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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00154
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 29, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00154

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
S r.ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterrient and upbulilding'of
the City of Port St Joe.


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-

R the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY,, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1939 NUMBER 50
*I


THEATER TAX


IS PASSED BY


CITY FATHER


.Applies To All Forms ofT
tertainment; Estimated t
Bring In .$1200 Yearly

The board of city commiss
,ers at their meeting Tuesday i
ning, after hearing arguments
*and con on the matter, passed
amusement tax ordinance levy
from one cent to five cents on
admissions to any form of en
At- inment within the city of.
.St.--Joe, except those staged'
school children or similar .orgi
nations in the form of ben
performancess:
Maniager'Roy Williams of
'rt theater .was 'the t only per.
present who opposed the'-tax, ,
-he stated that a "theater tax w
'hurt the business men of the c
asw-ii ar- keep .people from out
town,, coming. Into the city a
'spending their money, particular
'on Sundays."
SC. A. LeHardy, president of
Business Men's association, in
plying to Mir.. Williams, said tl
"menibers ot the association kn
that the city 'has 'to -have- .1
-money and they are willing to
operate with :the city in eve
Sway, it. they, feel 'that furtl
revenuO will have -to' be ral$
iu addition to that itreu.red ftr
the ij1j't and. gasoline tax, a
as ,th cigaret tax 'has alrea
Seen imposed they feel. that
amusement tax should also
Levied. ,
"'The cigaret tax, it has be
estimated, will rafie $300 or $4
a 'month and we figure that
amusement tax would bring in
the neighborhood of $i2fi a ye:
"This would allow the city, to ca
for :many small items and also
1ow for a possible reduction in t
village.
"If 'an amusement tax is .
levied," concluded Mr. LeHarC
"'the members of the Busine
M.en's association have gone
record 'as' being opposed to t.
digaret tax."
SW. W. Barrier, president of t.
Chamber of commerce stated th
the amusement tax would bring
more revenue than an increa
to $500 of the theater's operating
license.
-Mayor J. L. Sharit express
his pleasure that the business mi
of the city are manifesting an I
terest in operation of the col
unityy, stating that "It take
such .interest to find out what ti
people' want done, and if this co
tnues. it won't be long before '
really begin to get somewhere
Commissioner B. W. Eells sa:
"We'll be glad if you people ca
show us where we can make sa
ings ,in operation of the city, i
it is your money we are spending
not ours."
Commissioner iB A. Pridgeo
thanked those present for backin
the'board upI in regard to levyin
of the amusement tax, stating:
think such a tax is the proper
move and I'm glad to find tha
.the merchants are back of us."'
'Manager Williams put forth th
suggestion of a general sales ta
in place of the amusement, ga
and cigaret taxes, saying tha
more revenue dould be raised in
that manner. To which Commis
sioner Eells replied:
"The two-cent tax on theater
- tickets will hurt the least number
of people. If we put a sales ta:


WATTS ASKS CITY PASS
PLUMBING ORDINANCE

E. MIl Watts, local plumber, ap-
peared before the city commis-
Ssioners Tuesday night with thu
request that a plumdng ordinance
be passed requiring that those ap-
plying for a plumbing license pass
an examination in order to pre-
vent those having little or no
knowledge of the trade securing
such licenses.
"We call this a 'Town of "Op-
- portunity'," said Mr. Watts, "but
> with what we have to put up with
a heie, where in h- is the op-
; portunity? Anybody can get a
1 plumbing license.'
The commiiissioners agreed that
t some curb should be placed on
Stli- issuing of plumber's licenses
Shik order' to protect the health or
t 'itt'~ensa, and agreed t9 look into
the matter before' October 1, when
e licenses become' due.


New StreetTax
L ( .
Ordinance Is

Passed By City


Boosts Age from 45 to 50 Years;
Amount Equal to Tax Collection
Will Go tfo New Fire Truck

A new- street 'tax ordinance: wa,
passed by the city' commissioners
Tuesday night to supercede the
present law; The 'old ordinance
provided that $2 likeollected from
all able-bodled men between' the
ages of 21 and 45; w-fle the new
law boosts the maximum age to
50 years "
It providess that every able-
bodied mnale person residing in
the ctty 30 days or more pay the
$2 'tax or hare -the privilege of
working on tie streets of the city
for si days 'out :of the year In
lieu 'of cash.. payment. Those who
fail to. pay the tax after being
iduly notified are subject to a-fine
of $25 or 30 days' imprisonment.
Exempted from payment of the
tax are those with permanent dis-
abilities, those of unsound mind,
ministers in charge of churches,
members of the St. Joe fire de-
partment and members of the
Florida National Guard.
City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson was
authorized to appoint an enumera-
tor to cover the city and list the
names of all male persons between
the ages of 21 and 50 years or
age in order that the tax may be
collected 100 per cent, and yester-
day named Mrs. Patrick O'Day to i
do the work.
The commissioners agreed to t
appropriate an amount from the
general fund equal to that raised r
by the street tax toward the pur- I
chase of a new fire truck. In this 5
manner those paying the tax will I
be contributing to their own wel- e
fare and the good of the city as i
a whole. h


g, on, that one or two cents extra
for a loaf of bread to feed a hun-
n gry child will hurt. We are only
g taxing what we consider luxuries,
.g not the necessities."
'I The amusement tax will go into
'r effect October 6 and will levy one
Lt cent on all admissions exceeding
10c up to 15 cents; two cents on
e all admissions from 15 cents to
x 25 cents, and five cents on all ad-
s missions exceeding 25 cents. No
It tax is levied on the 10-cent thea.
n ter tickets for children.
-- The ordinance covers, circuses,
prizefights, wrestling matches, tent
r shows and all other forms of en-
r tetainment, with the exception of
s those noted above.


a

$
I
$
J

p

fi
b
tr
n


t7
7
bt
M


REID AVENUE

PAVING TO BE

STARTED SOON


Mayor
Work
vey


Assures Merchants
to Commence; Sur-
Begun Yesterday


A crew of surveyors yesterday
began laying grade lines'on Reid
avenue for grading and paving of
this main business thoroughfare
which, on account of its dust, has
been the bane of merchants along
its length for two' years'past.
A' delegation-froni 'the Business
Men's association appeared before
the board of city commissioners
Tuesday evening to ascertain when
the street was to be improved and-
they were''"~assed by: Mayor J. L.
Sharit that '1 while the'bxact date'
'could not ie' stated, it -probably
obuld be some tinmeb.in. October.
Mayor Sharit said' Reid :avenue,
from First to approximately the
iiitrsection of Fourth 'street, will
remain at its presefit level, witq
dil mix placed on the shoulders,
while the' remaining block to
Fifth street will haye to be cut
down to conform to-the new .Fifth
street grade.
--- ------

Swing High, Swing

Low at BallTonight
. : ...~ ~. ) : ..'. ;


Firemen
Club


Impofr New York Niht
Orchestra To Furnish:'
. Syncopation" -


Disciples of swing, or any other
type of dance music, can have the
time 'oft their lives 'tonight 'at the
fireman's ball' to bi' held in the
Centennial auditorium .with music
for the occasionf furnished by the
Shelley and-Reeves orchestra im-
ported from a New York night
club for the shindig.
Everyone is urged to turn out;
as proceeds from the dance will go
toward purchase of a new fire
truck which, it is anticipated, will
be ordered next Monday.
--------4-------
ASK CONTRIBUTIONS
FOR NEW FIRE TRUCK

Chief Troy Jones yesterday was
circulating a petition among busi-
ness concerns and individuals or
the city asking for contributions
toward the purchase of a new fir,
truck.
It is pointed out in the petition
that .the present truck is disable(c
and an increase in fire insurance
rates is imminent due to this fact.
t is also pointed out tat a new
i00-gallon capacity engine, as com-
pared to the present 350-gallon
engine, will decrease the present
insurance rates in the neighbor-
hood of 20 per cent.
Contributions already made are
.s follows:
St. Joe Lumber & Export Co.,
25; Mrs. A. D. Lawson, $10; T.
I, Stone, $25; Gulf Hardware Co.,
25; Florida Power Corp., $25; St.
oe Motor Co., $25.
Further contributions will be
published next week.
It is the hope of the volunteer c
ire department that an order will
e placed Monday for the new
ruck, which probably will be (
counted on a Ford chassis.

The newly-organized. Boy Scout t
roop will meet this evening at <
:30 o'clock in the Centennial t
building under direction of Sammy i
[cCall, scoutmaster. f


C. OF C. WILL ERECT
"INFORMATION BOOTH

T. H. Stone appeared before
the city commissioners Tuesday
night and submitted plans orf
small building to :be erected by
the chamber of commerce on the
corner of Fifth street and Monu-
hient avenue in Port Inn Park to
be used as an information booth
and office for the secretary of
the chamber. It is the plan, he
said, to have someone in 'the o~
fice at all times and to make it
'a beauty spot.
The commissioners would not
issue a building permit, as tihe
frame structure would be within
the inner fire zone, but said to
tpoceed with its construction with-
olit the permit, which would give
them leeway to order its removal
in case any question should arise
over its -construction.
**. ---- ----

Sharks Play Altha

Today In First Tilt

Of Football Season

Pep Parade Headed By Band and
Team Will Wind Through
Streets This Afternoon

The Port St. Joe.Sharks will In-
augurate the football season the,
'afternoon when they meet the Al-
tha team on the field at the local
ball park.
The boys have been working
hard under the direction .ofCoach
Tommy Owens and Principal D. G.
McPherson and should, from all
indications emerge victorious.
Players on the Shark snjuad are:'
Ends-Dick Stepp, Al Schneider,
Gordon Ferris, Dave Maddox, Ar-
thur Soderberg, Earl Brown. Cen-
ters-Willard Gilbert, Gleen Grim-
sley, R. H. Smith. Backs-John
Lane, Max Maddox, Jimmie Tay-
lor, Ed :Hufft, 'Lenelle. -Rowan,
Phillip Lewis, Billy Haiimock:
A parade of the football team,
and school children, headed by the
high school band, will' march
through the business district this
afternoon at 2 o'clock to aid in in-
stilling fighting spirit in the foot-
ball squad and advertise today's
melee.
Everyone is urged to attend thec
opening game and not to miss the
other five home games. Your loyai
support is asked and your ever-
encouraging cheering is needed.
In plain, simple language-be out
there and help win the game this
afternoon.
-- ---------

New Fords To Be

Here October 6

Many New Features and Numer- 1
ous Improvements To Be
Seen On New Cars

The sensational new 1940 Fords
will be on display at the St. Joe
Motor company salesroom on Oc-
tober 6, according to S. P. Jen- d
kins, salesman, who passed out c
the information in the absence of c
W. O. Anderson, who was in Jack-
sonville for a preview of the new i
creations. p
"Many new features and numer- c
ous improvements are to be seen t
In the new cars," stated Jenkins,
'the chief of which is the new d
automaticc ride stabilizer. With o
he many added features, beauty
f design and easy-riding quall-
ies. 'Fords for Forty' will be the B
est buy In the loW-priced car l(
field' J


ELECTRIC RATES

WILL DROP HERE

ON NOVEMBER 1

Power Company Holds To Its
Policy.of Cutting Rates
As Use Increases

J. P. Coombs, manager of Flor-
ida Power corporation's western
division, received word this week
from A. W. Higgins, president of
the company, that electric rates
in Port St. Joe, Apalachicola and
intervening points would 'be re-
duced effective with meter raal-
ings beginning November 1.
The total' reduction over the
company's system will involve an
estimated 'annual saving to do-
mestic and commercial lighting
customers of approximately $100,-
000, based on consumption of
electricity during the lpast'twele
months. Approximately $75,000 "6f
this amount applies to domestic
users.
Among the benefits to customers
wiN be a reduction in the monthly
minimum charge from $1.50 to'$I,
which will include the use of 12
kilowatt-hours of service a month.
The first step in the domestie
service rate, after the minimum Is
used, will be "even cents per Tit-
watt-hour, compared with ten
cents under the present rate.
"The Florida Power corporation
has for many years adhered to a
policy of making reductions in 10-
cal "electric rates' as the rise 'or
electric .service increases," stated
Mr. Coomrs. "The improvement ot
business' conditions over the p'as:
few years has resulted In wider
use of electricity in the average
consumer's home and biisiness
through "popular acceptance of
modern methods of lighting, cook-
ing, refrigeration and the' hun-
dredaof other services performed
electfically.
"This :'announcement of lower
electric rates comes in the face of
anticipated increases in the prices
of almost every other stable com-
modity. The corporation, even- at
this time of uncertainty, has faith
in Florida's immediate future, aa
well as placing confidence in the
future market for increased use
of electric service."
Mr. Higgins made the following
statement: "We, of course, pred!-
cate electric rate reductions on
an anticipated rise in the amount
of electricity the average con-
sumer will use after the reduction
is in effect. It is equally true that
electric rate reductions are earned
by the consumers through !n-
creased use of the service before
the reduction is made. It always
will be our policy to. continue to
reduce rates if conditions will per-
nit us to do so."
-k-
FISHER NAMED HEAD
OF COMMERCE BODY

T. E. Fisher was elected presi.
lent of the Port St. Joe Chamber
of Commerce at the first meeting
If the new board of directors held
Monday night. Other officers se-
ecter were H. A. Kidd, first vice-
president; B. E. Kenney, Sr., sec-
ind vice-president; Horace Soute,
treasurer.
T. W. Wilson was named by the
directors to continue .in the office
f secretary of the body.
$ ------
S.S. Governor John Lind of the
lull Line arrived yesterday to
oad paper at the dock of the St.
oe Paper company,


THEII









PAE W TEETRPOTST2JE GLFCUNY9FOR3


YE.


Society


BAPTIST B. A. U. HOLDS
QUARTERLY MEETING
Members of the Baptist B. A. U.
held their quarterly business
meeting and social at the church
last Friday evening. Mrs. Ivey
Vanlandingham presided at the
business session at which time
the following officers for the next
quarter .were elected: President,
Mrs. Vanlandingham-; vice-presi-
dent, Mrs. W. J. Daughtry; secre-
tary, Miss Myrtice Coody; Bible
quiz, Mrs. E. C. Cason; group
captains, Mrs. Clyde Allen ana
Mrs. Kate Harrell; social chair.
man, Mrs. J. 0. Baggett; choirls-
ter, Mrs. J. A. Connell.
Following the election, Mrs. W.
J. Daughtry and Mrs. E. C. Cason,
program chairmen, took charge
and after a short devotional and
prayer by Rev. J. W. Sisemore, a
spelling match was enjoyed, Mrs.
J. 0. Baggett winning the prize.
Mrs. E. A. McCaskey led in prayer,
followed by a talk, "Ways That
Win," iby Mrs. M. J. Fillingim.
Mrs. Sisemore gave an interesting
talk on "Obeying the Great Com-
"plfion Through Personal Serv-
ice." A song was sung, after which
Mrs. Ezell dismissed the meeting.
During a short business session
the mission study was announced
Sor Thursday and Friday after-
noons at 2:30 o'clock. f

LEGION AUXILIARY IN
MEETING FRIDAY NIGHT
The Ladies Auxiliary of the i
American Legion met last Friday t
night in- the Legion hut with Mrs.
Lois 'VanHorn, president, In ttre
chair. Following regular opening
ceremonies, minutes of the pre-
vious meeting were read, followed
by -the treasurer's report. Mrs. R.
R, Davis of Wewahitchka turned d
in monies collected for the crip-
d
pled, children's surgical room. A
letter of thanks from the Lake
City hospital was read for money
sent. A motion was made and ap-
proved to buy a piano for the hut.
Mrs. Bailey of Wewahitchka was C
welcomed as a new member, after
which -the meeting adjourned ano
all were invited to LeHardy's 0
where refreshments were served.
4 4 4 B
MARIE JONES CIRCLE MEETS S
AT HOME OF MRS. TAUNTON
The Marie Jones Circle of the r
Methodist Missionary society met af
Monday afternoon at the home of th
Mrs. C. C. Taunton, with Mrs. J. of
L. Temple, circle chairman, con- in
ducting the business meeting, af- -te
ter which Mrs. Jesse Bradbury, si
program chairman, presented an -
interesting program on the topic, ic
"New Horizons of Home Mis- A.
sions." The program was opened op
with prayer by Mrs. Bradbury, St
who also gave the introduction w<
and discussed the first topic. Mrs. Bi
Edwin Ramsey, Mrs. George Su- Mr
her and Mrs. R. A. Swatts gave M
interesting talks .on home mis- th,
sions. Following a prayer by Mrs. wa
Bradbury, the meeting adjourned
and a delightful social hour was an
enjoyed. Mc
t f Th
Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Kenney and Al
Mr. and Mrs. Marc Glaskow of Pl
Carrabelle spent Sunday in pa- An
lachicola, guests of Mr. and Mrs. wit
S. Sheipp. pri
George Johnson has returned to we
the city following a week's stay dra
in Mobile, where he attended a pal
meeting of the I. L. A. ser
Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Metz of
Jackson, Miss., spent last week in I
Port St. Joe, guests of Mr. and Cit
Mrs. Louis Emrich. at
Mrs. C. P. VanHorn and sons, her
Cornelius and Marion, and Carlyle lu
Matthews visited Sunday in Pan- is
ama City. bea
Mr. and Mrs. 13: B. Conklin and dill
Mr. and Mrs. H. Lilius attended day
the district Lions meeting held be
Tuesday in Marianna imp


- Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


At the Churches


INVITATION IS EXTENDED
BY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Many of our friends have not
yet seen our new church, nor at-
tended service there. Now, dur.
ing our Loyalty to Christ month,
October, we cordially invite you
to attend one or more services.
There will be preaching every
Sunday of October, both morning
and night.
A number of seats have bee-:
named in honor of individuals and
families, and we are sure that
these will feel honored by you It
you will sit in their seats when
in the Presbyterian crurch. The
following are the seats, with
names and numbers:
1. Miss Lettie Beaty. 3. Dr.
and Mrs. A. W. Jones. T. James
Thomas McNeill. 5. Mr. and Mrs.
R. A. Costin. 6. Mrs. Basil E.
Kenney, Sr. 7. James Hardin
Hunter, Jr. 8. Mr. and Mrs. E.
H. Horton. 9. Byrd Parker. 10.
Manning B. Smith, Sr. 11. Catho-
lic Friends. 12: Mr. and Mrs. I.
A. Kidd.
This is God's House, so we wel-
come you fellow Christians to
worship with us. Come praying
for a blessing upon yourself ane.
upon others. Study the Gospel or
John with us each Sunday night.
No offering plate is passed' dut-
ng sgevices, but a box is near
he door were you may place your
gifts to the Lord's Caife..
Yours in His Service,
The Presbyterian Church.

DR. MOORE TO PREACH
Dr. E. C. Moore of the Marianna.
district will preach at the Metho-
ist church Sunday morning at 11 t
'clock and 7:45 in the evening.

ALTAR SOCIETY TO MEET d
The Altar society of St. Joseph's
Catholic church will meet Mon-
ay afternoon, October 2, at the
ome of Mrs. J. J. Darcey at 3
'clock.

IAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS AT CHURCH
The Royal Service program was
rendered at the church Monday
fterpoon by the Mary Circle of
he Baptist church with members
f the Martha and Lydia circles
Attendance. Top.-c for the at-
rnoon was "The Great Commis-
on and the W. M. U. Chief Aims
-Enlistment and Personal Serv-
e," and was in charge of Mrs.
L. Ezell, who announced the
opening song, "I Love to Tell th-c
ory," and called for the watch-
ord to be repeated in unison.
ble study was also given by
rs. Ezel, followed with prayer by
rs. J. 0. Baggett, after whic-i
e following interesting program
as presented:
Talk, "The Great Commission
d Enlistment," by Mrs. A. E.
cCaskey. Song. "Talk, "The
iree Women," by Mrs. Claude
len. "W. M. U. Enlistments and
ans," by Mrs. W. L. Durant.
S"Ad" contest was then held,
th Mrs. E. C. Cason winning the
iize for the most correct ans-
rs. Animals crackers were then
awn and matching animals were
rtners for delicious refreshments
rved in the basement.

Rev. Frank Dearing of Panama
y filled his regular appointment
the St. James Episcopal church
'e Sunday night.
Irs. B. A. Cogsdill of. Gainesville
spending several days at their
,ch home caring for Mr. Cogs-
who has been ill for several
Ys past. His many friends will
glad, to know that he is much
,roved.
... .


PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
IN CONFERENCE TODAY
The Auxiliary of the Presbyter-
ian church held its regular meet-
ing at the church Monday after-
noon with eight members and one
visitor present. Final nlans were


Mr. and Mrs. Basil Kenney, Sr.,
attended the dinner given Satur-
day night by Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Sherman at the Panama City
Yacht club.
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Mrs. G. W.
Vining and Miss Corene Davis ar-
rived Wednesday to spend a few
lays in the city as guests of
their brother and sister-in-law,
Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis.
Mrs. J. L. Sharit spent yester-
lay in DeFuniak Springs.


Mesdames B. E. Parker and G.
White of Wewahitchka were visit-
flg Monday inthis city.
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake spent
last Sunday in Marianna, guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Yancey.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith were
week-end visitors in Dothan anc
Headland, Ala.
Mrs. W. S. Smith and Mrs. 3.
A. Christmas visited Monday in
Marianna and Chattahoochee.


THEATRE OPENS

Daily 2:45

Saturday 1:15

PHONE 109


UIZJTrAI kV-RJAjniA


UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; called overhead and sides;
good water; $4 montlfA.pply St.
Joe rmber Co-. 12121t
ROOMS FOR R.iT

FOR RENT-Two-room apartment.
See Mrs. Ada Jones.: I
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try t- today. tf


THEATRE OPENS

Daily 2:45

Sunday 1:45,


PHONE 109


HEDY LAMARR ROBERT TAYLOR


"LADY OF THE TROPICS"

LATEST CURRENT NEWS -- RIOTOUS COMEDY


TUESDAY-OCTOBER 3
Greater Than the Best!


COMIC


IjI
Aki wTkNIlOFF I.Ioyl 1101AM
MaryBolasi Patdwcla Mosion

EDY CURRENT NEWS


Gay Ro]


SATURDAY-OCTOBER 7







A COLUMBIA-PICTUL9--!^...;
Spider's Web" No. 15 and
"Dick Tracy Returns" No.-T


WEDNESDAY-OCTOBER 4
WHOO-WO-


"THINK FAST"


OWL SHOW SATURDAY 10:30 P.
THRILLS OF AN EXILE!


RITA RIO AND ORCHESTRA


I-


THURSDAY-FRIDAY-OCTOBER 5-6

mance Burning Love!


"When Tomorrow

Comes" I


i
I


n


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOBE,' GULP COUNTY, PLORIDA


FRIDAY SEPTEM 9'


THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB made for tre group conference to
MEETS WITH MRS. GORE be held at the church today.
The Thursday Bridge club met The morning session today will
Wednesday night at the home of be held at the church and at noon
Mrs. George Gore on Long avenue. dismisesd for luncheon, to be
The living room where three served at the home of Mrs. B. E.
tables were placed for play was Kenney, Sr., and after the lunch-
decorated with vases of beautiful eon the afternoon session will be
roses. At the conclusion of play held at the church.
prizes were awarded -to Mrs. J. B. *t
Gloekler, high, and Mrs. H. H. WOMAN'S CLUB TO HOLD
Saunders, cut. MEETING OCTOBER 4
Frozen salad and iced drinks The Port St. Joe Woman's club
were served by the hostess to will hold its first meeting of the
Mesdames Gloekler, E. Ramsey, M. year at the Centennial building
P. Tomlinson, C. Edwards, R. Co- next Wednesday, October 4, with
burn, T. Owens, J. M. Smith, E. O. Mrs. Basil Kenney, Sr., presiding
Lewis and B. A. Pridegon, and in- in the absence of Mrs. W. E.
vited guests, Mrs. Saunders, Mrs. Smith, president. Hostesses for
Dell Mahon and Miss Cordelia Le- the afternoon are Mrs. Edwin
Gallie --, Ramsey, Mrs. C. Edwards, Mrs. F.
*- c Curtis and Mrs. J. 1. Miller. Mrs.
MRS. S. C. PRIDGEON Horace Soule will have charge of
OBSERVES BIRTHDAY the program, which will be "Fat
Mrs. S. C. Pridgeon was the Gardening." Full attendance is
honoree at a surprise birthday urgently requested.
party last Friday evening. Fall *. t
flowers attractively decorated the EASTERN STAR CHAPTER
living and dining rooms and form- HOLDS INITIATION
ing the centerpiece of the dining Three candidates were initiated
table was a beautiful birthday Tuesday night at the meeting of
cake. The honoree was the recipi- the local chapter, Order of East-
ent of many lovely gifts which ern Star, being Mrs. 'D. G. Me.
were packed in a cedar chest anc Pherson, T. M. Schneider and Roy
presented to her. Fruit punch and Evans. The hall was decorated for
cake was served to members or the occasion with mixed fall
the immediate family and the flowers. Following the initiation
Misses Myrtice Coody and Edna ceremony the chapter was close
Davis. and refreshments served to about
28 members and visitors.


Chief Jones Says Tax
Must Be Paid By Monday

Chief of Police Troy Jones said.
yesterday that all those who have,
received notice that their street
tax assessment of $2is now due-
and paybale and who have not
yet paid same will be haled be-
fore the municipal judge unless
the tax is paid by Monday.

Miss Enid Matthison returned-
this week from New York, where"
she has spent the past two
months taking a special course in
nurses training.



CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
SPECIAL PRICES ON LOTS are
being offered until Oct. 15 on
lots in Garden Crest Develop-
ment at White City by Rev. IH
F. Beaty. '9-151 6,

TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE.:
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
battit (complete). Froht and back
porches screened. Electric lights:
annd water.
6 1450 EACH
TERMS-$200 down and balance
at $20 month. Interest at 5% :
$1350 CASH .,
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet "

FOR SALE-Frst 10 lots. in Ben-
der Addition at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J; L. KEIR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
FOR RENT


PAQB TWO









FRIDAY SETEBE 29, 193 TH_ STR POR ST. JOE GUL CONY LRDAPG


ALLIGATOR HATCHING TIME
It's alligator hatching time at
the St. Augustine alligator and
ostrich farm. Hundreds of baby
reptiles have been saved from the
alligator papas and mamas, who
have a habit of eating the eggs
and thus cutting down the birth
rate of their species. The alliga-
tors bury the eggs in sand nests
and when they turn* their backs
the hired' hands at the farm steal
the eggs and put them in a safe
place where they will be sure to
hatch.

HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S LITTLE
LIVER PILLS
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed



DR. J. C. COE
--DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


Glaues fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
y : Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9a.m. to 6p.m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FREH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY PARK
FURNISHED CABINS
*- On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


For Your

PROTECTION
This Summer
Our special filtering process
and quick-freeze method as-
sures you ice that REALLY
is pure! It protects your food
S. therefore it protects you.
There is no substitute for the
value of REAL Ice.
THE WELL-INFORMED
USE ICE
Deliveries by Phone
or Regular Route
PHONE 47
-o-

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.
,- ------- --- -- .


Turgent Drama Is Placed

In Exotic Far East Locale


~2i.ybe-f alhlor.I-,
Wrt T SI l .iI


Robert Taylor and Hedy La-
marr, the most talked-about wo-
man in motion pictures today, ar-
rive as the newest and most- fas-
cinating romantic! team of the
screen in "Lady of the Tropics,''
playing Sunday and Monday at
the Port theater.
The setting of the story takes
place in the heart of the Orient,
where wanderers of all races, ir-
respective of caste, meet and
mingle, seek love and sometimes
die. Settings faithful to the coun-
try include the most fashionable
cafes, hotels and government
buildings of Saigon, the "Paris or
the East," from- whence the in-
terest the two leading characters
hold' for each Iother ripens within


enigmatic temple of Angkor Wat,
shrine of a forgotten race only
recently torn out of the jungle by
French explorers.
Taylor plays young Bill Carey,
penniless American, who meets
and falls in love with Manon, a
beautiful half-caste, portrayed by
Miss Lamarr, whose dream is ta
flee from Indo-China where no
race recognizes her, and become
a white woman. Joseph Schild-
kraut, as Delaroch, throws all ob-
stacles in her path because he
also loves her, and even her mar-
riage to Taylor fails to thwart
him in keeping her bound to :I-
do-China. Miss Lamarr, after Tay-
lor has voiced distrust in her,
finds the solution~ in a tensely


the mystifying ruins of the great dramatic climax.


Book On Florida

Geology Is Free

Written In Language That Will
Fascinate the Ordinary
Layman


The editor of The Star is in re-
ceipt of a most interesting book-
let, "Scenery of Florida Inter-
preted by a Geologist," written by
C. Wythe Cooke of the United
States Geological Survey and pub-
lished by Bob Dowling, state su-
pervisor of conservation. It Is for
free distribution and a copy may
be secured by writing to Mr.
Dowling at Tallahassee.
The book's accuracy is based
on the highest authority, and the


author has chosen such language
as will fascinate the ordinary
layman. Those who would delve
into the mysteries of Florida's
geology will find its 122 pages
quite worth reading.
The source of great springs that
belch forth navigable rivers at
one gorge are dealt with. The
chemistry of soils, the origin of
minerals, the variety of clays, the
physiography of limitless land-
scapes, even the flora and fauna
of today and the prehistoric ani-
mal life, all these are detailed and
woven into a composite picture of
Florida as it was millions or
years ago, as it evolved through
the centuries, and as it actually
appears today.
.It is a booklet well worth pe-
rusing, and we urge all of our
readers, as well as students of the
local high school, to secure a copy.

WRUF CONTINUES OPERATING

No bids have been received for
the operation of the state-wned
radio station WRIUF at Gaines-
ville, state board of control of-
ficials announce, but added that
in spite of this fact the station
will continue operation.


Believes Townsend

Plan Will Increase

All Lines Business

Schoepf Points Out Plan Would
Insure Employment for At
Least Three Million

Speaking before a large group
of Townsendltes at Orlando last.
week, Burton Schoepf of Tampa
gave a business man's viewpoint
of the "plan" and said that in hl5
opinion its adoption-would result
in an immediate increase. of at
least 25 per cent in all lines of
business.
He further pointed out that in
addition to business stimulation
through increased national buying
power, the plan would insure Im-
mediate employment for at least
3,000,000 persons, who would take
the place of those past 60 years
of age who would give up gainfur
occupation under the plan.
Schoepf said that, like man)
others, he was skeptical of the
plan at first, but after considering
it with an open mind and looking
at it from. a strictly business
standpoint, he became convinced
that it posessed unusual merit and
if given a fair test would prove
out beyond the expectations of
even its most ardent supporters.
He pointed, out the fact that
many people do not really under-
stand the plan, and said the gen-
eral impression was that it auto-
matically provided a pension of
$200 each month to all over 60
years of age.
This, he said, was not the case.
It would simply provide each per-
son eligible to receive a pension
under the plan with their pro-
rata share of the actual revenue
produced under the national two
per cent- transaction tax, and no
one knew definitely just what this
amount would be.
A number of central Florida la-


bor leaders shared the platform
with Schoepf and expressed tnelr
approval of the "plan." It was
pointed out that with labor and
Townsendites united in support of
the plan, definite action could be
looked for in the next congress.
------------
ORLANDO GETS MEET

Florida's most sought after con-
vention, the annual meeting or
the Florida Education association,
will be held' in Orlando, March 36
through April 2, 1940.


Choose Your

Druggist

As Carefully

As You Would

Your Doctor
The effectiveness of the
doctor you choose with such
care depends greatly on the
pharmacist who fills the
prescription. A Registered
Pharmacist is, always on
duty at LeHardy's, so that
YOU can have your pre-
scrTptions filled carefully
and rapidly.
Open 7 a. m. to Midnight

LeHardy's

Pharmacy
"Where Friends Meet"
PHONE 5


Steel making involves four main
steps-at the ore mine, the blast
furnace, 'the open hearth furnace
and the rolling mill.


MALARIAn
If you are run-down and "'1t
good" due to Malaria, try Winte-
smith's Tonic! Thousands of people
all over the South "swear by it"-
)millions of people, for over 70,
.years, have said it's th thing fofl
Malaria. .. The small bottle costs
only 50 cents-yet may convince
,you that it's what you need. TRY,
Wintersmith's. That's all we ask.

WINTERSMITH'S

TONIC


We have the

EXCLUSIVE

AGENCY
for


Bruce's

4
Juices
I 4


ORANGE
GRAPEFRUIT
TOMATO

We Deliver

On Order
4


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

IVEY VANLANDINGHAMI
Local Representative


------------ I----------
,, ,, ,,,, -, ------------,,

MOVING? '

We have the sub-agency for the
MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times

'Red' Horton's Transfer
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
S---- ------- ------ ^- -


SA RE there days viien it seems
That the radio, the ringing of
the door or telephone bell, the
clatter of dishes, or even the laughter and voices
of children nearly drive you frantic-days when
you are restless, and cranky? i
Do you lie awake nights?
When these hectic days and wakeful nights in-
terfere with your work and take the pleasure out
of life for you, try
DR. MILES NERVINE
Dr. Miles Nervine is a combination of effective :
nerve sedatives, originated by a famous nerve
specialist. 7i
SDr. Miles Nervine has brought relief to millions
of nervous sufferers. You may find it exactly what
you need.
Will you try Dr. Miles Nervine?
Your druggist has it. :


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1939


T.HE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE







ATAON


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida;
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

--<{ Telephone 51 ).-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

ABOUT THIS THIRD TERM BUSINESS
Many voters of Port St. Joe are of the
opinion that the United States will be dragged
into the European war some time during the
early part of 1940-just before election time
-in order that President Roosevelt will be
enabled to return to office for a third term,
just as President Wilson was re-elected to a
second term during the "World War because
it was not considered advisable to change
horses in the middle of the stream or, in that
case, to change presidents in the middle of
a war.
Their guess is as good as the next fellow's
but as President Roosevelt hasn't come right
out and said he will be a candidate in 1940,
we're of the opinion that all this hullabaloo
about a third term is being raised by those
individuals and groups who feel that their
own continuance in. posts of authority and
influence depends upon Roosevelt being re-
turned to office, and if this nation does be-
come involved in the war before election
tinie it will be partly through the efforts of
these office holders.
No president has ever been elected for a
third term, though several have tried and
been defeated, and it seems to be a national
policy that no man shall be president of these
United States for three terms.
SIn 1875 the house of representatives
adopted a resolution which, though it did not
amend the Constitution in fact, did in form.
It reads:
"Resolved: That, in the opinion of
this House, the precedent established by
Washington and other Presidents of the
SUnited States, in retiring from the presi-
dential office after their second term,
has become, by universal concurrence, a
part of our republican system of govern-
ment, and that any departure from this
time-honored custom would be unwise,
unpatriotic and fraught with peril to our
free institutions."

As congress assembled for its special ses-
sion, the definitions of a "limited emergency"
proclaimed by President Roosevelt, were
many. One wag even interpreted the pres-
ent condition as an improvement. He rea-
soned: "We have had an 'emergency' since
1933, but now we have only a 'limited emer-
gency'. That is an improvement."

Wonder how Herr Hitler will explain to
the German people how it is that after Ger-
man soldiers fought and died to take Poland
that Russia gets the major portion of the
spoils ?

Old world chancellors trade and traffic in
a manner suggestive of American political
practices, by which the enemies of today may
be bosom friends tomorrow.-Montgomery
Advertiser.

Today's football game will bring out
whether the Port St. Joe Sharks have a
Maginot line or a Polish frontier.

One thing we can be thankful for is that
every time we hear an airplane overhead we
don't have to dive for a rat hole.


CAUTION IS DESIRABLE
When war breaks loose, things have a ten-
dency to go wild for a time. Immediately
following the outbreak in Europe, housewives
rushed to lay in supplies of staple groceries,
and consequently prices advanced, despite the
fact that there is every evidence that food
supplies in the nation are ample for our own
needs and for export.
Citrus, tobacco and cotton growers are of
the general opinion that prices for their crops
will be somewhat better this season because
of the war. But past history seems to indi-
cate caution. The records show that tobacco
prices fell considerably for the first three
years of the World War. Cotton was the
lowest in 1914 it had ever been, and the boom
prices only came near the end of the war and
following the war.
Secretary Wallace of the United States
Department of Agriculture has appealed to
farmers throughout the country to proceed
as though there had been no European out-
break: He advises against plunging and says
that under the existing set-up provision is
made for the production of ample supplies.
If the war is long-drawn-out, and it seems a
,year from now that increased production is
advisable, plans for increasing can be made
at that time.
For the present, however, caution seems to
be tthe part of wisdom. Neither panic nor
wild plunging is justified.

SHOW ABOUT THAT FALL GARDEN?
September and October are excellent
months for starting the fal' garden. During
these months may be planted bush beans,
beets, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage,
Chinese cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery,
collards, endive, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce,
mustard, onion seed and sets, parsnips, pars-
ley, garden peas, radish, spinach, turnips and
rutabagas.
Start right now and combine pleasure,
health and profit through the medium of a
*Florida home garden. And, incidentally, it
will help a lot in easing the strain on the fam-
ily pocketbook due to steadily mounting food
'prices caused by the Euiopean war.

Remember that your home town paper is
continually working for the betterment of
Port St. Joe, ahd when you have a printing'
job, bring it to The Star instead of sending it
to a mail order printer who pays no taxes in
Port St. Joe, contributes nothing to its
schools or churches and whose only interest
in Port St. Joe is to get as much money out
of the city as' possible.

With that war going on in Europe Florida
should have a large increase in tourist busi-
ness, for those who could afford to take a
trip abroad will come down here to spend
the winter and their money.

Pickpockets got $706 which a Vermont
resident had been carrying in his pocket for
six years. If he went that long without spend-
ing any of it, he'll never miss it.-Columbia
Record.

One of the newer film spectacles will fea-
ture 100 midgets, and later on we may have
something really colossal, like "Blizzard
White and the Five Thousand Dwarfs."-_
Boston Herald.

A long and unusual list of questions is be- 1i
ing prepared for the census next year. But
nowhere do we read on the list the very use-
ful question: "How are you going to vote?"
-Savannah News.

The best way to keep up with affairs in
Europe is to quit work and do nothing but
listen to the radio and read the papers.

When old enemies make up they watch one
another for an advantage. Hitler it watching
Stalin, and Stalin is watching Hitler.

A cauliflower is nothing but a cabbage that
has hi-falutin' ideas. .. .


BUSINESS AS USUAL


--- AMERIITS
BWS: I- MH EIICA PRIOCLAIMS WGUI RALRP~tY.


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


From the long-silenced lips of
Colonel Lindbergh comes a calm,
studied, earnest appeal to Ameri-
cans. An appeal for sanity, toler-
ance and intelligent balanced
thought and action with regard. to
both world affairs and a national
program.
It was a clear-cut message that
every American- should heed and
take to heart. We live in an hour
when thoughtless wArds and un-
guarded action may easily involve
us in destructive entanglements
and piunge us'along' with othei na-
tions into the seething caldron of
hale so rampant in Euiope today.
.The desire to stay out of war
is in the heart of every loyae,
right:thinking Anierican and' thu
only baI-is on' wiiich this lnatloa
might excuse armed conflict would
be in the actual repelling of as
attack: upon our shores, and, pro-
tected as we are by the vast ex-
panse of the two great oceans to
the east and west and friendly,
understanding neighbors to the
north and south, the possibility of
an attack seems far remote.
The prestige, wealth and power
of the United States makes us a
natural target for the propaganda
of every nation at war, and no
stone will be left unturned to
bring pressure upon us with the
hope of bringing us in on the side
of this or that warring faction.
Every effort is being made to
arouse our sympathy, stir our emo-
tions, and break down our desire
to remain unbiased, neutral and
tolerant in our reactions to the
present crisis.
If we as individuals or as a na-
tion permit ourselves to be swayed
one way or the other by such
propaganda, sooner or later we
will find ourselves involved just
as we were in the World War.
You or I may feel that we as
individuals are without influence
as far as our national and inter-
national policies are concerned,
yet that is a mistake, for YOU
and I, and countless others like
us, are AMERICA. All that she IS
and HAS and DOES is governed
by YOU and ME.
When you and I permit our-
selves as individuals to be swayed
by propaganda, when we take
sides and give voice publicly to
our feelings, we speak as Amerl-
cans and for America..
The only hope that any warring
nation has of influencing us as a
nation is based upon its ability to
influence us first as individuals,
and that is something that every


loyal citizen should keep in- mind
at this time.
Regardless of what our" ow'*
feelings or. ymipathies ,may be,
this is a poor time to,.,giv8ti~ -
expression in either word or ac-
tion. We can best serve the'cause
of peace, n'ot.only here at hbome
but internationally, by guarding
our tongue and nvoking our rea-
son.
Remember that America, yours
and mine, is a melting pot of
creeds and nationalities. Liberty,
equality and justice to all, is the
standard upon which we have at-
tained our present position. '
Side by side, throughout our na-
tion's history, the Slav and tle
Latin, the Nordic and the Teuton,
the Jew and the Gentile, men and
women of every land and every
creed, have worked to build' and
guard America,
The term "American" applies to
every citizen, be he born or na-
turalized an Amer6can. All' are
equal, be tlirei skin dark' or light,
their accent brad' or sharp, en-'
titled to respect and fellowship as
such so long as they as individuals
observe our institutions and re-
main loyal and steadfast.
Amfertcan"ISM"' is the only
"ism" that this nation will toler-
ate, and it cannot be expressed by
showing sympathy with or hatre.
toward any other. Any attempt,
whether from within or without
our borders, to influence our emo-
tions, set creed against creed or
race against race, or breed Intoler-
ance, hatred and strife, should be
crushed wherever and whenever
it shows itself.
You and I, as Americans, can
safeguard the nation, and we
alone-for AMERICA is in the
end but YOU and I.

NOT SO EMBARRASSING
A woman got off a train at a
way station on a special stop or-
der. Only one person was in sight
and she asked him: "What time
is the next train for Chicago?"
"The train left a while ago and
there'll be no other until tomor-
row."
"Where is the nearest hotel?"
the woman asked.
"There's no hotel here.'
"But what shall I do?" she
asked. "Where shall I spend the
night?"
"I guess you'll have to spend
the night with the station agent."'
"Sir!" she said indignantly, "I'll
have you understand I'm a lady!"
"Well," said the man as he
walked away, "so is the station
agent." *
4------
Tientsin, with its 1,300,000 pea-
pie, is China's third city, Only
Shanghai and Peiping being
larger.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1939






DA, SEPTEMBER 29, 19 TE T
U U


FOOTBALL


HOLD THAT LINE!
COMPLIMENTS OF

St. Joe Bar and Billiard Parlor
ED GEORGE, Prop.

BE THERE KICKOFF
And After the Game Drop in at-
MILLER'S FOUNTAIN
for
ICE CREAM AND SODAS
-You'll need 'em after rooting all afternoon for the Sharks and
cheering vociferously after each touchdown!

Root for the Sharks---
At the game thi. afternoon but always keep In mind
that we are rooting for our customers and are offering a new
and complete Fall line of modern
House Furnishings
-at prices that are well within your means.
DANLEY FURNITURE COMPANY
ST. JOE'S LEADING FURNITURE STORE

A TOUCHDOWN!
FOR YOUR POCKETBOOK! When you buy
your Groceries and Meats from us!

QUALITY GROCERY & MARKET

YEAH, SHARKS!

PATE STEVEDORE COMPANY

FILLETTE-GREENE & COMPANY

Mow 'Em Down, Sharks
Success to the St. Joe Sharks
from

GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.

Block That Kick!
FRESH MILK AND ICE CREAM
SERVED DAILY TO
ST. JOE SHARKS

SOLOMON'S DAIRY

Boost Our Football Team and
Boost Our Town!


MOTOR
LOUIS EMRICH


PARTS
MONUMENT AVENUE'


FIRST GAME of the
SEASON

TODAY

PORT ST. JOE

SHARKS


ALTHA
at the
BALL PARK-
HOME GAMES
October 13-Carrabelle
October 27-Frink
November 10-Bristol
November 17-Florida High
November 30-Wewahitchka

HOME PLAYERS
Ends
Dick Stepp, Al Schneider, Gordon
Ferris, Dave Maddox, Arthur
Soderberg, Earl Brown
Centers
Willard Gilbert, Glenn Grimsley,
R. H. Smith
Backs
John Lane, Max Maddox, Jimmie
Taylor, Ed Hufft, Phillip Lewis,
Hoot Rowan, Billy Hammock

SEASON TICKETS
NOW ON SALE
SEE ALL SIX
HOME GAMES
FOR ONLY

$1.00
Buy them at the Gate Today


HOLD 'EM

SHARKS!

COMPLIMENTS
OF

CHAVERS

FOWHAND

FURNITURE

COMPANY


TODAY!


AN END RUN---
TO OUR STORE BEFORE THE GAME THIS
AFTERNOON will convince you of the many
GROCERY BARGAINS we carry.

SUWANNEE STORE & MARKET

Attend the Game
AND THEN ATTEND THE
SPORT THEATRE *
NOW SHOWING-
"I STOLE A MILLION"
Starring George Raft, Claire Trevor and Dick Foran

WE SCORE!
Before going out to the game, we invite you to step
into our store and see our complete stock of
SPORTING GOODS

ST. JOE HARDWARE COMPANY

Block That Line!
COMPLIMENTS OF THE
ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY

"MAY THE SHARKS BE AS FAST
AS A FORD V-8"

A LINE BUCK
TRAVEL MORE FOR LESS WITH
STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS

J. Lamar Miller's Standard Service

A Straight-Arm
We're telling you straight from the shoulder that our
prices on food can't be beat, and we invite you
to come in before and after the game

ST. JOE RESTAURANT
MRS. LAWSON, Prop.


Clean 'Em Up, Sharks
We Clean 'Em and Press 'Em
------ -----
CREECH BROTHERS
TAILORS AND CLEANERS

Win, Lose or Tie---
We're for the Sharks 100%

ST. JOE FURNITURE COMPANY
"The Home of Good Furniture"


--1- = -1 --- ----rP. -" CI--l~_ ~CI P~IIFC---1 C


FRIDAYY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1939


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


-PAGE FIVE







PAGEC~ SIX>- TH TR *OT OGL ONY FOIAFIA.SPEBR2.13


THE TATTLER
THE STAFF


Editor-in-Chief ... Dick Stepp
Asst. Editor. Max Maddox
Sports Editor. .Joe Lilienfeld
Society Editor ......
.......... Martha Hinson
Reporters ...... Florence
Fac:'one and Opal Greene
Joke Editors ........Paul
Bi n' BJohnson and Al Schneider
Sees All, Kn~ows, All, Tell All About Port St. Joe High School


CHAPEL PROGRAM
The second chapel program of
the 1939-40 session of school was
opened in the customary manner
last Friday. The band played a
march while the students filed
into the auditorium: We were hon-
ored at this time by the presence
of the grammar grades.
-After all were seated a concert
by our own high school band was
enjoyed. Numbers rendered were
all very familiar to us, being "The
Old Gray Mare," "Carry.Me Back
to Old Virginia" and "Touchdown,
St. Joe.'"
The first number was played as
it used to be years ago and then
In the "swing" time of today. The
entire student body joindid in the
second number and sang the old
Southern tune. It was suggested
that the football team and the
school adolt the thiird "niiimber,
"Touchdown, St. Joe," as a' theme
song.
Several announcements were
made pertaining to the football
game and then everyone marched


from the auditorium to first pe-
riod classes.
ENROLLMENT JUMPS
Enrollment of the Port St. Joe
school at the end of last year waa
496. At the end of the first week
of this term the enrollment was
527.
HISTORY OF A TEACHER
Name-Louise Anne Lee.
Born-Noma, Florida.
Favorite Color-Pink.
Favorite Sport-Basketball.
Hobby-Reading.
Miss Lee graduated from the
Holmes county high school and
she later attendedd Lincoln Me-
morial University at Harrogate,
Tenn.,.and'' the University of -Ten-
nessee at Knoxville, finishing at
*Florida'State' College: for Women
at Tallohassee.
It seems that a certain senior
boy is' interested in Tallahassee
lately. Why, Max?


rC-C-----


.


<


EDITORIAL

Why Not Have Rainy Day Sessions
As it is now, when it is raining
in Port Sa. Joe, the school children
are turned out at noon as usual
to go home in the rain for lunch
if their parents haven't come for
them in cars. But there are some
parents who do not have cars, so
the children either have to bring
their lunch or trudge home in the
rain.
In most other schools they have
the so-called "rainy wday sessions"
and it seems that we ought to be
able to work out a schedule and
have these sessions when it is
raining at noon.
We get out at 12 and have but
30 minutes for lunch. That is
plenty of time for the pupils who
bring lunch to school, but for
those students who have a con-
siderable distance to go, it isn't
sufficient time. By talking this
matter over in the Student Coun-
cil when it starts meeting we can
probably work out a plan.
We could wait until 1 o'clock on
rainy days toturn out for noon,
and then school would be out for
the day. We could have the fifth
period, from 12 to 12:30, cutting
that period 15 minutes; then we
could have the sixth period from
12:30 to 1, cutting that period 15
minutes also, and' omitting the
last period entirely.
Other schools have tried this
system and found it successful. It
seems that this system is better
than the ofie we have now as we
wouldn't have to risk getting wet
coming and going' to lunch when
it ralns.


S ROUNDER
"Ya can't kid us, our pa owns.
a goat farm."
What senior boy said: "What's
the joy in being good looking if
you don't know it?"
Do M. T. and L. H. till hold
the giggling title, or could we be
thinking of someone 'else?
M. T., tell ns who the new boy
friend is-not all of us know him.
We' wonder who a certain se-
nior girl (M. H.) has a date with
for the dance tonight?
Will the boys be as sure of win-
ning today's game as they are of
'getting dates?
We wonder why a certain sen-or
girl (D. T.). refused to go to the
dance with a certain post-gradu-
ate (W. J.).
What two senior boys got eight
demerits the first week of school?
By the scars on some of the
football players it seems that we
are going to have some real
streamlined football this year.
Who's engaged to E. E.? We see
she's wearing a diamond ring.
PREMIUMS FOR WINNING
SMembers of the football team
have been promised anything up
to a malted milk by Miller's Drug
Store if they win, and Manager
Williams of the Port theater' has
promised them free admissions to
the picture show.
----$"---
.Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Bynum of
Wewahitchka spent Tuesday in
this city visiting friends.
'Miss Eileen Arnold attended the
Florida-Stetson football game in
Gainesville over the week-end.


I 1


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Sunny State Service
PHN 61 POTtT JEsFA


LIBERAL TERMS
*Bohn given more for your
money, any way you judge a
refrigerator Only Bohn had
the patented Fin-Grid, that aa-
sures more cold per pound of.
ice-more steady cold---fer
food protection! Live, water.
washed air keeps food fresher,
full of flavor You get plenty
of crystal-clear ice cubesl
Choose your BOHN at-


St. Joe Ice

Company
\. '
-3


I


A Florida teaching certificate
based on .four -years. of college
training was. issued last week by
tarn~ SiJp.irint[o.iodr of Schools
Colin English to Thomas Andrew
Owens of Port St. Joe, instructor
in the local schools.


See the Sensation of the Year


The New 1940


""""""~~--~~"""'


I L I r. I I


THE STAR, PORTAT;. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE SIX


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1939


FO DS


On Display



October 6


at the


St. Joe Motor

Company

"FORDS FOR 'FORTY"


PHONE 61


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.