die. Great God, what a.death!
The heretofore prosperous city
was doomed. The Death Angel held
undisputed sway, and as he pass-
ed from door to door he found no
blood-stained lintel as in the days
of yore. None were spared. Fam-
ilies were broken up by flight,
only to be soon reunited in death.
How quickly love," hatred, the pas-
sion for wealth, for learning, were
placed in one common receptacle.
How insignificant was man! Rea-
son, humanity, charity all had
fled. Like the dumb brute of the
woods or field, man died uncared
for and alone. In a very brief
space of time the city was depopu-
lated, never again to be the habi-
lation of 'manr 'The few that .es-
caped, and the pure-blooded Afri-
(Continued on page 7)


LION'S CLUB HOLDS

REGULAR MEETING

DISCUSS THE ADVISABILITY
OF HOLDING DANCE TO
S :--.RAISE FINDSp


Postmaster Draile hopes that the
.artmtoa r l soon take cog t t The Port St. Joe Lions club met
dei-arOnt -ill .sootn take cogniz-e An ad in The Star gets results! Tuesday night at the Black Cat
ar..*e of th. fact that Port St. Joe Cafe in their regular meetings,
is a rapidly. growing city and fur- adding some additiona.help, as atpresided over by the pgular meetident,
nrl' larger, and more elaborate present the staff, is: hard-put to presded oer. by the president,
quarters for the office, as well as care for the rush.of. business. sat down at th e table.
S .-,,:.. "' sat down. at the table.
N Letters were read requesting
that as many members as possible
attend charter nights of similar
City, Comm isisson organizations at Apa!achicola and
SetoS ip F ent F --Havana. Eight members indicated
their willingness to attend. the
Epnt For Apalachicola gathering, but after
y oi discussion it was deemed too lon
Buys Equipment: For EE
:. : "a trip to .attend the Havana af-
:rfair. The Apalachicol charter
F .ire P.r 6 t t'o n.II night will be November 1.
Advisability of staging a dance
Telephone, switchboard. at the Port Inn November 11. Ar-
'UPCHASE' WILL CUT DOWN It was pointed out by Mayor Joe sice Day, was discussed in or-
SINSURANCE F'ATE SUFFiCl- Sharit that this expenditure for der to bring the Lions club to the
ENTLY TO PAY FOR INVEST- fire-fighting equipment will pay attention of the public and raise
MENT DURING -FIRST YEAR for itself the first year .in low- funds for Christmas work. After
.. ered insurance.rates on business some..talk it was decided that it
At a special called meeting of buildings and w:esidences.in the: wbuld not pay to hold a dance on
he city commissib'ners Wednes- city. date, as' uin people would
be out of to -wi, and it was thought
j,' night the city dads signed the Manning Smith, operator of a tht northern an it was ought
-ccssary resolutions for th- pur- dry cleaning establishment, ,ap- profitanother dat e ou emoro i
iase of a, 'used -LaFrance 'fire feared to protest the increase in nprofitable. committee, consist ,
a O" et :O f -iye ..ing of C. A: L!jlardY, chairman,
tiuck and. 1000- "fet 6f 'two'-ply cleaning licenses from $15 to $50,Ralph Swarz ad chairman
hose to meet the provisions of the and he was informed .that the in- Ralph wartz a and tM P. Tomlin- t
fire unr;r. rit.ers for a,'lower rate crease was made at the .request on, was appointed to get in touch
f insurance. of another dry cleaning concern. with an orchestra and work out t
f insurance.of another dry cleaning concern.further details on the dance.
A fire siren is also necessary, Mayor Sharit said: "I feel the The next meeting of the
nr the board is having one sent license is too high for a small izon wl be held nex t eorgan- b
an approval; to cost $175. It was pressing club' similar to that Mr. izatmon wil be held next Tuesday,
thought that arrangements could Smith operates, and dn.'t think mbers to be notified '. time C
)e made to mount the siren on we should raise rates at the re-b
:op of the A. & N. depot where it quest of individuals in order to
-puld be close to the telephone keep Other business men out of The Woman's Club meets at the d
rated from a button on thPort Inn the first and third Wed- E
Sa button on th (Continued on page 8) inesdays of each month at 3 p. m. f(


Paper Mill e.:pacted to Begin
Operations In December;
Dock Work Being Rushed


WORK STARTED ON
FOR CELEBRATION HARBOR DREDGING


Will Contain 27. Square Miles
Of Water 30 Feet Deep;
Town Is Expending Rapidly


Senator Charles Andrews, who Port St. Joe, ling by the Gulf
was a recent visitor in Port St. for many years as a quiet, un-


Joe and expressed his amaze- obtrusive little village, is rapidly
ment at the progress that has coming to the fore, and if expec-
been made here, states that he stations are realized and growth
will personally extend an invita- continues in the future as it has
tion to President Roosevelt to in the past few months? it will be
attend the 193S centennial cele- a city of from seven to eight
bration to be held here in 1938 in thousand souls and will compete
honor of the 100th anniversary of for recognition with other cities
the signing of Florida's constitu- of Northwest Florida.
tion. Pierce Wood, in charge of the
Looking at our landlocked har- DuPont interests here, states that
bor, which is deep enough for any the $7,500,000 paper mill is about
ship on the Gulf to dock and leave 80 per cent complete, and that if
under its own power and large expectations are realized, the first
enough with its 27 square miles paper will be run the latter part
of deep water to accommodate the of December. The mill will man-
entire United States navy, Sena- ufacture wrapping paper, bag
tor Andrews felt confident that
tor Andrews ft confident thatpaper and other heavy duty kraft
the president would consider fa- papers. There are about 600 men
vorably such an invitation. employed in construction work at
the mill and a weekly payroll of
BAND IS MAKING PROGRESS approximately $28,000 is being
UNDER DIRECTION FARMER distributed.
-.. -- c: i Rumors, without offital confir-
The Port St. Joe band, under mation, are being-hi'cursted that
the able direction of Dan Farmer, with the completion of the initial
has made much progress in the unit another unit -will be
few weeks that it has been or- started;'that the company will
ganized. Adelaide Hardy, Alice build a rayon mill and a chemical
Ruth Gibson and David Maddox, plant here, but, as stated, confir-
cornets, and Roy Gibson, William nation is lacking.
Harwick and Carlyle Matthtws Work on the city's dock is be-
clarinets, beautifully rendered ing rushed to be in readiness for
numbers in chapel program and opening of the paper mill, and the
uSnday school, federal government has a dredge
It is with much interest that we in operation in the harbor deep-
watch the progress of our band ening the channel to the docks
and- know that in the near future from. it present 25 feet to 30
we will have a band that 'we canfet uo pro-ide,-a-_uniform 30-foot
boast of. Let our motto be: entrance. This will ental--1irtex-
"Boost the Band," and give Mr. penditure of $200,000. The depth
Farmer the co-operation that he of water at the dock is already 30
best deserves as director. feet, created by the city and the
exchange, as the siren will be op-
Advertising pays-try it! (Continued on page 8)


Martin and. Davis to


Start Construct!on of


Thlaaterl.. Building


WILL HAVE A SEATING CA-
PACITY OF 1,024 AND BE LO-
CATED. ON THIRD AVENUE;
OF MODERNISTIC DESIGN'.

Good news to theater-goers of
Port St. Joe and vicinity is the
announcement by Martin and Da-
uis, owners of the St. Joa Thea.
ter, that they will begin immedi-
ately construction work on a n.w
heater building on Third. Avenue.
The structure, which will be 45
by 120 feet. will be erected on
our lots adjoining the Miles Ten
3ent stoie and will be of steel and
brick construction.
Construction work will be un-
der the supervision of L.'N. Mc-
3achean of Tallahassee, architect
or the Martin and Davis inter-


ests, and all labor, as far as pos-
sible, will be local and strictly
union, according to Bill Turner,
manager of the present theater.
Building materials will also be
purchased through local concerns.
Seating capacity of the theater
will be 1,024 and all the latest
conveniences for the comfort and
entertainment of patrons will be
incorporated in the building..
The play house will be of the
latest modernistic design, with
a glass tile front and all the lat-
t-st lighting effects. A stage for
road shW-`s an;l vaudeville will be
provided.
Martin and Davis are to be con-
gratulated on their foresight and
faith in the future of Port St. Joe
and may rest assured that the
citizens of the city will support-
them to the fullest extent.


SENATOR ANDREWS

TO INVITE PRESIDENT


FEELS CONFIDENT BID WILL
BE ACCEPTED BY NATION'S
HIGHEST DIGNITARY


r -.


I


i I









PAG TWO THE -SA otS.Je Pa. coe2


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher

issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Application for entry as second-class matter
is pending.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-.-{ Telephone 51 1.*-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The The spoken word barely asserts; the
printed word thoroughly convinces. Th'e
spoken word is lost; the printed word re-
mains.


A STATEMENT OF POLICY

It is with the greatest faith in the future
of Port St. Joe that the publisher presents
this, the first issue of The Star to the resi-
dents of Port St. Joe and Gulf county, and it
is the culmination of several months of end-
less effort overcoming difficulties that al-
ways appear in the establishment of a news-
paper plant. In fact, we had begun to weaken
perceptibly and at times were almost ready
to give up the ghost. However, no matter
how dark the clouds may appear, we have
found that invariably there is a silver lining,
and this first issue is, to us, the silver lining.
While we know that we cannot please all
of our readers all of the time, at least we
can try to please' some of our readers some
of the time. As a friend of ours remarked
to us a number of years ago: "It's a darned
poor excuse for a newspaper that doesn't
make somebody mad once in a while."
We do not intend to irritate anyone in-
tentionally, but we realize that no newspa-
per of character can be pleasing to all peo-
ple and all factions. Sometimes a newspaper
can be judged quite as effectively by its
enemies as its friends.
As far as local and county politics go, we
will try to be independent without being
neutral, and. we- will try to keep our political
;policies on the editorial page and out of the
news columns.
We will endeavor to be as fair in our news
-columns to those with whom we disagree as
to those with whoi we agree. We will not
'consider above frank discussion any subject
having to do with the health, happiness, edu-
---atiii-a-tt progress offtlihe average ,citizen.
We wilL essay the difficult role of being
tolerant with the intolerant. We will try to
keep in aiind that there is no such animal
as journalistic infallibility. And above all,
we will cherish as a pearl of. great price a
thing we believe to be ours a sense
of humor.


THE SOUTH IS RAPIDLY BECOMING
PAPER-CONSCIOUS

Looking at Port St. Joe today and Cfom-
paring it to the Port St. Joe of twj,years
ago gives one an idea of what it happening
in a dozen towns in the South where paper
mills have been erected or are being erected
for the manufacture of paper from pine logs.
All but one of these, mills are in the
coastal plains regions, the single exception
of importance being located at Crossett, Ar-
kansas The rest, like the mill here, are on
deep water.
The Port St. Joe mill represents an invest-
ment of $7,500,000 by the DuPont interests,
and the total of all the mills in the South
represent an investment of better than $60,-
000,000. And this is not all, for into the build-
ing of residences for workmen, harbor im-
provements and th.e purchase df forest lands
will go another $40,000,000 _from the paper
interests, the government and individuals.
The South's forests have been redis-
covered, and this will bring about economic
end social effects that will cause far-reach-
ing changes that no one can forecast as yet
ibut which we in Port St. Joe will pass


through. No such step toward industrializa-
tion of the South has been seen since the
textile industry migrated frm New Eng-
land, but unlike the textile invasion, which
was spread over a period of years, the paper
manufacturing industry has been built up in
something like 18 months, and the paper-
making capacity of the South is being in-
creased from 3,500 tons a day to 6,500 tons.
Not ony will the paper industry offer em-
ployment to thousands in the mills, but it
will open to thousands of farmers who have
been depending on cotton for a living a new
an. steady source of revenue. From the
time the cotton has been cultivated for the
last time, until it is picked in the late au- I1
tumn, there has been nothing for the cotton
farmer to do. Now he can develop a source N
of income that will tide him over that period. F
Most farmers in the coastal area have land
that has been cut over and which has de-
vcloped a second growth. Moderately good i
forest land in the South will grow a cord
of pine to the acre every year, and a given
tract can be cut every 15 years---in some in-
stances more often. Or, after 15 years, it
can produce turpentine for six or eight
years and then be cut. These are the facts
which encourage forestry experts to believe
that the 200,000,000 acres of forest in the
South can and will be made to yield a vast
supply of wood forever. And this can be t
done if, for every tree that is cut another
tree is planted.
If such a practice is followed, and we be-
lieve it will be, as the farmers of the South
are becoming forest-conscious, there is no
reason why this new source of revenue can
not continue indefinitely for the benefit of
southern farmers and land owners.
This is no destructive invasion like that
of the lumbermen from. the North who dis-
covered the South's forests in the nineties ca
W:
and felled the magnificent stands of yellow b,
pine trees, many of them 100 and 200 years FI
old,,leaving a vast expanse of stumps. These fi
cut-over lands for a long time were regarded yo
as utterly worthless. But southern pines c
grow fast, and lands that once were a sad,-th
desolation of unsightly stumps are again th
covered with trees, although not of such ou
girth as those the lumbermen found. du
Dr. Charles H. Herty is the man most th
responsible for this development in the i
South. For years he has preached the.value w,
of southern pine as a source of cellulose. He
did more than that-he demonstrated its
possibilities in his laboratory at Savannah. m
But the paper manufacturers did not believe a
that there was enough pine in the South to ta
warrant the construction of mills. But Dr. s
Herty and his backers persisted. It was a
pointed out that there was a sufficient sup- wi
ply, and in addition a number of economic pe
advantages Men can work the year around J
in the South, while northern mills do not a,
tei
feel safe without a year's supply of wood in t
the yards; and interest on money tied up in ni
wood amounts to considerable in the oper-
ating costs. Southern kraft mills ordinarily
work with about four days' supply of wood to
on hand, and often less. Fuel and other raw ac
materials are just as cheap here and as ac
readily available. Our pine is heavier than w,
most competing woods and yields more pa- sr
per to the cord. And wages, one of the big m
items, are lower in the South.
M
So, with all these reasons summed up, the w
rush to the South is on---and the South is w
becoming paper-conscious. in


When a man tells a funny joke
woman he isn't sure whether she will
or slap his face.---Florida Times-Union.
he shouldn't tell those kind of jokes.


to a
laugh
rWell,


If you like The Star, come in and tell us
about it. If you don't---come in a'ld tell us
anyway.


Trade in Port St. Joe and keep your dol-
lars at home where you can get another
crack at them.


hi

"'
yc

bt
he
tu


Stardust and

Moonshine
By The Other Fellow


(Editor's Note: Under the above
option, The Star has signed up
hat we beli'ave to be one of the
ist column writers In Northwest
[orida for the enjoyment and edi-
cation of our readers. We hope
u will like the column. As the
inductor explains it, "The Other
illow" is not only himself, but all
e readers as well, and he asks
at:aour readers contribute gener-
slly and help to make the "Star-
ist and MoonShine" column one of
e outstanding features of this pa-
ir. This, he points out, is not
ily his column, but yours as
all.) ..

Now that Editor Bill has started
e off on the right foot and saved
lot of space that would have been
ken up had I tried to say the
me thing, I'll get down to this
rio-comic business of conducting
column which I hope our readers
ill turn to before they read the
irsonals to see whether Petunia
ones spent last Tuesday in Pan-
ma City, or whether Silas Win-
rbottom was calling on his gal
lend in Apalachicola Saturday
ght.

This city of Port St. Joe is new
me, and so I went strolling
bout the streets yesterday to get
,quainted and endeavor to de-
lop sources of Information that
would aid me in filling my weekly
pace and save wear and tear on
y brain tissues.
While idling in front of th'-
iles Five and Ten admiring the
Window display, a man came by
walking on his hands, and, sens-
g something unusual, I stopped
m and engaged in conversation.
"Will you tell me," I asked,
why it is you are walking on
our hands?"
The man grimaced painfully,
brought his heels down behind his
ead and regained a normal pos-
Ire.


"
Somebody
"
y he growled, "is al-


cuss the subject.
"There is," I remarked," the huff
which comes with the puff .
a variety used by wiclkedol.
to blow a house down. k-Yjiu will
find -it mentioned in literature as
well as brought to life on the
cinema screen."
"But you said I was In-one-you
know you did," retorted the mac
"Um, well bu"an-ybibw,
what has this to do with walking
on your hands?"
"What has anything to do with
it? I am the same unoffending per-
son on my hands as I am on
my feet. That which is wrong is
your perspective you cannot
reconcile what you see with, your
ideas of what my deportment
should be I. stand on my
hands to change my perspective, to
make topsy-turvy ideas such as
the PWA, the CCC, the CIO, the
'AA, the PDQ and the CGOD Tight
thehmelPves and If anyone
is going to come around here: to:
tell me I shouldn't "
"There, there," I : d hastily,
'"don't get in -a-"
"If you saT. i ntr again, the
man yelled, 'I'll kick you down the
street to Miller'%s'drug store!"
And, bein~i rather paace-
able nature *t'.. t being any
too large, t~jlgio out that time I
renembered,,h important engage-
ment I had with thra Queen of
Hearts to go out and kill a China-
man.

PASSENGERS OFFERED TIP
IF DRIVER IS- RECKLESS
Don't cross your legs if you are
riding in the front seat of an au-
tomobile with a reckless driver.
That is the advice of Dr. Rob-
ert Funsten, professor of ortho-
pedic surgery at the Universlty'
Virginia. He read a paper ,
"Dashboard Dislocations of the
Hip" at the 50th annual conven-
tion of the American Orthopaedic
Association at Lincoln, Neb.
This type injury is a frequent
result of automobile collisions and
presents a surgical problem, he
said. The passenger in the front
seat can avoid it by planting both
feet on the floor boards and lon-
ing back in the seat.
If he crosses his legs, he is apt
tn rlislonate his hin -'a well as in-


ways spoiling my fun by asking jure his knee. That means con-
questions." finement in a hospital for eght or
"There, there," I said, "don't ba ten weeks, Dr. Funsten said.
in a huff." -
"What huff?" asked the man. The Netherlands government 4a
"Any huff you suggest. There expected to put an end to its n
are, you know, several varieties of too-successful plan for use of sini
huffs." .. And the two of us plified spelling.


PAGE TWO-


Pd ot; jbe Fa otbr-ii;


THE -STAR







SSO eE


HINT ON DISHWASHING
:- MAY PREVENT COLDS
The way the housewife washes
,dishes may have something to do
with thunumber of common colds
now prevalent in Port St. Joe.
T"orks, spoons and the rims of
cups and, glasses have been found
to transmit bacteria that may be
responsible for common colds or
other diseases.
To -guard against this danger,


dishes should be washed in good
live suds, as hot as the hands can
stand comfortably. As real bac-
teria killers, the alkaline soaps
are the most effective, as they are
the 'strongest. Soaps made, of
cocoanut and palm oil also are
good and are least affected by
hard water.

Minelaying submarines are at-
tached to all navies.


SWe Congratulate the Publisher of The Star Upon the
Establishment of a Newspaper in Port St. Joe







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-ALUILDING MATERIALS
Ma. l ee Jardwar CB.



b8 F 8

CONGRATULATIONS TO 'THE STAR



I.TH FT Co
'. CLOSE OUT
/


j' ;,'


SUMMER

DRESSES

Up ti $.95 Dresses


29c 39c 49c
E A C H

15c Yard Quality
CHAMERY

PLAY CLOTH
SPECIAL


10c yard
(Limit 15 yards to customer)

Full Size, Nice Quality
81xi08 RAYON

BEDSPREADS



89C


RESTAURANT HELP

MUST PASS STRICT

PHYSICAL EXAM

Statewide Campaign Inaugurated
To Force Cafe Owners To
Comply With Law

TALLAHASSEE, Oct. 28 (FNS)
-A vigorous statewide campaign
to force all proprietors of restau-
rants and eating houses in the
state to require health cards for
their employes was inaugurated
this week when 14 eating house
proprietors in Miami were noti-
fied to comply with the law, or
suffer the consequences, in the
form of a revocation of their li-
censes, Hotel Commissioner Tay-
lor announced.
"Many operators of eating os-
tablishments have not complied
with the state laws requiring all
employes who handle food to pass
physical examinations and furnish
health cards before they can go
to work," Taylor said. "The hotel
commission has instructed its en-
tire force of inspectors to wage a
war on this practice, and to cure
it in one way or another.
"We are right at the beginning
of a. monster tourist season," the
commissioner said, "and it is our
determination to do all in our
power to protect the public health
and welfare through rigid enforce-
ment of these rules and regula-
tions designed for this purpose."
Employes seeking positions in
restaurants should first have a
physical examination and secure
a regulation health card from
their physician. The fee which is
onid to the physicians setat$1,
he commissioner explained.


COTTON TO BE USED

FOR IIUF 1. PAVING

FIRST TIME IN STATE; WILL
MAKE EFFORT TO SECURE
FABRIC FOR PAVING HERE

Acco'.lingi to .J. H. Dowling o0
rC:,r!:'s e. chief state highway
nei-c r, colton as a 1,cinforcing
i-trial for road paYinr; will be
-3.dl in, io:i-la fcr t:e f::'st (ime
.r !i''ns city o0 Fo':l ".
A $!0,000 contact fo: resur-
eing 17 r.iles of hi-hway be-
-wcen Port S J3e en'.! VWwa-
e'.-:a has bee. .awarren : to the
. -t'1 Ei7inee:rirg company cf
p?:aaccla, ard 'tre -wrk is a.
r:ady under way. This will be
goo-.a news ta residents of Gulf
county who have be n f.'rceed to
drive over the clay topp'ng that
hIs bee:' pie.cel over the old pav-
irg and whic-h was extrenremly
"a-:ardous in wet- weat'-er.
Cotton fabric, su,-h a;s used in
a--ol paving experiments in A!a-
binrm. Texas and; N-orth Carol'ne,
will be used, according to Dowl-
ain!, on about four rn`i one-half
miles of the project. Tl.,, nate:ia'
is being furnished without cost to
tl:e state by the fedcr:! govern-

arint.
rayor J. L. S'-"it o' Ihi ci y
ateit t .ho' ef'orfs wiP' '0. n'alo
+n r'cure the fabr'c0 or ue'e i'-
contenmp!atod street) p.vv`'! hc.re.
The cottcn lab ic is I '' on iop
o" the cliy base and se-i d to the
b-se and the top surfacing wi' h
asphalt.

FISH PARALYZES MAN
Robert Linstott, Jr., iookcd p
borneiout at Conway, N. I-.--and
the point hooked Linsco''-, inathcr.
The fish landed on tlh elder Lin-
scott's back and a horn pene-
irated his sp;ne and partially palr-
a'l-sd him.

PRISONER'S POCKETS FULL
Police of WcV:'ton, Ohio, who
searched a prisoner found four
bottles of beer, two pints of whis-
key, two knives, a pair of brass
knuckss' and five 10-cent pies.


metropolitan ideas and "broad" munity-must ever appeal to the
philosophies, to remember that reflective thought of those seek-
the basic .feature of American life ing the acme of happiness and the
is the home,: arid. the attendant satisfaction of well-doi~g.
and necessary concomitant of Your home newspaper is the
homne life is the community which "companion of your fireside," act-
gathers within its borders the edu- ing as chief source of information
national and cultural opportunity as to the varied activities of your
for widening. knowledge and cominufiity, bringing together in
broadening thought. compact form all that is necessary
The welfare of the community, to stir your interest as 4, citizen,
its civic organizations, its insti- or make special appeal to house-
tutions of .earning and culture holder and housewife. More than
its churches and its various other ever before your weekly n'ews[a-
activities for the3 general good, is per should be, at hand for the
of prime importance in an age cf quiet hour at home.-Frankford
progress such as the present. (Pa.) Dispatch."


S-FOR


SAI hR I





FREEE DELIVERY

No. 2 TOMATOES, 3 cans 25 TOMATO JUICE 3 cans 25-
SPINACH 3 cans 3' Ideal DOG FOOD 3 cans 250
GREEN LIMAS 3 cans 25V POTTED MEAT 3 cans 100



4101s s*h. 1 0
L MMKi~a^S~!B!e! A 0 ,


-- FL U R
WHITE RINC, t4 11s.
SELF-eISING 12 lbs.
PILLSBURY 2: lbs.


--" CRANBERRIES
$.1Q JJ. D. GRiTS
49 CIGARETTES
$g.29 SNUFF 3 t


I1:. 2Def
2 b-g:; ,
2 pkyr. C
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CHUCK ROAST 2 lbs. 35, COOKING OIL -
CHUCK STEAK lb. 20 Gallon can ...............g
SPARE RIBS Ib. (One to a Customer)


QUALITY GROCERY
THE HOME OF TRUE ECONOMY
Clerks Poite FORT ST. JOE Prices Righi


Full Cut Athletic Shirts and Shorts
A SCOOOP! and Special for Saturday l
only. Each ...-...-. ... .





Port St. Joe, rFa.
Port St. Joe, Fla.


INCREASE NOTED

IN VEHICLE DEPT.

Report Shows Jump of $600,000
In Income and Drop of
$45,000 In Expenses

TALLAHASSEE, Oct. 28 (FNS)
-Governor Cone's often repeated
statements that the state has suf-
ficient money to meet its oblig:t-
tions and that no new sources of
by the report of increase.l revenue
ind decreased expenses of the mo-
tortor vehicle department.
For the first three quarters of
this year the report shows an in-
crease in revenue of considerable
more than $600,000 and a decrease
in operating expenses of more
than $45,000, making a combined
total of a little less than three-
quarters of a million dollars for
the nine months the new admin-
istration has been in control. Of-
ficials of the motor vehicle de-
partmcnt estimate that the in-
creased revenue and decrease in
expenditures for the first year
will reach a sum of nearly a mil-
lion dollars.
The savings in the operation of
this department can be accounted
for largely by the decrease in the
number of employes. When the
new administration went into of-
fice, it found more than 180 em-
ployes stumbling over each other
trying to find something to do.
Now the department is operated
on practically half that number,
and the increased amount ofbusi-
ness handled shows that there has
been no loss in efficiency.

YOUR HOME NEWSPAPER

It is well in these days of wide-
spread and far-flung interests, of


TEACHERS' SALARY

FUND WILL RECEIVE

LARGE AMOUNT

Comptroller Lee Anrounces Allo-
cation of $1,255,000 Shortly
After November 1

TALLAHASSEE, Oct. 28 (FNS)
-Florida's school teachers' salary
fund will get its full monthly al-
location of $1, 255,000 shortly af-
ter November 1, State Comptroller
J. M. Lee announced today after
a couple of weeks of uncertainty
as collection efforts under the re-
tail store tax were being pressed
to bring in the necessary cash.
Allocation will be certified to the
state superintendent as soon as
checks received from hundreds of
merchants the past 10 days clear
the banks and are credited to the
state treasury account by the
banks.
The payment will leave the
cupboard bare as this payment
will require that even the surplus
in the motor vehicle expense fund
be tapped for approximately $180,-
000 to get the total required. This
surplus represents savings in op-
eration of the motor vehicle de-
partment from its expense allow-
ance of six per cent of tag sales,
the transfer of which probably
will be authorized by Governor
Cone and Comptroller Lee.

A company has been formed in
Japan for the production of iodine
from subterranean brines which
occur in the natural gas area of
.Otaki. Japan also produced iodine
from seaweed.

An ad in The Star gets results!

The home, the fireside, the com-


dF6rt St.-.J*,6,Fla-, October 29, 1937


PAGErl~ THREE:


THE STAR


f









SQUIRREL LINES NEST
WITH AMERICAN FLAGS NAV L ST

E. Mutchler, custodian of PROGRAM WILL
Forest Hill cemetery at Madison,
Wis., who has been sitting up at E O T UE
nights trying to catch the thief
stealing flags off soldiers' graves,
now sleeps peacefully. DISTRICT OFFICES IN THIS
So many of the flags disap- TTE EOR
peared that the remaining old
ones were replaced. Then the new TO BE RETAINED
ones started to disappear and -
Mutchlc, sat up nights trying to With the 1938 naval stores con-
catch the small boys he believed servation program formally ap-
responsiblei for the flags vanish- proved by Secretary of Agricul-
Ing. ture Wallace, announcement has
A hard win-l storm solved the been mae from regional offices
mystery. A .squirrel's nest .was. of the United States Forest Ser-
blown out of a tree. It was lined vice that district offices in Pen-
with .21 American flags. Mutchler sacola, Jacksonville and Savan-
climbed trees and examined other ah will be continued in 1938 as
squirrel nests. All were lined with they have been during 1937.
flags, old and new. Joseph C. Kircher, regional for-
oster in charge of the Atlantaof-
Thc first Shakespearean play fice, announces that all opera-
to achieve a run of 100 consecu- tors and producers of gum naval
tive pscrforr.ances was Charles jtor~s in the states of Florida,
.:can's presentation of "King Georgia, North and South Caro-
H'Erry VIII" in London in 1855. 'ina, Alabama, Mississippi, Lou-
isiana and Texas are eligible for
First ,o uid picture (musical participation in the program.
p-o-e on disc synchronized with' Major requirements for par-
ft;m) was "Don Juan," exhibited ticipation are listed as follows:
in 1926. Major Requirements
No new (virgin) faces may be
l- 1910i. three years after his worked by the operator on trees
-o ion picture debut, Charlie under nine inches in diameter
C !ap'in received the unprecedent- four and one-half feet from the
ed salary of $670,000. Icround on any place he operates.
No faces (old or virgin) may
The Star is $2 per year-sub- be operated on trees under nine


scribe now!
w w..raa m.--wBs _- ,l


EXPERT ARBERS
Our customers say that
we have a knack of giv-
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for. That's because our
barbers are experienced,
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COOPER'S
BARBER SHOP


inches in diameter four and one-
'half feet from the ground on
"arms covered by a work sheet.
Trees less' than 14 inches in
'diameter four and one-half from
the ground shall not have more
than one face currently worked
during the 1938 season on farms
covered by a work sheet.
No tree shall have any new
(first-year) bark face unless a
bark-bar on each side of the back
face is provided, the total of the
two being not less than seven
inches in width, measured hori-
zontally along the .back surface;
provided, however, that the re-
striction with respect to width of
bark-bar shall not apply to any
which has on it two or more old

During the 1938 season, the
'oight of the face chipped shall
not exceed 20 inches.
Payment shall not be made on
faces taken out of production on
:ny drift or tract wherein the
average height of face at the be-
ginning of the 1938 season ex-
ceeds 90 inches, measured in av-
erage vertical measurement be-
tween the shoulder of the first
streak and the shoulder of the
last streak,' including jump
streaks; provided, however, that
payment will not b'a made for
faces on which cups were in-


W e Haul Anything- -

We have the only Truck for hire in Gulf County
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


Horton and Densby
PHONE 10 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.






GIFTS

FOR EVERY OCCASION
BELT BUCKLES COMPACTS
SWANK TIE SETS BRACELETS
CIGARETTE CASES BIRTHSTONE RINGS
RONSON LIGHTERS CROSS AND CHAINS
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT and WEDDING RINGS
-*.i{ Watch and Jewelry Repairing }-


LILIUS JEWELRY CO.


b
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1:
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a1


C


PAGE FOUR


OCTOBER BUILDING PERMITS

The following building permits,
totaling $7,830, have b'oen issued
at the city hall during the past
month:
W. B. Smith, dwelling, $600.
Mrs. Ruby U. Pridgeon, dwell-
ing, $2,500.
P. A. Howell, garage apartment,
$1,000.
G. L. Duren, business building,
$300.
J. L McQuaig, dwelling, $1,000.
C. B. Costin, dwelling, $650.
C. G. Costin, dwelling,' $1,500.
Two permits issued for the ne-
gro section came to $330.

China's population is estimated
as low as 350,000,000 and as high
as 500,000,000.


EAT AT THE -


BLACK CAT /



CAFE



EXCELLENT PROMPT- AND
FOOD COURTEOUS SERVICE,,.


inches at the beginning of the
season. This means that if the
average height, of all the faces in
a drift or tract exceeds 90 inches
then the entire drift or tract will
be classified as being under 90
inches. An operator ir-ay work
faces over 90 inches in height,
but no benefit payments will be
made on faces over 90 inches in
height- at the beginning of the
1938 season.
Fire protection is required
where state and federal co-oper-
ation is available in the vicinity
of land participating in this pro-
gram.
Must Abide By Ruler,
All operators and producers
are required to abide by the cut-
ting and conservation rules as
adopted by the Southern Pine
Pulpwood Industry, where stands
of timber under their ownership
or control are cut during the
1938 season. In cutting all
worked-out turpentine, defective
and non-turpentine trees, the op-
erator is required to leave uncut
at least six thrifty seed trees 11
inches or more in diameter
breast high per acre or sufficient
young growth (at least 150 trees
per acre six to eight feet high).
Where thinning are made, at
least 50 trees per acre, six to
nine inches in diameter at the
stump, spaced approximately 30
by 30 feet, shall be left uncut.
Benefit payments, contingent
upon appropriations to be made
by congress, are:
One cent per face in continu-
ous operation during the 1938
turpentine season except n'ew
(virgin) faces-front or back-
and except faces in drifts or
tracts which, by drifts or tracts.
average more than 90 inches in
height at the beginning of the
1938 season.
Five cents per face (a) on
cich face on trees less than nine
inches in diameter four and one-
'ral feet above the ground and
on any face of two or more
faces on trees nine to 14 inches
in diameter four and one-half
feet above .the ground which
were taken out and kept out of
operation in accordance with the
conditions of the 1937 program
and which are kept out of oper-
ation in 1938, and (b) on each
face taken out of operation at
;he beginning of the 1938 season
in accordance with the conditions
of the 1938 program.
Participation in the program is
voluntary. Any operator or pro-
lucer may qualify for the pro-
gram, no matter how small or
low large his operations.
Those wishing to take part in
this program must submit work
sheets to the Regional Office, At-
anta, Ga., or to one of the three
district offices at Pensacola and
Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah,
Ga., not ater than April 2, 1938.


...IT'S TIME TO

CHECK YOUR CARI

Winter is here if you've put off having
your car checked for winter driving, you'd better
have it done now! Let us double-check your car
for you enjoy the dependability and safety
of a car in perfect condition.

Complete Winter Check-up.-.

Includes chassis lubrication, changing oil, check-
ing battery, hose connections, tires and cleaning
all glasses.

Time to Change Oil---

Don't you think that it is about time you changed
and got rid of that old, dirty sludge in your mo-
tor? Drive in and let us check up.





Littles Service Station


Gulf Products


Firestone Tires and Tubes


I Port St. Joe, Fla.


THE STAR Port St. Joe, Fla.., October 29, 19i'

stalled prior to the 1934 season. Theater Guild subscriptions for New York'~s, 'etr6politan alia
This includes faces on trees be- out-of-New York presentations in- has i24,579 acres of park land.
low nine inches breast high and creased 40 per cent for the 1937- Brown eyes are more common
second face on trees between 9 38 season, than blue in the human race.'
and 14 inches breast high.
Payment shall not be made on Mrs. B. W. Eells was a luncheon The United States is by far the
any face retained in *Operation i t
any drift or tract wherein i rath v guest Thursday of Mrs. H. L. largest producer of petroleum in
any drift or tract wherein the av-Oliver in Apalachicola. the world:
rage height of fac:s exceeds 90


----------- -----------


O oi-



j.i
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
-.<-f Hligh Quality Always ..*- -
'I
SLT JOE AR
P rt St. JeA, Fk -ida
SPort St. Jcc, Florida !!
r 'f "






Port St. Joe, Fla., October 29, 1937


1Por St Jo, F~., ctoer 2, 137 HE SAR AGEFIV


NEDLEY-THAMES$

NUPTIALS HELD
MWss, Thames and Mr. I. C.
N'cdly were quietly. married in
'Apalchicola Friday, October 22,
the Rev. Father Massey officiat-
.P g. Only a few relatives were
S.,resent.
Miss:'Thames moved to this
city recently from Chipley, and
has made many,friends here. Mr.
-Nedley is a native of Franklin
county and has been in business
in Port St. Joe for several years.
The Star joins with their many
friends in. wishing for them a long
and happy married life.
Imrn.'ediat..l:. following ih'.- cere-
:"noy,a a delicious buffet supper.
was: served at the home of Mr.
-and Mrs. M. .P. Nedley. Upon on-
tl~fl6th: din'Sng room the bride:
wa- ai'-s;nted with a lovely wed-
ding cake.
Those enjoying this delightful
affair with the honored couple
ware Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Nedley,
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Thompson, Mr.
and Mrs. R. P. Nedley. the Mis-se.
*Iva Mae, Elsie, Phillippa and Me:-
ha Nedley, Messrs. George Core,
Varn Teatt'rman and little Eob-
bie Joe Thoirpson.-

APALPCHICOLA U. D. C.
CHOOSES OFFICERS
At meeting of th'e Apalachi-
cola Chapter, United Daughters of
the Confederacy, held at the home
o' Mrs. William- J. Lovett, officers


WOMAN'S CLUB IN
SECOND MEETING
The parlor of the Port Inn was
full to overflowing Wednesday
afternoon with members of the
Woman's Club attending their
second meeting. Mrs. G. A. Pat-
ton, president of the club, pre-
sided in her usual gracious man-
ner.
Following the Lord's Prayer.
was the roll call. Reports by the
spacial committees were heard
and a constitution and by-laws
were adopted. Hostesses appoint-
ed for the next meeting were
Mesdames Ramsey, Curtis and
Gloekler. Ten ntw members en-
rolled, giving the club a total of
50 members.
The next meeting of the club
will be held at the Port Inn Wed-
nesday, November 3. at 3 p. m.

REGISTERED AT INN
Those registered -at the Port
Inn for the week-end were: Mr.
and Mrs. J. L. Kelly, Mr. and
Mrs. S. A. Witt, H. L. Donall, H.
A. Middleton, H. Linebaugh, Jr.,
Harry Saunders and party, Miles
Pinton. C. Arrington, Miss Sada
Bostick, Mrs. Nell Fairclath, Mrs.
R. L. Hosford, Margaret Baiden,
M. W. McCombs, W. C. Austin, J.
R. H.inter, Roy Wilson and wife,
Tom S. Codeway. H. M. Brown,
Jim Bevis, Miss Jean Creed, Mrs.
F. A. Groff, C. T. Sellers, K. A.
Sweeney, J. D. Lane, John Snow-
den, T. G. Williams, T. L. Camp-
bell. C. A. Benson, C. D. Flanders,


-, learning year were. chosen
e c ing year were chosen A. I-I. Kea and Harry Salmons.
oaa fol,'ws: Mrs. J. P. Hickey, ,; >


J. A. i. CLUB


The annual initiation of the J.


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


A. M. club was held Thursday of and Mrs. Byrd Park'er, Mr. and
last week at the home of Mrs. Mrs. Stetson Pridgeon, Mr. and
Lcroy Gainous. Following the in.- Mrs. Bernard Pridgeon, Mr. and
itiation ceremonies the members Mrs. H. A. Drake, Mr. and Mrs-
were joined at the home of Mrs. Jessie Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Bus-
'Bernard Pridgeon by (their hus- ter Owens, Mr. and Mrs. i.Ed
bands to enjoy with the initiates, Pridgeon, Mr. and Mrs. Leroy
Mrs. Peck Boyer and Mrs. Clar- Gainous, Mrs. Coy Redd, Mrs. Wil-
ence Pridgeon, the banquet pre- lie Howell, Mrs. Florria Connell,
neprid in their honor. Mrs. Lola Costin and Miss Myr-
Mrs. Pridgeon's home was beau- twice Coody.
tifully decorated with autumn col- Guests ;were Mr. and Mrs. Joe
ors and the Hallowe'en motif was Fcrroll, Miss E1dna Davis, Mesrcrs.
predominant. The banquet table. George Inman and Billie Coody.
was laid with a snowy-wbl-t' linen
cloth, sparkling silver and glass-
ware. Table decorations were of .'oe Suber and Mr. Hunt of
lovely fall flowers and mirrored Greensboro, Fla., were business
pumpkins. Tall tapers lighted this visitors in the city Wednesday.
scene. Place cards ware witches, i p
cats, moons and pumpkins. Favors County Superintendent C. L.
of whistles, confetti and masks Costin was a visitor in the city
were found at each place. 'Tuesday.


After a time of merry-making
the guests were served a delicious
dinner of shrimp cocktail, baked
chicken with oyster dressing, but-
itered peas, candied yams, cran-
berry sauce, giblet gravy, tomato
salad, ambrosia and cake, hot
rolls and coffee.
Members and husbands present
were Mr. and Mrs. Peck Boyer,
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Pridgeon,
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Perritt, Mr.


10 a.
11 a.
7:30


m.-Sunday school.
m.-Devotional.
p. m.-Evangelistic serv-


Ladies' Council meeting Tues-
day afternoon.
Prayermeeting Wednesday eve-
ning.

W. H. Linton was a week-end
visitor in Wewahitchka.


president; Mrs. Dan Gillis, first
vice-president; Mrs. Annie R.
Marks. second vice president;
Mrs. Wills Crawson, secretary;
Mrs. Rosa V. Bragdon, treasurer;
M'rs. L. R. HarriFon, correspond-
ing secretary; Mrs. Emma Pat-
toA, historian, 'and Mrs. W. J.
' Lovett, re-i.trair.
Mrs. J. P..Hickey, the retiring
president, presided over the ses-
sio'n.

G.- M. Sheppard, Charles Shep-
pa'd and Joe B. Stone of Blounts-
town were visitors in Port St. Joe
yesterday afternoon.
-.. .r :
Mrs. Votie :Gibson of this city
was the i-ue-t c.t 'her mother, Mrs.


Mrs. Ethel Lewis of Bonifay,
Fla., new owner of the e' t.* Press-
in-, Club, has moved -: -r othev
and children to th:' city and they
will makle their home in the Far-
mer apartments in Bay Ridge.

Visiting Mr. and Mrs. B. W.
Eells on Sunday were Judge and
Mrs. W. J. Oven of Tallahassee
and Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Wilson of
Jacksonville.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dorsey
have returned from Tuscaloosa,
Ala., and will make their home
here in the future. Mr. Dorsey
has just returned from a business
trip to New York.


Pelham of Panama City, Tuesday. A
Friends of Mrs. Robert Tapper
Mrs. Joe Hile i has returned to are glad to learn that she is
the city after a very pleasant trip greatly improved after an illness
to her home in Pl'aasantville, N. of several days, and wish for her
Y, a speedy recovery.


Use Your Head beautifully!






,. ". ,, - 4 ^ /
.








FALL COIFFURES
Ycur fall costumes will be much
more effective if your hair is set
in a new sty'. .. We can
suggest several that will do jus-
tice to you and your clothes!

SPECIAL PERMANENTS
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.-' ,r. :" ;* s A
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setting up the old coal or wood
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It provides just the heat you want
where and when you want it. Pat-
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heat whereitis most needed.Warms
floors quickly. Reduces drafts.
Beautiful New Models
See the beautiful new models,
modern design, finished in rich two-
tone brown porcelain enamel with
black trim. Sizes to suit individual
needs of homes, schools, churches,
shops and stores. A product of
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Let us explain the easy operation
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LET US DEMONSTRATE
Easy Terms If Desired


Stewart-WXarner Radios

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Westinghouse

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ELECTRIC IRONS
TOASTERS


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Staple Groceries

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES


WEDNESDAY NIGHT BRIDGE
CLUB IN SESSION
The Wednesday Night Bridge
club met this week at the home
of Mrs. George Gore. The guests
were met by the charming hos-
tess and ushered into a room
beautifully decorated in fall col-
ors. Three progressions of bridge
were played, after which prizes
were awarded, high prize going to
Mrs. Ross Coburh, low to Mrs.
Clay Lewis and cut to Mrs. Hor-
ace Soule. The hostess then
served a delicious salad course.
'Those present were Mesdames
Bernard Pridgeon, Jessie Smith,
Horace Soule, Ross Coburn, Clay
Lewis, Ed Ramsey, Tom Owens,
Buster Owens, M. P. Tomlinson,
Chester Edwards, Tom Gibson,
Jr., and Miss Juanita Gunn.

ASSEMBLY OF. GOD


DRA U COMMUNITY

STORE


PAGE FIVE


THE STAR







PAE IX TE TA PrtSt oe Fa, Otoer29 i_


Joe E. Brown at

St. Joe Theater

In 'Riding on Air'


COMEDIAN IS SUPPORTED BY
FLORENCE RICE, DAUGH-
TER OF WRITER

The lovely new leading lady to
Joe E. Brown in his latest pic-
ture, "Riiding on Air," is Flor-
ence Rice, daughter of Grantland
Rice, nationally famous as a
sports writer and commentator
for many years. She is recognized
as a really talented player, whose
presence is an addition to any
production.
"Riding on Air" is adapted from
the "Elmer" series of short
stories by Richard Macaulay that
hive appeared in the Saturday
Evening Post. The character of
Elmer, the small-town newspaper
handy man and "local correspon-
dent" who blunders into a big-
town adventure, is said to give
Joe E. Brown one of the finest
screen characterizations he has


'GUM FARMING'


FIRE PREVENTION


LOANS OFFERED RULES OUTLINED


BY FEDERAL LAND BANK;
NAVAL STORES AGENT
OUTLINES TERMS

The Federal Land Bank recently
advised the Florida Forest and
Park Service that it is now pre-
pared to make loans to owners of
pine land to finance "gum farm-
ing." John O. Boynton, naval
stores agent at Tallahassee, d'e-
:ined a "gum farmer" as any pro-
ducer of pine gum, whether he
sells his gum as such or processes
it himself.
Boynton explained that loans
will be made through local farm
loan associations where such ex-
ist. In the absence of an associa-
tion, loans may be obtained from
the Federal Land Bank direct.
The interest rate on loans obtained
direct is five per cent, while on
those obtained though a local as-
sociation is four and a half per
cent.
Loans Limited to $50,000
Loans may be obtained up to 35


had. The picture climaxes with a per cent of the appraised normal
thrill requence, in which Brown, value of the turpentine land of-
on a plane guided by a radio beam feared for security, plus 20 per cent
shoots it out with crooks who are of the appraised nomal value of
attempting to escape in another the permanent insurable improve-
plane. His antics in these scenes ments thereon, provided that no
are said to be at once spine- individual may obtain more than
chilling and side-splitting. $50,000. The period may be from
five to fifteen years, depending on
MONUMENT ERECTED the income-producing capacity of
TO HURRICANE DEAD the timber concerned.
ON MATECUMBE KEY In addition to the interest, the
-borrower will be required to carry
On Sunday, November 14, there insurance in the full amount of
will be unveiled and dedicated on the loan. Insurance rates will run
Matecumbe Key, a monument as from one per cent to two and one-
a memorial to the civilians and half per cent. of the amount of
war veterans who lost their lives insurance issued, the rate to be
in the hurricane .of. Labor Day, determined in advance of the
September,. 2,.. 1935. .'i 1.7 a-: study of the fif-e
The r ,. ...;. 1. is made of' la- hazards involve. "
tive keyrock,'a beautifuiiy marked: Lands listedd for co-operative
coral limrostone. In the center is fire- contrp! with the Florida For-
a large crypt in which remains of est-.anid Park Service will un-
unburicd dead found since Che coubtcdly qualify for the lower
hurricane will be interred with insurance rates, it is believed.
carcmonies at the time of the Boynton stated that the park
c'adicatic:'. service is ready to assist in" any
The me-umoial is located nea, way possible, but pointed out
one of the series of concrete hur- that applications must be made
ricane shelters erected io pr vent to National Farm Loan Associa-
a recurrence of the disaster in tion secretaries treasurers ac-
which flimsy "structures on il~e. cording to the county concerned.
low-lying coral islands were swept
away by wavas and winl Advertising pays-try it!



SHeavy Duty Work Clothes.

TESTED FOR STAMINA AND QUALITY
S FAVORED FOR MATCHLESS VALUE!


SHIRTS

S~/I M:d, o0 fi-e frs: co'or Wel-
ling'cn F.bri-, hi; standard
SWork Sh'it pFrovd3z, r omy
-'-i '- .




A... 98c

S- A REAL VALUE!



UNDERWEAR
A r al t arga:n in med u:. n
'cigh; f rt kn't underwta'.
P.cod a ..................... 9


BY INSPECTOR


PAT O'DAY GIVES 10 RULES
FOR HANDLING ELECTRICAL
EQUIPMENT ABOUT HOME

The need for removing accumu-
lated trash from attics and gar-
ages is rather well known, but the
fact that the electrical equipment
and wiring of a home also need
investigation for fire prevention is
not so well appreciated by the
public, according to Pat O'Day,
building inspector of the city of
Port St. Joe.
In the hope of increasing safety,
Mr. O'Day offered the following
set of rules as guidance to house-
holders in avoiding shock and pre-
venting fires:
1-Never tamper with fuses or


SATURDAY-OCT. 30


.<, .. .* .,* -' .
"A5


.. -













Q. "' f r r i

Shorts --
"CATS IN A BAG" and

ACE DRUMMOND NO. 11

SUN.: MON.OCT. 31-NOV. 1
S'-..- S' --
*CTS INA BAG" and
ACE DRU-MONO NO. 11




,SUN..iON.-OCT. 31-NOV. 1



." .





_.'..










E;. ~ ,,.,: .


Use fuses- rated 15 amperes ex-
cept for special circuits. It is
wise to keep an extra fuse or two
on hand.
2-Replace flexible cords that
become worn, with approved cord
before the copper wires are ex-
posed. Take special care to pre-
vent injury of the insulation of
cords.
3-In removing attachment plugs
from outlets, grasp the plug it-
self; do not pull on the cord.
4-When purchasing flexible
cords as parts of appliances or
separately, select those that have
been approved and labeled by Un-
derwriter's Laboratories.
5-Avoid, so far as possible, the
.handling of electrical equipment
in the presence of water and in
damp locations. When such is
necessary, make sure that the in-
sulation of wires, cords and appli-
ances is intact.
6-Have repairs and additions
made by experienced persons.
7-In bathrooms, kitchens and
rooms with earthen floors, avoid
the use of brass shell sockets on


prevent their intended operation.pendant cords. Replace such with


A MARTIN DAVIS THEATRE


TUESDAY-NOV. 2






Wi-h6 !l *g, a ,
Wah all ,


. . .-.. .-. .-.-" .:. .'.'..:.. .'". .' "
WuI, :I tj be rhadl ,-3*' --,
90 .n


those of insulating mat-'rlals or
have such sockets mounted bon
ceiling or walls, and control them
from wall switches with in-
sulating handles and cover,plates
8-Do not use extension cords
as a substitute for permanent
wiring.
9-Use only rub'r sheathed
cords on washing machines and
other equipment likely to be used
out-of-doors or in damp locations.
10--In case of emergency, throw
the main switch and call,- the
power company.

DOG SAVES DOG
The hero of, Bad Ischl, Austria,
dogdom is a little daschund which
rescued a fox terrier pup play-
mate when the small animal was
drowning.. The daschund grasped
the terrier's leather collar in its
teeth and swam ashore.

The Louis'ana sugar industry
represents an investment of mo'e
than $200,000,000.
Weaver birds are as common
in Africa as sparrows and fitches
In Ame'rica. .


BILL TURNER, Mgr.


WED.-THURS.-NOV. 3-4,"


'4' .4,'
'A"~
..-ts


I-.


L


'-I1 -'


i0
"'1



'F



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4 '. ***4
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A g



BORIS NOLAN

JOUN~ BOt.ES
Community Sing "

FRIDXY-NCV. 5.


HIGH HQ; LA*6.a.,-.
cI v ID L LOEWV
i.r;-IPslj F NIS '
C: I-.

/i


Sits $1.9S RAY MAYER MISCHA AUER i,, ,'. I *, ,' '1g.
-The Three Sailon Peggy Ry n Gr eld Olive r
S.. .' Smit Jlck Smaq The Colllfornl Collcglenm
LEATHER PALM GLOVES .. ...... 4c Clae ill G rU c *. E.n Coo.r .nd, .. '
------- ------ ------- ------ --_49 c,-" dazzling ccst of 350
WORK SOX, e! cazes; pair --...--..-~..-.....-------o 2S ;- ~
DENIM OVERALLS, 8-ounce ... -$2.23 ..-. "- ..- "

:, G A Ea ..:S ..; :, Pi "I Want to Be An Actress"
( There are ISO re:sirs why $
Chart: "TWO LAZY CROWS" you cho':d see this show $ Short: "MAD MONEY"
S GENERAL MERCHANDISE PORT ST. JOE
j .. .. ......... .,... .,,, ..... ., , ,'-- ,, .... v ..:7 .,. "- _.,,, ,,.. ._,,,.,,,1 -.,- ...7 -


PROGRAM WEEK OCTOBER 30 TO NOVEMBER 5


........... ............ ............ "I',,',',,, ............ ............


meow

10 E THE T=ft" E


PAGE SIX


THE STAR


Port St. Joe, Fla, Optober 29,'-1061


- .. -1







Prt 5L Joe F*. Ocoe 29 19 TH STA .AG SEVEN~ *


Look Us Up!
When you need any
ELECTRICAL WORK
If you want it done
RI G H T!

PORT ST. JOE
ELECTRIC COMPANY
H. ,B. Whitaker


-.--A RR- '-'-









WE CAN SUPPLY Y OU



N, matter how small or how

large your order, come to us.

SYour business will be

appreciated.




Gulf Hardware &



Supply Co.
BUILDING SUPPLIES PORT ST. JOE


FIREHOUSE AT AUCTION
BRINGS BID OF $12.81
A bid of $12.81 was made by
John W. Frisbee to acquire own-
ership of an abandoned firehouse
at Esperance, N. Y., during an
auction. Bids started at $10.

Command performances of dra-
matic productions f o r K i n g
George V numbered only seven in
20 years; for King Edward VII
there were 32, in 10 years.


STOP!





and Think....


Before you place any orders for printing
with out-of-town-concerns .. .
:' A larger percentage of the dollar spent for
printing in Port St. Joe stays at home than
most any dollar you can mention .

You have another crack at your money,
but when you send it out of town it is gone
for good, and you don't have even a slim
chance to see it again .

When you spend a dollar with us for print-
ing it goes back into the regular trade chan-
nels for groceries, clothing, gasoline, hard-
ware, furniture and the many other every-
day necessities and luxuries stocked by local
merchants. When you get your
printing done somewhere else it is spent in
the city where the printing plant is located.
That is a good argument for patronizing
us, but the fact that we can give you better
and quicker service, a proof of your job for
your approval, work equally as good and in
many cases better, than you get elsewhere,
is a BETTER argument. .


THE


STAR


MEMOIRS OF A DOOMED
AND FORGOTTEN CITY

(Continued from page 1)
can, who is immune, remained for
a while to dispose of the prop-
erty, often left without living
beneficiaries. The famed city of
St. Joseph was dead!
Three years had passed over
the deserted city; rank vegeta-
tion had taken the place of trhe
choice shrubs and flowers of the
erstwhile well-kept grounds. Wind
and rain, joined with the heat of
summer, had made sad havoc with
the uncared-for wharves, hostel-
ries, stores and homes. Stately
herons paraded the waterfront in
pace of the city watchman. Ra-
ven croaked and whirled above
the vacant landings. The mocking
bird, the South's favored song-
ster, alone remained to chant its
melodious requiem over the field
of death.
Summer was passing away. Al-
ready the days were growing
short and the first cool breath of
the far-away Northland heralded
the approach of the impending
struggle between the mighty wind
forces of the north and south. A
week of calm .had passed when,
as the sun rose, through the pine
forests to the northwest there
came fitful gusts of wind, in-
creasing in strength with the
growth of the day; nor did the
wind go down with the dropping
of the green sun into the dark-
ened waters of the Gulf. All dur-
ing the night it roared and
shrieked through- the abandoned
city, gaining power with 'each suc-
ceeding hour.
The few venturesome fishermen
remaining there, who feared death
neither by pestilence or storm,


anchored their boats in the "Ship-
yard Cove" and watched the
seething waters. For two days the:
northeast gale continued, steadily
increasing in velocity. Then came
a lull in the storm. The mountain-
ous clouds, which had been driv-
ing across the sky with ter:ific
force, seemed to stand still. Eut
only for a brief time. The wind
was shifting. Slowly it Teered
from northeast to north--from
north to northwest Then to the
west. There it stopped, as though
preparing for a last gigantic on-
set upon the quivering land. Soon
it began again, now with all the
titanic force and fury of the
tropical hurricane. It broke the
cables of the few boats in the
cove, tossing them ashore like
cockle shells. Roofs went flying
through the air and brick walls
crumbled at its onslaught. Chaos
reigned supreme. Then from out
of the west there came above the
crash of falling walls and flying
d'-bris a sound that struck terror
even to the hearts of those long
accustomed to the angry moods of
the Gulf. From San Bias to St.
Jo Point there arose such a thun-
dering reverberation from the
mighty, ponderous waves crashing
upon the beaches as had never
been heard before. They were the
equal of a tidal wave, but with
a continual power far more de-
structive. They rushed unobstruct-
ed through and over the narrow
barrier opposite the city that sep-
arated the bay from the Gulf, and
came roaring in at the wide en-
trance to the bay.
The waters quickly flooded the
streets. Before one could note the
advance they were crashing thru
the doors and windows of the va-
cant buildings. The low plain 'on
which the city was built was
now a raging, furious,' tempestu-
ous sea, the few taller buildings
seeming but islands in it. And
there was no cessation in the hur-
ricane. Hour after hour it forced
the waters of the Gulf in gigan-
tic waves over the site of the
twice-doomed city, crumbling to
atoxns brick buildings, undermin-'
tig streets and carrying far in-
land with the furious sweep of the
storm, brick and. timbers that -so.
short a time before formed the
most stable structures in the city.
The light of another day had
come. The desolation and destruc-
tion was complete. Heaps of sand
dug out of the depths of the sea
and driven forward by the ir-
resistible waves, had buried even
the foundations of the once-stately
buildings. Slowly the sea re-
turned to its depths.
The sun shown down brightly
over the wrecked ambitious works
of man. Death's aide, the hurri-
cane, had completed the work be-
gun by it's twin brother, Pestil-
ence, and buried beneath the
sands of the sea, or swept to the
four winds of Heaven, all that re-
mained of th'e proud young city
of- St. Joseph.
Four score years have passed
since the hurricane destroyed old
St. Jo, but even now a visit to the
wilderness where at one time
stood the city that came so near
bAing the capitol of Florida, is not
without interest. Other hurri-
canes have swept over the site
since the one made memorable by
the destruction of the city, but
they found no works of man upon.
which to wreak their vengeance.
Here and there great clumps of
rugged Spanish bayonet stand
guard over the foundation walls
of some massive building, and
beneath the waters along the
beach may still be seen sections
of the brick sidewalks of the old
city, while the many bricks scat-
tered through the young pine for-
est, even a mi'e back from the
shore, attest the power of the
wrathful sea. In the old roadbed
of the old railroad are found a
few ties and stringers, so rich in
resinous material that for seventy
years they have defied the ele
ments. At a nearby turpentine


HE MARRIED HIS

SECRETARY TO SAVE

PAYING HIS TAXES

ARCHITECT MARRIES BEAU.
TIFUL AIDE TO FOIL
UNCE SAM

The brilliant comedy drama.
"As Good As Marri'ad," begins a
two-day run Wedensday at the
St. Joe Theater.
This picture,- says Manager
Bill Turner, is, with no exag-
gerated. statement of fact, daz-
zling. It is a novel story, center-
ing around tlh efforts, of a suc-
cessful architect to save money on
his income tax by marrying his
beautiful secretary, who is in love
with him. Naturally plenty of
complications arise.
Heading the cast are John Boles
and Doris Nolan, and th' latter is
said to surpass all her previous
efforts. With these two stars are
such exceptional performers as
Walter Pidgeon, Tala Birell,Alan
Mowbray, Katherine Alexander
and Esther Ralston.
The dialogue is the fast, hu-
morous, breezy type, carrying a
laugh or a dramatic punch as
often as the.plot will allow. It is
produced by the New Universal,
the studio that scored with 'Three
Smart Girls,' and it. has the same
happy appeal.
'*Top of Town"
The newest thing in screen mu-
sicals, "Top of the Town," has
been booked for Tuesday at the
-St. Joe Theater. The offering hits
a high note, stressing swing mu-
sic, varied types of. comedy de-
veloped by 10 different comedians
and a dancing, singing chorus that
captures the eye and ear. Doris
Nolan is also starred in this pic-
ture, supported by George Mur-
phy.
Gertrude Ntasen, exotic star of
the Ziegfeld Follies nationally
known for her radio singing, is
prominently cast and sings some
appealing lyrics. Ella Logan, popu-
lar radio singer, sends notes
hurdling over music bars with gay
abandon:.
Each of tliA 10 comedians in the
picture has a 'brand of humor all
his own. The comics include Hugh
Herbert, Gregory Ratoff, Henry
Armetta, Mischa Auer, the Three
Sailors, Ray Mayer, Richard Carla
and Jack Smart The seven 4ons*
hits are composed by Jimmy Mc,
Hugh and Harold Adaimson.

EDITOR IS VISITOR
H. K. Johnston, publisher of
the Apalachicola Times, was a
visitor in our city Tuesday and
dropped in to chat with th'e edi-
tor and look over The Star's new
plant. -
"You have a wonderful oppor-
tunity in Port St. JoJeJJ," said
Mr. Johnston, "and I know from
the equipment you have installed
that you realize this fact and are
ready to 'profit by it."

Remains of a 4000-year-old house
were recently discovered in Den-
mark.

still hangs suspended by wires,
and used as a bell to call together
the laborers, a steel driving axel
from the first locomotive that
saw service upon this historical
road. These relics, with a few
ruined tombs in the old burying
ground, are all that remains of St.
Josepr. The ambitious, strenuous
men of that long ago recked not
of the power or frequency of the
tropical hurricanes that come
creeping off the Gulf, as a lion-
seeking its prey, but like the
foolish man of Scripture, "Built
his house upon the sand; and the
rain descended, and the windl
blew, and beat upon that. house,
and it fell, and great was the fall
thereof."
.(Continued Next Week)


Port St. Joe, Fla.

YOUR HOME-TOWN NEWSPAPER


~pe~BBs~sp ~II I ~1 I~t~l ~s~sp"


Lpot -S -~Joe,, fla., Octobe'r 29, 193'


t


~PAE EVENI


THE STAR






PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR


port St Joe Fla* Octo 1


CITY COMING TO FRONT INTERESTING PROGRAM FIRE EQUIPMENT Attending the luncheon given
ENJOYED BY P. T. A.
SENJOYED BY P. T. A. t T ) last Thursday by members of -the
(Continued from page 1) The Parent-Teacher Association W hat They Say. C'"' (Continued from page 1) Philaco club in Apalachicola werd
met yesterday afternoon at the Mesdames Robert Tapper and D.
pper company in constructing the it r R G the town. I think we should re- C. Mahon.
dock and making fills. -t g hig school, with Mrs. Roy Gib- The business men and residents duce the license to $25."
- Alack in housing facjilti's here rs. Roert Tpper of iPort St. Joe are enthusiastic On a motion made by Commis-
is causing a large portion of the he meeting was called to rover the establishment of a news- sioner Pridgeon the rate was re- 'r. ShRobert aBellows ane MrsP
weekly payrolls from the various er metin was moved and paper in this prospering city, and duced by unanimous vote. J L harit attnded the hi
building activities to be taken to'der and that e tion of wa s m and express their opinion in various The matter of pain Fifth Ave- club luncheon in Apalachicola last
nearby towns where the workmenprs s or words: nue from Firt to 16th Street was Thursday, the guests of Mrs. A.
building activities to be taken to carrieond vithat elect ion of first and words: nue from First to 16th Street wasHam.
have been forced to locate and second vicelarence Pride eon was ROBERT BELLOWS: "I believe taken up and figures compiled in
commute to and from their labor der. M rs. Clrenvce Pridgeon was it will be one of the best things order to ask WPA aid from the
commute to and from their labor. chosen first vice-president and that has happened to Port St. Joe government n the project Cost
This need is being filled to a cer- Patty Lovettsecond that has happened to Port St. Joe govethe project. Cost NOTICE -
tain extent, but from the presentMres'n vice-
tamn extent, but from the present president. since the town was founded. It would be according to figures
president. wouldccuriousewould be. according to figures
rate of construction, it will be Rports of various committees would be a curious town indeed furnished by City Engineer Galt,
soe time before sufficient resi- were heard and a motion that did not have a representative $44,000, the city to put up. 25 per Dr. D. Brd McMulen
dences will be constructed to care made and carried that a first aid newspaper." cent, or $11,000, and the govern- y e
for the influx that is expected W. C. ROCHE: "We need it. ment the balance of $33,000. sres to announce to the p-
when the mill begins operations. oom be fitted out for the high The Star will be a big asset in lic that he has opened anof-
The city's modern water system e. Beatboosting our town and telling the Miss Elsie Nedley of Apalachi- fice in the Miller Drug Store
has been in operation for some world of the things we are doing."
htime, an. ins eperacted that te Roll Call." The meeting was then world of te t s we e dit is cola is the house guest this week to do general practice of
time, and. it is expected that the L. W. OWENS: "I believe it is of Miss Iv Mae edley. medicine.
turned over to the program com- of Miss Iva Mac Nedley. medicine
sewer mains will be ready for use tu over to t program com- a mighty good thing, and I am
within the next month, pending mittee for a short program. peased that the publisher has the
completion of the sewage dis- A very interesting talk was faith in the future of the city
The city is ontmplating eon- and Your Child's Teacher." Mrs. I. C. NEDLEY: "I think it is dflieS 0 f
Eula Pridgeon gave a short talk
struction of a new city hall, and o "Visits of Parents to the grand, and people ought to sup- Come in and See Our Candies of Every DescriPtion
already has plans drawn up for -o ort it to their fullest ability. We
School." The meeting was opened
street paving work, to be con- ol" e meeting was opened should support any enterprise '
for discussion of these subjects
structed with WPA aid. or scusn o these suects that comes in on the ground floor Hard Candies that are a part of everyb,6dy's
Private enterprise ha.i not been and whose owners live here and festivities. Of pure cane sugar-and
Iagging and many new business ASSEMBLY OF GOD DISTRICT spend their money here." fruit flavoring.
ASSEMBLY OF GOD DISTRICT R.S. CARV ER "One of the frui flavoring "
buildings have been erected with- R. S. CARVER: "One of the
MEETING MONDAY NIGHT things for the city, and in
in the past few months, the ma- best things for the city, and in
jority on Third Avenue, giving There will be a fellowship meet- th'e very near future I believe The
that thoroughfare an air'of bustl- ing of District No. 11, Assembly Star will become a daily paper." LeH ARDV' DPH AR M A CY
ing activity similar to any metro- of God, at the Port St. Jo'e chuch H. A. DRAKE: "I believe it isI /M\fV PH A RM A CY
politan area. Monday night, November 1, at an indication of growth of the
Port St. Joe has at last awak- 7:30 o'clock, according to an an- town to have a second newspaper Port St. Joe, Florida
ened from its Rip Von Winkle nouncement yesterday by Rev. H. established since construction on
sleep of many years and is ready P. Money. The public is cordi- the paper mill started. I am for
to take its place in the sun. ally invited to attend. it."
We ask you to keep your eyes CECIL COSTIN: "I'm glad to
on Florida's fastest growing little EXPANSION WORK have The Star and think it will
city-great things are in store. AT POSTOFFICE be profitable both to the business SC H N DHH e' ,
A new window has been in- men of Port St. Joe in placing
Mrs. G. A. Patton was a lunch- stalled at the postoffice to care their merchandise before the buy-
eon guest Thursday of Mrs. H. D. for parcel post needs, another ing public and profitable to the
*Marks, Sr., in Apalachicola. section of 95 lock boxes has been publisher. I am very glad to co-
added to care for the rapidly ex- operate to the fullest extent."
----------- 4' pandihg demand for boxes, and H. W. SEWELL: "A city. aI-
4 the working rooam has been en- ways grows with its newspaper
UNION large considerably by removal of and we hope The Star will create
S ta partition at the rear. interest in Port St. Joe and the
O- UjteI B All this work is being done at surrounding countryside. A GOOD NEW FALL
the expense of Postmaster H. A. newspaper is 'enjoyed by every- :'
SDrake in order to give the public one." SILK DRESSES
WE HAVE ALL KINDS better service. T. M. SCHNEIDER: "It is a
OF SEA FOODS wonderful thing to have a news- Specially Priced
OF E FOMr. and Mrs. I. C. Nedley and paper published in our commun-
4 daughters, Iva Mae and Melba, ity, filling a long-felt want, a-nd
'ere visitors in Chipley Sunday, I will gladly lend my support to' $
FISH SHRIMP AND visiting Mrs. Nedley's mother, keep it up to the high standards'
OYSTERS set by the publisher OR 2FOR$5
Herbert Johnson, C. It. Marks H. B. WHITAKER: "Any mar
I. C. LUPTON, Prop. and R. P. Nedley of ApalachicolG' who will come.into a community.
were business visitors in the city erect a building and install the
Tuesday. equipment that the publisher' has, SMARTEST A :
deserves all the financial support 'I .
necessary to keep the paper a go- Footv ear
A A ing and growing concern."' STYLES
E' SI9IA L S FRITZ CRISTIANSEN: "I amto395
... indeed glad to see that someone 9
has the initiative and enterprise *1.
to establish a paper here. It
EGGS, dozen ............ 30c REGAL MATCHES, 3 for 10c will aid in the progress of our .
TURNIP GREENS, 3 cans 25c Branson's MUSTARD, qt...20c city. LeHARD "o he
MACARONI, 3 for ........10c ONIONS, Red, 5 Ibs. ....25c newspaper published in our own
-- city is hard to realize. I think .
that Mr. Smith is to be dbmmend- N
ed. for such an undertaking and I
will grow along with the fast-
Potatoes 10 lbs 250 S
growing town. Im with him."
Western T-BONE, lb ......35c vilXED SAUSAGE, lb. ....15c LOngs
DR. BYRD McM'ULLEN' OPENS
Short Rib STEAK, Ib......17c SMOKED SAUSAGE, Ib. ..20c sD M
OFFICE' IN PORT ST. JOE os
STEW MEAT, 2 lbs. .....25c CHUCK ROAST, lb.......15c who hasT
R"l Sl r. IByrd McMullen, who has
ROUND STEAK, ib. ......25c SMOKED BACON, Ib. .....21c practiced medicine for years in l
Clearwater, has opened offices in jR gular
O N 9924 b 9Port St. Joe at the Miller dru g:
store. He is a graduate of u~oiry Sport Backs
Sa University and comes to this rity
highly recommended as .iu ..xptr.- Neatly Tailored
PET MILK, small, 4 for ...15c TOMATOES, large, 3 for ..25c enced physician
COOKING OIL, gallon ....95c Field CORN, large, 3 for ..25c "I am very much delighted with
conditions here,' said Dr. McMui-
Water Maid RICE,, 3 Ibs. ..23c CORN MEAL, 5 Ibs. ......15c len. "Everybpdy is so friendly and
congeniaL One great enterprise of
A ,M which the people should indeed
be proud is the establishment of *
EI S!B a home paper." S nneider S
.Mrs. W. J. Be:in and daughters,
the Misses Martha and Margaret, p r
Miss Louise Soloman and Miss
BAY SHORE GROCERY Avaryee Collier were visitors in S o
SPanama City Saturday. OUTFITTERS 'FOR THE

Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage Robert Key of Apalachicola was ENTIRE FAMILY
.a visitor in Port St. Joe Monday. L ui. ---", L