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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00153
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 22, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00153

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow i .-
ing little .newspaper--dcd.ioated to
theiebetterment and buildingg of .:
the -City of Port ,St Joe;.


T:H E
jnL.I^ .


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,1300,000
DuPorit P ier"Mill- -Florida's fast.
T A LL...est growing little. pity. e ib '
S.... the heaRl of the pine belt.
S .. =' .;. /


.The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT' ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1939 NUMBER 49
i.\


Mill Employes

Protest Paying

Of Street Tax

;Aver Living Costs High Enougt
Without Added Burden of
Special Tax

A special meeting of the board
of city commissioners was called
Monday evening -to consider a
paper presented .them signed by
144 employes of the St. Joe Pa
per company .pledging not to pay
'the' $2 street tax in the city of
Port St. Joe. The paper was pre
senitd'"to the commissioners by C.
L A. Atwood. '
S Regasrentatives of the paper
.mnill group gave as their reason
for refusing 'to' pay the tax the
act that living expenses here are
too high compared with wages,
"-,that- rentals are "out ,of llne ana
that they N-IL when these matters
were taken into conside.ratklo they
should not b~e assessed extra taxes
as thWir wages would not allow
'them to pay the tax without work-
ing a hardship' on them.
After about an hour and a half
of debate, pro and' con the com-
missioners postponed further col-
'leqtion. df the street tax until a
committee 'from the .paper mill
employee group has an opportunity
"to go over the city's 'books withi
City Clerk M: P. Tomlinson in orn
d: to .gt a clear picture of th9
Financial situation, after whlcVJ
they will again meet with the city
'e' cinlarse r ftr- thfL. diseus-
alon 'of the street tax matter and
other special taxes.


L :icense Year*

Begins Oct. 1

SFor A'll Seafood'Dealerq and Boat
S Owners In the State of
Floridal .

A new license year for seafoods
dealers 'and boat owner will be-
gin October 1, according. to an an-
nouncement yesterday by Super-
Vis5o of "o nservation R7 ,. Dowl-
~ig. He has sent notices to ap
proximately 500 wholesale dealers,
.3000 retail dealers and 12,000 boat
Owners, advising them that all 1i-
censes should be renewed, by Oc-
tbber 15.
A' change has been made in is-
suing dealers' licenses 'so as to
permit the sale and transportation
-of both fish, oysters and other.
salt water products under one $50
wholesale license.
Formerly the department sold a
S$5 retail fish license and a $5 oy-
ser.license. Now the law provides
one $10 retail seafoods license, un-
Sder which any and all fish and
'pafoods may be retailed.
Every boat in salt water that Is
in anyy way engaged in fishing or
transporting of fishermen, either
for commercial or pleasure put-
poses, is required to have a license
and a number.
: --;--^------
LEGION POST ENJOYS
FISH FRY AT ROWELL'S
Forty-eight members of Gulf
SCounty Post 116, American Le-
gion, members of the Auxiliary
.and guests from Apalachicola and
Panama City posts enjoyed a de-
licious fish fry last Monday eve-
ning a.t Rowell's Landing on the
Dead Lakes.
'Shellcrackers, bream and hush-
puppies were partaken of in
enormous quantities by all pres-
-ent, and all reported a most en-
j'Joyable time.


ONE MORE WEEK OF Sharks to Meet
BIG FURNITURE SALE
-,AI -'I1 w


For the past three weeks the
St. Joe Furniture company has
been holding a special September
sale and offering extremely attrac-
h tive prices on all lines of house
hold furnishings.
Those who have not yet taken
advantage of this sale are urged
to do so immediately, as the big
event closes September 30, which
L gives just one week more of low
cost furniture prices.

Firemen to Hold

Dance Sept. 29th

Will Ilport N ew York Night Club
O orchestraa to Rat., Funds.
F:or .New Equipment

With extensive repairs needed
on :the.city's fire truck as a result
of the rui to Wewahltchka last
week in which a piston was
thrown through the crankcase.
more than ever: before the people
of Port St. Joe should turn out
en masse. next Frtiday: night or
the fireman's ball to be held at
'the ehtennial auditorium.
Chief Troy Jones states that
Shelley and Reeve s "Versatilians"'
have been secured to play and
that this dance orchestra has
"been playing in New York before
coming south,
Jones "further stated thai right
now negotiations are under way
with two or three organizations
for a tew fire truuk it i' It is fig-
ured that it would lie cheaper .In
the long run to replace the preq-
ent truck rather than-try to keep
it repaired. -As a consequence, the
fire laddi must raise a consider-
able' amount it they get the new
truck.
A representative of the Ameri-
can LaFrance company met with
'he firemen Wednesday -and sub-
mitted a price and terms on a
new truck which were, according
to Chief Jones, very favorable.
Your attendance at these dances
is for the benefit of, the entire
city, as the funds raised go into
a special fund for the purchase
of' needed equipment, so plan to
take in next Friday night's event
--~--- --
JACKSONVILLE MAN TO BE
EMPLOYED IN ST, JOE BANK

Mack Toffalete, who for several
years has been connected with the
Florida National bank In Jackson-
ville and for several weeks' past
serving as relief clerk at the Chip-
ley bank, it is understood, will be
employed at the new bank which
will open here shortly.
At present Mr. Toffalete is en-
joying a vacation in New York.
-----S.-----
SENIOR CLASS SELECTS THE
STAR AS OFFICIAL PAPER

The senior class of the Por.t St.
Joe high .school this week voted to
use the columns of The Star for
their school paper, "The Tattler,-
and next week, after selection of
a staff, will get out the first issue.
---------K-
BUILDING PERMITS
The following building permits
were issued this week by City
Clerk M. P. Tomlinson:
T. M. Schneider, 6-room brick
dwelling on Monument avenue;
$4000.
Council Smith, 6-room frame
dwelling on Palm boulevard;
$2000.
Permits for construction of 12
small houses in colored quarters.


Altha In Opener

Of Grid Season
r1

.Six-Man Teams Will Tangle On
Local Field Next :Friday
*In First Game

Next Friday, September 29, .will
see the opening of .the football
season in Port St. Joe when the
Sharks meet the Altha high team
on the local gridiron at the ba:,
park in the first conference game
of the year.
The Port St. Joe boya: have been
[: practicing hard for this game and
Expect to walk away with top'
honors. New uniforms. ere issued
'Monday which seemed to boost
the -morale, of the players several
notches and from the way they
talk and the exhibition they put
on at practice seems to indicate'
that they. are confident of mopping
up on every team Il the con'qr-
ence.
Coaches of the 11 schools mak-
ing up thq conference this year
met Saturday in Tallahassee an
worked out the schedule; which
gives Port' St. Joe the allowingg
10 game,:
Sept. 29--Altha, here.
Oct. 6--Crawfordvlle, there.
Oct. 13-Carrabelle, here.
Oct. 20-Florida High, there.
Oct. 27--Frnk, here.
SNov. 3-Altha, there.
Nov. iO-Briatol, here.
Nov. 17-Florida Hiigh, here.
SNoav 24--rink, the';t. :.
Nov. 30--WeWahltchka:, here.
Everyone is urged to turn out
for this first game and root for
the Sharks. And not only that,
buy a season ticket for all 'home
games for $1 and boost the boys.
.' *" ---- .'-

Ad Is Written

By Delivery Boy


New Style Promises to Rtvolution.
ize Grocery Advertising
In Port St. Joe

It seems that yesterday Hiram
Sansbury of the Griffin Grocery
went fishing or something and
forgot to write his ad copy, and
the job was undertaken by Clint,
the colored delivery boy.
The result, which wil be found
on page two of this issue, is truly
startling and may set a new stan-
dard for grocery advertising in the
city of Port St. Joe.


A MINISTER'S OPINION
-K


On the Present World Situation Marshaland B. B. Conklin.
On sor The new board will meet in the


By REV. H. F. BEATY
Pastor Port St. Joe Presbyterian Church
Since many people are inquiring established that the reported
about the war in Europe, it is well cruelty charged against the Ger-
to review the beginning of the mans in Belgium were false ana
World War 25 years ago, lest we were made for propaganda pur-
fall into the same dangers and poses.
serious mistakes. The "pretended" chase of Pan-
When the war began in 1914 I cho Villa into Mexico was all an
was in Cuba and so had good op- army experiment. President Wil-
portunity to get an unbiased idea son was no doubt sincere In try-
of the situation. From the first, ing to keep us out of war, but the
the newspapers of the United "war crowd" in America was lay-
States gave a biased record of ing the trap all the time. Now it
events so as to stir up Americans is definitely known that we "went
to join in the war. When Germany into the war" to protect tne
was cut off from cable connections money loaned by Morgan and other
the false statements from Europe men of great wealth.
went wild, but later tempered President Wilson tried to settle
down when Germany was able to the war by returning the peoples
send out word again. It is now (Continued on Page 5)


next few days to select a new
president to take the place of W.
W. Barrier, retiring president,
and name a secretary.
______-K
WEDNESDAY CLOSING TO BE
DISCONTINUED AFTER SEPT.27

Next Wednesday, September 27,
will mark the last Wednesday af-
ternoon closing for the business
houses of Port St. Joe. It will
also be the last Wednesday on
which the postoffice closes. Start-
ing October 7 the postoffice will
close on Saturday afternoons.
---
PORT NEWS
S.S. Jean of the Bull Line sailed
Wednesday for Baltimore and
Port Newark with a cargo of pa-
per and lumber.


_


i


SCHOEPF TO BE IN
GOVERNOR RACE

Burton Schoepf of Tampa an-
nounced from Chicago Tuesday
that he would be a candidate fo.
the Demcratic gubernatorial nomi-
nation in the Florida primaries
next May.
Schoepf had been conferring in
Chicago with Dr. Francis Town-
send, founder of the Townsen,<
pension plan, and stated that he
would have the support of tile
Townsend organization in his
campaign.

Carter Urges Car

Owners Get Cards

tn Order to Avoid Last Minute
Rush and Swamp His Of
fice With Work

County Judge Thos. R. L. Carte,
urges cr. 0owwners and others who
expect to drive motor vehicles a?-
fer October ., to secure their
driver's license' without delay. A
large number of licensee have a?-
ready been issued, but a rush will
be made during the last day or
two of. te month by. those who
are persistent in putting oft
everything until the last minute,
he said, and it is going to work
a hardship on him.
After the deadline of October I
has been reached, an examination
must -be 'passed by the applicant
before a license will be issued,
causing not only a delay for the
applicant In Iecurtrg hts or. 'her
License, but added inconvenience..
If the license is applied for before
the end of September, .no delay
will be 'experienced.
Applicants may secure licenses
in a very short time now by call-
ing at the county judge's office,
answering a few simple questions,
signing the application blank an.
paying the prescribed fee of fifty
cents. Alter October 1, a rigid
road-test examination will be re-
quired.
Help Judge Carter-and your-
self--by securing your license to-
day. or tomorrow.

ASK STORES TO CLOSE
FOR FOOTBALL GAME

A petition is being circulated
today among business houses of
the city asking that they close
their doors from 3 to 5 p. m. next
Friday while the opening game or
the football season is being waged
at the ball park.


School Trustees

Will Be Elected

On November 7

New School Code Provides That
Nominations Must Be Made
Not Later Than October 7

Chauncy Costin, Gulf county
superintendent of schools,- stated
yesterday that the school code
passed by the 1939 legislature pro-
vides that the first biennial elec-
tion for trustees shall'be held on
the first Tuesday after the first
Monday'in November, 1939, whicli
will be November 7, at which time
trustees shall be elected for a term
of two years or "for 'the-'pat ..of
such term which remains After
the terms- of trustees holding of-
fice at the time of that;- election
expires. ''
\ Nomination for trustee must b'
made by petition of fite or more
persons qualified to vote in the
election, 'which petition. must be
filed with the county board, at
the office of"the county superin-
tendent, at least 30 days -rior to
the holding of the election.
The name t n.o peisoa:may be
printed on the ballot unless iomt-.
nated as above, ana not later than
October '1 Voters still inma rite
'on he ballot the names of per-
sons of iteir -chice for trustee
whose nanies do not appear oin'the
ballot
Superintendent Costin cals the
attention of everyone desiring to
make nominations to observe the
change in the IlCts- stated above.

New Directors,

Are Named For

Commerce Body

Will Hold Meeting Shortly and
Name New President and'
Secretary

As the result of final ballots
mailed to all members of the
Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce last week for the election
of six new directors, H. A. Kidd,
Basil E. Kenney, Sr., W. O. An-
derson and T. H. Stone were
elected to the board for terms of
two years and Horace Soule and
T. G. Fisher were tied. One of
these latter two will be named to
serve a two-year term and the
other will serve for one year..
Twelve were named on the first
ballot for inclusion on the final
ballot, being B. E. Kenney, Hi A.
Kidd, W. O. Anderson, Horace
Soule, T. G. Fisher, T. H. Stone,
Joe Hauser, A. R. Yarborough, W.
S. Smith, L. W. Owens, Dwight









WAG TWO-~-- TH STR PORT. ST. J*E GUL CONY LRD RDY ETME 2 9


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor
r 'oit 'esn l h'h s


FIRST MEETING OF P.-T. A.
SET FOR SEPTEMBER 28
It is announced by Mrs. E. A.
Horton, president of the Parent-
Teachers association, following an
executive .meeting, that the first
meeting of the year for the body
will be held in the high school
auditorium next Thursday night,
September 28, at 8 o'clock. Time
of meeting was changed from af-
ternoon to evening for the pur-
pose of giving fathers an cppor-
tunity to meet with mothers and
teachers to build for a bigger and
better P.-T. A.
At the executive meeting the
following committees were named:
Finance, Mrs. R. R. Minus; mem-
bership, Mrs. J. J. Darcey; grade
mothers, Mrs. A. I. Gangneiux;
program, Mrs. George McLawhon.

CHURCH LOYALTY
MONTH-OCTOBER
Plans are being brought to com-
.pletion for the celebration or
"Loyalty to Christ" month at the
Presbyterian church during Octo-
ber, according to Rev. H. P.
-Betty.
On the first Sunday there will
Be a rally day in Sunday school.
There. will be both morning and
evening services at the church
* during the month.
"Everyone in Port St. Joe w*io
has not attended our church is
cordially invited to attend at
least once during October," said
Rev. Beaty. "Read the Gospel of
John with us, once a week."

THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. EDWARDS
Mrs. Chester Edwards was hos-
tess to the Thursday Bridge club
yesterday at her home on Long
avenue. Vases of cut flowers, with
marigolds predominating, were at-
tractively used in the living room
where tables were placed for play.
At the conclusion of several pro-
gressions, prizes were awarded. A
delicious party plate was served
by the hostess.


MISSIONARY CIRCLES
IN JOINT MEETING
The Susannah Wesley and Ma-
rie Jones Circles of the Methodist
Missionary society held a joint
Bible study at the church Tues-
day morning. The study for tfe
day was "Songs of Zion," ny Mary
DeBondeleben. I
The meeting opened by singing
"Old Hundredth" and was fol-
lowed by Psalm 19 read in unison
as a prayer, led by Mrs. Roy Gib-
son. Mrs. Jesse Bradbury gave
the introduction and began the
study by discussing the "Psalmist
Idea of God." Mrs. Gibson led the
second part of the discussion, and
after the song, "Joy .to the World,"
Rev. D. E. Marietta led in prayer.
The meeting adjourned for lun-
cheon, the Rev. Marietta return-
ing thanks, and a, delicious finger
lunch was enjoyed by all members
present and two. visitors, Miss
Betty Jo Temple and Miss Mai-
tha Lovett.
Following luncheon, Me study
was resumed with song, "Jesus
Shall Reign" opening the meeting.
Mrs. J. L. Temple led in the first
part of the study and Rev. Mari-
etta concluded the 4Wicussion.
Songs, "Still, SiENT With Thee" and
"God of Abraham," were sung,
and Mrs. Boyd then took charge
and conducted a shot business ses-
sion, after which the meeting was
dismissed by Rev. Marietta.

MRS. COSTIN ENTERTAINS
J. A. M. CLUB MEMBERS
Mrs. C. G. Costin entertained
the members of the J. A. M. club
at her home Tuesday night. Vases
of fall flowers decorated the liv-
ing room where the guests enjoyed
an hour of sewing and chaftingg.
The hostess served salad, sand-
wiches and iced drinks to Mes-
dames, W. H. Howell, J. A. Con-
nell, H. A. Drake, E. C. Pridgeon,
L. Gainous, B. A. Pridgeon, W. C.
Pridgeon, L. Perritt and Miss
Myrtice Coody.


CLINT Battin' HIRAM

Hiram Sansbury, the Big Boss, Flour's gonna be in big de-
wasn't around yesterday an' he mand in Yourope, to, so here's


was sposed to rite our ad, but
guess he fergot to, an' Mr. Da-
vis, our meet man, sed he guest
it wuz up to me to rite the ad.
This is the furst time I ever
writ a ad, but I'm gonna do it
if it kills me. I bin
redin' in the papers where they
is. a war goin' on over in Your-
ope and that probuly the price
of groceries would be going' up.
President Roozevelt has asked
us grocers to hold prices down
as long as we kin, an' I dee-
sided that instead of holding' 'em
down I wuz gonna cut em lower.
Seein' as how sugar is going'
up fast, the furst thing is
CANE 5 LBS.
SUGAR MBy socn 35c
They say armies eat a lot of
monkey meat, so I'll give 'ern
MATCHLESS CAN
Corned Beef 20c
An' a special for a cool meel
on a hot night is
TUNA 2 Ca" 35c
You gotta have matches, so
we'll give you
3 CARTONS FOR
MATCHES 10c
An' if you're gonna do any
fryin' we have
COOKING Gallon
OIL oT Good 85c


White Water Rose 12 Ibs.
FLOUR Ain't o 50c
Weevils
To my way o' thinking, an ad
ain't an ad without cofee, cause
everybody uses it, so here's a
reel buy-
LUZIANNE Per Ib.
COFFEE 30c


An' also we got
SALAD
DRESSING


Qt. Jar
25c


Everybody's goin' daffy 'bout
those choirc


SWEET MIXT
PICKLES


22 OZ.
20c


I looked around a little fur-
ther an' found we can sell


BULK
RICE


5 LBS.
I Eat a Lot 25
of This 2-5c


An' we also got
TETLEY
TEA U Cain't Go
Rong on This


V4 Ib.
19c


Well, I gess that's all I got
room for, but we got a lot 'o
other CASH bargains for Fri-
day an' Saturday, an' I'll' be
seeing' you-all.
CLINT,
The Delivery Boy.


GRIFFIN GROCERY

Port St. Joe ANDMARKET PHONE 63


JUNIOR G. A,'s IN
MISSION STUDY
The mission study program of
the Junior Girls' Auxiliary of the
Baptist church was held Tuesday
afternoon at the church. The
meeting was opened with ,song,
followed by the 120th Psalm read
by Jimmie Palmer, mission study
chairman, who was in charge or
the program for the afternoon. A
prayer was led by Otho Powell,
after which the study book, "Trail
Makers In Other Lands,'' was
completed and' an interesting talt
on "Getting Acquainted With
Japan" was given by Jimm!e
Palmer. "Reopening the Yoruba
Trail In Africa" was given Fy
Mrs. E. C. Cason, counselor, and
was followed by open discussion
on "A Peek Into Yoruba Land."
After a short business session, It
was announced that the nefrt
meeting would' be September 29,
with election of officers. Mrs. .'
O. Baggett dismissed the meeting.

MARTHA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS, PRIDGEON
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon was hos-
tess to the Martha Circle of the
Baptist Missionary society Monday
afternoon at her home on Monu-
ment avenue. Mrs. E. A. McCas-
key, chairman, presided and open-
ed the meeting with song, "I Love
to Tell the .Story," followed with
prayer by Mrs. E. B. Dendy. The
scripture was given by members
and the topic for the afternoon
was "Love for One Another" o0
which Mrs. McCaskey gave an in-
teresting talk. The roll was called
with nine members answering.
Following routine business, the
meeting Wias turned over to Mrs.
Dendy for Bible study, completing
the Book of Nehemiah. Mrs. J. O.
Baggett urged all members to at-
tend the annual W. M. U. in Apa-
lachicola on September 26, after
which the meeting was dismissed
by repeatiing the Mispah.
Refreshments were served by
the hostess to the members and
one visitor present.

PRESBYTERIANS TO HOLD
GROUP CONFERENCE HERE
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Presbyterian church has been no-
tified by the district chairman,
Mrs. D. T. Murphree of DeFuniah
Springs, that a group conference
of District Two of the Presby-
terial will be held here at the
church on Friday, September 29,
in the form of a luncheon.
State officers and delegates
from Panama City, Apalachicola
and other nearby towns will be
present.

MRS. J. LILIENFELD
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. J. Lilienfeld entertained
with two tables of bridge at the
Legion hut Tuesday afternoon. At
the conclusion of several progres-
sions, Mrs. B. H. Graves was
awarded high prize, with second
high going to Mrs. W. M. Howell.
Jello topped with lime sherbet
and Chierries, cke and lemonade
..:,i .re- to Mesdames Howell,
,r:ret'. W. S. Smith, Joe Rauser,
Gsorg. Cooper, J. Grimsley and
P D. Fai ner..

II:TERMEDIATE G. A.'s
EI'NOY SOCIAL HOUR
"lora Mae Cason was hostess to
the Intermediate Girls' Auxiliary
of the Baptist church this week
at her home on Fourth street.
Games were enjoyed, arter which
the hostess served refreshments
to Marie Nations, Helen Wright,
Edna McCloud, MaDelIne Soder-
burg, Margie Costin, Dorothy Cos-
tin, Margie Kirkland, Gwendolyn
Howell, Florence Fachion, Vir-
ginia Pridgeon and the leader,
Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.


LYDIA CIRCLE MEETS AT
HOME OF MRS. QUARLES
The Lydia Circle of the Baptist
n'MisMioearyBOicet~,iet' [oiday at-
ternoon at the home of Mrs. WlP-
liam, Quarles. The devotion, lea
by Mrs. Curtis Palmer, opened the
meeting and was followed with
prayer by Mrs. W. H. Howell. Old
and new business was disposed
of, after which the chairman askea
for donations from the members
for the orphanage. The collection
was then taken and the Bible
study chairman, Mrs. J. F. Miller,
took over the meeting to study
the Book of Ezra.
The meeting was dismissed by
the Mispah, after which the tos-
tess served delicious refreshments
to the eight members. One new
member was welcomed at this
meeting.

PRESBYTERIAN .SERVICES
AT. WEWAHITCHKA
\There will be services in the
Wewahitchka Presbyterian church
on Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day nights, September 27, 28 and
29, in which Rev. H. F. Beaty will
present the Gospel of John as re-
vealing Jesus Christ as God and
the source of life.
"Everyone is. invited to attend
these services," said Rev. Beaty,
"and if you wish to live a fuller,
richer life, come learn the truth
that can help you."

MARY CIRCLE MEETS
AT CHURCH MONDAY
The Mary Circle of the Baptist
Missionary society held its regu-
lar meeting at the church Monday
afternoon. Following the opening
song, "Just As I Am," Mrs. George
Cooper read the scripture, taken
from Mark 16th chapter. Mrs. 3.
W. Sisemore led a prayer arter
which the personal service report
was given. Old and new business
was transacted and a Bible study
given, with all members taking
part. A collection was taken for
the Baptist orphanage after which
the meeting was dismissed.

LeGRONE-BRITT
Mrs. Ruth Shirey Britt and Alex
LeGrone were married September
15 in Apalachicola, with Judge
Sawyer performing the ceremony.
The bride, the only daughter or
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Shirey, wore an
attractive outfit of navy blue with
matching accessories. She has
made Gulf county her home all of
her life and has lived In this crty
for the past two years.
The groom is the son of Mrs.
Lola LeGrone, having moved to
this city two years ago, where lie
has been employed by the St. Joe
Paper company.
Following a short wedding trip
,o Wakulla, the couple are at
home to their friends in this city.
*r *
MOODY-BAGGETT
Of interest to the younger set,
of which she was very popular, is
the wedding of Miss Helen Bag-
gett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 3.
E. Baggett of Zephyr Hills, form-
erly of this city, to O. L. Moody
on Wednesday, September 9.

Mrs. Paul Farmer spent the pas,
week visiting with her mother on
St. Vincent's island.

HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S LITTLE
LIVER PILLS
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed


Grandmotherknewtool
Itd you realize that as far back
as your Grandmother could prob-
ably remember, Wintersmith's has
been one of the South's best-ltnowv
tonics for Malaria and for use as
a General Tonic. For over 70 years,
millions of people can't be wrong!
TRY a bottle and see for yourself!

WINTERSMITH'S

TONIC


Miss Beatrice Vines, Red Cross:
field -representative, was a visitor
here this-week and called on Mrs.
Robeht -Bellows; local Red Cross
chairman.






-I



THEATRE OPENS
Daily 2:45 -:- Saturday 1:15
Sunday 1:45
PHONE 109 FOR SCHEDULE

Friday, September 22
BASIL RATHBONE and
IDA LUPINO in

"The ADVENTURES of

SHERLOCK HOLMES"

"Golf" Tax Trouble

Saturday, September 23

The 3 Mesquiteers



"Wyominr


Outlaw"


"Spider's Web"


Cartoon


Owl Show 10:30
JQHN..BHOWARD aind
GAIL PATRICK in







Musical Comedy

Sunday-Monday, Sept. 24-25 "

Spencer Tracy

Richard Greene

Nancy Kelly

Walter Bremen

"The Story of

Stanley and

Livingstone"


News


Comedy


Tuesday, September 26


"Stage Fright"


News


Wednesday, September 27
THRILLS! CHILLS!,
AIRPLANE CRASHES!

Chester Morris

Wendy Barrie

Alien Jenkins


"Five Came

Back"

pe**^-ee *--i


THE STAR, PORT ST. JO~j GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1989'


!PAGE TWO








FRIAY SETME 22 193 THE STAR, POR ST JOE GULF- COUTY FLORID PAGE THRE


SSmith Island is.only a mile'off
the coast of North Carolina, bu-
resembles a tropical island despite
its nortlierly'location. Scientists
say a "sharp swing of the Gult:
Stream toward the coast at that
point is the reason for the freak-
ish vegetation.
k


EYES EXAMINED -...B... ,.




Glasses fitted when needed -. -.
Made In Our Own Laboratory "'
All Work Unconditionally '
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY "
OPTOMETRIST- -?- I.
PANAMA CITY, FLA.
Pictured here is Germany's g
Fraace. Marksmen man an anti-a
&rst sig ofa bombers I scouting

It's Time To
s Tie Life and Death
D-!AN E !N!
w w Choice Is Grim
Whef':the; M 4t 4 ,io :f the
bt... where the. service Theme o- Filn
Is prompt al. Tff~ltT e --
.. -and wher y 41 t "Five ame' Back" la .a Gripping
t crehn Dramna of a Jimunle Plane
: IOME COOKED Crash and its Consequenese
S -+ *-- MEALS--
S.. If .you had the task of condemn-.
: i:ng four persons to a speedy-death
T A. N Lw E in order that five others might
R I N -L E have a chance to live, how would
RESTAURANT you choose?
This grim riddle forms thp
,- BEER and WINES theme of the sensational climax
in "Five Came Back," gripping
.screen drama of a Jungle plane
ERASE the DOUBT crash and its consequences, which
comes to the Port theater next
About Your Wednesday I
FRESH WATER FISHING Eleven persons are aboard the.
S* nY: DP n K plane when it lands in a clearing;
-two are killed by head-hunting In-
t HAT dians, and when the partly .re-
Sn n *thea HEART of the paired craft is ready to fly again
ead Lakes 'Fihing Area It can carry but five of the party.
.Gulf County's north line out 'The others face certain death, for
S.the Dead Lakes at the the Indians will attack In force
watitline any moment.
SMeet Your Frendse At" How the fortunate five are
M I D W A Y PA.RK chosen makes, for one of the most
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront Ar
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Poatoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA ,"' ': : :-. ". 2 .
.f I'. ..-, ,. : ..


On Germany's Famed West Wall


dramatic scenes ever-filmed. On, Pensacola ill
or the party is a confessed mur.- Sacola P
deer on his way back to his na- Get Paper Plant
"tive country to stand, trial. And
since this man is doomed to,dle "i !i b
in any case, he elects to remain Work Scheduled to Start By Fb. ? I
behind and offers to select the ruary 1,1940, n Thri
five he deems most deserving of .Million Dollar Mil ORANGE
life, tf the. others will ablde by GRAPWRUI
'his decision.. ." Organization of the Florida Pulp AI
ThQ reaulgt .comprises ,a renark-. and .Paper company or the conATO
able picture. struction of a $3,000,000 plant to Deliv
S manufacture white book and wrap- el er
ADD TO WAR CASUALTlEt ping .paper at Pensacola has been n O er
The export chick business built announced by John C. Pace, A. D. O
up during the past several years Pace and James H. Alien of Sa- .
by Alfred Englemann, well known vahnah, Ga,
Avon Park hatchery man, has The Pace interests, which pre- C9W/^T4
been hard-hit by the European viously operated sawmills in the iJJVljJ1 l .
war. In the usual course of bust- Pensacola section, have put up
ness he ships thousands of chicks 95,000 acres of pine lands which I1 4JAT V
to the West Indies, Central and will produce indefinitely 50,000
.South America and to the British cords of pulp wood a year. IVEY ANLAND N,, AIW
possessions, via air lines for quick The plant, which will consist of EVE VANLANDINGHAMI
delivery. Since the war started, he a pulp and paper mill and a Local Representative
reports, his customers abroad bleaching unit, will use the Swed- *,
seem to have lost interest th the ish process which Is said to elini-
chicken business-chickeS (dfn't nate 80 per cent of the odor of a
make good ammunition! paper plant.
It is stated that 75 per cent of
Yellowatone National Park has the necessary capital has been ob
more than 2,850 square miles of tainted and a market for the prod-
wilderness land, reached only by uct has been arranged. It is an-
primitive trails. ticipated that all preliminaries
will be completed and ground

W' ilder broken for the plant by February
W o' UA 1, 1940. i

.Spaniards for a brief time main-
tained a mission in central V1r-
ginia, more than 30 years before Au
Jamestown wa- settled.


------------------,

ISHING--

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.




BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.


SEE-


0. 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, FLA.


NERVOUS TENSION
Shows in both face and manner
You are not fit company for
yourself or anyone else when you
are Tense, Nervous, "Keyed-up". (
Don't miss out on your share oi
good times. The next time over-
taxed nerves make you Wakeful,
Restless, Irritable, try the soothing
effect of
DR. MILES NERVINE
Dr. Miles Nervine is a
scientific formula com -
pounded under the super-
vision of skilled chemists
in one of America's most
modern labora-
tories.
Why don't you try Itt
Large Bottle $1.00
Small Bottlh 254
At your Drug Stor,


DR.MIE
*NE~RV~INI


Pretty Joan Whlisnantnever let the fact she had no arms bother
her, for she educated her toes to do the work of fingers and her legs
to do the double duty of both arms and legs. She's shown here-and
with a ring on her toe, too-using the telephone as ambidextrously as
anyone with more appendage equipment. Joan Is 18, was a resident
of Tulsn and is now one of the chief attractions in the Ripley Oddi-
torium at the Western World's Fair on Treasure Island.


MOVING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
A -- # -.-4- # t .. ..--. .... - 4,<


r'
~ .

,''/
,~ .
i..
lycp~d~ g~:* ~~

1,:~c-

'' '
~
;~a~ur~ ~a
'e :I
,P~P~kJ?


garrison on its famed "west wall"-the former Siegfried line, which faces
aircraft on ln its above-round emplacement oa the "wal," awaiting the
planes.


F


















J.


^
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^
^
^
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>>
^
^
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>
>

^
k>
^

^
^
^
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ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.
-r== ---- --- ..-.-.......:


V


F


~---


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1939


PAGE THREE


FIRE TRUCK DRIVERS
MUST HAVE LICENSES

City firemen who' drive trucks
must get state drivers' licenses at
50 cents each, but drivers of gar-
bage trucks and other municipal
motor vehicles must get chauf-
feurs' licenses at $1 each, accord.
ing to a ruling on the state's new
drivers' license law by Attorney
General George Couper Gibbs.


DR. J, C. COE
--DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


,We have the

EXCLUSIVE

AGENCY
: for


r~a.,
Egrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrg
t,~~d~Q ~
i.15~~"


V T







PAGE FOUR



THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year...... $2.00 Six Months ......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-'*. Telephone 51 ~.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

"LIMITED EMERGENCY"
President Roosevelt has declared this coun-
try to be in a state of "limited emergency"
as a result of the thunder of the big guns on
the far side of the Atlantic. And for a num-
ber of reasons it's important to define that
phrase, for it's a new term.
We assume that the president, by adding
that :ord "limited" to the usual form of the
declaration, is seeking to direct attention to
the fact that we shotildn't let events in the
other hemisphere completely destroy our
own American sense of proportion, our own
American way of life. F6r no one who has
viewed the frequently unpleasant happenings
that make up the history of the world since
1918 can fail to realize that the greatest en-
emies of democracy are war and the threat
of war. These have all too often provided an
opening wedge for setting up a planned econ-
omy which, once instituted, is seldom aban-
doned, even with the return of peace.
Therein lies the most powerful of reasons
. why we ought not to yield to. what the psy-
chologists call "war phychosis"-which simply
is a kind- of group mental disease by which
people believe that our getting mixed up in
the war-is inevitable, and that everything this
country does and thinks in the future ought
Sto pay homage to that fear. '" a.B
No one in this country is as yet willing fd
accept such a line of reasoning.. Acceptance'
of .such a premises can only, no matter what
happens, work to the w6rst possible interest
of. our system of'-representative democracy.

.i, IT'S A GOOD IDEA
Senator Arthur Capper of Kansas has an
idea worth considering. He favors legislation
requiring the 4,000,000 aliens in the United
States to become American citizens within
one year or be deported. He says he is not
an alarmist and does not, for example, be-
lieve the communists are likely to capture
the United States, but he does believe in
America for Americans by birth or by de-
scent or by adoption.
There is a whole lot of argument for the
adoption of the law he recommends. And
the law should be so drawn that unless an
alien would make a desirable citizen, he can-
not be naturalized.:-Melbourne Times.

Folding senators' speeches for mailing cost
the taxpayers $19,500 during the last session
of congress. The sad part of it is, some of
the speeches should not have been made and
few of them should have been mailed to the
tired taxpayers at their own expense.--
Greenville News.

There are going to be a lot of Gulf county
voters find themselves disfranchised when
election times rolls around next year unless
they get busy and re-register as required by
law.

Considering the time the average family
stays at home, real estate ads should read:
"For Sale Splendid two-car garage with
bungalow thrown in."

We understand that in the Garden of Eden
Eve was sometimes A. W. O. L.-away with-
out "leaf." -. ,..


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


SPEED TAKES MORE GAS
You've heard the story of the motorist
who, when he suddenly discovered his gaso-
line was getting low, speeded up so as to
get to the next filling station before the gas
gave out? Well, that's where he pulled a
boner, because to get the most mileage out
of a given amount of gas, it is best to drive
not faster than 20 miles an hour.
Thousands of tests have been made to de-
termine the rate of gasoline consumption at
various speeds, and these tests have shown
that the faster one drives, the greater the
consumption of gas per mile.
A typical illustration is given by the bu-
reau of standards, taking a car that gets 18.9
miles per gallon at a speed of 20 miles per
hour.
At 30 miles an hour the same car will get
18 miles per gallon. At 40 miles an hour it
will get 16.4 miles per gallon. At 50 miles
an hour, 14.6 miles per gallon. At 60.miles
an hour, 12.6 miles per gallon. At 70 miles
an hour, 10.6 miles per gallon, and at 80 miles
an hour, 8.6 miles per gallon.
It is shown also that the consumption 'of
oil at 60 miles an hour is six times as great
Sas it is at 30 miles an hour.
Excessive speed places a great strain on
an automobile .and shortens its life, as the
engine, tires and steering mechanism are all
subject to unusual wear and tear. Not only
as a matter of safety, but as a measure of
economy as. well, driving at moderate speeds
is. recommended to all motorists.
And, incidentally, we might add, the same
things apply to living. If you live at a fast
pace a great strain is placed on the body and
inner mechanism with a consequent shorten-
ing of life.

THINK THIS OVER
Once upon a time a man opened up a ham-.
burger stand, fixed it up spic and span, put
out a big attractive sign, hired a couple of
good looking waitresses and conducted a big.
advertising campaign in the newspaper. Busi-
ness rolled in and he was filled with joy un-
til his son arrived home from college.
"My, my," said the young man, "don't you
know there is a depression in this great land.
Such expenditures are unjustified in the light
of present conditions."
So the hamburger king took his son's ad-
vice, took down his sign, fired the waitresses
and cancelled his advertising. Business came
to a standstill.
"By gosh," said the man, "there IS a ter-
rible depression on, I had no idea that a col-
lege education could be so valuable in busi-
ness."-Winter Haven Herald.

H. H. Milligan, president of the Missouri
Laundry Owners' association, says one "ism"
that hasn't been discussed yet but which Is
pounding at the foundations of our American
institutions is damfoolism, or trying to spend
ourselves into prosperity.-Macon Telegraph.

All the characters in a young dramatist's
first play are dishonest business men. We
presume the names of the cast will be printed
on the program in the order of their disap-
pearance.-Montreal Star.

Dr. Dafoe says he doesn't spank the quints,
and the situation can be appreciated. How
would the doctor's hand feel after one day
with five children?-Boston Transcript.

One large industrial firm just declared a
dividend. It is reported that hundreds of
stockholders fainted in unison.-Columbia
Record.

An assistant secretary of the treasury is
resigning, but supposedly there'll be enough
help left around to dust off the I. O. U'.s
every now and then.-Cincinnati Enquirer.


ou
ge


Value.of Timber

Should Be Known

Prior to Any Sale

Suggested That Owner Get Esti-
mate and Find Value of the
.Products Being Sold

Selling the stand -of timber or
the trees on any area or 'a lump
sum often is like selling a herd
of cattle without counting them.
Dispoding of standing timber or
stumpage without knowing the
number of board feet or cords of
wood that can be cut or the price
per thousand board feet or per
cord is about the same as selling
farm animals without knowing the
number or the price per pound.
The forest service of the United
States Department of Agriculture
offers a number of recommenda-
tions to owners of timberland or
farm woodlands who have timber
or pulpwood for sale.
The first suggestion is that the
timber owner get a reliable est-
mate on the. cords of pulpwood,
or the number of poles or posts,
or the board feet of saw timber
that is being sold.
A second recommendation Is
that the seller find out the value a
of wood products being sold. The
sale is likely to be made'blindfold
unless estimates are made of the
number of cords of wood or the
number of units of other products
being sold.
Studies made by the forest serv-
ice have shown that it takes
nearly twice as long to cut a cord
of wood from six-inch trees as
from 12-inch trees, and it requires
five times as many five-inch
sticks, or three times as many
seven-inch sticks as it does 13-
inch sticks to make one standard'
cord. When five-inch trees are cut
it requires six times as many
trees to make a cord of wood as
it does with nine-inch trees.
Culling out the poorer tree
from five to ten inches in diam-n
eter helps the better trees to grow
faster, but cutting the smaller-
sized better trees redffces the
yield of the woodland.
-- -----
CAN'T SPEAK OF WAR
SThe governments of southeast-
ern Europe, faced with ever-in-
creasing hazards to their neutral-
ity, are taking more drastic safe-
guards daily-even against con-
i irttioanlists. Vigilant enror s


Ships sailing the seas nowadays are with- ship, imprisonment for gossipera,
it lights, but courtship for years has been control of mass displays of sym-
etting along without lights pathies, dispersal of crowds, pleas
toting along without lights. or public calmness and clamping
down on revolutionary parties are
Trade at home and get your Gold Stamps. being employed. 2


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1939


Invites Hitler To-

Resume Art Study
-
Sarasota .,Mayor Believe@ Fuehrer
Will Not Be Disturbed.After
'Restoration' of .Germany

Mayor Verman Kimbrough of
Sarasota has invited Adolf Hitler
to complete his art studies after
the "restoration" of Germany.
"Press dispatches quote'you as
stating you want to. complete the
'restoration' of Germany then de-
vote the remainder of your life to
art," wrote Kimbrough, resident
of the Ringling School of Art, in
a letter to the fuehrer.
"We would not be interested in
accepting you as a painting stu-
dent in our school in your present
state of mind. However, we are of
the opinion that in a briefer pe-
riod of time than you imagine, you
will be much more docile and
amenable to reason. We are cona-
fident that you will have plenty
of time to devote to your art, in
some location far removed from P
Germany.
"As we have a little island just
off the shores of Sarasota in Flop.
Ida, where you could live in a mild
climate in solitude (I am sure nu
one would want to disturb you)
and paint to your heart's content,
[ am taking the liberty of mailing
you a copy of our catalog."
Recalling that he had seen re-
productions of paintings by Hitler,
Kimbrough added: "It is my opin-
ion that you need considerable In-
struction in fundamentals, with
particular stress on the human
figure. I note that you have a pe-
culiarly distorted concept of the
heads of human beings. However,
your experiences during the next
year or two may remedy that."

FLORIDA PLANTS TO
MAKE WAR GOODS
Florida industrial plants will be
called upon to manufacture gun
carriages, bombs, pontoons, mat-
tresses, Diesel engines and to
build ships under a war depart-
ment plan for industrial mobili-
zation in event of war.
.Items allocated to Florida are
part of a nation-wide plan to sup-
ply the army and navy with every
conceivable item needed for coa-,
flict.
Locations of the 'plants has no|I
been disclosed, and whether or
not the St. Joe Paper company has
sealed orders in it's safe is not
know.,
---------~-----
The Field Museum in Chicago
has a 12-inch egg of a huge bird
known as Aepyornis, that became
extinct in Madagascar several
thousand years ago.


-









FRIAY SETME 2 g1TESAPR T OGL ONY LRD AEFV


Find Black Shale

In Test Oil Well

is Considered By Geologists As
Extremely Important Contribu-
tion to Geology of Florida

discovery of a black shale in a
deep test well in Nassau county
4 considered by geologists as an
trremely- important contribution
o the geology of Florida.
The find was reported by Her-
man Gunter, geologist for the
state conservation department, ana
announced by Supervisor R. L.
Dowling. A complete set of the
samples from the well, which Is
being drilled near Hillfard, has
been supplied to the geological
survey offices at Fernandina by
the firm engaged in the drilling
operations.
Geologist Gunter said heretofore
nothing has been known of the
rocks that lie between the Cre-
taceous and the basement igneous
and metamorphic rocks. The blacx
shale discovered' has been corre-
lated with the oil-bearing sales
of the Apalachian fields, ie said.
Palentologists who have ex-
mined the shale samples have
postulated that they are! of Penn-
sylvania age or older. Supervisor
Dowling said the .samples -will be
studjedl!osely and the findings
-will he made known through the
'geological survey office -for the
benefit' of legitimate oil operators
and for students of geology.



CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
-SPECIAL PRICES ON LOTS are
being offered until Oct. 15 on
lots n Garden Crest Develop-
imeft'at White City by-'~ev: H.
F. Beaty. 9-15 10-6

TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
bat-t (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS--200 down and balance
at $20 month. Interest at 5%
$1350 CASH
S'Lot Size 50 by 90 feet

,FOR SALE-First O0 lots in Ben-
der' Additionl at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J. L. KERR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
v- ^--
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceied overhead and sides;
good water; $4 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 1212|tf


At the Churches

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. H. F. Beaty Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a m.-Preaching service.
8:00 p. m.i seeont and fourth
Sundays-Evening services.
Rev. Beaty will preach in We-
wahitchka the first Sunday night
at 7:30 o'clock, and in Liberty
county the third Sunday night.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemere, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thlursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services -.
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11: 00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m.--Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Glion Benson, Rector
10:00 a. m.--Church School.
Services first and third Sunday
nights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.



Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second. and fourth
Tuesday of each 'month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first Monday of each month at
the Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.

In some hospitals a traveling ex-
hibit of paintings is used, so that
a patient may have a picture in
his room for a week or so, and
then the pictures are shifted to
various rooms.
-K
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Rollins ana
daughter Peggy were week-end
visitors in Gordon, Ala.


STARTS WORK ON BAND ROOM

Arthur- Lupton this -week began
construction 'of 'the special room
for band practice :at' the 'school
grounds and expects to have it
completed in a short time. Con-
tract for the job was awarded Mr.
Lupton by the county school
board for $75, materials to be 'fur-
nished by the board.
-----------
T. J. Porteous and sister, Miss
Laura Porteous, have returned to
their home in Hodge, La., follow-
ing a week's visit here with Mrs.
Margaret Samford.

Read the ads-it pays!

MINISTER'S OPINION
ON WORLD SITUATION

(Continued from Page 1)
to small governments where their
own. nationality was in the ma-
jority. But the other countries im-
posed harsh terms that: could but
engender hate and retaliation. We
gained nothing for ourselves by
going into the war, nor contributed
anything permanent for the weak-
er peoples.
I returned to the United States
before America entered the war.
And' now I want to call attention
to a sin of our churches. No United
States flag, nor service flag, was
put in my church, nor was any-
thing allowed that placed the
church on the side of war. Nor
did I personally urge" the young
men to go to war. In 1929 our
general assembly, recognizing the
sins of our churches (and of
others) declared that the Presby'
terian churches should never
again become a tool of the war-
mongers. Thus it was seen that
my position was the right one.
Then one Sunday when I was
reaching to a joint congregation
in the Methodist church of Con-
cord, N. C., my text was "Love
Your Enemies." I called upon the
.people "not to hate persons, but.
only evil deeds, and that of our
allies and of ourselves as well an
those of the enemy." So now 1
urge you not to have improper
feelings against tnose of German
blood. Regard them as good citi-
zens until they prove themselves
otherwise. I detested .tAe term
"hyphenated American." Their
foreign birth does not prevent
their loyalty to America. If they
did not have a love for their own
people and for the land of their
birth they would not be capable
of making loyal Americans.
Now as to the present situation,
we cannot prophesy, but the out-
look is exceedingly serious. Shall
we enter the war? NO, a thou-
sand times NO. Leaving aside any
lack of appreciation and the
abuses we have received from
Europe since the war, we must
look at things from a very serious
angle.
If Russia, Japan and Italy join
Germany (which is probable), it
is exceedingly doubtful if we
could save England and France by
fighting over there. If they are
defeated we can do more for them
later than now. It is well known
that these dictators could not
agree among themselves and so
would begin warring among them-
selves over the spoils. Fascism,
Nazism and Communism cannot
long agree. So before they could
impose any severe penalties on
England and France, the victors
'(?) would engage in mortal com-
bat.
Our care now is to be honestly
neutral and at the same time give
these other nations to understand
to "stay out of the Americas" and
that all Americans stay here or
assume all responsibility; and
that all American ships operate
at their own risk. Then, too, we
can afford to take offenses lightly
rather than bring billions of dol-
lars of cost and the loss of mil-
lions of lives without any gain.
After the war should end, we
then would be in condition to de-
mand satisfaction for any or-i
fenses. But as they remember


that the Americans DID fight In
the World War, none of these na-
tions will care to stir us up
against them.
As to sellingi: supplies to every:
nation, I cannot say what is the
thing to do. Just now it would
help England and France (which
we want to do) but it would soon
come to selling to others, also,
and that seems the safest way to
keep the other nations from doing
anything against us.
I have been asked why the
churches have not been able to
prevent such calamities. First, it
all the members of our churches
were faithful to attend church,
and were faithful to practice what
we preach, much could and would
be done to avert world calamities.
So the blame can readily be lo-
cated, and the problem solves iy
the church people.
Second, we are neglecting to
give the gospel to people in our
own country, allowing them to
grow, up in ignorance and crime,
and to be subject to the danger-
ous teachings of Communism,
Nazism, etc. In our southland
there are about 34,000,000 people
outside of Sunday schools. About
half of our people are under some
sort of religious instruction. This
half produces 5 per cent of the
criminals, while the uninstructed
half produces 95 per cent.
Third, another great difficulty is
that some church members "wear
out" only the holding-back straps
and use their tongues for criticism


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
. And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they'become droopy
you merely place.them in the
refrigerator and in. i brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


,.MM -O


REDDY



KILOWATT


Your Wired


help
-I



I on farm


and home



R* eddy Kilowatt is at your place day and
night-wired and ready for work. He waits in
the farm kitchen, the barn and dairy. He's on
his toes to make farming life easier, happier
and more profitable.

Since Reddy first became steady hired help
on Northwest Florida farms, he has done
dozens of good turns for housewives. He's taken
the blue out of Monday with electric washers.
He's reduced Tuesday's labor through handy,
heat controlled electric irons. He's cut Wednes-
day's cleaning with the vacuum sweeper.
Thursday, M:otrher whizzes through her sewing
on an electric machine. Friday, the baking is
a lark done on an electric range. Saturday
finds Mo;ter .hopp.ng with new zest because
her electric refrigerator will keep things better,.
safer and lo.;ner.

Don't be n iledt though. Reddy is not a ladies'
man all the time. Father's got a lot of tasks
for thi helper w well. Reddy Kilowatt, as
your wired help, is the best hired help in the
world. P.t him to work now!

"I'Iu the best hired help in the world.
DIside the house-around the farm I
do more than 140 jobs better, faster
and cheaper."



FLORIDA POWER


Corporation

p----------


1f


TRAVELING

SALESMEN...


When you order printing from a travel-
ing salesman, you are never sure when
you will get it or what it will look like.
We can show you proofs and deliver the
job the same day. No letter to
write, no packages to cart from the
postoffice-just a telephone call to our
office and we do the rest.







THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"

PHONE 51 PORT ST. JOE


instead of praising God!
One thing is clear: God will
not permit these persecuting na-
tions to retail .against Chrst.,
Psalms 2:1-4. Are- you tor or
against Christ? If you do not line
up with the church and for Christ
you will help make America like
Europe.



FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


FRIDAY, SEPTiMBER 22, 1939


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF CQIVNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVK







L- .--. '. -.- -


Little Edward Williams, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Williams, re-
turned Sunnday following a two
weeks' visit with his grandpar-
ents in Fitzgerald, Ga.
L Ls 7 ---s -


FILL YOUR

DRUG NEEDS

BY PHONE!
You needn't step out of your
home to get your drug needs.
Merely phone us and we will
deliVer' them :at* no etra
SchargbU to you.
Telephone Us Today

L Hardy' d

Pharmacy
"Where Frien'ds Meet"
'PHONEi : s


Only for
Not For


i nRUDA'S CHARM, INDUSTRY


MAYQ IN WASHINGTON
Nathan Mayo, commissioner of
agriculture for Florida, named a
member of the president's agri-
cultural planning committee, has
gone to Washington to attend an-
orgahization meeting of the group.
Composed of 18 members, thel
committee was selected by Secre-'
fary of Agriculture Wallace at thi
request of :President Roosevelt to
outline the nation's agricultural
program duringg the European war.


PHONE 59


SSchool;
f County


LEARNING, SHOWNAT NE YORKFAIR
Two pictorial views of the Florida exhibit at the New
York World's Fair have been judged as most attractive
and symbolic'of Florida. (Left) the gardens seen from
the encircling pltio, with tower in background. (Bot
tom) the exhibit, with the pictorial dioramas of the
most interesting sections of the state, has become one
S -one of the most popular exhibits at the Fair.


Tpnse Drama In
VE RS 0 N A L S
SS A L Port Owl Show

Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Brooks eXt.
pect to leave this week-end for, "Grand Jury Secrets" Combinea
Luikln, Texas, where Mr. Brooks Actionq, Thrills and Romance
will be employed with the South- In Correct Prqportiona
land Paper company. .
S* "Grand Jury Secrets," the new,
Miss Mary Katherine Knightl Paramount drama, playing at the
has returned to the city from' Port theater's Owl Show is ouct
West Virginia, where she spent standing for moments of tense,
the summer visiting relatives. throbbing drama. With a story
*t that combines action, thrills ana
Mrs. Brooks Harrell and little romance in just the correct pro'
daughter, Sarah, left yesterday for portions, and a cast headed by
a week's visit with relatives In John Howard and Gall Patrick,
the picture shapes up as a drama
STu of high calibre.
Mr. Paul Kirby and small son It doesn't take the story long to
left Monday for her home in build up to a high dramatic pitch.
a a s t w Howard, cast as a crack reporter
Tampa after spending two weeks and ort-wave radio enthusiast,
here as the: guest of her uncle and a h e
aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith. has a hnch that the special gran
Aj, jury called by his brother and as
sistant district attorney, Harry
Mr. and Mrs. Marc Fleishel and Stephens, is conducting a very
Mr.- and' Mrs. Clirence'Brown 'Of
Mr. and Mrs. C fence Brown of important investigation, one good
Shamrock were guests Tuesday or for a "hot" story. He is well aware
Mr and Mrs. Basil E Kenney, S. that his brother won't give him
the story, but he has no scruples
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney, Jr., ana abouf going after it in his own
little daughter, Jacquellne are the way, just as he has no scruples
guests this week of Dr. and Mrs. about showing interest in h!s
Gainey of Panama Beach. brother's fiance, played by Miss
S* Patrick.


The many friends of, Mrs. Floyd
,Hunt will be glad to know that
she Is convalescing following an
operation in a Jacksonville hos-
pital.
Mrs. G. H. Wellington spent last
Thursday in Blountstown on busi-
ness.


Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bernal left
Saturday for a week's visit with
relatives in Nashville, Tenn.

Mrs. Hoke Larkin and mother,
Mrs. Rhoden of Bristol, spent the
week-end visiting here.


Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Costin and
little daughters, Ann and Martha
Lee, of Wewahitchka, visited In
this city Sunday with relatives.
Mrs. Joe Thompson and son,
Bobby Joe, of Apalachicola, were
guests Tuesday of Mrs. Sally
Montgomery.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Long and
family have returned to their
home in Jacksonville after spcnc-
ing the past week in this city.
Miss Eva Doyle of Apalachicola
was the guest last Thursday and
Friday of Mr. and Mrs. Chester
Edwards.

Earl Waldo spent the week-end
in Gordon, Ala., visiting friends.
Mrs. C. P. VanHorn and son
Cornelius 'and Carlyle Matthews
spent last Saturday In Panama
City.

Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Bynum or
Wewathitchka spent Monsay In
this city. The many friends of Mr.
Bynum will be glad to know that
he is able to be out again follow-
ing his illness In a Montgomery
hospital.
A. T. Ambrose left last week
for his home in Shreveport, La.
He is a former employee of the A.
N. railroad.

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Howell
spent Thursday of last week In
Panama City, guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Erbie Rowell.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


I E


P Wi@


special College and Seool

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"Your Home Town Newsppa r"





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PORT ST. JOE JE FLI


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ONLY ONE WEEK MORE

OF OUR SENSATIONAL SEPTEMBER


/ FURNITURE SALE!
With Furniture prices steadily mounting, it will be many
a moon before you will again have the opportunity to buy
Quality Furniture at the prices we have set for this Sale.


COME IN TODAY!
WPWE GIVE GOLD STAMPS TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS



ST.JOE FURNITURE CO.
"A Home-Owned Store"





1, 1


Z;tz-


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1939


!PAGE SIX


L


THE STAR,~ PORT ST. JOE,,,.rVLF.C.9UNTY, FLORIDA


a