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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00156
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 13, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00156

Full Text






T The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and uptbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


SPrt S'. Joe-Site cf the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1939 NUMBER 52


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Rowell, J. A. Barfield;. clerk, C.
F. Hanlon.
District 11, Overtstreet school-
inspectors. J. T. Kinard, F. B.
"Whltfield, F. L. Kemp; 'ilerk, Mrs.
W. G. Hardy.
S. District 1, Wewahitchka In-
ispectors, Mrs. D. A. Nichols, Mrs.
LB.:F. Britt, J. A. Barrington; clerk,
C.: Glen.
. j ge for all districts this year
I. set ;at ten mills.
------+d-----

Baptist Assn. To

Meet In This City

On October 18 for Two-Day Con-
clave With Churches of Three
Counties Represented

-Next Wednesday, October 18,
will see delegates from churches
in Gulf, Bay and Franklin coun-
ties convene here for the fifth an-
nual session of the Northwest
Coast Baptist association.
Churches included in the associ-
ation are Port St. Joe, Apalachi-
cola, Youngstown, St. Andrews,
Wewahitchka, Bayview, Millville,
New Hope, Panama City, and
1yan Haven. -i
The conclave will open at 10
o'clock Wednesday morning with
an address of welcome delivered
by Rev. J. W. Sisemore, pastor of
the local Baptist church, followed
with short messages by other
representatives. Reports of com-
mittees will occupy the afternoon
session.
The Baptist Training Union will
hold its annual meeting at 7
o:clbck Wednesday evening and
eilct and install officers for the
,esguinur year. Thls will be fo*-
lowed by an interesting program:
Sub j e c t, "Courageous Hard
Work." Song service led ny Miss
Alice Baggett of Port St. Joe;
prayer; roll call; business; spe-
cial music, solo, "God's Tomor-
row," Miss Alice Baggett; direc-
Kor's report by Eugene Stewart or
Panama City; "Courageous Wit-
nesing. Today," B. F. Hunt, Porn


a total revenue of $6,463,837, wnlcl
is an increase of 35,057 tags sold
over the same period last year,
and an increase of $434,837 In rev-
enue, and an increase of $690,742
over the same period of 1937.
Receipts from the sale of auto-
mobile licenses go into the teacn-
ers salary fund from which the
state's allotment to schools is
paid.

St. Joe; "Every Christian Must
Be a Soul Winner," J. P. Evans,
Bayou George; special music, by
Panama City choir; "Is It Neces-
sary to Continue the Fight for Re-
ligious Liberty?" Mrs. Ruth Gwin
of Apalachicola; closing remarks
and hour of worship.
The session will continue Thurs-
day at which time lectures will b4
delivered, short talks made ont
missions and kindred subjects, ana
the woman's missionary hour will
be held.
The Woman's Missionary society
of the local. Baptist church will
provide entertainment for repre-
sentatives of the 12 churches at-
tending.


Local Doctors To CORRESPONDENT


IVE FILE FOR John Sweeney
A0 The Low Down

CHOOLTRIUSTEE Dies at Age of 84 fr om
Hlad Been Resident of Port St. Joe Wil'is Swamjp
ELECTION NiV 71 Two Yearn; Interment At -aBii .-
Lumberton, Miss. Editor The Star:
SI'm up a tree, half the time.
x of Ten Mills Determined Tohu Sweeney, a resident of this Sc-ems like just about everything
Necessary for Upkeep "'ty for the past two years, passed coin' on is goin' on backwards
Of Schools aawy Saturday at the home of his from what I got used to when my
SSchools ma and pa was down here on the
cinag'hter, Mrs. Fred Hufft, in Oak farm and us boys was helping'
Grove. He was 84 years of age. around.
hauncey Costin, county super- interment was made in Lumber- We was happy as larks. I know
tendent of schools, stated yes- ton, Miss., wih a Panama City that, even though once in a while
day that petitions have been we did work a speck andget up a
d infuneral home in charge of ar- sweat and look as black as the
d in his office, according to rageents. ground, so you wouldn't. know us
, requesting that the following Deceased is survived by on by night after running' a harro-.'
aes be placed on the ballot for son, J. W. Sweeney of New Or- all day. And we tried to raise all
tees in the trustee and millage eathe corn we could every year, and
stion to be held in the Port some years we raised lots, and
tion to be held in the Port StHufft of this city, Mrs. Harry Mc- some years not so much, though i
school district (No. 16) on Kenzie of Bogalusa, La., Mrs. L. guess we did manage to average
e r 7: B. B. Conklin, W. E. Ladanier of Lumbertown Miss., about 20 gallons to the acre.
rdock, B. A. Pridgeon, W. A. La n erBut now things are so. kinda
ith and Jesse M. Smith and Mrs. Lawrence Miller of Pica- left-handed like, that a farmer
e fve cdi syune, Miss, and a large number or don't know what to do, 'cause one
these five candidates, of whom grandchildren and great-grandchil- year Uncle Sam tens him to slow
se are to be elected, are all dren. down, and then the weather turns
t will appear on the ballots, as r Sweeney was a native o dry and.he has no crop. And this
ober. was th last day thaweeney was a nave year it's just the Opposite and
i ri' could b filed. H Canada, coming to the South they're broadcasting' to fill up the
'rflos could be filed. However, ears ago. corn cribs
blanks wilbeI 69years ago. corn cribs.
ee blank spaces will be pro' Just like women wearing' men's
ed should electors choose to.. pants-they sure look comical,
te in the names of other pr- Auto Tag Sales Show and with these swivelchair boys
'. Increase Over 1938 down there in Washington tellln
e c h a regular farmer how much, anA
he city hall will be the polling According to a report for the how, and where to plow, they are
ce and inspectors appointee -even more comical.
cSam Husband, Mrs. Zola Mae- third quarter of the year released Yours with the low down,
and Husband Mrs. Net a Brandon, with by D.W. Finley, motor vehicle JO SERRA.
and Mrs. Nets Brandon, with commissioner, purchases of autO- _____ ___
rge M. Johnson acting as clerk. o o te o--
ret.on hoicialsforoterd.s-mobile license tags this year snows
,lectlon officials for other dis- SHARKS WIN V
ts are: The report shows that 473,421
istri,! 13, Buckhorn school- he e sho that 473, D IN
riot-ir. Tags have been sold this year for d flb VfU. iI -* T *r J
-,pe,-for Arthu-r Jackeson, W. T., A WPA P ME 111?


It.l fTv f It V 1 .u V Jl a night 'show this evening at the
SPort theater starting at 10:45.
Y 41 The picture is "Mystery of the
B"Y 41 IV 6 SCOR E White Room," with Bruce Calib
and Helen Mack portraying the
Expect Toughest Tussle of principal characters, with Con-
eson With Carra le stance Worth, Joan Woodbury,
Se With Carrabelle Tom Dugan and Addison Richards
This Afternoon in support.
The story is laid in a hospital,
The St. Joe Sharks ran rough- where the eerie events begin with
shod over the Crawfordville ;Pan- the scalpel murder of a doctor In-
+1- NIA-Z_ A-1 -11 -- u vH d-


that was full of thrills from start tective work by a young doctor-
to finish. The Crawfordville team highlights the ensuing action at
was much better than' the Altha he unravels a double-murder case
aggregation which the Sharks had involving nearly a dozen sus-
previously beaten 49-0. The score peots.
at Crawfordville was 41 to 6. Hospital staff intrigue provides


Coach Tom Owens used his first
team intact for only a few min-
utes of the game, and after a safe
margin of victory was chalked up
he used a combination of first,
second and third string men.
The first score was niade by Ed
Hufft. hard-driving halfback, on
an end run. Al Schneider's try for
extra point failed. A few minutes
later Max Maddox made a beautt-
(Continued on Page 5)


an undercurrent to the mystery.
------
Fraser Announces for
State Comptroller Job

Edwin G. Fraser, Baker county
representative in the legislature
announces that he will be a can-
didate for the office of state
comptroller in next year's elec-
tions. The office is now held by
J. M. Lee.


Colony of Retired Railway Employes


Located In Port St. Joe Why Not?


Russell Kay, in his '"Too Late to That is something to consider. Port St. Joe we believe it woula
Classify" column this week, puts Port St. Joe has everything to be a boon to the city. Our neigh-
forth an idea that may well be offer these retired railway em- boring city of Panama City ha,
considered by the Port St. Joe ployes-a salubrious climate, good t',Ii-,;-hl.ld a colony of Spanish-
Chamber of Commerce, business fishing and hunting, bathing in the American war veterans under the
men and other interested citizens, warm waters of the Gulf, boating same plan and we see no reason
Kay quotes the Florida Dispatch on beautiful St. Joseph's Bay, a why a similar colony of retired
of St. Augustine, published in the friendly populace, good church, railway pensioners cannot be es-
interests of railway employes, as of all denominations and fine tablished here.
saying that there are 123,000 re- schools. Kay's column follows:


tired railway employes drawing
pensions of from $40 to $120 per
month, and that another 150,000
are eligible to retire. He goes on
further to state that if a colony
of say 1000 of these pensioners
were induced to settle in a com-
munity that they would have a
combined yearly buying power of
between $600,000 and $700,000.


All that would be necessary to
secure these good citizens would
be the allocating of a tract of
land divided into medium priced
lots and arrangements made for
them to secure long-term FHA
loans for construction of dwell-
ings.
If a sincere and honest effort Is
made to bring these people to


"TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY"
By Russell Kay
Editor M. D. Baer of the Flor-
ida Dispatch of St. Augustine, pub-
lished in the interests of railway
employes, advances a suggestion
that is well worth consideration.
Baer points out that there are
(Continued on Page 4)


Take Over Clinics

Benefits Derived By Those Unable
To Pay As Well As Those
In Position to Pay

Four Port St. Joe physicians,
Cr. A. L. Ward, Dr. J. R. Norton,
Dr. A. F. Thomas and Dr. L. H.
Bartee, have agreed to take over
the pre-natal clinic and the neo-
clinic in this city in the drive to
improve sanitary conditions and
and promote the general health of
the community.
Dr. Ward and Dr. Bartee will
have charge of the clinics for tne
first two months, and at the ena
of that period Doctors Thomas and
Norton will take over.
The physicians stress the fact
that thorough examinations will
be given in all cases, even though
clients are unable to pay for the
services, but that where persons
are able to pay will be billed for
the service.
----- -----

Special Friday the

13th Show At Port

"Mystery of the White Room" To
Be Shown At Special Mid-
night Show Tonight

Are you superstitious? Whether
you are or not, it will pay you to
attend the Friday the ui.b mid-


FORSTARNAMED

STATE WINNER

T. W. Wilson Is Awarded Cer-
tificate In National Con-
test of Country Home

The publisher of The Star was
startled yesterday by receiving a
gold seal bedecked document from
the Country Home Magazine stat-
ing that T. W. Wilson, who oc-
casionally contributes articles to
this paper, had been named the
champion country correspondent
for Florida for the year 1938 in the
annual competition conducted by
Country Home.
We are indeed proud to have
been the medium through which
Mr. Wilson received this award,
and extend to him our sincere con-
gratulations and ask him to come
to The Star office and receive his
certificate.
_The handsome certificate bears
the signatures of four famous edi-
tors, William L. Chenery, of C6l-
lier's; Gertrude B. Lane, of the
Woman's Home Companion; Sum-
ner Blossom, of the Americal
Magazine, and Iubert Kelley of
Country Home .Magazine.
Competition this year in the
contest drew 4600 entries, the
largest number since the- awards
were estab1ishod, in-. ,P935 for-Atthe-
purpose of giving recognition to
what the Country Home Magu-
zine's editors regard as an import-
ant phase of American journalism.


Paul Farmer Is

Bitten By Snake

Youth Carrying Ground Rattler to
School Suffers Bite When
Snake Escapes

Paul Farmer, Jr, 16-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Farmer of
Oak Grove, was bitten on the
middle finger of his right hand
Wednesday afternoon by a ground
rattler while he was carrying the
reptile to school.
Paul dropped the snake, and In
attempting to recapture it he was
bitten. He immediately applied a
tourniquet below the bite and
rushed to the office of Dr. J. R.
Norton where he received medlcat
treatment and was administered
an anti-venom.
The youth was reported out of
danger yesterday afternoon, but
his hand was still badly swollen
and discolored.

Busy Bees New Type
Of Winter Tourists

Busy bees are swarming down
in Florida, giving us a new type
of winter tourist. The first con-
tingent, some 280 hives, reached
Clermont last week from New
York.
Wintering bees in Florida has
been found profitable by northern
apiarists, who find that their bees
work industriously through the
Florida winter and almost double
the northern output.
--'C---
SHOWER FOR CHURCH
A shower for the kitchen of the
Baptist church will be held this
afternoon at the home of Mrs. W.
C. Pridgeon on Monument avenue.
All members of the Baptist Wom-
en's Missionary Union are urged
o be in attendance. Refresh-
nents will be served.


wakened r er er *,


ht ers Frida a a


STAR.









PAGE TWO THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1939


MRS. CASON HOSTESS TO
JUNIOR GIRLS' AUXILIARY
Mrs. E. C. Cason, councellor of
the Junior Girls' Auxiliary of the
Baptist church, was hostess to the
girls Tuesday afternoon at her
home on Third street. Topic for
the afternoon was "Time to
Tithe."
The following program was pre-
sented by members: "Redeemed,
the Time," Hazel Cason;- "Let's
Take the Clock Apart," Helen
Gangneiux; "The Face of the
Clock," Geraldine Parker; "The
Hands," Mary Louise Wooden;
"The Wheel Work," Lillian John-
son; "The Weight or Spring,"
Mildred Wright; "Keys for Wind-
ing the Clock," Mrs. A. E. McCas-
v. *Tf .vvE n T)Reali dA It was,


- Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


r -t


HOLD RECEPTION FOR
MINISTER AND WIFE
An informal reception was held
Tuesday evening in the basement
of the Presbyterian church, nonor-
ing Rev. and Mrs. Frank Dearing
of Panama City, the newly-ap-
pointed rector of the St. James
Episcopal church. The basement
of the church was beautifully dec-
orated for the occasion with fall
flowers and potted plants. Mrs.
Robert Bellows and Mrs. Nick
Comforter presided at the table
where cake and punch were served.

WOMAN'S CLUB TO HOLD
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
The Port St. Joe Woman's club
will meet next Wednesday, Octo-


xey; ery ne ze11JVR her 18, at their cluu rouuom in e
Time to Tithe," Jackie Fillingim: Centennial building at which time
a story, "Christian Hands," by an educational program will be
Carolyn Gangnelux. Following a presented by Mrs. Charles Brown
quiz on the topic, the meeting on the topic, "The Direction In
was dismissed by Mrs. Cason. Which Edecation Starts a Man
Will Determine His Future Life."
RUIZ SISTERS WED IN Hostesses for the meeting will be
DOUBLE CEREMONY Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr., Mrs. E. C.
The Misses Gladys and Leona Lewis, Mrs. Paul Marshall and
Ruiz, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Horace Soule.
George Ruiz of this city, were t *
married last Saturday in Apalachi- BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
cola iff a double ceremony to Ger- Born, Sunday, October 8, 1939,
lad Lester and Otis Ensley. a daughter, to Mr. and Mrs. Tom
Following the ceremony the two Mitchell. The young lady has
young couples left for Wakulla been named Barbara Lorine.
Springs on a brief honeymoon be. I f
fore returning to Beacon Hill COMMUNION SERVICES
to reside. Messrs. Lester and Ens- Holy Communion will be held
ley are employed by the St. Joe at the St. James Episcopal church
Paper company. Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock.

Miss Ruby Strickland has taken G. M. Sheppard and Charles
a position as saleslady with the Sheppard of Tallahassee visited
Tradewell b & 10 Store in De- Wednesday and Thursday with
Funiak Spi-rigs. Mr. apd Mrs. W. S. Smith.




Fall SWEATERS


A Thrilling

Selection

Priced at



$1.19

$1.98 and $2.49
CHILDREN'S, WOMEN'S
AND MISSES SIZES
They'll be a handsome
Addition to Your Wardrobe
SILK CREPE


AND WOOLEN


DRESSES and SUITS



$4.50
They're smart in every detail of style, pattern and color.
See them today-you're sure to find the kind you want.

MEN'S FELT


HATS


$1.95 to $3.95
NEW STYLES ... NEW COLORS
For the Best in Hats, See These!


Men's
All-Leather


HOE


$3.00 to $10.00
Fortunes and Florsheims


COSTIN'S Dept. Store


LEGION AUXILIARY GIRLS
ARE REORGANIZED
A number of girls of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary met Thurs-
day night of last weer at the
home of their newly-appointed
leader, Mrs. Sammie Davts, for
the purpose of reorganizing the
Girls' Auxiliary.
Following a brief discussion on
the work, plans were made to hold
a social in the near future IS
arouse enthusiasm and get the
girls interested in their work. A
meeting was held yesterday to
complete plans for the social and
appoint a nominating committee.

MARIE JONES CIRCLE
MEETS WITH MRS. STAGG
The Marie Jones Circle of the
Methodist Missionary society met
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. W. B. Stagg. The Bible
study, "Broadening Horizons in
Fields Afar," wih Mrs. J. C. Brae-
bury in charge, carried the mem-
bers through foreign countries.

MRS. GLOEKLER HOSTESS TO
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
The Thursday Bridge club mem-
bers were entertained yesterday
at the home of Mrs. J. B. Gloek-
ler. Tables were placed in the lir-
ing room, which was attractively
decorated with vases of cut flow-
ers. After several progressions,
scores were tallied and prizes pre-
sented. Delectable refreshments
were served by the hostess to the
members and invited guests.

MRS. ADAMS ENTERTAINS
PRESBYTERIAN CIRCLE
. bThe Presbyterian Circle was en-
tertained this week at the home ot
Mrs. Claude Adams on Monument
avenue. The program on home
missions was led by Mrs. Robert
Logan. Mrs. E. H. Horton gave
the Bible study, taken from the
Book of John, which proved very
interesting. Following dismissal,
iced drinks and cake were served
by the hostess. The next session
will be an Auxiliary meeting at
the church October 23.
ft *r t
MRS. GIBSON ENTERTAINS
SUSANNAH WESLEY CIRCLE
Mrs. Roy Gibson entertained the
members of the Susannah Wesley
Circle of the Methodist church at
her home Monday afternoon. Da~-
ing a short business session plans
were made for the zone meeting
held Wednesday in Wewahitchsa.
Mrs. George Patton was in charge
of the Bible study and presented
an interesting program. At conclu-
sion of -the meeting the hostess
served delicious refreshments.

SHOWER FOR MRS. WOOD
The adult education class under
the direction of Mrs. Fred Maddox
honoredd Mrs. M. C. Wood, mem-
ber of the class, with a shower
Tuesday afternoon at the home or
Mrs. McDaniel at Bayview Heights.
Before presenting the honoree
with the gifts, theregular class ac-
tivities were carried out. Ice
cream and cake was served to the
22 members of the class.

Miss Pauline Arnold of Cherry
Lake was the week-end guest of
Miss Eileen Arnold.

Due to the death of his brother's
wife, Mrs. A. L. Sharit, Mr. and
Mrs. J. L. Sharit were called to
St. Augustine for several days
this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Thos. R. L. Carter
left Tuesday for Dothan, Ala.,
where Mr. Carter will be under
observation in a Dothan hospital
for several days.

Rev. Frank Deering of Panama
City was the guest last Friday of
Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis.


Society


L~ U


BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The Baptist Missionary society
met Monday afternoon at the
church for the purpose of dividing
the society into three circles, the
Marttha, Mary and Lydia Circles,
and the following chairmen were
appointed: Martha Circle, Mrs. J.
0. Baggett; Mary Circle, Mrs. P.
B. Fairley; Lydia Circle, Mrs. C.
A. McClellan. Committees -were
named at this time to take crage
of arrangements for the meeting
of the Northwest Coast Baptist
association here October 18 and
19.
The following schedule was
adopted by the society: First'
Monday, business meeting at the
church; second and third Mon
days, circle meetings at homes o*:
members; fourth Monday, Royal
Service program at church; when
there are fifth Mondays, a stew-
ardship program will be given.
The Lydia Circle will meet next
Monday at the home of Mrs. J. P.
tha Circle at the home of Mrs.
that Circle att the home of Mrs.
M. F. Fillinglm on Sixth street,
and the Mary Circle at the home
of Mrs. E. C. Cason on Fourth
street.

EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
MEETS WITH MRS. KENNEY
The Episcopal Auxiliary met
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr., with eight
members present. The regular
business routine was carried out,
after which plans were discussed
for the reception for the minister
to be held Tuesday night. Follow-
ing dismissal, a social hour was
enjoyed and delicious refresh-
ments served by the hostess.

Attending the CrawfordvilleeSt.
Joe football game in Crawfora-
ville last Friday were the Misses
Elaine Gore, Lunnette Hammock,
Melba Nedley, Marigene Smith
and Murnice Taunton, Howare
Taunton and Johnny Kirkland.


THEATRE THEATRE
OPENS OPENS
DAILY
DAILY Saturday 1:15
2:45
Continuously Sunday1
all-


SUN.-MON.-OCT. 15-16
ONE KISS .
That smashed three lives .
A blazing battle between
blonde and brunette!


Travel Talk Current News

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 18

RICHARD GREENE
DRENDA JOYCE
RICHARD DIX
ROBERT YOUNG


"HERE I AM, A

STRANGER"

Our Gang Comedy 'Auto Antics'
'Singapore and Jahore'

SATURDAY, OCT. 21


TUESDAY, OCT. 17
The family inherit a gold mine!
But against Injun ghosts, bur-
lets, bandits and gunfights they
strike it rich!


Latest News Events
"Witness Trouble"
and "Travel Talk"


THURS.-FRI.-OCT. 19-20
DANGER AHOY! Thrill to the
surge of the deep!

-...

>-m RANDOLPH SCOM
IRANCES DIE

"Youth In the Saddle" News

OWL SHOW SATURDAY
10:30 and 1:15 p. m.
RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!


Chapter No. 3 of Serial Thrill~ I- v
"DICK TRACY RETURNS" Swingsational Musical Come
'The Golden West' Cartoon! "Yankee Doodle Home"
I-glCI 1 I' -


Mrs. Carl Stevens of Wewa-
hitchka, who recently underwent
an appendectomy at a Panama
City hospital, was brought to the
home of her sister, Mrs. J. A.
Christmas, in this city Tuesday,

Miss Kathleen Saunders returnee
last Friday to Dothan to resume
her studies at a business college,

Judge and Mrs. Thos. R. L. Car-
ter spent Monday in Wewahitchl
on business.



Save Half
THE PRICE THAT YOU
EXPECTED TO PAY I


1939 BOHN
NEW AIR-CONDITION
FIN-GRI REUrNC O

*Pay ma& les than you'd
planneod-qgt nmuc nmoetr l.
mast new 3OHN gives you
th-- be~fit of ICE efrigira-
tioa Plent td crystal-dear
ice cubeo-oo&d keepftsher,.
Jicier, flavortul-ittle need
for udIg woverWd dishet


ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY


THE STAR, PORT ST. JGaE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 19391


PAGE TWO


I







.FIDAV YOTOnBF 13, 1939


1.-...- -. .- .--- .
I-


Dead End Kids

Play New Role

"'The Angels Wash Their Faces"
Is Film of Thrills and
: Excitement

As the title so aptly indicates,
"'The Angels Wash Their Faces,"
.which plays at the Port Owl Show
:'Saturday, October 14 only, pre-
.ents the six "Dead End Kids" In
the somewhat unfamiliar guise or
:Jaw-abiding citizens, but let no
one conclude from this that they
hav-e gone sissy. Ann Sheridan
heads the adult contingent of
players, which also includes Ron-
:ald Reagan, Henry O'Neill and
:Berton Churchill.
Miss Sheridan gives an appeal-
ing portrayal of a fine girl who
:has waged a hard but winning
fight to make a good citizen of a
-younger brother who got a bad
start, in his life in the slums.
This younger brother is played
'by Frankie Thomas, and the
rstory. of. the picture revolves
lai-gely about him. After serving
.a 'term in a reformatory for
:youthful misdeeds he has left that
institution thoroughly reformed,



.i





































an.d he is admitted to membership
in their club by the.kids who are
portray-ed by the Dead Enders.
"While these kids are typically
hard and tough products of their
tenement environment, none of
them is vicious and they are con-
sistently on the side of the law In
this picture. In fact, they prove to
be buslwarks of strength to the
forces of law and order, for it Is
they who are responsible for
bringing to justice a sinister band
of criminal grafters to whom
taurder and arson are just part of
the day's work.
This is swell melodramatic stuff
with a unique new twist, and it is
made effective entertainment by
the vividly authentic portrayals of
the members of a wisely selected
cast.
4(
MORE DISCUSSION

-l Hub by came home at .3 o'clock
-in the morning and was fumbling
-aroinnd trying to unlock the front
door v-hich had been bolted from
the inside. From an upstairs win-
dow came his wife's voice:
"Where have you been until
this hour?'
"Been down to clubsh 'scussin'
the taxi sh-trlke."
. "Very well, then,' was the cold
reply. "Now you can go back and
..discuss the lockout."


Reserve Trees

Should Be Left

In Pulp Cutting

Best Practices Call for Leaving
About 200 Trees Per Acre
For Later Crop

When cutting trees for pulp-
wood, best practices call for leave
ing about 200 trees per acre for
a later crop, according to L. T.
Nieland, farm forester of the Flor-
ida Agricultural Extension Ser-
vice.
New pulp and paper mills being
built in the South are buying pine
pulpwood over a wide territory,
Mr. Nieland says. While the mills
will take wood as small as four
inches in diameter at the small
end of a four to five-foot sticks,
he believes it is unwise to cut the
small trees or to clear-cut stands


when they are growing at their
fastest rate, even though most or
the trees may be of pulpwooa
size.
Pulpwood can often be cut from
dense young stands so as to im-
prove the stands and increase the
growth of the remaining trees.
Frequent cuttings at Intervals or
from five to not more than ten
years will yield more wood and
more cash returns tnan clear-cut-
ting.
General rules given by the U.
S. Forest Service for cutting pulp.
wood or marking trees to be cut,
include the cutting of worked out
naval stores pine, crooked or
poorly formed trees, the weaker
crowned trees in dense stands ana
heavy crowned "wolf trees" over-
topping young growth. Overma-
ture, diseased, and fire scarred
trees can also be cut.
Trees to be left include "round"
longleaf or slash pine, the


straightest and best formed trees,
and trees with good thrifty
crowns. Except in crowded stands,
trees under nine inches in diam-
eter should also be left.
A stand of trees requires thin-
ning and weeding just the same
as a cotton patch, but normally
from two to four times more
money can be obtained from saw-
timber than from pulpwood, de-
pending upon the size and quality
of the trees. Holding about 20;
per acre of the thriftiest and besi
crowned trees for a future timber
crop will mean extra dollars a
few years from now, Mr. Nieland
says.

Statement of the Ownership, Man-
agement, Circulation, etc., requir-
ed by th'e Act of Congress of Au-
gust 24, 1912,
0O The Star, published weekly at
Port St. Joe, Florida, for October
1, 1939.
State of Florida, County of Gulf ss.
Before me, a notary public in
and for the State and county afore-


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


*














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PAGE THREE

said, personally appeared W. S.
Smith, who, having been duly
sworn according to law, deposes
and says that he is the Owner of
The Star and that the following
is, to the best of his knowledge
and belief, a true statement of the
ownership, management, etc, of
the aforesaid publication for the
date shown in the above caption,
required by the Act of August 24,
1912, embodied in section 411,
Postal Laws and Regulations, to-
wit:
That the names and addresses
of the publishes, editor, managing
editor and business managers are:
Publisher: W. S. Smith, Port St.
Joe, Florida.
Editor: W. S. Smith, Port St.
Joe, Florida.
That the known bondholders,
mortgagees, and other security
holders owning or holding 1 per
cent of total amount of bonds,
mortgages, or other securities are:
None.
W. S. SMITH,
Sworn to and subscribed before
me this 5th day of October, 1939.
M. P. TOMLINSON,
(My commission expires May 20,
1941).








PO


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months.........65c

Telephone 51 }.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

OLD AGE SITUATION IS SERIOUS
Prices of foodstufss, clothing and every-
thing else is going up, not only in Port St.
Joe, but everywhere in. Florida and the na--
tion as a result of the European conflict.
Of course that means something to the
working man who has a family to care for.
But it means a lot more to those old folks
receiving old age assistance from the state,
as many of them have,,only this source of in-
come to support them in their declining
years, and the few cents extra on :this and
that item amounts to considerable in the
sum total.
And on top of these mounting prices, aid
to the old folks has recently been reduced,
making the amount for most of them inade-
quate to meet even the pressing needs of liv-
ing. In addition, there are at present many
cases pending which, if approved, will tend
to further reduce the pro' rata amounts re-
ceived by the aged.
More money must be secured from some
-source in order to remedy this deplorable
condition and, as is pointed out by the Put-
nam county delegation to the state regisla-
ture, the only way to accomplish this Is
through a special session of the legislature.
To this end a petition is being circulateQ
among members of the legislature requesting[
Governor Cone to call a special session to en-I
act old age pension legislation. Those legis-
lators signing the petition agreeing to attend
at their own expense.
SThis is indeed a wise move, and we trust
that Governor.Cone will issue the necessary
,order, as it will render aid and comfort fb
anany of our oldest and best citizens.

STAR COMPLETES SECOND YEAR
This issue of The Star marks the conclu-
sion of two years of publication of this news-
paper and the editor rightfully feels that The
Star has done much in advancing the inter-
ests of the city of Port St. Joe and of Gulf
county during that time.
We sincerely thank those who have given
us their business in that period and aided us
in our continual drive to make our citizens
"trade at home" conscious. We trust that
this support will not slacken as we enter our
third year, but that it will increase, giving
us greater opportunity to work for the fur.
their advancement of our community.

Haven't heard any kicks yet on the cigaret
tax in Port St. Joe. The majority of mer-
chants are passing, the one cent on to their
customers, while one or two are absorbing it
themselves.

We have been tracking down a rumor that
the good ship Bremen, about which many
tales are told, is hiding out somewhere in
Willis Swamp.

Ripley tells of a man carrying the same
umbrella for 30 years. He wasn't by any
chance referring to Chamberlain?

As a last defense in war, the Dutch would
flood their country, thus affording a well-
earned rest to the lad with his thumb in the
dike.-Atlanta Constitution.


HE IS AN AMERICAN
He is an American.
He hears an airplane overhead, and if he
looks up at all does so in curiosity, neither
in fear nor in the hope of seeing a protector.
His wife goes marketing, and her pur-
chases are limited by her needs, her tastes,
her budget, but not by decree.
He comes home of an evening through
streets which are well lighted, not dimly in
blue.
He reads his newspaper and knows that
what it says is not concocted by a bureau, but
an honest, untrammeled effort to present the
truth.
He has never had a gas mask on.
He has never been in a bombproof shelter.
His military training, an R.O.T.C. course
in college, he took because it excused him
from the gym course, and it was not com-
pulsory.
He belongs to such fraternal organizations
and clubs as he wishes.
He adheres to a political party to the ex-
tent that he desires-the dominant one, if
that be his choice, but with the distinct reser-
vation that he may criticize any of its poli-
Scies with all the vigor which to him seems
proper-any other as his convictions dictate,
even, if it be his decision, one which holds
that the theory of government of the coun-
try is wrong and should be scrapped.
He does not believe, if his party is out of
power, that the only way in which it can
come into power is through a bloody revo-
lution.
He converses with friends, even with
chance acquaintances, expressing freely his
opinion on any subject, without fear.
He does not expect his mail to be opened
between posting and receipt, nor his tele-
phone to be tapped.
He changes his place of dwelling, and does
not report so doing to the police.
He has not registered with the police.
He carries an identification card only In
case he should be the victim of a traffic ac-
cident.
He thinks of his neighbors across interna-
tional borders-of those to the north as
though they were across a state line, rather
than as foreigners-of those to the south
more as strangers, since they speak a lan-
guage different from his, and with the knowl-


edge that there are now matters of differ-
ence between his government and theirs, but
of neither with an expectancy of war.
He worships God in the fashion of his
choice, without let.
His children are with him in his home,
neither removed to a place of greater safety,
if young, nor, if older, ordered ready to serve
the State with sacrifice of limb or life.
He has his problems, his troubles, his un-
certainties, but all others are not overshad-
owed by the imminence of battle and sudden
death.
He should struggle to preserve his Ameri-
canism with its priceless privileges.
He is a fortunate man.
He is an American. -New York Sun.

New safety slogan: "If your drinking, don't
walk," which supplements "If you're drinking
don't drive." Which adds the drunken pedes-
trian to the mounting list of traffic menaces.
It would put a judge in an awkward situa-
tion if he had to decide who was in the wrong
in a traffic accident involving a drunken pe-
destrian and a drunken driver.

We'd like to see the warring nations let
up a bit on their censorship. They're keeping
the world too much in the dark about just
what is going on over there. From the tone
of most of the "communiques" it seems to be
more of a garden party or pink tea.

The chief concern of government is the
making of laws to straighten out the mess It
caused by making other laws.-Tyler Morn-
ing Telegraph.

We discovered a long time ago that noth-
ing is ever gained by grouching.


IN HIS OWN BACKYARD


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY

(Continued from Page 1)
today 123,000 retired railway em-
ployes drawing pensions of from
$40 to $120 each month, while an-
other 150,000 are eligible to re-
tire. Many of these folks have
other income supplementing their
pensions.
Freed from active service, thsse
pensioners are in a position to so-
lect most any location that ap-
peals to them. In their "sunset
of life" they naturally desire a
healthful, balmy climate where .
living costs are nominal and out-
door recreational opportunities ex-
ist.
No state, contends Mr. Baer, has
more to offer than Florida, and
urges that an effort be made by
the state, as well as individual
communities, to establish colonies
of these retired railroad workers,
providing them with accommoda-
tions within their means and rec-
reation facilities that will appeal.
He suggests colonies, pointing
out that these elderly railroaders
like to be together. They are
somewhat clannish and naturally
feel more at home in a community
where other railroaders are lo-
cated, for, like old soldiers, they
enjoy sitting around recounting
their experiences over many years
of active railroad service.
Suppose some community seer-
ing good citizens were to go out
ifter these folks in an honest, sin-
cere effort to establish them as
permanent residents. Suppose a


Another thing to think about is
that these railroad men have built
up a wide acquaintanceship. over
the years. During active service
they have met and madliffric
with thousands of railroad pa-
trons. Most of them have a large,
circle of close personal friends
and relatives in their own com-
munity.
Bring them to Florida. Treat
them right. Help them get com-
fortably located and be neighborly,
and everyone will turn out to be
be a booster who will bring hun-
dreds of others to Florida.
Some day a national old age
pension plan will -be putt ifi5 op--
eration, with "oldsters" receiving
a substantial sum each montu.
When this occurs, Florida will be
in an enviable position because o
what she has to offer the pen-
sioner.
The few far-sighted business
leaders who are today supporting
the Townsend plan probably rj
alize this and see this s:ate., **
possibly California, as the.---.,A
beneficiaries of any plan that-will
provide the old folks with sufti-
cient funds to travel and visit or
locate permanently in this lang
of sunshine.
Encouraging and supporting or
pension movements and extending
a cordial welcome to pensioners
isn't such a screwy idea as 'some
people might think. Florida, above
all other states, is in a position
to attract millions of pension dor-
lars and it is high time she ,recor-
nized this advantage ane started
going after this worthwhile busi-
ness. Railway pensioners offer a
splendid opportunity.


colony of 1000 were attracted to
the community. What would it
mean in buying power? It would I FAVORITE
mean between $600,000 and $700,-
000 a year from railway retire- RECIPES
ment pensions alone-and remen _
her, many of them have other In- -"
comes from investments. CURRIED SHRIMP
Bringing these folks to Florida, 4 tblsps. butter 1 tsp. minced
Baer contends, is not a job for 2 tblsps. chopped parsley
the slick real estate promoter orP onions /2 tsp. curry
those concerned only with the 2 tblsps. chopped powder
sale of real estate, but rather of green peppers X tsp. salt
the community itself. While the 3 tbspschopped tsp. paprika
income of these pensioners indl- 3 tbsps. flour
vidually is small, it is nevertheless celery 12 cups milk
dependable, and in the aggregate c 1 cup cleaned 4 tbsps. catsup
would mean a great deal to any cooked shrimp 2 cups hot
town that went after it in the % tsp. salt boiled ric -
right way. Heat butter in a fr.ing- S.
America today Is pension- Mix in and brown slightly thq
minded. Practically all of our onions, peppers and celery. Add'
larger industries are providing th'e shrimp, parsley, curry, salt
their retired workers with pen- and paprika. Cook slowly for four
sions, and amounts ar-e being in- minutes. Add the flour and mix
creased each year. For the mosi carefully. Then pour in the
part these pensioners represent and cook until the mixture l
sound, substantial, honest, hard- comes creamy. Add the catsup a
working people-mighty good it!. pour immediately over the ri.
zens for any community, arranged in a heated dish. Serve.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1939







RIY O R 1 O Y F


,ED CROSS MEETING
HELD LAST EVENING

A meeting of the Gulf County
Chapter of the American Red
Cross was held last evening at tne
Legion hut for the purpose of
'electing officers for the coming
year.
\Mrs. Beatrice Vines, field rep-
ntative from national heac-
rs of the organization, was
speaker and brought an in-
al message.

S HAVE YOU TRIED
-LeHARDY'S PINK TIP
S"COLD CAPSULES
gAdreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed



DR. J. C. COE
-DENT IST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
SSundays By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


Gladsss fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Work' Unconditionaly
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9a.m. to 6p.m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
GulfCounty's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
S 'waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY PARK
NISHED CABINS
Sthe Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


For Your

--PROTECTION

- Our special filtering process
and quick-freeze method as-
sures you ice that REALLY
s 'pure! It protects your food
therefore it protects you.
There is no substitute for the
value of REAL Ice.

THE WELL-INFORMED
USE ICE
.-jDeliveries by Phone
..- or Regular Route

PHONE 47
: --o- -

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
AIAX KILBOURN, Prop,


Sharks Win

(Continued from Page 1)
ful run around right end for tl
second score of the game. Schn(
der then kicked the oval squarely
between thte goal posts for tw
extra points.
In the second quarter, Huf
lugged the ball over for the their
touchdown and Schneider missed
the try for extra point. At thi
stage of the game, Coach Owen
sent in a string of substitutes, an
after a brief period of play th
quarter ended with the score 20-4
During the third quarter, Bill
Hammock, promising young hal:
back, raced around end for th
fourth touchdown. A pass froi
Gaskin to Farris accounted fo
the extra point. After this th
team seemed to bog down for
time, but two passes from Lane t
Stepp and Lane to Schneide
brought the pigskin from one en
of the field to the other and place
it in scoring position.
Crawfordville made their onl.
score in the last quarter, failing
to convert. Two more touchdown
were made by St. Joe on passe:
to Farris and Schneider, with ex
tra points made by Brown an<
Stepp.
The Sharks play one of theii
toughest opponents this afternoon
at the local -ball park when they
meet the Carrabelel Mullets. The
invading team has a strong aggre
gation of pigskin tossers and have
already defeated Crawfordville and
Wewahitchka by topheavy scores,
Everyone is urged to turn oul
this afternoon and support the Ic-
cal boys. The game is called for
3:30 o'clock.
-----X------
ARTIFICIAL SUN
Years and years ago, people
lipped rushes into oil and burned
hem as their only artificial light.
Then came candles-very smoky
:andles at first, but one of the
greatest boons ever given to man-
kind-followed after hundreds of
years by a much superior brand
nade of tallow. Then came new
kinds of oil lamps, gas illumina-
ion, and finally electricity.
Now, however, something en-
irely new may come about, some-
hing that will startle even those
who take scientific wonders for
granted. A famous firm of electric
ampmakers has been experimena-
ng with an air-cooled mercury
discharge lamp that is literally
ike a little sun. You can believe
t or not, but this new lamp is
aid to have the brightness of
nearly one-seventh that of the sun.
In a word, this lamp will be a
:ind of artificial sun. It is said in
l11 seriousness that with one or
hese lamps mounted at a height
f about half a mile above the
arth, it will be possible to 11-
imipate a whole town.
Just think what that woula
nean! No street lights, no lamps
r lights in houses, no motor car
ghts, and no torches. ,Simply by
turning a switch at lighting-up
ime, a town could be illuminated
r6m one end to the other.
-K<
CARS COLLIDE
The car of Duffy Lewis had the
ear bumper and fender bent Sun-
ay night when it was struck by
car driven by Morton Mahon.
Irs. Lewis suffered a bruise on
er head and nervous shock, but
o one' else suffered injuries.

B. A. Cogdill spent the weetk-
nd in Gainesville with his fam-
y. Miss Ursa Cogdill, student at
S. C. W., joined him in Talla-
assee and attended the Florida-
:ississippi game Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Maho.
ave as their guest their daugh-
r, Mrs. Gordon Warren and son
f Santa Rosa.

Lola: "My huslhand proposed to
e in a thunderstorm."
Lulu: "Thunder always fright-
is me out of my wits, too."


-- ---- ---- --- --- -- --- -----------
THE TATTLER
THE STAFF
Editor-in-Chief ... Dick Stepp
SAsst. Editor...Max Maddox
Sports Editor..Joe Lilienfeld
Society Editor ...........
..........Martha Hinson
Reporters ...... Florence
Facione and Opal Greene
Joke Editors ........Paul
Johnson and Al Schneider
Sees All, Knows All, Tells All About Port St. Joe High School


Student Body WE WONDER
S If E. H. likes S. M:? They seem
To Elect Soon awfully thick.
To Elect on If M. S. has lost her feminine
charm? Look out, M. S.!
If the football boys are collect-
Candidates for President and Vice- ing all the kisses promised them
President Nominated Tuesday for touchdowns?
What kind' of a charm a cei-
The big political campaign is tain senior boy (M. M.) possesses?
underway in Pot St high Whatever it is, you other boys had
underway in Port St. Joe high better get busy and find out.
school, the air is full of arguments Who the two visitors were in
for and against the various office- the senior class Tuesday who wore
seekers, ballyhoo fills the air, and red ribbons? (Annabell L. and
there is enough hand-shaking go- Mary Sue G.)
ing on which, if converted into Why some people think seniors
electrical energy, would be suff- Why some people think seniors
electrical energy, would be suffi- are dignified? My, my, but they
cient to light the city of Port St.are
Joe for at least six months. aretr St. Joe girl will
Nominations for a president and basketball this year?
vice-president of the student body If G. G. enjoys writing for the
were made Tuesday morning in junior paper Mabe he's a u-
the junior and senior classes, thenior (n his heart)
candidate for the presidency being Why M. G. had rather walk to
selected from the senior class, asschool than accept rides?
was done last year, and candidates cIf a certain post-graduate (W.
for the vice-presidency from the .... .
J.) is as popular as he once was?
junior class. Why a certain senior boy rather
Presidential candidates are Al en joysrutning Ito ditches.
Schneider and Paul K. Johnson, I ether M. T. has forgotten al
Whether M. T. has forgotten all
and vice-presidential nominees ar, about E H since B. F. came t
Murnice Taunton and James Wea-' a t E nce B. F. came to
therly.,
The election will be held soon
to decide who shall hold these of- FURTHER INCENTIVE TO WIN
fices of honor, and meanwhile the The Midget Sandwich Shop has
electioneering by candidates and agreed to give the football players
their ardent supporters goes on a hot dog and an RC cola when
apace, they turn in a win.
------------


CHAPEL PROGRAM
Our chapel program last Friday
was in the same .order as former
ones. The senior and junior high
school enjoyed another band con-
cert, the band rendering "Under
the Double Eagle," "I'll Take You
Home, Kathleen," and two school
songs. The cheer leaders took
charge of the program and gave
a few yells. Principal McPherson
made several announcements per-
taining to the length of our chapel
programs, the trip the band was
to make Saturday, the absences
and excuses, and the football game
with Crawfordville.

HISTORY OF MISS MESERVE
Name-Eva H. Meserve.
Birthplace-St. Augustine, Fla.
Hobby-Swimming, reading.
Favorite color-Red.
Miss Meserve attended high
school at St. Augustine, then went
to Brewton Junior College in Mt.
Vernon, Ga. She later attended
John B. Stetson University at De-
land, Fla. She is one of our new
teachers this year and we are all
glad to welcome her.
BOYS DISLIKE-
Girls who brag about all the
boys being crazy about them.
Girls wearing high-heeled shoes
with socks.
Having the girl do all the talk-
ing on a date. They want the. girl
to be a good listener.
Silly girls who giggle all the
time when nothing is funny.
Girls who wear so much makeup
that it looks like war paint instead
of makeup.
Girls wearing bright-colored nail
polish.
,Catty girls who make it thel
hobiy to talk about other girls
So-girls, read this and improve
yourselves accordingly.

FOOTBALL ON PAGE ONE
For complete account 'of ladt
Friday's football game with Craw-
fordville, see page one.

SYMPATHY
The senior class wishes to ex-
press their deepest sympathy to
Florence Facion and Edward Hufft
in regard to the death of their
grandfather, A. J. Sweeney.
THANX
Members of the football team
wish to thank Miller's drug store
and the Port theater for a free
set-up and free admission to the
show, which they received Tues-
day night.

We regret to say that Charles
Parker, mathematics teacher in
our school, has been called out of
town due to death in his family.
Mrs. Cox is the substitute teacher
and is liked by all.


Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon and little
son, Anthony Lawson Pridgeon,
were dismissed from a Panama
City hospital and returned to their
home Thursday.

Miss Juanita Brock of Marianna
is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. '.
W. Davis and' family.



CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
SPECIAL PRICES ON LOTS are
being offered until Oct. 15 on
lots in Garden Crest Develop-
ment at White City by Rev. H.
F. Beaty. 9-1510-6

TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
batht (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS-$200 down and balance
at $20 month. Interest at 5%
$1350 CASH
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet

FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben-
der Addition at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J. L. KERR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foet cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $4 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying...
Try it today. tf


Guest this week of Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Lilius is Mrs. Karlene
Owens of St. Petersburg.

Don't PLAT Wit Malarial
Malaria is one of the world's
really bad scourges. It is nothing
to play with. If you have Malaria
do something about it. For over
70 years, Wintersmith's Tonic has
been preferred by millions of
people. Millions of people can't be
wrong. Get a bottle today, and
see for yourself. For your ow*
sake-try Wintersmith's!

WINTERSMITH'S

TONIC


We have the

EXCLUSIVE

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for '


Bruce's



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ORANGE
GRAPEFRUIT
TOMATO

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9

SOLOMON'S "

DAIRY
D M4


IVEY VANLANDINGHAM'
Local Representative '





^^^SfIrPZ


IF you never have had any
of these pains, be thank-
ful. They can take a lot of
the joy out of life.
If you have ever suffered,
as most of us have, from
a headache, the next time
try DR.MILESANTI-PAIN
PILLS. You will find them
pleasant to take and unusu-
ally prompt and effective in
action. Dr. Miles Anti-Pain
Pills are also recommended
for Neuralgia, Muscular-
Pains, Functional Menstrual
Pains and pain following-
tooth extraction.
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills do
not upset the stomach or leave
you with a dopey, drugged.
feeling.
At Your Drug Store:
125 Tablets $1.00
... 25 Tablets 25c.


,r-.,,.,,,,,. -----------___~__

MOVING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times

'Red' Horton's Transfer


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


--


"~~""""""""""~--------'------


-RIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1939


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FcIV4







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORiti,


LEGAL ADVERTISING

NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DX.TRICT NO.
1, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe.
cial Tax School District Number
One is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the County Court House in We-
wahitchka, Florida for the said
district to determine the rate of
village to be assessed and col-
lIcted on the property i'-rI.
fli the next ensuing two years,
and to elect i'.. r ustees for the
District for -Li r .r ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
tax o:. real or personal prop:
erty and are otherwise qualified
according to Lw are entitled to
vote at said election. It is deter-
mined that ten, mills will be
necessary to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
The Inspectors are: Mrs. D. A.
Nichols, Mrs. B. F. Britt and J. A.
Rirrington. The Clerk is C. F.
Glen.
l By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939. ,
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTI4' Chafrman.
County Supenntendent. 11-3
NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL"
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.'
11, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to. Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws-of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Number
Eleven is. called for 'iesday, the
7th day of November*A. D. 1939,
at the Overstreet School in Over-
street, Florida, for, the said Dis-
trict to determine the rate of
village to Ire- assessed aid col-
lected on the ..property therein
for the *next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
a tax on real...ibr eirsbn'ai piop-
.-erty and are otherTwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to
Yote at sid election. It is deter-
'Tiined that -ten mills ivill be
necessary to, maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District,.
The inspectors are: J. T. Kin-
ard, F. B. Whitfield, F. L. Kemp.
The Clerk is Mrs. W. G. Hardy.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Insiction of Gulf County,
Florida, i this 3rd day of October
-A. D. 1939.
Attest: r THOSE. MERIWETHEt
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Who rules your life? If NOT
Christ. you are serving the devil.
Hear the sermon on "Chris.t My
King" Sunday morning.
Do you know God the Father?
Your acts prove it. Or they may
Vrove that you are a child of the
devil WHICH? Hear the sermon
Sunday night on "How Christ Re-
veals to Us the Father,"
God does not excuse your ignor-
ance when you may learn the
truth. Democracy is founded upon
Christianity. If you aile not sup-
porting and attending the cluAli,
you are aiding Communism, Naz-
ism, Facism and other evils to de-
stroy our nation by injuring the
church, hence you are a traitor tt,
your native land.
When God calls upon you to givw
account of how you spend Sunday
you will have NO excuse, for we
have good comfortable churches
and the sermons are instructive
and spiritually uplifting.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. TU.
8:00 p. mi-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
,Prayermeeting Welnesday, 7:30 p.
.m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASS IMBIY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Fulrftime services
10:15 a. Im.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. mi.-Preaching Service.:
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.,
Prayermeetig 'every Wednesday
night.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Glion ,enson, Rector
10:00 a. m.-Church School. .:
Services first and third Sunday
nights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.

METHODIST CIU RCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
;Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11o0 a.m.--Morning worship.
7,30 p. m.--Evening worship.


Srlra NnfiCae


NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL JLVU5U 1VL IAm
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
13, GtULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Order of Eastern Star
SPursuant to Section 438 of the Meets on second and fourth
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next Tuesdays of each month in the
regular biennial election in Spe- Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
cial Tax School District Number tors who are members are cor-
Tihrteen is called for Tuesday, the ally invited to be present.
7th day of November A. D. 1939, ly invited to be present.
at the Buckhorn School for the said American Legion
District to determine the rate of Gulf County Post 116 meets the
village to be assessed and col- Monday of each month at
first Monday of each month at
elected 'on the property therein
for the iiext ensuing two years, the Legion Hut.
and to elect three trustees for the Masonic Lodge
District for the next ensuing two St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay and fourth Friday nights at 8:31
a tak on real or personal prop- o'clock in Masonic hall.
erty and:' are otherwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to Mr. and Mrs. Percy Coombs
vote at said election. It is deter-
mined that ten mills will be and Mr. and Mrs. Dewitt Marks
necessary to maintain a uniform of Apalachicola, Mr. and Mrs. H.
system of free schools within said R. Saunders and Mr. and Mrs. B.
District. E. Kenney, Sr., of this city were
-The Inspectors are: Arthur
Jackson, W. T. Rowell, .. A. Bar- guests Saturday of Stanley Sheipp
field. The Clerk is C. F. Hanlon. at his Palm Island cottage.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County, Jimm McNeil spent the week-
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939. end in Palatka visiting relatives.
Attest: THOS. MERIWETHER He attended the Florida-Missis-
C. L. COSTIN Chairman. sippi football game Saturday in
County Superintendent. 11-3 Gainesville.
NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL a *
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. Jimmie Baine of Jacksonville is
16, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. the guest of Stanley Sheip at his
Pursuant to Section 438 of thePm id tta
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe- Law are entitled to vote at said
cial Tax School District Number election. It is determined that ten
Sixteen i* called for Tuesday, the mills will be necessary to maintain
7th day of' November A. D. 1939, a uniform system of free schools
at the City Hall, Port St. Joe, within said District.
Florida, for the said District to The Inspectors are: Sam Hus-
determine the rate of millage to band, Mrs. Zola Maddox, Mrs.
be assessed and collected on the Neta Brandon. The Clerk is George
property therein for the next en- M. Johnson.
suing two years, and to elect By order of the Board of Pub-
three trustees for the District for lic Instruction of Gulf County,
the next ensuing two years. All Florida, this 3rd day of October
qualified electors, resident within A. D. 1939.
said District, who pay a tax on Attest: THOS. MERIWETHER
real or personal property and are C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
otherwise qualified according to County Superintendent. 11-3


S Display Mercury 8 Sedan for 1940


THE Mercury 8 sedan for 1940 is a provide entrance to the rear. A new
big, roomy family car, with ample finger-tip gearshift on the steering
seat room for six to ride comfort- column is fast and easy to operate
ably. Young children can be carried and contributes to an unusually
in the rear compartment away from quiet ride. Other improvements are
door handles. The front seat back a torsion bar ride-stabilizer and
sw_ n_ AUW" _l a s St. ^ J_ -._- Wi1-iX1U _i__ LU- euwe I _~ _--.VWLL J.It


OLD RATE
NTT PER MONTH

15 kwh or less..........$1.5(
Next 10 kwh ........@ 10c
Next 50 kwh ........@ 6c
Next 125 kwh .........@ 3c
All over 200 kwh .....@ 2c
Minimum Charge-$1.


OLD RATE

NETr PER MONtTH


First 15 kwh
Next 35 kwh
Next 150 kwh
Next 800 kwh
Next 3000 kwh


Next 3000 kwh ....... @
All over 7000 kwh ....@


.Ilpl-~-sprs~r~N ~-P ~~


'FRESH FLORIDA-

I OP ..a V


30


swings Inward as it Ups forward to controlled tall-weather ventilation.
a C.
. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bellowo,: Lewis JDunne of Roanoke, Ala.,
and son Bobby spent Saturday visited Saturday with Lefty Wads- .:ext to
Jacksonville. worth.

















MORE THAN

$100,000 REDUCTION
OVER FLORIDA POWER SYSTEM


doz.



WILLIAMS
Triangle Cafi
r^


DOMESTIC NEW
.... NET PER MONTH

0 12 kwh or less .........1
c per kwh Next 28 kwh ........@
3 per kwh Next 44 kwh ........ @
c per kwh Next 116 kwh ........@
c per kwh All over 200 kwh .... @
.50 Minimum Charge--$


COMMERCIAL

LIGHTING
H IMRWM I/'-T'IK1"


fOc per kwh
9e per kwh
8c per kwh
70 per kwh
5c per kwh
3c per kwh
2c per kwh


Minimum Charge-$1.50


ATE


.00
7c per
6c per
3e per
3c per

1.00


kwh
kwh
kwh
kwb


'NEW RATE

mw Pran M*S2


First 50 kwh ......@ 8 per kwh
Next 350 kwh ...... @ per kwh


Next 1100 kwh ......@ 8
Next 2500 kwh ......@ 5e


per kwh
per kwh


Next 3000 kwh ......@ 3 perkwh
All over 7000 kwh ...@ 2o per kw,

Minimum Charge--1.00


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


LIVE Flectricallv .. AND SAVE


Domestic and Commercial Lighting RaM


Go Down on November 1st

In Apalachicola sxd Port St. Joe,'
We are pleased to uotunee 'a ; due- m be necessary to meet these'extra
tion :in the Donmeso and a On amercil expenses with sonm temporary increase
Lighting ries effective with meter read- in the charge for electric service. If h-
ings on and after November 1 1939. Since cessity demands, we have no other cho,
these rate reductions were contemplated. Vt is our hope that these lower rates br
war has developed abroad, with the result enable yot to enjoy greater use of 0' -
that material costs, particularly fuel oil, tricity for the many services it ertneia
will probably rise. As a consequence, it so efficientryi

J. P. COOMBS, Manager, Westert Dim'iait

S :


~CI


^ ^


IT,


:---llr- ----~


s~ias~--~p----~-- '-aP~s~ix~s~a~sa~i~B~ss'l--


PAGE SIX


FRIDAY, OCTOBER j1i 19

ATTEND GAME .
Among those attending the Flor-
ida-Mississippi football game in
Gainesville last Saturday wer~e Mr.
Sand Mrs. Dan Farmer, J. D. Wilder,
SMrs. M. C. Edwards, William 1i ad.
dox, Lillian Ferrell, J. L. Temple,
IWilbur Wells, Charles Parker
Jimmie Morton, Joe Thompson,
SWillard Gilbert and Glenn Grims.
ley.
ReaO the ads-it pays!
Read the ads--it pays!


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@


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